Skip to main content

Full text of "Boone County Recorder"

See other formats


KsusstpBfpt 



> 



Vol. XXXXVI 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



Eitablished 1875 



BURLINQTQN, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY .JANUARY 6, 1921 



$1.50 Per Year 



No 14 



fioaef fjappenings. 



Don't fail to write it 1921. 



All the schools in the 
opened again Monday. 



county 



GONE TO HIS REWARD 



John Furlong Dltt After an III 

noes off Sovoral Years 

Of Paralysis. 



Tobooco Maktt Good Fortillztr 



i 



Both, bank* wore closed last Sat- 
urday, New Year 1 * day. 

Tfrs wUl of John W FuKtang «d r«Uer 
was probated last Monday. pt. PleaaanTi 



It 1« reported that 
are plentiful on the 
pond*. 



wild ducks 
creeks and 



'* 



Riggs Dexnpsey, of Los Angeles 
California, attended the funeral 
of Mr. Dempsey's aunt, Mrs. Eli/.a 
Rouse. 

John Botts and wife, of Peters- 
burg, spent Christmas day with 
their daughter, Mrs. D. R. Blythe 
and family. 

The county clerk's office nas 
been the busiest place In town 
the past few days, issuing auto- 
mobile licenses. 



The floors of hot', boose Leaf 
tob»' v ip warehouses in Walton will 
\3e mied with the weed as fast 
aa it can be unloaded. 



to 



c 



With the closing of the year of 
1S20 last Saturday the hunting sea 
son also closed and will not re- 
open until November, 1921. 

The Ford Motor Co. has closed 
ite JJetroit factory indefinately. 
Automobiles are not selling as 
rapidly aa in the past and fac- 
tories will have to reduce prices. 

.Quite a number of our subscrib- 
er* have called in during the last 
few days of 1920, and renewea 
their subscription. May the year 
ltH bring them all happiness ano 
prosperity— — — 

The report that I have sold out 
i» untrue, and I will still con- 
tinue to haul milk on my old 
routes. 

A. D. nUNTER, 
Hebron, Ky. 

President Wilson plans to ac- 
company President-elect Harding 
from the White House to the Cap- 
itol on March 4th and Dack again 
to the White House for luncheon, 
a» is the usual custom when a 
new chief executive is inaugurat- 
ed. 



Kentucky draft evaders whose 
fears have been lulled to rest by 
more than two years oi security 
;r '\ from prosecution are about to 
!*■«, receive an un-leasant surprise. 
Their names will be published in 
their "home town'' sections as a 
preliminary step to bringing them 
to a speedy trial, the War De- 
partment announced. 



Alter an ill new dating back five 

?ears, when he suffered a paraly- 
ic stroke, John W. Furlong pass- 

** w *Wsi* home 
Pt. Pleasant neighborhood, at %M 
p. m., Friday, Dec. 24, 1020 

He was born near Limaburg, Ky. 
March eth, 1603, and at the time 
of bis death was 58 years, nine 
months and 18 days of age ; he was 
a son of .-James and Johanna Fur- 
long, who preceded him to the 
grave many years ago. 

John W. Furlong and Miss Cath- 
erine Joyce were married at Bow- 
ling Green, (Ky., Dec. 22nd, 1902, 
and to this union were born three 
children — one dying in infancy. Be 
sides -' his wife and two sons, 
Thomas and Joseph, he leaves two 
sisters, Miss Mary Furlong and 
Mrs. Kirb Tanner, of Burlington 

The writer knew the deceased 
from boyhood and having had the 
pleasure of an association with 
him found him to be worthy, con- 
scientious and upright. He was 
eiiergetic and strived hard to gain 
something for himself end family 
and to accomplish^ something for 
the betterment of Mb friends. Be- 
ing a quiet and unpretentious 
man he did not lack any of the 
qualtitiea that go to make up a 
good citizen, and we are sure that 
all will Join with us in saying that 
the community never lost/a more 
honorable citizen. 

The funeral took place from St. 
Henry's church, at Florence, Tues- 
day, Dec. 28th, Father Conley de- 
livering a beautiful and fitting 
tribute to the worth and merit 
of the decease*!. The remains 
were interred in St. Mary's ceme- 
tery on the Dixie Highway. 

The many frien ds of the bereav- 
ed family condole with them in 
their great misfortune. The pall- 
bearers were James Brown, Kirb 
Tanner, Arnold Baurers and Mike 
Knaly. 



In view of the current prices of 
commercial fertilizers and the tact 
that some grades of tobacco are 
selling for less than $2 per hun- 
dred pounds, Kentucky farmers 
can profitably use tobacco, es- 
pecially some of the dark to- 
baccos for fertilising purposes, ac- 
cording to a reply made by 
Prof. Geo. Roberts, head of the 
in I Agronomy Department of the 
State College of Agriculture, in re- 
sponse to numerous inquiries be- 
ing received from farmers. A too 
Of tobacco fins enough tor dis- 
tribution would be worth about 
$67 50 or $3.37 a hundred pounds 
according to calculations made 
on certain . currcntp rieed of mix- 
ed fertilizers. However, if the 
tobacco is to be used as a fer- 
tilizer it should only be used in 
connection with acid phosphate 
was the suggestion of Prof. Rob- 
erts. 

A ton of tobacco containing 
the average amount of nitrogen 
and potash, which is four percent 
of the former and six per cent of 
the latter, when mixed with 1,000 
pounds of acid phosphate would 
make a ton of fertilizer having 
the following approximate com- 
position: Nitrogen two per cent, 
phosphoric acid eight per cent 
and potash three per cent. On 
the basis of certain current mixed 
fertilizerp rices this tobacco mix- 
ture fertilizer would be worth 
about $50 a ton, according: to 
Prof. Roberts. 



The burglar alarm recently in- 
stalled by the Erlanger Deposit 
Bank, performed Its duty Christ- 
mas night. The siren e was sound- 
ed, which awoke the citizens in 
that neighborhood. Upon in vest i- 

Sation a side window of the 
ank building was found open and 
the combination on the vault door 
had been tampered with. The in- 
truders Had been frightened away 
by the alarm. 





r 



Lynchings in the U. S. were 
less numerous in 1920 than in 1919, 
according to records compiled at 
Tuakegee, Alabama, Institute ana 
made public at the close of the 
year. Sjxty-one yeraons, includ- 
ing eight white men, as compared 
with eighty-three last year and 
sixty-four in 1918. Of the above 
number the state of Kentucky fur 
nished one: Texas leading with 10 
to her credit. 

A total attendance of 1,940 Ken- 
tucky tractor owners was record- 
ed at the 27 schools on the first 
half of the schedule being con- 
ducted by the College of Agricul- 
ture, University of Kentucky, ac- 
cording to a report of Earl G. 
Welch, extension worker. Morn 
than 500 farmers were enrolled in 
the schools and an average at- 
tendance of 71 8' at each meeting 
was recorded. The schedule will 
be resumed at LaGrange, Jan. 17. 

Many Kentucky farmers will 
keep books on their farm business 
during the coming year as indftat 
ed by the 10,000 requests which 
have already been received by the 
College of Agriculture for the re- 
vised account book which is be- 
ing issued. The book may be ob- 
tained by seeding sixteen cents to 
the Farm Management Depart- 
ment, College of Agriculture, Le* 
ington, to cover the cost of 
printing. 



Should Extend Studies 

To Cost of Other Crops. 

Pressing need for adequate and 
comprehensive studies of the coat 
of producing such crops as corn, 
oats, sugar Deets, beans, rice and 
other products, together with stud 
ies relating to the organization 
of various types of farms and 
ranches, was expressed by the 
Secretary of Agriculture in his 
anmrat report to the Presidentr 
Valuable contributions totbeavail 
able data regarding the cost of 
producing farm products, partic- 
ularly cotton, wheat, and beef 
cattle, he said, have already been 
made. 

"There has been a constant de- 
mand from the public generally, 
but more especially from farmers 
and farm organizations, for the 
results of these studies; and it 
has been repeatedly urged that 
they be extended and others un- 
dertaken,' the Secretary declaren. 

"Such studies furnish the far- 
mer information which enables him 
to reduco expenses or otherwise 
to ircrrase Mb profits. . If he 
makes full use of it, he will be 
in position to adjust his opera- 
tions from time to time to those 
op terprises which will yield a sat- 
isfactory profit, to add to his in- 
dividual income, and, ultimately, 
to influence the prosperity of hi§ 
community. Cost studies also in- 
form the general public regard- 
ing the cost ofp rodudng farm 
products and should tend to 
bring about a more general realiz 
ation on the part of the consumer 
qf the necessity of paying prices 
which will adequately reward the 
farmer and secure the necessary 
supplies in the markets." 

Y\ — 

Can't Do Without It. 

Erlanger, Ky , Dec. 29, 1920 
Editor of the Recorder : 

Dear Sir.— Enclosed please find 
$1.50 to renew my subscription to 
the old Boone County paper. My 
mother was a subscriber for '20 
years, and now she has gone to 
rest, and we can't do without the 
old Recorder in our home. I wish 
you a happy and prosperous New- 
Year. 

Yours Truly, 
MRS. G. W. BRUNNER, 
Erlanger, Ky 



FARMERS' WEEK 

Program Completed for Meet- 
ing at Lexington From 
February 1 to 4. 

Kentucky farmers and their 
wives who attend the ninth an- 
nual Farmers' Week to be held 
at the College of Agriculture, Un- 
iversity of Kentucky, Feb. 1-4, will 
be treated to the best program 
the convention has ever had if 
preparations being made by auth- 
orities at the college for the 2,- 
000 visitors, who are expected to 
attend, are to be taken as an in- 
dication. More than twenty out-of 
state specialists on various agri- 
cultural subjects together with the 
entire faculty of the agricultural 
college will be on hand to givo 
those attending the meetings the 
latest information on farm and 
home problems. A special program 
has been prepared for the farm 
women of Kentucky. 



ONE CENT 

Assessed as Damages Against 
Stephen L Blakely. 

In a verdict signed by ten Jur- 
ors Joseph C. Grote, Covington, 
Insurance agent, was awarded one 
cent damages against Stephens L 
Blakely, Commonwealth Atty. of 
Kenton county, for an alleged as- 
sault upon him by Blakely on the 
night of June 5, 1918, when in the 
saloon of Frank Rowekamp, Six- 
teenth and Greenup streets, Cov- 
ington, Covington, Ky. Grote suea 
for $50,000. 

The same Jury returned a ver- 
dict for John B. O'Neal and Har- 
vey Myers, attorneys; J. Robert 
Kelley, manufacturer; Stanley B. 
Ashbrobk, broker; A. S. Hartloyi 
Covington merchant, co-defend- 
ants who were charged by Groto 
with having conspired with 

Blakely to make the attack upon 
him following a tour /thru Ken- 
ton county by members of the 
Citizens' Patriotic League of Cov- 
ington, on June 5, 1918, when pla- 
cards containing a section of the 
espionage law were posted in 
Covington, Erlanger and other 
places, and which also contained a 
warning against all acts of dis- 
loyalty to the U. S. Government 
during the war with Germany. 

The judgment directs Grote to 
recover from Blakely, in addition 
to one cent, his Court costs; also 
directs the other five defendants 
to recover their court costs from 
Grote. 

The defendants in the suit were 
represented by Maurice L. Galvin 
as counsel in chief, assisted by J. 
E. Shepard, Lewis F. Brown and 
UK J. Howard. 

Grote was represented bv At- 
torneys O. M Rogers and' Fred- 
erick W. Sehmitz 



Two Sides to It. 

The granger states plead the 
emergency of falling prices for 
their crops as Justification for a 
temporary tariff bill which would 
amount to a prohibition of com- 
peting imports. 

But the consuming population 
of the great industrial states 
faces an emergency of their own 
which they plead in reply and 
which should be recognized. Re- 
duction of wages is now spread- 
ing, and if it is to be accepted 
without protest, or is to be en- 
forced, there must be a corres- 
ponding reduction in prices to en- 
able the wage earners to live in 
reasonable comfort under the new 
order. ' 

Reasonable protection against 
the dumping of foreign products 
is due the granger as well as 
the manufacturer. But a protec- 
tive tariff designed and used to 
maintain any price at or near the 
war level and to prevent the 
natural course of readjustment 
consistent with the trend of earn- 
ings is not desirable.— Philadelphia 
Bulletin. 



A farmer while in town one 
day last week called at this of- 
fice and handing us $1.50 said. "1 
have never taken your paper, but 
as it is the only thing I have 
found that has not raised In 
price, you may put me on your 
list for Hfe." After writing him a 
receipt and thanking him for his 
kindness, he inquired if wo knew 
when taxes would decrease Wo 
informed him we did not, but the 
printer's "devil,'' who knows ev- 
eiythirig, and is always ready to ' duties 
help a fellow when in trouble, 
told him when the office-holders 
like the farmers refuse to form n 
)Wk, when the doctors like ysur 
iietahbors, will make his visits 
'aa w) \? n y°? aiw sick, when tho 
undertakers Hke the pmaoheri, 



Holiday Exercises. 

The Christmas tree exercises at 
the Baptist church, Dec. 21th, was 
a success in svery particular. The 
children as well as the older 
ones who attended enjoyed the 
pogram, which was rendered in* 
good style by the children of tho 
school. Every child In attendance 
was remembered with a package 
containing candies, oranges and 
nuts. The tree, a large cedar, 
was beautifully decorated by the 
ladies of the church, and was 
lighted with electric UgMa„_witli.JL 
number of dlftereot eoforedbulbs. 
Master Alexander Yelton was the 
electrician who had charge of 
lighting the troe and he is to i*- 
commeuded for the successful man 
in which ho performed his 



,v»-dlgfsre will work for aotk 



Srjf,' t 



Under average conditions, the 
cowpea compare* quite favorably 
in vield with nthor Crops com- 
monly grown for hay, while t 
ranks v«?ry high In yield of fowl- 
ing Vnlue. The rowpeu u ill yield 
from on*, to two tons of hsv to 

acre, and frequently, 
ve**- favor able condition*, 



Dress Warmly. 

There are good, at d bad con- 
ductors of heat, ar.d the materials 
to keep one warm are those 
which are bad conductors. Linen is 
a good conductor of heat; wool 
and silk are not. This is quickly 
made apparent, altho many per- 
sons do not understand the true 
philosphy of it, on getting into 
bed on a cold night. The sheets 
quickly conduct the heat from 
yuor body; the blankets do not. 
If persons would remember that 
the true aim in winter is to keep 
our own animal heat in, rather 
than to shut the cold out, there 
would be radical changes in some 
of the winter clothing now gen- 
erally worn. 

Many persons believe wrongly 
that heavily or closely woven ma- 
terial is warmer than the looselv 
woven varieties. They lose sight 
of the fact that air is a baa 
conductor of heat, and that any 
article of dress which is loosely 
woven therefore holds a certain 
amount of air in its meshes, and is 



Tobacco FilMng Floors. 

James C. Stone, President of the 
Lexington Warehouse Men's. As- 
sociation, said today that he be- 
lieves the capacity of the entire 
floors, which is approximately 10,- 
000,000 pounds, will be reached 
by opening day. 

Each large purchasing agency 
which buys the weed on the Lex- 
ington market, will have three 
sets of buyers. The buying inter- 
ests announced their local man- 
agers for the season as follows: 
American Tobacco Copany, M. M. 
Geary; Liggett & Myers' Tobacco 
Co., James Pryor; R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Co., Theodore Kirk; P. 
Lorillard Co., Kirkpatrick & Stev- 
en*; J^-P. Taylor Company,-Geo. 
R. Parker. 

John W. Newman, President of 
the Burley Tobacco Association, 
gave out an interview in which he 
outlined the plan of the associa- 
tion to form an association for 
marketing of low grades. 

Mr. Newman said the plan was 
to organize a burley tobacco mar 
keting company and to exchange 
the preferred stock of the com- 
pany with the grower for his 
lower grade tobacco at this sea- 
son's average market price. The 
marketing company is to be own- 
ed and controlled exclusively by 
the growers. When the tobacco { 
redried and put in export pack- 
ages, Mr. Newman said, by ex- 
changing this tobacco for Gov- 
ernment bonds it would extena 
credit to people who actually need 
a product for which there isprac- 
ticallyn o demand in this coun- 
try. 

Will Ship Pooled Wool. 

Because there is no market in 
this country for the pool of 600,000 
pounds of raw wool which It 
holds, the Kentucky Farm Bureau 
federation is formulating plans to 
ship the material to Austria to be 
made into cloth. Geoffrey Morgan, 
secretary, has announced. 

Mr. Morgan pointed out that the 
lack of a market here has work- 
ed a hardship on Kentucky wool 
growers, that the mills of Austria 
are closed down for lack of raw 
material and that the wool prob- 
ably would be welcomed at that 
place. 

The cloth, according to the sec- 
retary, would be sent back to this 
country to be placed on sale He 
said that tariff and transporta- 
tion costs would be nullified bv 
the cheap labor in Austria. 

Most of " the wool is stored 
Louisville warehouses. 



36c Pound to Raise Tobacco. 

Burley tobacco growers expend- 
ed approximately $85,149,000 or 36 
cents a pound in the production 
of the 236,500,000 pounds crop of 
light leaf raised in this State in 
1920. 

Despite a 13 per cent increase 
in acreage in Kentucky in 1920, and 
a larger yield of burley In the stale 
than in 1919, the amount of bur- 
ley grown in all State* in 1920 is 
approximately 33,000,000 lbs., less 
than in 1919. 

The average yield an acre in 
1920, was approximately 869 lbs. in 
1919 the average was 1,150 pounds 
an acre. 

Approximately 29 per cent of the 
1P20 burley crop is damaged or 
very low grade tobacco. 

These facts were announced by 
the Burley Tobacco Growers' As- 
sociation following the receipt of 
final reports from the mail cen- 
sus conducted hy the association 
and the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture in the burley 
belt of Kentucky. 

A preliminary report of the cost 
an acre of the 1920 crop was pre- 
pared last week by the Kentucky 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 
This showed the cost to be ap- 
proximately $309 an acre, an in- 
crease (of 7 per cent over 1919, 
when the cost a pound was 25 
cents. 

In preparing the estimate on 
the production of burley in this 
State in 1920 the Government auth 
orities checked the figures from 
two sources. There was a differ- 
ence of about 9,000,000 pounds in 
the estimates the questionnaires 
sent to the association members 
indicating a 246,410,000 lb., crop 
in this State in 1920 and Govern- 
ment statisticians figured it at 236, 
000,000. 

The latter figure was adopteo 
as the one more nearly correct, 
because a survey mad:- in the 
warehouses disclosed that farmers 
were unintentionally estimating 
the poundage an acre about four 
per cent larger than it weighea 
out on the scales. 



SCIENCE 

On 'Farm Puts End to Editor's 
Hope For Pork. 



GOOD ROADS FOR ALL 

For Each Dollar The State Puts 
Uncle Sam Gives Another. 



For each dollar your state puts 
up for good roads under certain 
conditions, Uncle Sam gives it 
another dollar. Such government 
aid for the current fiscal jear 
ending June 30, 1921, aggregates 
many millions. But then it 
stops, unless Congress renews the 
grant. Nation and stat e should 



i.i 



646,559 Pupils in Kentucky. 



provide funds and plans for years 
ahead, so that a definite policy 
can be followed. 

National trunk line highways 
built and maintained by the feel- 
er al government, for the heav- 
iests traffic and for military pur- 
poses, may render existing rail- 
ways and their terminals suffi- 
cient for their purpose. State and 
country highways, also local roads, 
built and kept up by state ano 
local authority, will connect ev- 
ery farm with every market. 

Federal licenses for motor ve- 
hicles used in interstate traffic, 
based on weight, loead capacity 
which must not be exceeded, pow- 
er and speed, will furnish revenue 
to maintain the national highways. 
Let a suitable part thereof accrue 
to the states, in addition to the 
state registry fee, and be us?d to 
Keep up roads that receive the 
hardest wear. 

The system must be worked out 
so as to build up the rural dis- 
tricts, not result in more favors to 
cities. Here is an important duty 
for our national agricultural or- 
ganizations. Above all, no graft, 
no favoritism, no politics in it. De 
velop waterways and hydro-elec- 
tricity along with good roads. 



These are lean days for the 
country editor. 

With watering mowth, he hovers 
oyer his cases. It is the heignt 
of the sausage season in the Pork 
Belt. The sweet smell o* •»**•»- 
bones and spareribs filters thru 
the print shop windows. 

But the smell is all that fil- 
ters Gon% are the days when 
Ye Ed was slipped a mess of 
backbones to pay up that sub- 
scription. 

Therefore the lean days The 
Editorial We is living on the smell 

The super-efficiency of college 
farmers, the postal ruling that 
subscriptions cannot' be delinquent 
more than a year and the war 
have caused the famine, according 
'to R. L. Elkin, editor of the Lan- 
caster Central-Record, and presi- 
dent of the Kentucky Press As- 
sociation in session in Louisville 

"Business is beginning to pick 
up a little now, with the low 
price of hogs, but during the ten 
years I've been a country editor, 
I ve never had so few contribu- 
tions from farm subscriber* as dur 
ing the last four years,'' Mr EU 
kin complained. 

Time was when the subscriber 
would come in during the butcher 
ing time and ask how far behind 
he was with his paper. "Three 
years? Well, how would a nice big 
mess of backbone and spareribs 
fix it up? Or three or four bush- 
els of the finest potatoes you ev- 
er saw?" 

"Those words I haven't heard 
for several years," the editor said 
yesterday. "The other day a mau 
gave me a seven pound bass for 
h*s paper, but where are the pump 
kins and the apples and the fresh 
meats we used to get?" 

Subscribers are getting so sophis 
heated that they dont even care 
to see their names in print any 
n ? or L e. In vain does Ye Ed record 
that "Ed Howe is butchering this 
week. Eds hogs certainly are fat 
and well-fed and they should be 
productive of good spareribs and 
backbones and fat hams Good 
luck, Ed." 

But Ed does not rise to the broad 
suggestion. Ed. is a collegiate ag- 
riculturist who pays bis bills by 
check, and keeps a cost system 

However the editor can play his 
trump card when the larder gets 
too low. He can have a squash 
contest, or an apple contest, or a 
pr ^ for the tinest Pumpkin pie 
♦u-H ^ on , teftt ta abottt the only 
th !"g left," the Lancaster editor 
^aid. We get them competing for 
the prizes, or we can report mat 
Sister Mary Smith brought us in 
the biggest pumpkin of the sea- 
son. Weighs twenty-five pounds 
Can anybody beat it? Thr» proud 
specimens are left with us, ano 
when uncalled for as they are 
make good pies.-' 



Frankfort, Ky.-There are 595 
public school districts in Kentucky 
taught by 13,653 teachers, and with 
a census enrollment of 846,559 pu- 
pils, according to a directory of 
the schools of Kentucky, Just sent 
necessarily slower in conducting j to press bv the State Department 
our natural warmth from our bod- of Education The school districts 
ies than quicker, more solid gar- j are divided into 316 graded school 
m | nt . 8 - i it u. , , ...L, districts 180 county districts and 

Se\eral light, loosely fitting gar j 59 city districts. The country gra'i 
ments are not only more healthful j ed schools have 1,545 teachers and 
but much warmer than one or two I 64,770 pupils, while the county 






.www.'jttauuaiB •""-• 



under 
much 



thick and heavy one 

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Eddins de- 
lightfully entertained at. Choir 
home in Burlington on New Year's 
day their children and grandchil- 
dren and other relutivoe. A most 
enjoyable day wns spent, espec- 
ially at the noon hour, when all 
were invited to tho dinlig room 
and saw a large table overloaded 
with m> ma ly good thtngr* t.. est 
Mr. and Mrs Rddlna are never 
happier than when all of thuir 
Children are it home. Thoy have 
three sons and two daughters, all 
living, and fl.'e gra-ithhiliiran 
The Recorder wlrthee fhn 
familv may livu and enjoy 
floor* New Yeer days 



food 

in. i r, 



districts have 9,600 teachers, mos't 
tlu*m »ne — t o a sch o ol, — mrd 
441,440 pupils, and the city dis- 
tricts 2,708 teachers and' 140,319 
pupils. 

Destroyed By Fire. 

The garage of G W. Markshe,: v 
K Son*, of Florence, was destroy- 
ed by fire Sunday ntgtif, Mr -v, 
about II p m One 3-ton Seh 
truck, one one-ton International 
truck and rTupraobUe touring car 
wore In the garage and wer • I 
ed with their amge. which « 
total loss The truck* a nd au' . 
mobile weTs Insured for f 6,700, hut 
BO Insurance was can i.<d 
garage. 



Course for Ex-Service Men. 

Plans are rapidly going for- 
ward by the State College of Ag- 
riculture and the Y. M. C. A. where 
by selected ex-service men in 
Kentucky may be enrolled free in 
the next agricultural short course 
which opens at the College of Ag- 
riculture, University of Kentucky 
Jan. 4th and continues until March 
1, according to an announcement 
by Dean Thomas Cooper. All ex- 
penses of the men including rail- 
road fare will be paid. War vet- 
erans who enroll will be given 
the same training which regular 
short course s^uents receive Tho 
course will include lectures and 
laboratory work on all hases of 
farm subjects. Complete informa- 
tion concerning the work may be 
obtained from the College of Ag- 
riculture or county agricultural 
agents. 

Miss Kreylich's Class. 

The entertainment given by tho 
expression pupils of Miss Mattie 
Kreylich at Library Hall Wednes- 
day night, Dec. 22nd, was attended 
by a largo crowd and enjoyed l.y 
all Tin* pup. Is in the rendition of 
the differr-nt characters __in» ihe 



Why Wheat Hit Toboggan. 

A "large volume" of future 
trading in wheat is "mere gamb- 
ling ' and should be stopped by 
congressional regulation, the Fed- 
eral Trade Commission wrote Pres 
ident Wilson. 

The commission's communication 
was in reply to the president's re- 
quest for a study of the cause 
of falling wheat prices. 

The commission advised the proa 
ident he has no power to prevent 
importation of foreign wheat aa 
demanded by farmers hit bv fall- 
ing prices. 

Seven factors combined to re- 
duce wheat prices, the commission 
ported. These factors were given 
as i 

1 A world wheat crop biejrer 
than in 1919. 

2 Concentration of foreign gov- 
ernment buying in one commission 
which bought heavily in the spring 
but later reduced its demands. 

3 Unprecedented importations 
from Canada this fall coupled with 
a discount rate of exchange. 

4 The record breaking yield of 
corn and oats which helped to de- 
press wheat - pric&3. 

5 Slackening of domestic de- 
mand for flour. 

6 General decline of all 
modify prices. 



com- 



7 Change in «— 



JSt/m 



play. "Mrs. Driggs of the Poultrv 
> > aid." showed that they han 
been drilled l.y one whowasskili- 
el. All of thp students who par- 
ticipated In the play acted their 
parts in good styltf. You can be 
tin that you will have an 
«\.m,itf'A entertainment worth 
nhlr wJien MLai Kieyliih *a~ 
•he play and instructs the 
pupil* in the rendition of the 
character*, 



The 

ii'iei. l 

\v \ V 



Mutuil Li,'. 
'•• i' ■ •> ippolntod vt j (i p 

i . I in r 
t!l Mr Pi.il , l( .,| v 



a rertldent r>f 
county 



th 



"with resulting disposition of dis- 
tributors to refrain from accumu- 
lating or maintaining usual stocks 
until conditions are stablized. , 

The United States Court has 
been asked to review the action 
of the prohibition directors of 
Kentucky in revoking the permits 
of scores of physicians to pre- 
scribe whisky. 

The action was instituted when 
Judge George DuRelle filod a pe- 
tition for review on behalf of 
Dr Percy R. Peters, a negro phy- 
sician, who was one of those who 
lost their permits 

The defendants In the action 
l T .f. Pa "l Williams, Federal prohi- 
bition director; James H Comhs, 
former prohibition director for 
Kertucky, and W. B. Stanfield, act 
ii ff Federal inspector 

The claim is made that the can- 
cellation of the permits was not 
warranted by the faces or the 
J aw J that th^ actlo'i was Insti- 
tuted by Comiis himself, and not 
by complaint, as provided in the 
prohibition law 



The following h.ivt 
i-omtecl membcra of tl 
Hoard of Supei vis. 
W tlton l; i 

' loud t .hi*: 



1 II p- 

lunty 



J H 
\\ Ri 

J II 

Beotl 



II e.h 



'A. 

m 



*a 



1 
1 



h 
1 



4 



i 



u 



Q 



f«l.Ul*\ 



W, If. Whttso 



BOONS COUNTY RICOKDB1 



-ft 



• 



PETERSBURG. 



• 
♦ 



sick 



Robert Patterson is very 
With pneumonia. 

The postoflice has been moved 
to the room belonging to the K. 
of P. Lodge. 

The firm of Riley & Berkshire 
changes hands this week. It is 
now White Bros. 

D M. Bondurant and wife, of 
Rabbit Haah, spent Xmaa week 
here with relatives. 

Mrs. Sarah White, widow of Wm. 
White, deceased, is confined to 
her room on account of sickness. 

The entering of the New Year 
and littic'L- _>"■":.. '.' T**»°e is 
making every one Joyous ana 
more happy. 

Eddie Weisickle and Wife, of 
Covington, were guest» " f ,Jw 
uncle, Charlie Beemon, several 
days last week. 

Mrs. E. A. Stott and son Gaines, 
spent Christmas week with her 
mother and sister in Dayton, Ohio, 
returning home on New Year's 
eve. . . '■ 

Bolivar Shinkle, Jr, received sev 
eral .hundred dollars back pay 
and allowed $30 per month pen- 
sion for disabilities contracted in 
the world war. 

1 began reading the items and 
news in this dear old paper in 
the year .1874, and am still one 
«V4ta readers, which,, -gives me- 
more satisfaction than any read- 
tog matter that I can get now. 
1 hope the Editor and his staff 
had a (pleasant Christmas, and 
wish you and all its readers a hap- 
py and prosperous New Year. ' 
'•- J ■ 



ANNUAL STATEMENT 

Of Thfe Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany of Boone County: - 

Insurance in force January 1, 1820 $2,131,625.00 

Insurance in force January 1, 1921 2,3 76,575 00 

Cash on hand January 1, 1820 $ 94.37 

Cash Received during 1 920 1,522.60 

Expended during 1920 

For Losses $768.92. 

" Printing and Supplies 75.60. 

" Taxes 15.60, 

" Salaries to Officers and employes . • ■ 630.00. 

" Rebates 57.2b. 2 

$1,547.40. $1,616.97 
Leaving Cash Bal. Jany*4, 1921 69.57 

Total Amt. of cash received since organization $115,320.32 

Total Amt. of losses paid since organization 96,073.84 

R. B. HUEY, Secretary. 






I A Vault That Can Not Be Robbed. 



♦ 



RABBIT HASH. 



Z. T. Kelly ia confined to the 
house with, a crippled foot. 

Lee Stephens and wife, of Cin- 
cinnati, were here last Monday to 
Bee his parents. 

Raymond Acra gave a dance at 
K. ol P. Hall New Year's eve which 
was well attended. 

Mrs. Lizzie Stephens has been 
quite sick during the past weeo, 
but isn ow improving. 

Mrs. Will Rickets and Mrs. Fisk, 
of Rising Sun, were guests of 
Mrs. Colin Kelly, Saturday. 

Mrs, John Feldhaus slipped ana 
fell one day last week and broke 
one of her limbs at the ankle. 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rice enter- 
tained the young folks with a 
play party last Wednesday night. 

Paul Damrath, who formerly ran 
the ferry here but now living at 
Paducah, was here during the hol- 
days. 

Clifford Ryle, wife and son, of 
Rising Sun, spent Christmas with 
their uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. 
B. C. Setphens. 

Howard Ogden, of North Bend, 
Ohio, was the guest of his siB- 
ter, Mrs. Robt. Hodges, and his 
brother, Will Ogden, Friday and 
Saturday. 

Albert Noell and son, Joe, mov- 
ed from North's Landing to Mrs. 





n 



If you live within 125 miles of ! 
Cincinnati vou are interested in 
the wonderful Safety Deposit 
Vault at Fourth and Vine Sts., 
built by The Central Trust Co. 
and guaranteed to be burglar, 
fire, mob and storm proof- It 
sets in a hole in the ground, 50 1 1 
feet deep and is lined with steel 
rails set in glass slag. It is 
guarded night and day. It con* 
tains securities worth millions 
of dollars in the Safest Place in 
the country. 

Don't Keep Your Valuables Where They Can be Stolen. 

Out of town persons can afford to patronise our vault. A box, with 
complete privacy, as low as $3 a year. Write us for particulars. Farm- 
ers, Dairymen, Tobacco Growers, Market Gardeners, etc., this should in- 
terest you. 

The Central Trust Compary 

Fourth and Vine Sts., CINCINNATI, OHIO. 




RAy^- FURS, 



WANT 




Mink, Raccoon and other furs. 

Highest Market Prices Paid 
H. Kirk, Burlington, Ky. 

RAW FURS AND HIDES WANTED. 
No. 1 Skunks, $i.26, IT*. 1 Oppos- 
sum, 80c; Beef hides 6c per pound 
Bring them Id. . 

THE OHIO CO., 
1215 Pike St., Covington, Ky. 



Wanted. 



Man with family to work on, farm 
by month or crop. 

J. K. GAINES, 
Burlington, Ky., R. D. 1 
dec 16-4t pd. 



Notice. 



All who have uot paid the 26 per 
cent of their subscriptions for the 
Burlington and Locus Grove turn- 
pik are requested. t>) do so at once. 
By order of the Board of Directors. 
B. T. KELLY, Secretary. 

For Sale 

Cleveland Tractor, been used but 
in Al condition : will sell reasonable 

B. B. HUME,, 
dec9 Burlington, Ky. 

NOTICE. 

All persons owing said eetate 
against the estate of George E. 
Rouse deceased, will present them 
to me, proven as the law requires. 
All (persona owing said estate 
will come forward and settle. 
W. P. BRADFORD, 
Admr. 



r S3M i 



r| ®~S OS (HJ' i 



Josie Piatt's house in Rabbit Hash 
and have taken charge of the 
ferry. Mrs. Piatt has gone to Ris- 
ing Sun to live. 

The entertainment and Christ- 
mas tree given by the schools 
and the K. of P. Lodge Christmas 
night at K. of P. Hall, was at- 
tended by one of the largest 
crowds even seen in Rabbit Hash, 
and was quite a success. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 






RICHWOOD 



A. B. Tanner butchered hogs 
Wednesday. 

Ernest Groger and wife have 
been quite sick. 

P. P. Hunter and wife entertain- 
ed quite a number Xmas day. 

Patrick Code has purchased the 
Watson residence here. 

L. D. Jackson is improving slow- 
ly after a long illness. 

Frank YouelTs house is com- 
pleted and they have moved in. 

J. L. Sommers and wife visited 
relatives in Covington, Saturday. 

P. P. Hunter and wife will leave 
soon for an extended Southern 
trip. 

J. T. Powers entertained quite 
a number of friends and relatives 
Christmas day. 

Walter Grubbs and family and 
Mr. Gibson's family New Yeared 
at Major Conner's. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Vallanding- 
ham spent the Week with rela- 
tives in Grant county. 

Wiley Grubbs and family, of 
Middletown, Ohio, spent several 
days here the past week. 

Theo. Carpenter and wife enter- 
tained quite a number of friends 
and relatives Christmas day. 

Mrs. Maggie Williams is in Cali- 
fornia for several months, visiting 
her brother, Claude Rice and 
family. 

Young folks enjoyed pleasant 
evenings at J. T. Powers' Christ- 
mas night, New Year's night at 
Meredith Conner's and Capt. Rob- 
inson's. 

Thomas Marshall, an old pioneer 
of the Frogtown district, passed 
to the Great Beyond and was laid 
to rest at the Marshall cemetery, 
Friday, aged eighty years, and 
three months. 



WE ARE RECEIVING TOBACCO 
We Are Selling Tobacco 

Come lo Aurora 

Drop in at 101 Ridge way Street, we 
* _ will be glad to see you. 

We only charge 80c straight. 



H 



For Sale. 

Petersburg Garage, building, 
tools, and accessories; also 
two Fords— touring car and 
roadster. Apply to 

PETERSBURG OARAGE, 

Petersburg, Ky. 

dec9-8t 



ENTERTAINMENT 



Juvenile Junction 



-AND- 



* 



Aurora Loose Leal Warehouse Co. 

Aurora, Indiana. 

We Guarantee Satisfaction We will Satisfy. You 



Young Dr Devise" 

To be given by Florence 
High School At 

St Paul Auditorum 



Florence, Ky. 

Jan. 7th, 1921 

at 8 p. m. 

Reserved Seats 35c. 
General Admission, 25c. 





Tftim fotll appreciate 
|J!{titp ®altaferr0 



Ik 





S elected for their qualities 3 
E very order filled with car E 
Every shipment same as samplE 
Desirable seed, expertly testeD 
Sold direct at wholesale prices 

Field— Flower — Garden 

* ■ > 

Bought in carload lots — sold direct to 
the. Farmer at Low Prices. 



X*. 



David Clements returned to Lex 
ington Monday morning where he 
is attending business school, af- 
ter spending the holidays with his 
mother and father, N. H elem- 
ents and wife. 

T. W. Bslsly, Mayor of Ludlow, 
and L. D. McGlaaaon, of Taylora- 
»rt, were transacting bualnes* in 
Tuesday 



TOBACCO MARKET. 

The Coving-ton loose leaf mar. 
ket opened last Tuesday morning 
wi th both floors in the warehous- 
es filled. The sales averaged less 
than 10 cents per hundred. To- 
bacco that sold for 35 cents last 
year only brought about 7 cents. 
After a small quantity of the to- 
bacco had been sold the farmers! 
present stopped the sale and at 
once organized to cut out the 
1921 crop and haul the tobacco 
now on the floor back to their 
own barns. Farmers should not 
take any more of the 1920 crop 
to the loose leaf warehouses. 

With Bids approximately fifty 
per cent less than were made for 
the same types of leaf last season 
the tobacco market opened in 
Lexington. An air of disap- 
pointment was evident among 
the farmers, altho they had an- 
licipated lower prices than last 
year. More than 20 per cent of 
the leaf placed on sale was re- 
jected. 

NOTICE. 



Leap Year has gone not to re- 
turn again for another four years; 
thereby closing the open season 
for man hunting for the ladies. 



Vary 



the New Year has fur- 
very much spring 
-warm and sunaruno, 
a greet relief to 



«rowd In att 
Monday 




tli« Boon. County Ksrm Hur _ 
Im» held lu the oftlcn at HurlliiKton. 
Natunlay. January Hth. IWl, at 10:00 
••Mock «. m. W. D. Hutton, County 
Kami ARaut, aixTMr Harry Hank, 
of K. nion county will b« prsesiit at 
this niseuag. This inseUag will be 
»f vital luUrsst to the farmers. 

i 0. KKLLY.B.c.r 



First class Grocery in a first- 
class town, doing a good cash 
business. Best location in a 
city of 6,000. Cheap rent. Also 
a nice two story brick house. 
Good location. Reason for sell- 
ing, bad health. Address Con 
Burners Grocery, 337 2nd Street, 
Aurora, Ind. 



FISCAL COURT. 



The fiscal court selected Albert 
Stephens, son of Esq. Wm. Steph- 
ens, of Petersburg, as County Road' 
Engineer at a salary of $1080 and 
the county to furnish tires gasoline 
and oil for bis automobile. The court 
received propositions for the posi- 
tion of Engineer as follows: 

Everett Ciore $1400. 

John Mannin $1100. 

John Baldou $1700. 

C. W. Kerr $1800. 

In addition to the above the coun- 
ty was to furnish auto tires, gasoline 
and oil for tnelr machine. 

Boone county paid during 1$$0 for 
the support of the poor |*;tf7».i8. 

Kenneth Klrkpatrlok who served 
during the world war, baa enlisted 



riia annual eleeMen of Officers of *" H f a rn if and rsportod fur duty as 

ureae will Ft- Thomas. He was sent to Okla- 



homa. 



Maris Hsasou Co. st court bouse 
Wednesday night, Jan. Mh, 8 p. m. 
Ef arybody attend. 

Mrs. yrad MofTto Is-aatartaaaiag 
htr alttar Miss ■trrmni. -f T fi*i 



Farm for Sale 

180 Acre, one mile south of 
Burlington, on the East Bend 
road, 15 acres in orchard, 25 
acres, in timber, 30 acres in 
corn in 1920, 15 acres in mea- 
dow, balance in pasture 

6 room house, large barn 
and all necessary out build- 
ings, Well watered. Price, 
$75,00 an acre on easy terms. 

Oscar Hanna, Bellevue Ky. 



TIMETABLE 

Borlington - Erlanger Bus. 

Dally Except Sunday. 

Lv. Burlington 6:15 a. in. 4:00 p. m 

Lv. Erlauger 7:10 a.m. 4*66 p. m 

SUNDAY. 

Lv. Burlington 7:10 a. m 

Lv. Erlaoger 7 :66 a. m 

Express Packages handled at Rea- 
sonable Bates. 
L. it McNEELY. 



Sweet Clover and Honey 

■ow sweet ©lever, obsapsr and bai- 
ler than red stover. Bo/ dlraat from 
grower, «P«^ "aW* •••4 '•» 

B.P.S1" Trflaw»«a.,*y 



GARDEN SEED: All varieties, early and late, 

sold in balk. Ask for ounces or pounds, not 

packages ; you get more and bettor seed. 



FIELD S E ED: All varieties, sound seed for 
Spring, Fall or Winter Planting. 

Hill's Seeds Do Grow. 

WRITE FOR PRICES 



Northern Kentucky's f BIWeSSKE 



Long Distance Phone S. 1855 and S. 1856. 
T Established 1863. 

I 




<** 






r\ 



F"II\IE FARM 



V 



FOR SALE. 



T. J. GRIFFITH FARM 

120 Acres of Fine Land 
One Mile West of Verona, Ky 



On good turnpike road. All of the land is in grass 
and in a high state of cultivation; one of the best 
farms in Boone county. Good residence of 7-rooms 
and has all the necessary outbuildings. Good three 
room tenent house. One extra fine stock barn. An 
extra good tobacco barn, and a good old barn. Farm 
is well watered with two ponds, three cisterns and 
two wells. Fencing mostly woven wire. Two nice 
locust groves. Two acres of Alfalfa. 

Price Fifteen Thousand Dollars. 

For further particulars 'phone or write the under- 
signed. Dr. R. E. RYLE, Beaver Lick, Ky ! 

J. O. GRIFFITH, Beaver Lick, Ky 




N 







r 



HEBRON THEATRE 

NEXT SATURDAY 

Jack Pickford in "SANDY" 
Sennet "Cupid's Day Off" 




Fir* Shaw 7*0 P. M. 

^■PS^BBa^eww^awwB a» • ^^^PwsjWP 



CfletsV 

aUsMlM 



BOONB COUNTY 



ft 



fiaaaf ana* Pergonal 

— ! — , , i, . j ,_ 

Boons Co. Christian Pastorate 

0. C. Omer, Paitor 
SUNDAY, JAN. 0th, 1931. 
Bullittaville, Preao&lng 11 a. m. 
Evening 8ervlce at Hebron, 7 p. m. 
The public Invited ; memben ur 
ged to be present. 



■oono Co. Luttisran Pastorate 

Khv. Geo. A. Roybb, Castor. 

Sunday, Jan. 9th, 1921. 

;eful, 10:80 a. m., Divine Wor- 
)ip by the pastor. 
Ebanezer, 2:80 p. m., Divine Wor- 
snlp. 

All are cordially invited to these 
services. ' ^ "^ 



*fe 



The Jail is empty again. 

i Crime is on a rapid decline In 

' Kentucky if the docket of the 
winter term of the Court of Ap- 
peals la to be taken as the straw 
t to indicate the way the wind is 

blowing- „, 

A — 

Taxes paid by Kentuckiane to 

the U. S. Government total around 

th $39,000,000. a year, according to re- 

' ' cords In the office of Elwood Ham 

llton, collector of Internal revenue 

at Louisville. 

k • — 

w John UUinger, , formerly of this 

county, but now on a farm near 
I ». L awrenceburg, Ind., sends us $150 
for moren/Bws from his Old Ken- 
tucky Home. He wants to keep in 
touch with the friends he left 
behind. Thanks. 



Automobile owners can not un- 
derstand why all of the money 
realized from the license tax . is 
Bent every Monday morning by 
the county clerk to Frankfort. 
The State Road Department needs 
the money and the roada of Boon*> 
county DO-NOT. 



Capt. Sam J. Martin, of Newport, 
Campbell county, has been ap- 
pointed District Game Warden for 
Northern Kentucky and assumed 
the duties of his office last Mon- 
day morning. He will have fifty 
' deputies, about half of them will 
be stationed in Campbell ana 
Kerton counties. 



St* 



Seventy-five dollars per mile 
to maintain her roads, is the 
amount that Boone county can 
raise for that purpose, by taxa- 
tion. This is hardly enough to 
drain the roads. With, the kind of 
traffic that the roads are sub- 
jected to, you do not have to 
draw on your imagination to know 
in what condition they will get. 

The American Legion will en- 
ter 1921 with practically 10,000 
posts, according to the estimates 
based- on the latest figures. Dur- 
ing the week ending December 10 
fifteen new posts were added, 
whieh brought the total to 9,930. 
Arkansas led with thr ee posts^ 



The Women's Auxiliary in hte 
name period obtained twenty-sev- 
en new units, raising its list to 
1.586. Pour new units, gained by 
the New York Department, plac- 
ed that department in the lead 
for the week. 



Mr. C. W. Kerr, who has been 
Conducting a garage in Burlington 
has sold all of his supplies to Chas. 
and Russell Miller, of Big Bone, 
Who will continue the business. 
There is no reason why these 
young men should not make a 
success, as a garage is needed 
and they now have the opportun- 
ity to build up a good business. 

Mr. Kerr ana family will leave 
in a few days for Southern Geor- 
gia, where he has accepted a 
position in the road department 
of that state. Mr. Kerr is an up- 
to-date road builder. 



Amsrioan Legion Maws Notes. 

State legislation which will of- 
fer the alternative of a $8,006 
farm or home loan or cash com- 
pensation at the rate of $16 a 
month of service for. veterans of 
the World War, will be pressed 
by the Oregon Department of the 
American Legion, it was so decid- 
ed at a recent meeting of the 
state executive committee of the 
Legion. The Legionnaires also vot 
ed to sponsor in the legislature 
a bill similar to the Japanese law 
of California, aimed to prevent 
lard holdings by orientals in the 
state, when it was pointed out 
that the adoption of the Cali- 
fornia law caused an influx of 
Japanese Into Oregon. 

A national poll of the members 
of the American Legion may be 
ordered by National Headquar- 
ters In the near future to de- 
termine which plan members will 
choose in the event that the Le- 

fion fonrtfold bonus bill is passed 
y the Senate. The Senate Fi- 
nance committee reported to the 
National legislative committee in 
Washington that this step might 
be necessary to ascertain an esti- 
mate of the immediate expendi- 
ture which the bill's fmssage 
would call lor. 

In an effort to alleviate the 
national shortage of employment, 
American Legion posts in many 

arts of the country have es- 
rtied employment bureaus for 
local former service men where 
industrial establishments and bus- 
ineSJT I.-uses of the cofTinitv list 
their -**h*lp wanted."'^ These^post 
bureaus are operated ~ free of 
charge and eligible to any veter- 
ans applicant, regardless of Le- 
gion membership. 

STILLED 

By the Hand of The Grim Reap 
ar-6ona to Her Reward. 

The spirit of Mrs. Eliza Blythe 
Rouse returned to Him who gave 
it at 6 :20 p. m., Oec. 21st. 192 J, 
at .her home in Erlagner, Ky. She 
was a devoted wife and mother, 
lived for her home and loved 
ones; yet no friend or neighbor 
ever laced for a cheering word or 
helping hand that she could givo 
She was a member ofv the Pres- 
byterian church and lived the life 
of a christian. She was the daugh- 
ter of Arthur and Sarah Blythe, 
and was born in Burlington, Ky., 
February 26th, 1853, where she 
resided until a short time before 
her death. She was united' in 



The Recorder is in receipt of a 
very interesting letter from Will 
Hoshall Kilgore who resided on 
the farm known as* 'Catalpa"]ust 
north of Hebron, from 1872 to 1884. 
Mr. Kilgore says "I am onot of 
eight deaf mutes employed by the 
Lukenhelmer Brass Founders Co., 
Norwood, O., which employs 5500 
men and is one of the largest 
factories of the kind in the coun- 
try, that another large foundry Is 
being built at a cost of $2,500,000 
and about the same amount will 
be expended in building homes 
tor the workmen. Mr. Kilgore 
now resides at 614 Philadelphia St. 
Covington,- Ky. 



♦ 



The truck owners in Covington 
have brought N a suit seeking to 
have the- law fixing the license 
* on trucks declared unconstitu- 
tional and void. If this law should 
be declared void. If this law should 
would be without funds to meet 
the Federal aid in road construc- 
tion, and then the truck owner 
would have to convert his truck 
into a flying machine. Be care- 
ful Mr. truck owner that you do 
not kill "the goose that laid the 

S olden egg." If the license tax 
lould— be removed and toll roads 
established, every truck owner 
would pay ten times as much in 
tolls as- he is now required to 
pay for a license. 




BBCOBPBB 






Already several prospective can 
dldntes for county postmastershlpB 
under the new administration 
have begun to 'loom up»' on the 
hot-izon.I n the county there are 
severs 1 pretty well worth while 
offices, the chief among them be- 
ing Burlington, Walton and Flor- 
e*i^e and Petersburg, The fir-it 
two named are in the presMential 
<i;i*s and as auch come und rttir 
civil service regulations, and un- 
less some good reason* est i»a 
Km id for ousting the present tic 
ub'n bents It mav take quite awhile 
for soma of the prospects to land 
the Jobs However, what dons the 
civil servis* law mw a aat to It eae 
wishes to be a postmaster and ha 
jprlsce he wishes Is held by a meal* 
• *»n nertvt 



marriage with Dudlev Rouse in 
Burlington, Sept., 3rd, 1873. To 
this union one child was - born, 
Hon. Arthur Blythe Rouse, who is 
the Representative in Congress 
from the Sixth Congressional Dis* 
trict. Her husband preceded her 
to the Great Beyond Feb. 1912. 
Besides her boh, she is survived 
by one sister, Mrs. F. P. Walton, 
of Newport, and four brothers, 
era, Geo. Blyth, Burlington; Harry 
W. Blyth, Lawrenceburg, Indiana; 
James Blyth, of California, and 
Rev David Blyth 
While Mrs. Rouse had r.ot been 
in the best of health for several 
years, yet her condition was not 
considered critical until a short 
time before her death when every 
comfort that loving hands could 
bestow was given by her son and 
relatives. 

The funeral services were con- 
ducted by Rev. J. N. Irvin, of Day- 
ton, Ky, at her residence in Er- 
langer, Dec. 24th, at 10 o'clock a. 
m., after which the remains were 
placed in the vault in the I. O. 
O. F. cemetery at Burlington, to 
await final Interment. 

Her seven nephews "Br. A P. 
Walton, D. R. Blyth, Riggs Demp- 
sey, F. Walton Dempsey, Hubert 
Rouse and Karl Rouse, acted as 
pall-bearers. The floral offerings 
were beautiful and numerous, the 
flower wagon bein«j filled to 
overflowing, Philip Taliaferro, of 
Erlanger, had oharge of the fun- 
eral arrangements and they were 
perfect in every detail. 

The draft of a proposed model 
State law providing for the or- 
ganization and regulation of far- 
mers' mutual fire insurance corn- 
paries has been completed l>y 
snecialists in the office of Farm 
Management and Farm Economics, 
United States Department of Ag- 
riculture Statistics have been tab 
ulated on these companies wi>hn 
view to obtaining comnrehensive 
and reliable data relative t , the 
cost of property projection 'hru 
su^h organization* The special- 
ists also have prtim-ed an out- 
line of f\ avitflll of krenl*'t re- 
cords for the firmer!' mutml mm* 
pan lea. 

On* of the notMts given *i>. 
atteVon Is fhv of h*l| vlnour- 
snee (or farm croon The depart- 
ment has Hi«l puhitsha't a » -li., k i.| 
on this »u». )■-«*', mi'vilm liitfe/fc 
eal as asU at •UtUMaal an I legal 
dull 



Personal Mention \ 

Mkw. B. B. Hume waa quite ill 
several days last week. 

John Barly, of Aurora, Indiana, 
attended county court last Man 
day. 

Mrs. Joaie Riley, of Grant, waa 
transacting business in Burlington 
last Monday. 

Edward Rice was confined to 
the house -several days last week 
with a severe cold. 

Mr. end Mrs. F. A. Hall spent 
the Christmas holidays with their 
children"' in Newport. 

Elmer Kelly and wife enter- 
tained a number of friends ano 
relatives at dinner, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Duf el, of near 
Richwood, were business visitors 
to Burlington, last Wednesday. 

The many friends of Mrs. Laura 
Carver will be glad to hear that 
her health la greatly improved, f 

Clifton Roberta of Walton, vis- 
ited friends ™nd relatives in Bur- 
lington several days last week. 

L P. Rice, of Idle wild neighbor- 
hood/ spent Sunday the guest of 
his brother, Ed. Rice and wife. 

Miss Katie Kirkpatrick, of Cin- 
cinnati, spent the holidays with 
her mother, Mrs. Vina Kirkpatrick. 

Dr. H. H. Hays, of Clevee,Ohio, 
spent "a few hours Monday af- 
ternoon with friends irrvUurling- 
ton. 

Attorney Ray Rogers of Cov- 
ington, was in Burlington Thurs- 
day of last week on legal busi- 
ness. 

"Mrs. James Hedge*, of -Wo|' -n. 
spet^t a fev %?«yi» fast week, the 

guest of her daughter, Mrs. F. H. 
ouse. 

Hoh. A. B. Rouse was a visitor 
to Burlington, Monday. He ex- 
pects to leave for Washington in 
a few days. 

F. H. Rouse and wife entertain- 
ed, a number of friends and rela- 
tives with a big turkey dinner, 
Christmas day. 

W. C. Weaver and wife enter- 
tained a number of relatives and 
friends with a big dinner last 
Sunday week. 

Mrs. Minnie Smith was called to 
Carrollton last/ Saturday, on ac- 
count of the death of her aunt, 
Mrs. M. E. Gibson. 

Kelton Kelly, of the Waterloo 
neighborhood, was the guest of 
his uncle, Elmer Kelly and wife, a 
few days last week. 

Judge Sidney Gaines left last 
Sunday for Plkeville, where he 
will preside at a special term of 
the Pike circuit court. 

Robert Carve/ of Lawrenceburg, 
Indiana, spent the holiday season 
with relatives and friends in Com 
missary neighborhood. 

Clifton Roberts, of Walton, spent 
several days last week with his 
sister, Mrs. M. G. Martin, and oth- 
er relatives in Burlington. 

James Barlow and wife enter- 
tained a number of their friends 
and relatives with a genuine old 
fashioned Christmas dinner. 

Mrs. Aloert Beemon, of Hopeful 
neighborhood, entertained- over— 44V 
of her relatives and friends with 
a big turkey dinner, Xmas day. 

William Finn, after enjoying the 
holiday vacation with his relatives 
on Woolper, returned to . State 
University at Lexington, Tuesday,. 

Judge B. F. Mlenefee of Crit- 
tenden, w^s a business visitor to 
Burlington last Friday. He had 
some legal matter in the circuit 
court. 

Clarence Tanner ano wife, of 
Richwood neighborhood, enter- 
tained a number of relatives and 
friehds with a big dinner, last 
Sunday. 

Lieutenant B. W. Gaines, U. S. N. 
and wife, visited his father W. A 
Gaines and brother B. C. Gaines 
and wife, during the Christmas 
holidays. 

Hubert Rouse and wife, of Lim- 
aburg neighborhood, entertained a 
'number of relatives, and friends 
with a New Year's dinner, last 
Saturday. 

W. D. Sutton Farm Agent for 
Boone couniy, reported early last 
Monday morning for duiy. Mr. 
Sutton will get busy a', once with 
his duties. 

Robert Youell, son of Charles 
Youell and wife, of near Limaburg 
returned to Lexington last Tues- 
day where he is attending State 
Univ erslty. 

Judge C. C. Roberts, wife and 
daughters Misses Sheba and Mary, 
of Walton, were visiting relatives 
and friends in Burlington several 
days last week. 

Miss Laura Frances Riddelt, af- 
ter a two week's visit with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Marce Ri<(- 
dell, returned to her work at Wash 
ington, D. C 

Miss Mary Gordon has returned 
to Lexington where she is attend- 
ing Hamilton College, after spend- 
ing the holidays with J. C. Gor- 
don and wife. 

Miss Louise Walton, of Snyler 
Park, Ohio, and who is attending 
Oxford, Ohio, College, spent the 
holidays with her grandmother, 
Mrs. Fannie Cropper. 

Denzil Carpenter, who is at- 
tending Georgetown College, re- 
turned last Tuesday after spend- 
ing the holiday season with his 
parents, Wm. Carpenter and wife. 

Charles Duit, of Alma, Michigan, 
who has been viaiting J. C. Gor- 
don and wife, returned to Lex- 
ington, Ky., Tuesday, where he 
is attending Transalvatiia College. 

Lieut. Arch McGlaaaon, who hi* 
been visiting his father, Oeo. B. 
Mc(i|.isson of Bel .on neighbor- 
hood, was in tow. Monday. IA >ut 
McUI.iim.oii will 'eave in a lew 



Sheriffs Sale for Taxes 

Notice is hereby given that I, or 
one of my deputies will, on Monday, 
February 7th, 1921, it being County 
Court day, between the hours of 10 
a. m. and 8 p. m., stthe Court Honae 
door in the town of Burlington, 
Boone county, Ky., expose to public 
aale for cash in hand, the following 

Eroperty , or so much thereof aa may 
e necessary to pay State, County 
and School taxes due thereon and 
unpaid for the year 1820, and the 
penalty, Interest and costs thereon. 

For a complete description of prop- 
erty see assessors book for 1919, st 
the County Tax Commissioners of- 
fice/ 

L. A. CONNER, 
Sheriff of Boone Counts. 

e~ 

Burlington Precinct— 

McCarty, Tobe, 46 acres $18.86 

Beaver Precinct- 
Bole*, Cbaa. 8., town lot. 209.82 

Roberts, Mrs. Agness, 66a 121.06 

Bellevue Precinct- 
Bice heirs, town lot 3.69 

Wlngate, D., nr 19 acres 11.12 

Constance Precinct- 
Anderson, Bruce. 8 acres 18.92 

Hood, John W., 40 acres 27.15 

Kindred, Mrs. Frank, town lot. 10.10 

Stephens, Jno. nr., 14 acres 6.16 

Teeters, Vesta, town lot 10.88 

Florence Precinct— 

Braoht, Fred, 10 acres 18.60 

Oastleman A Castleman, 2 t-lots.36.06 
Marksberry, G. W., 2 town lots. 72.27 

Biddell, P. B., 227 acres 386 96 

Hamilton Precinct— 

fi^ck, Ben, town lot 9.97 
endall, O. C, nr. 294 acres 126.30 

Mclntyre, Geo., 9 acres 16.73 

Bice, Erastus. 2 acres 3.77 

Petersburg Precinct — 

Gordon, Eugene, 2 town lots. 22.15 

Rector, G. W., town lot 15.74 

Union Precinct — 

Rice, G. W., 78 acres. ..'. 40.60 

Hughes, G. W., (col) 10 acres .14.84 
Frazier, Jno., est. col. town lot. 14.69 

Verona Precinct- 
Anderson, J. M., 18 acres 87.69 

Gardt, Job, town lot 42.98 

Powers, John W.. 3 town lots . .8.83 

Sturgeon, Lon, 78 acres 48.74 

Walton Precinct- 
Franks, Wm., nr. 13 acres 8.65 

Holland, J. J., nr. town lot 3.42 

Hopperton, Joe, town lot 15.07 

Johnson, Thos. E., 4 acres and 

town lot 20.60 

Kelly, E. L., 1 town lot and all 
personal property belonging 

to light plant 33.8S 

Morrison, Liazie, town lot 16.85 

Wolfe, Emma, 3 acres 11.67 

B. B. Hume has bought of the heirs 
the old hotel property and 40 acres 
of ground at Big Bone. 




(©, 1910, Waatara Newapapar Union.) 



Who shall have vision to pierce the 
mist 
Enshrouding the common thing, 
Or see in the dark hours, sorrow—'-' 
kissed. 
The gleam of an angel's wing? 
The world is wide, and the world is 
old: 
Its mysteries pass our ken; 
And only to God are the secrets told 
Which live In the hearts of men. 
—Christine Davis. 

MORE GOOD THINGS, 




Bcv. Con|»»y of Florence, was a 
business visitor to Hurlingio>i, last 
Friday, tr.d whilo in tow.-i made 

alia ofiicc a vcryp leaf ml cs.lt 
a renewed his kubacriplioji to 



ed his kubschpliojt 
the Recorder for another year 

Owen Moss an I Vita, oi Hopeful 
neighborhood, entertained at din- 
ner, laat chgseVav quit* a number 
of their isletives and trie-Ida Mr 
and Mrs, leas ire two of Boone 
anvnty'a thrifty rlifvoe 



For those who like rich pastry or 
onke the following will be a treat: 

Scotch Short 
Bread.— Beat one 
cupful of butter 
to a cream, add 
one-half cupful 
of light brown 
sugar, then work 
In four cupfuls 
of pastry floor. 
If the flour Is slightly warm it will 
work In more easily. Form the mix- 
ture into two flat cakes seven Inches 
In diameter. Decorate the edge with 
n fork or by crimping with the thumb 
and finger. Sprinkle the top with 
chopped cherries, caraway, candles or 
preserved citron. Bake in a slow 
oven. 

Tapioca, Pineapple Sponge.— Scald 
iwo cupfuls of grated pineapple and 
kalf a cupful of boiling water in a 
double boiler, add one-fourth of a cup- 
ful of minute tapioca and one-fourth 
of a teaspoonful of salt Stir occa- 
sionally and let cook abont half an 
hour, then add the Juice of half a 
lemon and one-fourth of a cupful of 
sugar. Fold in the whites of two eggs 
beaten stiff and cook until the egg Is 
set Serve hot or cold in glass cups 
with whipped cream as a garnish. 

Marahmallow Cream.— Soften one 
tenspoonful of gelatin In two or three 
tnhlespoonfuls of cold milk, then dis- 
solve by setting the dish In boiling wa- 
ter. Add half a cupful of sugar and 
one cupful of double cream and beat 
until Arm. Beat the white of s small 
egg, then fold It Into the cream with 
half a tenspoonful of vanilla, half of a 
quarter-pound box of mnrshmnllows 
cut in quarters, half a capful of 
skinned and seeded white grapes cut 
In halves, one bannna cut In cubes, 
and mixed with a tablespoon ful of 
lemon Juice to keep the pieces from 
discoloring. Dispose in glass cups 
with a cherry here aud there. Garnish 
the top with a quarter of a marahmal- 
low. sprinkle with fine-chopped mils 
and chill before serving. 



Public Sale. 



I will sell at public auction at my resi- 
dence in Burlington, Ky., on 

Saturday, Jan. 8th, '21 

The Following Property : 

All my Household and Kitchen Furni- 
ture, 1 490 Chivrolet Touring Car 1917 
model, 1 490 Chivrolet Touring Car '18 
model, 1917 Ford Roadster, and one 1- 
ton Ford Truck 1919 model, 5-passeng- 
er Buick B 35, 1917 model. 



~ TERMS OF SALE. 

All sums of $10.00 and under, cash ; on all sums 
over $10,00 a credit of four months will be given 
purchaser to give note with good security, payable 
at the Boone County Deposit Bank. 

C. W. KERR. 

J. M. Eddins, Auctioneer. Sale to begin at 1:30. 



I 



1 



*H 




CnX».C 



vrOJL 



Down goee the price ono third 
off on all funeral aupph.-i Souti 
Chambers, Walton, Ky IJ-U 

Jno I. Jooea, of Hiatlittii illr 
mMahborV*. I. hilled thtv*. hofa 
thai mad* it\ gn9vm of lard 



Efficienct, Service and Economy 

IS MY SLOGAN 

C. SCOTT .CHAMBERS 

Embalmer and Funeral Director 



WALTON, KENTUCKY. 






m 

A 



Erlanger Garage | 

WALTON DEMPSEY, Prop. 

Repair Work Absolutely Guaranteed. 

EXPERT MECHANICS. 
Full Line of Ford parts, Tires, Tube* 
and Accessories. 
F. W. DEMPSEY, iaa6tl Erlanger, Ky. 




m 



& 



Save Fifty Years! 

Suppose you were to set out to gather; 
by your own personal investigation, the 
wealth of farm knowledge that a single 
dollar will buy in a year's copies of 

•ZSe COUNTRY 
GENTLEMAN 

It would take you at least fifty years ! 
And by the time you had your material 
together, nine-tenths of it would be ob- 
solete — about as helpful in your farm 
business as the market prices of 1870. 




A year of Tint COUN- 
TRY GSNTUtMAN rep- 
resent* the work of fifty 
trained investigators — 
each a recognized au- 
thority in his held, thor- 
oughly informed on the 
latest methods that make 
for profit in farming. 
They give to THE COUN 
try Gentleman a vi- 
alon aa wide as the whole 
farm industry; they 



bring to it the collective 
experience of successful 
farmers the country 
over. 

Why not hire these fifty 
men to work for you? 
If you send me just one 
dollar bill or your check 
TODAY, I'U aea that 
they report for duty on 
Thursday of next week, 
and serve you every week 
of the cooiing year. 



Let The Country Gentleman Help You Prosper 

Eva May Riggs 

Peons Bri, 50-Y ErUn t er, Ky. 



ItaCa 



I 

I 



auOMat COUKTT KatCORDaOt 



FIGHT ON RATS 
MUST BE WAGED 

Constant Warfare Must Be Made 

on Pestiferous Rodent to 

Get Best Resuts. 



EXTERMINATION IS POSSIBLE 

No Matter How Badly House Be In- 
fested With Peats Methods Per- 
fected Will Absolutely De- 
stroy Little Animals. 

Spasmodic rat extermination cam- 
paigns are of course beneficial, but to 
secure lasting results constant warfare 
must be waged against the rat, say 
specialists of the bureau of biological 
survey. United States Department of 
Agriculture. The necessity for this is 
plain in the fact that rats begin to 
breed at three months and have from 
six to ten litters a year, with an aver- 
age of ten young to each litter. 
Riddance Possible. 
lecialists of the department of ag- 
riculture for years have made exten- 
sive studies of rats and methods of 
exterminating them. No matter how 
badly a house tuuy be Infested with 
rats, these experts maintain, the use 
of the meU»ods perfected by them will 
absolutely, and without doubt, rid the 
house of the rodents. 

Throughout the United States health 
authorities are advocating the use of 
these methods and gratifying results 
are being secured. Thus Kansas has 
designated a special "rat day." Cin- 
cinnati Is spending thousands of dol- 
lars in a rat campaign, and similar 
movements are being conducted at 
Norfolk, along the Gulf coast, and in, 
many other cities. In addition the bu- 
reau is constantly giving advice to hun- 
dreds of correspondents. 

Means of Destroying. 

"Rat proofing" of buildings is the 
basic step in rat extermination. Food 
should be protected and sanitary meth- 



OUR BIRTH RATE IS NORMAL 

' » ^ 

Census Bureau Statistics Show That 

Births Exceed Deaths by About 

One-Third. 

The census bureau, on the strength 
of registered returns, gives figures to 
show that the birth rate In the United 
States exceeds the death rate by one- 
third, which Is a gratifying fact. We 
are not one of the nations that need 
be anxious on this vital point as far 
as present conditions are concerned- 
One of the most serious troubles In 
France is the warning In Its censuses 
that in some years more of its inhab- 
itants die than are born, eome of 
Ha neighbors grow much faster in 
population. This disparity was some- 
what noticed In the past, yet without 
fully realizing; rbe terrible menace in- 
volved. The desolated towns and 
farms of France are a monument to 
the old census admonitions and the 
awful sacrifice of young French man- 
hood Is far more dreadful than the 
devastation. Often have the public 
men of France sounded an alarm on 
the defective birth rate. It is much 
discussed now by thoughtful French 
legislators and writers. A census al- 
ways demands Intelligent study. 

The United States grows by immi- 
gration as well as births, and our 
school system tends to Amcrlcanlze_ 
the whole body of citizens. Our 
schools are a great melting pot for 
Americans of the future and to In- 
creuse their proportionate number. 

The welfare of children Is a great 
national issue. The birth rate and 
death rate need continuous attention. 




HOW TO SELECT BEEF 
CALF AND RAISE IT 



ALL WANT TO LIVE IN PARIS 



Bulletin Written Especially for 
Young Farmers. 



Desirable and Undesirable Type* of 

Caiv.. Are Discussed and Illus- 
trated — Importance of Chang- 
ing It* Ration. 

For the prodigal who has finally 
turned away from growing Inferior, un- 
profitable, and uninteresting live stock 
the United State. Department of Agri- 
culture has prepared a special farm- 
ers' bulletin, No. 1135. Under the title 
"The Beef Calf: Its Growth and 
Development," this new publication, 
written principally for young farmers. 



So Many Foreigners Are There That 

the Frenchman "Is Being 

Crowded. 

. The New York Evening Posi's Parts 
correspondent says that in an article 
in Excelsior a French writer contends 
that while Paris before the war was 
the meeting place of all nationalities. 
It has now become their permanent 
abode, so that the Parisians are crowd- 
ed out into the suburbs or unable to 
find an apartment In the city. 



The writer says that if yon take a 
ods employed for disi>osal of waste ] census f th e average apartment you 
food. Where rats may die in the walls j wM | flnn thnt )t contn j ns "Belgians 



poisoning is not recommended, but 
where this condition cannot result 
barium carbonate worked into almost 
any kind of food is the poison to use. 
Snap traps, often called "guillotine 
traps," are the most effective in trap- 
ping. The traps should be placed in 
every part of the house that rats fre- 
quent. One or two traps are not 
enough. The traps should be baited 
with fresh meats, seeds, nuts, vege- 
tables, fruit, or any other food. 




who left when the Ocrmaus enme. 
Russians driven out by bolshcvlsm. 
French families from the devastated 
regions who seem to like it where they 
are. American students with their 
omnipotent dollars. Englishmen trying 
to do business and representatives of 
the Balkan states, Poland, Turkey and 
other distressed and unsettled regions 
who are living on the Lord only knows 
what. Paris is proud of her cosmo- 
politanism, but is finding It inconveni- 
ent when the peoples of the world 



The bureau will be glad to advise 

anyone regarding the correction of any ^ -show so little Inclination to mOve." 

rat condition, upon receipt of full de 

Cardinal's Hat Symbol of Office. 
The peculiarity of the cardinal's hat 
Is that It Is not to be worn. On one 
occasion only Is It to be seen on the 
head of the cardinal, and that is when 
the pope himself places It there as a 
symbol of Its owner's elevation to the 
Sacred college. When the cardinal dies 
ft is placed In his coffin. The hat Is 
of a deeper re.l than that of the robe 
worn by the cardinal. It has long 
heavy silken cords, each with 15 tas- 
sels at the end. hanging on either side. 
The crimson robes which, like the hat. 
denote the cardinal's office, nre made 
of cloth which for several generations 
past has been supplied by n firm of 
cloth merchants at Burtscheld. near 
Alx-la-Chapulle. The process by which 
the dye Is distilled is a Jealously 
guarded secret. 



Guillotine Trap With Wooden 
and Trigger Plate. 



Base 



talis. Letters should be addressed to 
the bureau of biological survey, United 
States Department of Agriculture, 
Washington. D. C. 



WATERPROOF WASH FOR SILO 



Mixture of Liquid Paraffin and Cement 
le Excellent for Ineide of 

Structure*. 

One of our renders has reported 
that he has discovered an excellent wa- 
terproof wash for the Inside of a 
masonry silo, says Wallace's Farmer. 
It is simply a mixture of three quarts 
of liquid paraffin to each 100 pounds 
of cement. The paraffin may be 
bought through tiny of the regular oil 
companies. The mixture Is well 
adapted to putting on the Inside of 
hollow tile or nrlek silos. 



Trade With Australia Grows. 
Trading between Uiis country and 
Australia Is showing a healthy growth, 
according to figures supplied to the de- 
partment of commerce by A. W. Fer- 
rln, trade commissioner, who Is at Mel- 
bourne. They cover imports and ex- 
ports for the first quarter of the cur- 
rent year, and show the imports dur- 
ing that period to hare been about 
$27,775,000, against exports to this 
country of approximately $16,360,400. 
February exports nearly equaled In 
value the totals for January and 
March, and In that month the outgoing 
shipments exceeded the imports.. In 
the same month, however, the value of 
the Imports was less than half of the 
goods brought in during March. 



VALUE OF ALFALFA PASTURE 

Lh/e Stack Man Can Use It for Hogs 

or the Hay as Feed for Various 

Farm Animals. 

The real value of alfalfa la with the 
live stock man who can either pasta*, 
with hogs or use the hay for feeding 
parpen**. There Is no doubt about 
the false of alfalfa as a bog paxture 
feed for cattle and horses, a 
fOer or Ave tons per acre 

*»IC» Will lover ai|| 

Utfaa> 

•a the 



Making It Homelike. 

On Dolly's birthday she was pre- 
sented with a baby bulldog, and her 
delight was delicious to behold. 

It was very young, and she insist- 
ed upon taking it to bed with her. but 
the next morning she was looking 
very tired. 

"Haven't you slept well, darling?" 
asked her mother. 

"No. mummy," said Dolly. "Nel- 
son was crying In the night for his 
mumsey. so I kept awake with him 
for company, and I made awful faces 
all night to make him fink 1 was his 
bulldog muvver to comfy him !"— An- 
swers, London. 



Aerial Taxieaba In Canada. 
Seventeen aerial taxlcab ceonpu 
nice are being formed In western 
Canada, and a number o( these al- 
ready have been licensed by the air 
board. Four commercial flying com- 
panies have been formed at Winni- 
peg, and there are companion at 
Regina. Moose law, Hn*katoon, Ed- 
monton. Ilanna (Alberta), Calgary. 
I.ethbrldge, llnnff and in VuncfMver 
Aerodromes are to be built at wfd> n 
and Vancouver 1'iteeeoser nyfjg la 
the nmt object of these 

far large »»..;>« are eTfWWd le fa*- 

low 




A Good Type of Bull Calf. 

tells how to select a beef calf and 
raise it either for market or for use 
as a breeding animal. 

The bulletin is a response to an un- 
usual demand by members of boys' and 
girls' clubs for specific information on 
the principles and practices of raising 
well-bred calves, preparing them for 
show or sale, and disposing of them 
to advantage. Desirable and undesir- 
able types of calves are discussed and 
illustrated. 

There are chapters on equipment 
needed, keeping the calf healthy, feed- 
ing, and the Importance of changing 
the ration as the animal develops, also 
methods of preventing parasites and 
disease. The bulletin describes clear- 
ly how to clip, curl, or otherwise pre- 
pare the coat of the various breeds of 
cattle preparatory to showing them, 
with additional directions regarding 
shipping and exhibiting. Persons de- 
siring such information should write 
to the United States Department of 
Agriculture, Washington, D. C, for 
Farmers' Bulletin 1135. 



PLOW LEVEL SOILS IN FALL 



Stubborn Sods Are More Surely Exter- 
minated and Moisture Supply la 
Greatly Increased. 

If all ground was level we might 
make the assertion that all soils are 
benefited by fall plowing as there Is 
much to be gained through this prac- 
tice. Level soils that do not wash are 
benefited since stubborn sods are 
more easily exterminated and the 
moisture supply for the crop The fol- 
lowing spring is greatly increased; 
however, hilly land or that Inclined 
to wash is damaged by being fall 
plowed. The available plant foods are 
washed out, gullies are made In the 
hillside and the fields are subject to 
weathering during the winter. The 
fertility of sandy soils or soils that 
are rolling Is best conserved by plow- 
ing only in the spring and then as late 
as possible in order to get the crop 
out on time. 



SUGAR BEET CROP IS LARGE 



Bureau of Crop Estimates Puts Total 
at Nearly Nine Million Tone- 
Hits Sugar Price*. 

According to the bureau of crop es- 
timates the United States will harvest 
this year nearly 9,000,000 tons of beets 
or 2,000,000 tons more than the nor- 
mal crop. Normally in the United 
States we produce about 17 pounds of 
beet sugar per capita, whereas this 
year we shall produce about 21 or 22 
pounds of beet sugar per capita. This 
extra four or five pounds of beet 
sugar will doubtless have something 
to do with reducing sugar prices to 
a more reasonable basis daring the 
next year. 



FRESH AIR QUITE IMPORTANT 

Chicken House Should Be Provided 

With Good Ventilating System 

Without Drafts. 

Chickens seem te require more fresh 
air than do cattle or twine. An au- 
thority oven says the amount of air 
breathed by a ken is three times great- 
er thaa that required by cowe or pigs, 
dive the poultry house plenty of ven- 
tilation without drafts; plenty of oar- 
gen without cracV- for the wind te 
enter. 



TIME LOST TO MAKE REPAIRS 



Parmer Would Net Be Compelled ta 

•top to Fix Machinee If Qlven 

Proper Attention. 

Man la like a machine. If kept IB 
good working order each day he will 
seldom have to stop for repairs. More 
time Is lost In making repairs than 
could possibly he used Is laBlag care 
ef aoaenlaea In order ta 
eeceealiy of re * I re. 



HAD QUEER MENTAL STREAK 

Stories Told of Oliver Cromwell Would 

Lead One to Doubt His Com- 

pleto Sanity. 

If Oliver Cromwell had lived in 
these days a committee of alienists 
doubtless would have Investigated his 
sanity before now. F^or the Protector 
had a moat . abnormal streak In his 
mental make-up. Fancy a loan that 
could sign the death wo mint of a 
king and then turn and spatter the 
ink from hie pen Into the fare of a 
friend. In bis youth taverns were the 
chief resort of Cromwell. His r*»ii 
and boisterous behavior early es- 
tranged htm from his equals and he 
came to associate with s class beneeth 
him, For he could brook no Interfer- 
^iee or contradiction. The matter of 
t he score at the Inns where . he 
caroused concerned him very little; 
the bills frequently went unpaid and 
be became extremely unpopular with 
the alewivee'of Huntingdon who, when 
they saw blm coming, would lock the 
doors to keep out the noisy bully. So 
Oliver turned out to be a wild and dis- 
sipated youth. The same Incorrigible 
spirit ran throughout his life. It led 
him to encourage his soldiers to play 
practical jokes upon each other, such 
as> putting hot CQnhUiLfhe other fel- 
low's boots. At the marriage of his 
daughter In 1657 to Rich, the Protect- 
or threw sack posset among the tames 
to soli their rich clothes, which they 
took as a favor from him, strange as It 
may seem. And he put sticky candy 
upon the chairs where his guests were 
to sit. and pulled off his son-in-law's 
peruke, pretended to throw It Into the 
fire, and ended by sitting on It. — Phil* 
acelphla Record. 



OBJECT TO MENIAL DUTIES 



Reason That Is Assigned for the Pres- 
ent Scarcity of Trained Nurses 
in Hospitals. 

The full ntlllty of many hospitals Is 
now Impaired by a lack of nurses 
writes "Giranl" In the Philadelphia 
Press. 

Howard Butler. Jr.. is trustee of an 
Important hospital here and he tells 
me they need 30 per cent more uurses 
than they can get 

"Why are nurses so scarce?" I 
asked.' 

"I presume." answered Mr. Butcher, 
whose business, as you know. Is that, 
of a banker and broker. "It Is because 
girls think they can earn more money 
In an easier way In some other occu- 
pation." 

I ha\e talked with doctors of wide 
hospital experience about It and tbey 
say that the old practice of making 
girls In training for nurses do drud- 
gery for a year or so has prevented 
many young women from entering the 
profession. 

"What good," said one great sur- 
geon, "did it do to a nurse's skill to 
make her scrub floors or wash win- 
dows? As well make medical students 
polish shoes, keep up the furnace fires 
and sweep out the lecture rooms." 

Another physician of long experi- 
ence and who If connected with a big 
hospital, added. > 

"The hospitals will be obliged to cut 
ont the manual labor for training 
nurses and will probably reduce the 
years of training, or the country will 
go back to the conditions when It had 
few or no trained nurses." 



He Made Eugenie Weep. 

An old singer living; In England. M. 
L. Albanl Gye, recalls an Incident 
which Indicates how heavily the late 
Empress Eugenie bore her many sor- 
rows. 

"Many years ago I used to take my 
holiday on Deeslde." he writes the Dal- 
ly Telegraph, "and once at least every 
season was called to Balmoral to sing 
before Queen Victoria. On one of these 
occasions the empress, who was on a 
visit at the castle, came with the 
queen to hear me. I believe that she 
had not heard any music since the 
death of the emperor, and 1 had scarce 
ly finished my first song when she 
burst out crying. The queen, on seeing 
this, began to cry also, and I. too, from 
sympathy, I presume, with the two 
great ladles, could hardly restrain my 
tears. I. however, very soon recovered 
my composure and was able to con- 
tinue my work." 

Qardcns ef Ashes. 

The town of Sheepehead Bay some 
years sgo entered Into an arrange- 
ment -with the borough of Brooklyn 
whereby the contents of all the Brook- 
lyn ash barrels were delivered for the 
filling in of a great swamp. 

The refuse, reaching Sbeepshesd 
Bay In large metal tanks, was carried 
out Into the swamp by specially con- 
structed trolleys and dumped. In this 
way seme hundreds of acres were con- 
verted Into dry land. 

The refuse contained so much vege- 
table and animal matter that almost 
Immediately grass and sunflowers be- 
gan to grow on the surface of the ma- 
terial, and by the end of the second 
year thrifty Italians had planted most 
of the area with cabbage and other 
vegetables. The ash dump became a 
truck garden. 

Timber Prom Oead Trees. 
gome prejudice exists against the 
uee of timber cut from dead trese, 
says the American Forestry Maga- 
Mae. As • matter of fact when sound 
dead trese are •■wed into lumber, and 
the weathered or rbarred outside ta 
eat away, there la no method known 
to (he ferae* products laboratory by 
which the lumber can he datUaiulahed 
from that eni from live treee, ecerpt 
that too fesntwr from 4ea* trees may 
1 he sors» ■■! » ■ < wBoa aawoat 




BIG REDUCTION IN CHOLERA 



In twine Loes of 72 Per 
Cent Noted In fix Counties In 
North Carolina. 



(Prepared. by the United State* Depart- 
ment of AtriculUre ) 

An example of the benefit which 
may come to a community from the 
well-directed efforts of state and fed- 
eral agencies, coupled with the co-op- 
eration of farmers, for the control of 
hog cholera Is shown In a recent re- 
port of n veterinary Inspector of the 
bureau of animal Industry. 

Hog cholera control work was In- 
augurated In six counties In the north- 
eastern section of North Carolina Au- 
gust 1, 1916, An intensive campaign 
was carried on for a period of 14 
months. It Included Investigation of 
reported outbreaks, demonstrations In 
the use of serum and virus, and the 
disinfection of premises. As the 
services of practicing veterinarians 
were not available, a number of lay- 
men were trained In the administra- 
tion of the serum treatment for chol- 
era. After that period of intensive 
activities the work was withdrawn ho 
another section of the state, only gen- 
eral supervision being given to the 
original area. # 

During October a survey was made 
of the counties comprising the district 
In question, and a questionnaire was 
submitted to as many of the farmers 
as could be reached. Answers re- 
ceived and tabulated indicate (that 
there has been a reduction in losses 
from cholera of over 72 percent, and 
an Increase of over 160 per cent In 
swine production, due to the protec- 
tion offered by the immunization of 
the animals. There has also been a 




Shoulder Injection for Hog Cholera. 

marked Improvement In the type of 
this class of animals, due to the 
knowledge that It is possible to raise 
mnre and better hogs without danger 
of having them destroyed by cholera. 



BRONCHITIS IN LITTLE PIGS 



Not Much Can Be Dene in Way of 

Treatment — Damp, Cold Pens Are 

Causa of Trouble. 

Bronchitis most commonly occurs In 
young pigs. Matured hogs are seldom 
troubled with It If It attacks very 
young pigs It often proves fatal, but 
pigs two or three months old will gen- 
erally survive, though their growth 
may be seriously interfered with. The 
disease Is accompanied by a distress- 
ing cough, which usually disappears 
with the advent of warm weather and 
outdoor exercise. Little can be done 
In the way ef treatment Dry pens 
free from drafts, nourishing feed and 
as much exercise as possible are the 
principal points to be observed. Damp, 
cold pens are the most common cause 
of this trouble. 



MORE HOGS ARE NEEDED NOW 

E*ry Farmer Must Put Forth Beat 

Endeavor* to Produce More 

Perk Thla Season. 

If we expect to continue to provide 
meat to foreign peoples as well as out 
own people, every former must pot 
forth bis best effort to produce more 
hogs. Hogs can be kept profitably 
upon many farms where tbey are not 
found today. Farmers who already 
produce bogs can produce more, for 
there Is not much chance of producing 
meat this year In excess of the re- 
quirements. 

FEED LIVE STOCK LIBERALLY 

Parmer Should Make It a Rule hi 

Keep NO More Animate Thaa 

Ha Coo Food Wail. 

Make It a golden into to keep nd 
mort stock on the farm than yon hart 
enough feed to aappty liberally. aV 

a earriAce. , For there U no stJMnj 
ostMl to that watch onsets !■ 



13 



OiMfEtMMH 

M0KUMENTS, 

H Largt dtotft on Display 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

tia Main Strerwt, 

AURORA, IND. 



JAMES L. ADAMS 
DENTIST 

Cohen Bolldlni 

Pike Stress!, Covington, Ky . 



— — Bora Fhokh — 

DR. K. W. RYLE 

GRADUATE VETERINARIAN 



House, 

BURUNOTON, a KY. 
Prompt Attention to nil Calls. 



The) Famous O. I. C 
I now have for sale registered 
O. I. O. Pigs, Some of which are 8 
weeks old. Ihetr sire is the famous 
O. C. Callaway Jumbo, and his sire 
is Callaway Edd, the world's Orand 
C h am pio 1 1 Boar^ All stock register- 

' FRANK HAMtfONS 

R. I). Florence, Ky. 



D. E. Castleman, 
A TTORXE Y A TLA W, 

— Office over— 
Erl&nger Deposit Bank, 

Erlanger, - Kentucky. 



List Your SSlas With Me Early Ml 
The Season. 

LUTE BRADFORD 

Live Stock Auctioneer. 

Your Work Solicited. See me 
and get my terms. 
Phone Florence, Ky. R. D. 

Farmers oct-14 



IT'S A WISE IDEA. 

Do as Many Others are doing 
send your cream to the 

CLOVERLEAF CREAMERY 

i 

Burlington, Ky. 

I pay cash for cream and insure 
you a square deal. 

I RECEIVE EVERY 

FRIDAY 



J. O. HUEY, 



Manager. 



WATCH 
THE BIG 4 

Stomach- Kidney a-Hoart-JLiveg 

Keep the vital organs healthy by 
regularly taking the world's stand- 
ard remedy for kidney, liver, 
bladder and uric acid troubles— 

C0LDMEDAL 




The National Remedy of Holland for 
centuries end endorsed by Queen Wilbcs- 
mln«. At all druggists, three eizee. 
Leek for tite aen* Geld Medal oe> «rety tea. 



Attention hti Oners! 

I am prepared to do first-class 
repairing- on all makes or cars. 
Starter and generator work a 
specialty. All work guaranteed. 

Give me a trial. 

Earl M. Ay lor. 

HEBRON, KY. 
Phone Hebron 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 

Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by c>4dver- 
tising. 



eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 

♦ ♦ 

IMPORTANT NOTICE. 



Watch the date following 
your name on the margin 
of your paper and If It Is 
not correct please notify 
this office at osmw. If your 
paper has been discontinu- 
ed by mistake before your 
time expired de net delay 
aotifylng thla office. All er- 
rors ef* cheer fatfiy eorreet- 
ed hero. 



e 

e 
e 
e 
e 
e 
o 
o 
e 
e 
e 
e 
e 



» 



* 



I** 



IV 






aaeaefe site* «see ---- -■ - — ■— — v 

•v*ffffe*eff*fffffffsvefe| j_v 




ate 



♦» "l" 



OM tt M a 



/ 



ff> 



t 



*> 






before I 



,1 



like money, must be posaasted 
it can be saved. 



222^ 



ONTY RECORDED 



"Poland needs soap." Especially aft- 
er handling the BolBhevikl. 



Paderewskl's knowledge of harmony 
could be used In Poland Just now. 



The shoemakers don't care bow 
many people walk to save the car fare. 



At the present prices of oysters a 
pearl ought to ba furnished with each 
dozen. 

■ '■ 

The ragar profiteers have learned 
the sad truth that what goes up must 
come down. 



It Is repotted that the Great Lakes 
are ' lower, but the consumer refuses 
to believe It 



Automobile accidents are fast hap- 
pening, with the emphasis on the fast 
as the reason. 



Can you think of anything that Tur- 
key will have to be thankful for this 
Thanksgiving? 



With wars, earthquakes, eruptions 
and strikes, it Is no wonder Italy can't 
Set settled down. 



Father knows that the 15-cent pa- 
per suit for bis women folk is too 
good to be true. 



Maybe we can import a few Aus- 
trian archdukes and archduchesses to 
aid the servant problem. , 



The price of pork keeps up, but the 
consumer «*m*t think of a time when 
there were so many hogs. 



The married women's vote will go 
for anything' that promises a larger 
pay envelope for husbands. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

• FLICKERTOWN. 4 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦ 

Our school opened Monday 



New legislation affecting the 
work of the Department of Agri- 
culture la recommended by the 
Secretary of Agriculture Id his 
Miss Hazel Akin visited Lucetta ar.nual report to insure purity of 



Hensley, last week. 
Mrs. James Burns entertained 

her children at dinner Sunday. 
Ed. Baker, of Addyston, Ohio, 

visited Richard Hensley last week. 
J. H. 8nyder and family viajted 

Ed. Maxwell and family, Sunday. 
Arthur Alloway and family vis-: 

ited Geo. Shinkle and wife, Sun- 
John Snelling, of Petersburg, vis 

ited Wm. White and wife, last 

week. » • 

Mra. J. W. White and daughter, 

Alice, visited in Covington, last 

Jot Brent and wife and J. w 
White and family dined wjth C.J. 
Hnesley Sunday. n * 

Joe Brent wfle and son, of Cov- 
ington, vWted J. W. White and 
family, last Saturday 

Win. Ruth, of Lawrenceburg, In- 
diana, spent the Christmas holi- 
days with his cousin, Wilber Sny- 
der. Wilber has been confined to 
the house with rheumatism for 
two weeks. 



Ntw Lttftlition Needed. 



seeds, feeds, and fertiliser, to fa' 
ciiitate tthe marketing of lira 
stock, and to continue the road- 
building program. 

The importation into the Unit- 
ed State* of forage and like seeds 
is regulated by the seed importa- 
tion, act of August 24, 1912, but 
there is now no law to prevent 
the adulteration or misbranding of 
seeds shipped from one State to 
another. While it is not clear 
that Federal regulation of Inter- 
state commerce In seeds would be 
practicable, he said, it is clear 
that the enlargement of the de- 

fiartment's authority and funds for 
eating and other investigational 
work, accompanied by full public- 
ity, would produce valuable re- 
sults. It has been suggested in 
the estimates, therefore, that 
authority be given to determine 
the purity, viability, and trueness 
to variety of seeds obtained Id 
the open market and to publish 
the names of the persons respon 
sible for the shipment or sale 
of those which are found 



to be 
»»««+«+«eeeee«eeeeeeeeeeee adulterated and misbranded. 



A better use for wood alcohol could 
be suggested If It were possible to 
split It and use the wood. 



Recent Importations of Paris styles 
indicate that there Is still a serious 
shortage of cloth In Europe. 



It may be comforting to expect to 
get your coal at a lower price, but It 
Is a good deal safer to get it 



That spring poet who went to work 
In an onion patch should find material 
for many a tearful quatrain. 



Doubtless the acme of unpopulnrlty 
Is reached by the census taker in a 
town that has lost populntlon. 



The prophecy of a return to the In- 
fluenza, epidemic Is denied. Which is 
another blow to the pessimists. 



Because a woman is the champion 
hammer thrower in England Is no sign 
she Is the prize knocker as well. 



Smokers need not be hopeful over 
falling prices for leaf tobacco. For so 
long as cabbage Is up cigars will be 
high. 



Many a man who undertakes to ex- 
plain election Issues to his wife will 
find that she is better informed 
than he. 



Will there be a woman political 
"boss," or will lovely woman cense to 
be the clinging vine when she goes 
Into politics? 



• ♦ 

♦ IDLBWiLD ♦ 

• ' " *~ 

»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Mr; arid Mr*. Scott Chambers, of 
Walton, were the mid-week guests 
of Mrs. Mary Marshall Terriil. 

Eugene Randall has installed an 
electric light plant in his resi- 
dence ana is delighted with the 
result. ' 

A considerable amount of Boone 
county tobacco has been hauled 
to Aurora to be sold at the open- 
ing sale, January 5th. 

Miss Maud Norman Aebury, left 
Monday for Lexington to resume 
her work at the University after 
spending a pleasant two weeks- 
vacation at home. 

C. L. Craven and wife, William 
Wolfe and wife, of Erlanger, and 
Mrs. David Houston of Limaburg, 
were gueBtB Sunday of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ben S. Houston. 

We are enjoying a wonderful 
open wiater. The goose bone pre- 
diction holds good so far. Eight 
above zero has been our coldest, 
and that for one day only. 

Mr*. Chester Grant entertained 
informally Saturday in honor of 
Dr. Raymond Cropper and wife, 
who are here from Georgia for a 
visit with their kinspeople. 

Mrs. Ben H Berkshire enter- 
tained the afternoon card club 
New Year's Day at her beautiful 
home on the hills overlooking 
Petersbrug. The occasion was in 
honor of Mrs. Max T. Gridley, of 
Indianapolis, and Miss Maud As- 
bury, of Lexington. The decora- 
tions were in harmony with the 
season and a wonderful time was 
enjoyed by all present. 



» 



^fiVON. 



♦♦♦< 

* 



CON8TANCB 



We are having a mild winter. 

The holidays passed quietly at 
this place. 

Mr. Taylor and family have 
moved to Newport. 

Charles Garnett and wife are 
spending the winter with, their 
son, Fred Garnett and wife. 

Harvey Tanner and wife have 
become residents of Constance. 

Harry K laser ner spent Christmas 
with relative* in Indianapolis. 

Mrs. Flora Weir is the guest of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Riggs She is 
a native of Constance. 

Mrs. Henry K laser ner is out on 
the hill with her daughter, Mrs. 
Ben Michaels, who Is quite ill 



BEECH GROVE. 



ss 



—a 



r? 



Everything in Wood 



a 



I 



Now that hard coul Is to go up again, 
the consumer wiU have no difficulty In 
nnderstnding the cause of those de- 
layed deliveries. 



The essential lack of material in 
Poland is that there are not enough 
Poles to build a fence against the 
hordes of Russia. 



You don't know whether the wool 
has been pulled over your eyes tines 
the war because you dou't know 
whether It is wool. 



Family courts are recommended for 
the settlement of domestic disputes. 
They'd never get a Jury if It had to 
•ample the biscuits. 



The weather prophet who announces 
a long 'hard winter may assist the 
Russian Sovletists In getting back to 
productive occupation. 



BenJ. Bristow and J. T. Easton 
are having The Colt Lighting 
plant installed. 

Haymond Rogers wife and son, 
Delone, were guests of Mr. ana 
Mrs. Frank McCoy, Sunday. 

Miss Cassie Hamilton, of Sadle- 
ville, will be the week's guest of 
Mrs. Rogers and Mrs. McCoy. 

Dr. Mrs. Sympson and son Jas. 
and Mrs. John Roache, were the 
guests of Mrs. T. J. Hutsell, Sun- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C Hamilton re- 
turned Friday evening from Sa- 
dieville, where they spent part of 
the holidays with relatives. 

Raymond Rogers and Mrs Rog- 
ers entertained New Year day ior 
her mother and father, Mr. and 
Mrs. Hamilton before their leav- 
ing for Dayton. 

Mr. and Mr*. BenJ. Bristow an- 
nounce the marriage of the-lr 
daughter Elizabeth Jane, to Ml*. 
Howard ML Fagln, of Mingo, Ohio, 
December 24, 1920. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fagin left for their home in Min- 
go Monday evening with the beet 
wishes of a host of friends. Mr. 
Fagin is with the Geo. A. Fisher 
Construction Co., at that place. 



Buffalo Hards la United 

States Inaraaaa Rapidly. 

The American Bison Society re- 
ports that in Jan. 1920, there 
were 3,303 wild and tame buffalo 
in the United States. This en- 
couraging report sets at rest the 
very real fear that existed not 
longa go lest the native buffalo, 
which once roamed the western 
plains, would soon become ex- 
tinct. 

Of the nine Government-owned 
herds, two of the largest under 
the care of the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture are located in the 
Wichita national game reserve, 
Oklahoma, and on the national 
bison range at Dixon, Mont. The 
herd on the Wichita preserve now 
numbers 164, including 28 calves of 
this year. In this herd 4 bulla 
and 12 cows are 10 years of ageor 
over and one cow is 29 years old. 
The 15 animals that constituted 
the original Wichita herd came 
from the New York Zoological 
Park. 

In accordance with the provis- 
ions made by the 1919 appropria- 
tion bill for their care, it is plan- 
ned this year to dispose of somo 
of the surplus buffalo in the 
Government herds. Public parks 
and municipalities are the lar- 
gest patrons. By distributing the 
animals over the country, if dis- 
ease or misfortune overtakes the 
main herds there still will be 
stock left with which groups could 
be built up again. 

The buffalo in the U. S. have 
increased about 300 per cent In 
12 years. In 1908 there were 1 - 
116 wild and tame buffalo in this 
country; at the begin ning of JS'iO 
there wero 3.393. Canada has a 
larger number— 5,030. This is due 
to the fact that several years 
ago, when the Pablo herd in Mton- 



tana, belonging to Michel Pablo, a 
half-breed Indian, was for sale, 
the Canadian Government bought 
the animals, sufficient interest not 
being exhibited by Americans at 
that time to make it possible to 
retain them in this country. The 
total number of wild and tame 
buffalo on . the North American 
Continent at present is probably 
more than 9,000 head." 



>♦♦♦* 

• ♦ 

»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Mrs. Wood Stephens visited rel- 
atives here last week. 

Lawrence Pope and wife spent 
Sunday with their son, Clifford 
and wife. 

Hogan Ryle and family were the 
guest* lof Mr. and Mrs. Owen 
Presser Saturday. 

David and Ivan Clements were 
guestse of their cousin, Wilbur 
Ryle, Friday night. 

Mrs. Courtney Pope and children 
of Union, were guests of her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Hogan Ryle, last week. 

J. W. Ryle and family and Da via 
Williamson and wife, were guests 
of Don Williamson and wife, Tues- 
day. 

David Williamson and wife and 
M. M. Ryle and family, were the 
guests of Wm. Presser and wife, 
Wednesday. 

Miss Lutie Ryle returned home 
Sunday from - a visit to her cous- 
ins, the Misses Stephens, on Mid- 
dle creek. 

Mrs. M. M. Ryle entertained the 
following guests Friday: A. D. 
Williamson and wife, David Will- 
iamson and wife, and J. D. Mc- 
Neely and wife. 



Get Our Price* 

WOOD AND ASPHALT SHINGLES, 

PULP AND PLASTER WALL BOARD, 

ORNAMENTAL SLATE ROLL ROOFING-MIXED 

COLORS— DIAMOND SHAPE, 

LIGHT, MEDIUM and HEAVY ASPHALT ROLL ROOF 

ING, BARN SIDING, GARAGE DOORS, 

HEAVY TOBACCO RACKING. 

The A. M, Lewin Lumber Company, 

COVINGTON, KY, 



I 



Madison Ave. and 24th St. 



• Madi 



Phone South 465 




FLORENCE. 



1886 



1021 



Thirty-five Years 

Of successful banking is our record. Start the 

NEW YEAR 

by opening an account with 



us. 



Boone 60. Deposit Bank 

Established 1886. 

Burlington, Kentucky. 



N. E. RIDDELL, President. 
W. D. CROPPER, Cashier. 



W. A. GAINER, Vice President. 
a. S. KELLY, Ass't Cashier. 



Either speeding will have to be brok- 
en up or the next census Imperiled. 
It may be a hard alternative, but the 
situation must be faced. 



London newspaper that has $000,000 
in soviet gold Ju Its possession and 
doesn't know wftat to' do with the 
money, might start a fund for the 
Polish orphans. 



Germany Is selling off its famous 
paper suits to other countries. Scrap* 
of paper, which the suits soon will 
probably become, evidently are that 

nation's speclarrf- 



A returning army officer say* that 
American soldiers are popular on the 
Rhine. They »eetu to he popular 
everywhere that Jeulausy of them does 
toot enter Into the auesttoii. 



The real apprt»U*jiMk>H among the 
majority of the men voters over the 
situation It Hint tli* process of voting 
wM 0m Mtarssd wstttw the «•*•• sleo 
torate Is |K»wi)erlsg k* 



*<"«*• 



It may be r»aMrfc»4 vitv-Mt stretch- 
In* the vtdtum that iuat taw the nise- 
iuWWrfir^Wrm la lit ir* 
with •ttiMttaaal rumor*, whereat the 
taeniae work* «a att «*ig-ju with ths 



ee ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ee 

• ♦ 

• PT. PLEASANT. ♦ 

• « 

♦♦♦♦••>•♦*♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦« 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Tanner en 
tertained at dinner last Sunday. 

BenJ. Michaels and wife are en-. 
tertaining a little son, BenjaSnin 
Jr. 

Mrs. Sallie Souther entertained 
Christmas day with a turkey din- 
ner. 

We are sorry to hear of tho 
serious illness of Mrs.. B?n Mich- 
aels. 

Come to Sunday school. We will 
continue as long as the weather 
permits. 

The C. W. flf. Vt will meet at 
the home of Mrs. Rucker next 
Wednesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bryce Mahew. of 
Saylcr Park, visited her parents 
New Year's day. 

Miss Clementine Walton enter- 
tained at dinner in honor of Mrs. 
Flora Weir, last Sunday. 

Scott Walton is taking treat- 
ment for rancer st Dr. Weber's 
private hospital in Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Flora Weir, of Texas, has 
been visiting relatives and friends 
in our neighborhood during the 
holidays. 

Mr. and Mrs. Keene Souther and 
childrem spent NeV Year's day 
st Say 1st Parti visiting Mr. and 
Mrs, K Y. Hood 



Many Pests Imported. 

The bugs that do so much dam- 
age to tour crops in this coun- 
try are nearly all of the immi- 
grants from foreign lands. These 
uninvited guests, according to the 
estimate of the Department of Ag 
riculture, cost us $600,000,000 a year. 

Most of the pests in question 
have come from Europe, Out Asia 
has contributed some of the worst. 
The San . Jose scale, which is a 
threat to every fruit orchard, ar- 
rived from China nearly a half cen 
tury ago, and already it has cost 
us upward of $100,000,000. 

The Japanese beetle and the 
Oriental peach moth both came 
from Japan, and the total of dam 
age done by these two insects is 
enormous. The beetle attacks not 
only fruits, but also garden veget- 
ables. 

Europe has contributed the 
corn borer whose spread is now 
causing so much alarm; also the 
Hessian fly enemy of the wheat, 
the gypsy moth and many other 
pestiferous insects, not least de- 
srtuctive of which ..re various 
moths and beetles that attack 
grain, flour and other food pro- 
ducts in storage. 

From Mexico we have got the 
boll weevil, the pink boolworm 
and a little beetle called the 
"bean ladybird.'' which promises to 
inflict immense damage on cow- 
pea and bean crops in the South. 

If the American farmer waB 
obliged to contend only with na- 
tive insects he would have a com- 
paratively easy time, bint wich an 
unceasing fight to be kept up 
against Imported species, his prob 
lem is rendered immeasurably 
more difficult 



Mies Ruby Walton and Mr. Par. 
k«r Hullla, wine quietly 



*•_, «. . 1 



married 
at the bom* <>f Br<> Omar. It 
Ilubron, last Sktknrdar night. 
Miss UladM Jsrgert and Mitt 

day morning found thrm speed- 
ing bach to their studies 4t LuU 
low High 



MhWU 



The town council is doing all 
they can to expedite the estab- 
lishment of the WaKon light 
plant. Some complications have 
arisen which h*ve' delayed the pro 
}ect somewhat but It is hoped that 
these will be overcome in tho near 
future. It la the intention or 
council to have a plant inaiallcd 
that will give the best of servico 
and they don't intend to have 
anything "put over'' oil them if 
they can hrlp it \n expert on 
lighting *yt«tem* wilt in nil prob- 
ability have control o( the In- 
•twjliitioji and when we do ge«t 
hi plant, cdunc 1 intends that 
II be oi that character thai 
not only excellent service will bo 
rrruiwed bo* t reeftnable rite 
will be mads to tb» Oomnunera. ~ 
Walton Advertiser. 



The American Legion dance was 
well attended Friday night. 

Miss Anna Carlton is visiting 
relatives in Covington. 

James Michaels spent Saturday 
with his sister, Mrs. Elmer Cahill. 
John Swim and wife entertain- 
ed their children at dinner Xmas 
day. 

Mrs. Mallie Beemon entertain- 
ed with a sapper last Wednesday 
night. 

Melvin Jones and family spent 
Sunday with Mr. and— -Mesr- Cam 
Kennedy. 

Albert Lucas has moved to Flor- 
ence, so as to be near the school 
this winter. 

James Aheran, of Covington, was 
the guest of Hugh Carey and 

sister, Saturday. '• 

Henry Arnold is the guest of 
his mother and other relatives 
here this week. 

Mr. and Mra. Leonard Oibbs 
were surprised by their friends 
one night last week. 

Mrs. H. L. Tanner and daughter, 
Alene, are spending a few days 
with relatives in Newpo^. 

Edward Snyder and wife enter- 
tained a number of friends ana 
relatives at dinner, Sunday. 

John Swim and wife entertained 
Mrs. Anna Beemon and children, 
last Sunday. 

Q. F. Schram and wife enter- 
tained with a match party and 
lunch Friday night. 

Robt. Rouse and wife and Mrs. 
Emma Rtouse, have gone to the 
city for the winder. 

Alvin Eddins spent Xmas with 
with his parents. He has a posi- 
tion in Detroit. He likes it fine 
there. 

Mrs. John Beotler and Mra Liz- 
zie Geiger, of Erlanger, were the 
fuests of Lee Eddins and family, 
unday. 

Albert Lucas and wife enter- 
tained L. E. Thompson and wife, 
and Ed. Snyder and wife, last 
Sunday. 

Fred C. Schram and wife, of 
Ivory dale, were New Year* guests 
of their parents, G. F. Schram 
and wife. 

Dr. T. B. Castleman Lb moving 
to the Buckner property and C. 
W. Myers will move to the house 
he vacates. 

J. G. Rcnaker and wife spent 
Saturday with friends in Cincin- 
nati, and attended the show at 
Keith's theatre. 

G. T. Renaker and daughter, 
Chriatina, left Monday morning 
for a visit with his daughter, Mrs. 
Will Lee, of Middleboro. 

Misses Minnie and Carrie Bee- 
mon had as their guests Friday 
night and Saturday Misses Mollie 
Lummel and Ruth Jaspers, of Cin- 
cinnati. 

Mrs. Anna Beemon and children 
and Mr. and Mrs. Harry Dinn, 
were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robt. Bass, of Covington, one day 
last week. _ 

Acquaintance Limited. 

A new clerk In an Anderson depart- 
ment store was asked by a woman 
customer where she might find mosqui- 
to bar. The clerk, misunderstanding, 
answered : 

"I haven't been here long, sn I 
don't believe I know where yon will 
find alias Keta Barr." 

Then studying a moment, after see- 
ing the puzzled look of the customer. 
She begged pardon and said hurriedly 
that the mosquito bar wits In the 
basement. 



YOUR OPPORTUNITY 



To Buy a Bull Calf sired by first prize winner and 
Junior Champion Bull at Florence Frir; also yearling 
bull ready ibr service ; and some boars and sow pigs. 



S. B. RYLE 

Breeder of Pure Bred 

Jersey Cattle and Chesterwhite Hogs. 



GRANT, KY., R. D. 



atalln'l 
• a Tlgr 
4 It wW 



Rubber Import* Increase, 
A marked Increase In the amount 
of .-unlit rusher Imported Intu this 
country la aVKwfl h,v flifur*>» for tha 
flscul year ended Jena Dt>, ID'.ti. rom 
piled by the National City bank of 
Ntw York. iMirlng the year flOo.oouv 
omi pounds wer* Imparted, an 
aared with l.tZOMKOnu In 1019 Two- 
thirds of the imoont Imparted 
far ante Ursa. 



Ill 

Let's Stop "Kidding" Ourselves 

ITS ALWAYS BEST TO FACE 
THE FUTURE SQUARELY. 

We are doing: this and have greatly reduced 
prices on all 

Suits and Overcoats 

For Men, Young Men and Boys. 

Quality and service have build our business, and 
we will take care of your wants at a great sav- 
ing to you. 

We carry a complete line of Sweater Coats 
and Corduroy Coats and Pants. 




Seta VMs, 



605 Madison Avenue, 

Covington. Kentucky 



ARE YOU A READER OF THE RECORDER? 



For Sale- 

Three registered bull calves, 
one sired by a son and two by a 
grand-son of Hood Farm Torono, 
out of high producing dams. 

O. C. Hafer, 
4toj6 Hebron Ky. 

DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

Will ba at Burlington ovary Mdnday 
prepared to do all dental work— 
palulesa extraotlon, bridge and plats 
work a apse laity. 

All Week Qaaraataat 




READ YOUR 
COUNTY PAPER 

$150 The Year. 



FOR SALE 

I Hare for Sale 
2 International Truck*. 
2 490 Chieroleti. 
1 Ford Truck Chaaia, 20- 
model. 

CASH OR ON TIME. . 

L. C. CHAMBERS, 

Pateraburg. Kf. 



T--r y^Tyt-d 



BOONS COUNTY 



BOONE CO. RECORDER 



rUBLlBHRI) HVKBY THURSDAY 

•N. E. RIDDELL, Publisher. 



l£ntn«>d Bt the Postofflce in Burling 
. an., liy., as Second-class Mail 



Foreign Adverfifting Repre»entntive 
THE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 



QUNPOWDRR 

►♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Since our last issue another 
year, with its blessings and blun- 
ders, has passed into history, ami 
a new year— 1921, has entered up- 
on its cycle of time, and what it 
haa in stere for us no one knows. 
During the year 1920 many of 
the county's oldest citizen* have 
paeeed over the Groat Divide. Ad-, 
ded to this number, are a few 
who were born in the county, have 
died and by special request their 
earthly remains have been brought 
back and burried beneath, the soil 
they trod in boyhood or girlhooci. 
Almost every person has a certain 
sentiment about the old home 
where they first saw the light of 
day. They may roam the wide 
world over, make new friends, en- 
joy better environments and even 
riches, but when the time comes 
to lay the care's of this life aside. 
and the spirit is about to sepa- 
rate from a tired body, the mind 
reverts to the old homo. 

The good old year of 1920 was 
one in which we should have pros- 
pered as the good Lord certainly 
gave us much rr.orc than we de- 
served. We were permitted to 
dwell here in peace and hapr.in2S« 
or in strife and turmoil as was 
our portion. With bountiful crop3, 
showers and sunshine those who 
did not succeed belong to that 
class of indolent never-do-wells 
whose lives were usually spent 
basking in the sunshine of anoth- 
ers toils or in repeating a har-i 
luck story to their more indus- 
trious and deserving brothers. 

Those .who tried, worked and 
lived economically during the year 
1920 have certainly much to* be 
thankful for. For the bountiful 
blessings of the past year let tra 
thank the all-wise Creator whose 
mysteries are many, and -nay th=» 
new year, with its hopes and fears, 
bring to the people of this coun- 
ty health, happiness and 
parity. 



Alpha Black, of Okaanna, Ohio, 
is visiting friends here. 

Rev. Royer and family spent 
New Year's day with E. A. Blank- 
enbeker and family. 

Moses Rouse and family, of Lim- 
aburg, visited his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. W. Bouse, on Wednes- 
day of last week. 

Win. Woodward wife and son 
Robert, broke bread with R. E. 
Tanner and wife, Tuesday of last 
week. * 

The Christmas exercises at Hope 
ful waa enjoyed by a large and 
attentive audience. The program 
waa composed by Pastor Royer 
and was very beautifully render- 
ed by the Sunday school. 

Albert Rouse and Miss Luelia 
Tanner, daughter of Arthur Tan- 
ner and wife, were married at the 
Lutheran parsonage Xmas eve. 
They have a host of friends who 
wish them a long and happy life. 
The Rouse sale last week was 
attended by a large crowd, ann 
every thing sold for fairly good 
prices. Corn sold from •'82 to 91c 
per bushel, cows from $40 to $85, 
and other things in proportion. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Utz enter- 
tained quite a number at dinner 
Christmas day. The menu consist- 
ed of a turkey with all the nec- 
essary trimmings and all other 
delicacies of the season Music 
was. a feature of the afternoon 
and the day was spent very 
pleasantly by all present. 



A Weeks Nesw. 

- " ' ♦ 

A man in Baltimore who kissed a 
policeman waa given five days in the 
work house. He ought to have been 
put in a padded cell. 




Trade Where They AU Trade." 



% 



If at first you don't succeed, cut 
the price again. 



ft Eighty thousand fish were ship- 
ped from the State Hatchery at the 
Forks of the Elkhorn, near Frank- 
fort, to stock ponds and streams 
throughout the State during the past 
year. 



^Travelers to and from Germany 
tfiay only carry Bums of money to 
the value of 1,000 marks iu any one 
day, or 8,000 in a calendar month. 
Larger sums must be transmitted 
through banks. 



A bear was trapped near DuBois, 
Wyo., recenty, that weighed 1,000 
pounds. The front foot of the bear 
measured 8$ inches across. 



pros- 



Fewer, larger and better schools 
are needed in Kentucky and Conn 
ty Boards of Education created 
under the new school law in 
Kentucky are being urged t»y 
State Supt, Gen. Colvin to de- 
crease the number of schools anri 
apply funds to making those re- 
maining as highly efficient aspoo- 
sible. It has been a practice in 
the past, he asserts in a commun- 
ication to the boards, to multi- 
ply schools and divide the rev- 
enue, sometimes to secure votes 
and sometimes to please individ- 
uals in the district. In many of 
these districts, the superintendent 
says, the population does not 
Justify a school, calling to the 
attention of the officials the clause 
in the State law which saysthat 
"every school district in the State 
— Jnust contain not fewer than fifty 
white children of school age.»' 

The entire village of New Sa- 
lem, 111., will shortly be rebuilt 
ard will have exactly the same 
appearance as it did when Abra- 
ham Lincoln worked there as a 
grocery clerk, fell in love with 
Ann Rutledge and carried her post 
office mail in his hat. The log 
huts of Lincoln's day have al- 
ready been rebuilt, and as the 
foundations of the old houses 
have been found intact, the new 
huts stand on tjie same spots aw 
they did almost a century ago 
The store where the great martyr 
worked, the little mill on the 
river which he visited, and all oth- 
er similar structures will be com- 
pletely equipped and will have 
as far as possible, the atmosphere 
of 1831,'' when the village * 
opened as a State Park in the 
spring 

An editor is, a failure if he 
runs a sleepy paper, and a 
"smarty' if hte paper is spicy 
and up-to-date. He is a fool if 
he fails and a rascal if he suc- 
ceeds. He either writes it wrong 
or doeB not write it at all He 
charges too much for his paper 
and offers insult when he asks for 
hia money lie i. a good fellow 
to have around at weddings and 
funerals, but his paper is not 
what it ought .to be. Half his 
leaders could run a better news- 
1 -^safier than he, but they won't. 
uh|the average editor is wrong 
every way, and he needs fixing. 
— Vanceburg Sun. 



The practice of paying some one 
a commission to "run up"the price 
of tobacco on the loose leaf floor 
should not be permitted by the 
warehouse companies, and the far- 
mer must not stand for that prac- 
tice. K 

If tobacco can not be put on 
the loose leaf market so that there 
will be a genuine sale, without 
paying some one to "pin hook ! 
or otherwise make the crop bring 
its true value, then something is 
radically wrong with the loose 
leaf sale. This practice is wrong 
and if continued, the loose leaf 
warehouse will soon be a thing of 
the past. To be a success tobac- 
co must bring its value on the 
loose leaf floor without the far- 
mer having to pay some one a 
commission in order to gets the 
true worth of hfs crop 

Whitesburg, Ky. — Mike Dandy, 
electrician, Burdiue, this county. 
has; just been advised that the 
Industrial Steel Corporation, New 
York, has accepted his offer of 
$75,000 cash for his Invention, a 
sand box for motors. 



The married and unmarried wo- 
men in Columbia are distinguished 
by the way in which they we«r flow- 
ers in their hair, the senoras wear- 
ing them on the right side and the 
senoritas on the left. 
♦♦♦♦ 

Mrs. Cayley-Robinson, an Eng- 
lish woman, is the inventor of a 
semi-gas furnace which is claimed 
will reduce the expenditure on fuel 
one-sixth by consuming all the 
waste products, such as cinder, soot, 
smoke and ashes. 



Mr. Farmer ! 

Better get busy an that seed buying before the demand gets big 
and prices adtfflhee. CLOVER is the finest fertilizer known *nd the price 
is right on good new crop seed testing 9930 pure. You can afford to sow 
liberally this year-you can not afford not to so\? it because the ground needs 
it. We have all new seed of best variety, American grown, where it thrives 
best and is most hardy. 

Write us for Prices on 

Clover, Alsiki Sapling, Alfalfa Sweet (white or 
yellow), Blue Grass, Red Top, Timothy, Etc. 

Also get our prices on 

Flour, Sugar, Salt and Groceries 

of all kinds. IT WILL PAY YOU. 



** 




Valuable Shade Trees. 

The Japanese walnut offers pes 
sibilities for landowners who a>e 
seeking to plant nut trees for 
shade or other purposes, say spec- 
ialists of the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture. It is 
nearly as hardy as the black wal- 
nut and is by no means uncom- 
mon in Northern and East e rn 



The cows of Periguex, France, 
which serve not only as milk givers 
but as draft animals, are highly 
prized by their peasant owners, and 
nothiug that can add to the comfort 
of the valuable animals is neglected. 
To save their} from the annoyance 
of swarms of flies which infect that 
section of France they are furnished 
with quaint hand-crocheted veils 
which cover the entire head and 
hang down almost to the ground. 
The veils themselves are works of 
art with long, silky fringes of vary- 
ing hues, or borders of crocheted 
lace. In schools which are aided 
by the Junior Red Cross of America 
French children are taught to cro- 
chet, and so can make these useful 
veils. 



gk GROCERIES. FL OUR SEEDS. MED/C/NES. 
(3-2/ P/KE ST. AS 20W.7™ ST. 



WHOLESALE-"Covington's Large.! S«d and Grocery Home"- RETAIL 

Covington, Kentucky. 



County Clerk VV. It. Rogers and 
hi* deputy, Miss Lizzie, were kept 
busy during the hint week of 1920 
issuing automobile and dog u- 
censes. When the year clon "I 
last Friday evening, they had is- 
sued to Auto owners nearly 600 
licenses, and about 500 tags to 
dog owners, out of about 1300 list- 
ed by the tax commissioner 

L. D. McGl:weo;i and wife, of 
Taylorsport, entertained, lasf Sun 
day, Lieut. Arch McGlasson, his 
father, Geo. E. McGlasson ana 
Miss Olara Uts.. 

The man that does the volume 
of business if the man that can 

£'ve you your money's worth C. 
ott Chambers, Walton. Ky. 

_ ljm-lt 

Reports from 172 out of 3*^5 w ork 
ing chapters »f the America n Red 
Cross in Ohio, Indiana and Ken- 
tucky give a membership of pIohc 
to bOO.OOO in the Fourth Roll (all 

All of the local trucks lettear- 
fy Saturday morning loaded with 
tobscco for the Walten warehuun 



New Year's day being a legal 
holiday there was do mail denv • 
ered by the rural route carriers. 



States, where it is especially ap 
propriate for farm and door-yard 
planting. For the present, seed- 
ing trees will have to be relied 
upon almost entirely, as very few 
budded or grafted trees are avail- 
able. 

This nut has been confused with 
the Persian or so-called English 
walnut, although the two are 
quite unlike. The Japanese is a 
dwarfish species, with dull green 
rough leaflets, often as many .is 
15 or 17 to the leaf ,and bears 
ruts in racemes of a dozen or 
more. 

The shells are thinner than 
those of the black walnut, but 
thicker than those of the better 
Persian walnuts. The flavor of the 
kernels is much like that of the 
American butternut 



According to the census taken' on 
January 31, 1920, Austria, in its pres- 
ent territorial limits, has a popula- 
tion of 6,087,480. Compared with the 
corresponding figure for 1910, the 
census of 1930 shows a loss of 227,909, 
or 8.6 per cent The city of Vienna 
a ion e, with a p o pu lati o n of l,Hi2,006 



V 



Phones South 338 and 336. 

United States Wheat Director License' No. 030057-Y. 
U. S. Food Administration License No. G-1770. 




in 1920, shows a loss of 189,498, or 9.8 
per cent. 



According to a recent survey there 
are more than 28,000,000 women 
keeping homes in the United States 
without servants. 



General Scott, Whig standard 
bearer in 1852, was the first to disre- 
gard the tradition that a candidate 
for the presidency should not deliv- 
er speeches in his own behalf. 



For Sale 



FORD Runabout, small truck 
bed, demountable rims, in good 
runnig condition, extra rim. 

CONCRETE Mixer, with gas- 
oline engine, in first class con- 
dition, will do good work. 
FEED Grinder, will grind ear 
and grain, been used very little 
WATER Wagon, been used with 
concretemixer, in good repair. 
Will sell cheap, for cash* 
J . J. Kirkpatick, 
Burlington, Ky, 



FOR SALE. ETC 

NOTICE— Beginning October 1st, 
all FOR SALE items will be charg- 
ed for at the rate of ONE CENT 
for each word. NO ITEM INSERT- 
ED FOR LESS THAN 25 CENTS 



10 ton fine balei hay, mixed. 9. 
H. Rouse, Burlington. 2t-pd 

Wanted Tobacco Strippers— WiM 
pay 15 per cent of selling price, 
must be good graders. This is 
fine tobacco. Located three miles 
from Burlington on Burlington 
and Petersburg pike. Geo. Denn- 
Iep, R. D. l, Burlington, Ky. 



For Sale or Trade— Coming four 
year old colt— prefer trading for 
a larger mare. Bluford Brady, R. 
D 1, Petersburg, Ky. pd. 

For Sale— Four ton good mixed 
hay, 250 bushel good corn, three 
ton good sheaf oats. W. L. Kirk- 
patrick, Burlington, Ky. 



Wanted— Good farm hand. Ap- 
ply to Everett Cason, Burlington 
R D. 1. 



For Sale— Two year old red poll 
Bull. Ag ood -one. Ira Aylor, Un- 
ion, Kv. 



Hot h lite and nnt are credited with 
wisdom, bui do such praise can be be- 
stowed on u By when In the same room 
with n niitn tinned with n fly-swatter. 
It cant let him alone. 



days far Ms pee* «f detr 
r.hadelski. Navy Ysrda 



st 



A cynic Is a person who puts the 
swmtteei of life on Ice to keep It from 
SOU r l lH , 



For Saie. 

" room bouse and one-half eor« lot 
In McViIIm. .,ii thn ohio river. The 
t'uiltUhKH email In good rfpelr. Will 
Ibosuld t>y ll«ll«view Lodge No. see. 
'£or perticulsrH apply to J. D. Me- 
f"»ly. W. it Msrchell, J. ft Willi- 
sVnaun. HuriltiKton, K fat* 

* lturel lUuto H. 



More copper is being consumed by 
manufacturers of machines for wash 
ihg clothes and dishes than in any 
other industry. Great quantities of 
metal also are being used for milk- 
ing machines. The scarcity of farm 
aud household help has boomed the 
manufacture of labor-saving ma- 
chinery and apparatus. 



"Our timber is being used up four 
times as fast as the new supply can 
be grown. Three-flfths of the na- 
tion's original timber Cm* been de- 
stroyed." Hence, the* present high 
price of wood for fuel or as pulp for 
paper making, also the high price of 
lumber of all kinds. Probably it is 
true also that profiteering has some- 
thing to do with the high prices. ' A 
wise policy by nation and state 
toward forestry is gradually needed. 
Protection against fire is a first es- 
sential. 



Supply short, demand great, prices 
rather firm. Such is the fertilizer 
situation today. One eause of it Is 
Uncle Ham's failure to run his $70,- 
000,000 air-nitrate plant since lbe ar- 
mistice. Had this been done, ni- 
trate might now be selling at half 
today's prices. Why longer pay to 
Chile a tax of f 11.18 ou nitrate from 
that country? Will Congress stand 
for it? Germany just now is putting 
her air-nitrate klants into an enor- 
mous trust, $250,000,000 capital to 
maintain her nitrate aud dye su- 
premacy, hoping that the world will 
become dependent upon her dyes, 
nitrate and potash. Italy aud France 
follow suit. United States lags be- 
hind. 



A Kentucky man who shot his 
daughter was acquitted because he 
was trying to shoot his wife. Such 
tolerance of honest mistakes Is In- 
deed admirable. 



Uolphs Sebree hss purchased of 
Mrs. Josle Riley her farm Hear 
Waterloo, end will move there 
the corekif eprlng 



Canning Plant for Sale 

' The Farmers Canning Plant at 
Grant, Ky.. will be sold on the 
grounds of the Company at 1 o'clock 
p. fn., on. 

Saturday, Feb. 12, 1921 

at public sale to the highest bidder. 
The plant consists of an engine, 
boiler, shafting, cookers, piping, 2- 
100 gallon copper kettles, platform 
scales, building and one-fourth acres 
of ground. 

The plant, grounds, building, ma- 
chinery will be sold as a whole. 

Terms— One-half cash, remainder 
on time with good security. 
AL RODOERS, 
J NO. SMITH, Com. 

W. Bv ROGERS, 

ATTENTION TEACHERS. 

We. have the following copies of 
books on hand for sale, will parcel 
post same to you on receipt of order 
by letter or phone. 

Copy English Literature. 

Copy of Great Cities of U. S. 

Copy of Graded Classics 6th Read- 
ers. 

2 Copies Winston's 2nd Readers. 

7 Copies Studies In English Book I 

8 Copies World Geography Book I. 
8 Copies Mastery of Words. 

5 Copies of Copy Book No. 2. 
19 Copies of Copy Book No. 6. 
2 Copies of Copy Book No. 3. 

2 Copies of Copy Hook No. 4. 

8 Copies of Copy Book Beginners. 

8 Copies of European Histories, 
Webster's III. 

3 Copies Biology , x Plant, Animal, 
and Human. 

10 Copies of Written and Spoken 
English. "^ 

2 Copies American History. 

9 Copies of Good Health. \ 

R. H. CARTER, \ 
Petersburg, Ky. 



START THE NEW YEAR 

—BY TRADING WITH— 

D. R. BLYTHE 

Where !r\>u Will Find the Beat Quality of 

MERCHANDISE 

AT LOW PRICES 
CALL AND^^^NVlNCED" 



Special. 

Prices on all Overalls and Shoes cut 

10 Per Cent. / 

D. R. BLYTHE, :-: Burlington, Ky. 



«* 



IK 

Are You Shipping Cream Direct? 
If so, are you shipping to us ? 



ir 



-KWS \S 



FLOl.T 



TAK1 YOUR COUNTY PAP»R 



Our Price this 
week is 



And we pay the 
Transportation 

Each Can of Cream, whether large or small, U given the 
moat careful attention -.„. 



The Can is Thoroughly Cleaned, Sterilized and 
Returned Immediately 

Eacfc Cm W Careful and Properly Weighed sad Teeted, and 
within 24 hour* the Check is mailed. 

We protect you against lose of Cans or Cream in trans- 
it. Make the BEATRICE your permanent home. 

THE BEATRICE CREAMERY CO. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



4 
<¥ 



m 



FOR SALE 

Kentucky Country Home 

On Dixie Highway, just 9 miles from Fountain Square. 
12 acres of fine level land, with 12-room brick house, 
surrounded by beautiful trees. An ideal country home. 
Inquire of J. W. Russell Bradford, Florence, Ky., or 
CLENEAY A NOURSE, Realtors 
odec9 152 Bast Fourth St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 



♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦e eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 

DO YOU TAKE THE RECORpER? 

If Not Try It One year. 

»ssoeesee e ee s ss » »ee< 





\ / 



BOONS COUNTY K1CORDIK 



a 



■i / i»i 



I * ' ' KM * .'HM. 



A Troubled Conscience 



!► 



ma iwii ww a carcuHER or reaPwaM 



9rV 




oAbout One-Eleven 



i> 




•• 



l* 1 .C/> 

cigarettes I^Y 



JUST an inside word about One- 
Eleven. The American To- 
bacco Company has served the 
public with fine tobaccos for 
man y years. It commands the 
experience and skill to prepare 
and know good cigarettes. 

The American Tobacco Com- 
pany would not give the address 
of its home office as the name of 
a new cigarette if it did not believe 
that the blend would please you. 



cr 



Finally^ 



try them 




—which meant th«t it you dont 
lik« V1X1 M Cipareucs. you closet 




THE NEW YEAR. 

The new year greets us as have 
all the consecrated years of time. 
It now matters little what the olu 
year meant to you. It is gone, 
gone into that infinite abyss of 
the past Which holds the joys, 
sufferings and struggles) of human 
ity from its cradling to the pres- 
ent. If the dead year held pleas- 
ant' memories, so much for that, 
Theyn ow are but memories. What 
now i» important is in what spirit 
do we face thea ew year? The 
ftSture eternally is rich with hopes 
and inspiration. The past is use- 
less save as it may point us 46 
the avoidance of error. 

With common interests and a 
common destiny we are to go for- 
ward with courageous purpose, or 
drop from the ranks of men and 
things and become one with the 
dead year*. 

Sense, experience, duty should 
inspire us to faith, effort ana 
service. Faith, effort and service 
In our life relations only can make 
for that happiness which truly is 
worth while. Faith, effort and ser 
vice only can make for success in 
business. 

We are a business nation. We 
Just have weathered a mighty 
storm. The waves have not whol- 
ly subsided, but they are respond 
ing to that breathing spirit which j| 
still gently commands: "Peace, bei 
still !' T 

National and international read- 
justments will be accomplished. 
The new year should be rich in i 
noble achievement. It should dis- 
cover the limitation of human | 
conflist, make progress towara ] 
the banishment of poverty, invite] 
warring capital and labor to for- 
get their feuds jn the develop- 
ment of a practical partnership 
which should, and would, insure 
peace and prosperity for both. It 
should find us returning to the 
fundamentals of sound govern- 
ment, setting aside invasions of 
personal liberty, exalting spiritual 
freedom. 

.The old year is gone forever, 
gone with its tears and smiles, its 
triumphs and defeats. May the 
new year be a happy and pros- 
perous year for all 1-rEnquirer. 



g-ym^w?- i,iuiiiPsmii 



*7?8xvr t 



HEBRON 






LOGAN FOSTER. 



B. B. ALLPHIN. 
/ 



Foster & Allphin 

Real Estate and Auction Sales Co. 



I am associated with the above firm and srlioit your busi- 
ness. List your farms with us. Give us youj saleH of Live 
Stock and other Personal property. 

We do the advertising, auction your sale, clerk and col- 
lect. All you have to do 1b give us property list. 



t 



FOSTER & ALLPHIN 

^$» Covington, K*. Walton, Ky. Phone 37 Con. 

^ B. B. ALLPHIN, Local Agent, Walton, Ky. W 

m 1 

Sic Cbank Our 

many 

friends and patrons 

for tbeir 

Liberal patronage 

tbe paet year 

(ftisbing alt 

H T)appy and prosperous 

j Gulley&pettit 

Tike Wur County PaDer, $1.60. 

Bc«4 Otsf Advertisements ond Profit ft v Them. 



Hugh Smith, of Price Hill, was, 

visiting relatives here last week. 

We wish the RECORDER and i*s 

many readers a most prosperous 

New Year. 

MUs Eldora Aylor was the guest 
of Mrs. Amanda Lodge and daugh 
ter, during the holidays. 

Thomas Hafer and wi.'e enter- 
tained all their children and their 
families, last Sunday at dinner. 

Frank Hossman and wife, Jr., 
were Sunday guests of Listen 
Hempflmg and family, of Taylors- 
port. 

Miss Grace Newman, of Carroll- 
ton, spent the holidays with her 
grandparents, VV. R. Clayton and 
wife. 

Aylor & Rcitman opened a new 
garage here last Monday morn- 
ing, and -will give day and night 
service. 

Jacob Crigler went to Brlanger 
Sunday afternoon to see his sister, 
Mis. Emma Tanner, who is ser- 
iously sick. 

Mr. f Parker Hollis and Miss Ruby 
Walton Were united in marriage 
last Saturday evening by Rev. C. 
Omer at Hebron. 

Culhim Garnett and family, had 
as guests Will Fleek and family, 
of Lawrenceburg Ferry, Saturday 
afternoon and night. 

Leon Aylor and family entertain 
ed at dinner Suaday W. R. Gar- 
nett and wife, A. J. Ogden ana 
family, Marce Rouse and family, 
J. H. Mann In and wife, Harry Reit- 
man, Hazel Walton, Roy and My- 
ron Garnett. 

Edgar Garnett and sister, Miss 
Edna, Mies Nannie Lodge and Ed- 
ward Baker and family, motored 
to Ludlow New Year's eve to at- 
tend a party and 12 o'clock sup- 
per given at the home of Leslie 
Baker and family. 

The annual election was held at 
the Lutheran church New Year's 
day and the following officers 
were elected for the coming year: 
Elder— W. . L. Crigler " and Prank 
McGlasson was elected for one 
year to fill the vacancy of his 
brother, R. C. McGlasson, Deacons 
—Prank Hossman, Sr , and Edgar 
Graves; Trustee — Webb McGlasson 
Choister— O. C. Hafer; Asst. Chois- 
ter— Mrs. O. C. Hafer; S. S, Supt.— 
Wm. Clayton; Asst. Supt.— Frank 
Hossman, Jr.; Secty— Bessie Aylor, 
Treasurer— Edwin Crigler. 

The Hebron Lutheran church 
hekl its annual Christmas enter- 
tainment on Saturday afternoon, 
Dec. 24. Albert Gedker, Supt., had 
charge of the program which con- 
sisted of a beautiful selection of 



Public Sale 

— ~ — ■ — ■ *. — . — , . , . 

Having decided to quit farming and go into the mercan- 
tile business, I will offer for sale at Public Auction 
at the farm of R. W. Allen, two miles north of 

Landing, Kentucky 

Wednesday, Jan. 12, 



i 



i 



The Fallowing Described Property: 



Milk Cows 

Jersey Cow 9 years old fresh in spring 
Jersey Cow 6 years old fresh in October 
Jersey Cow 4 years old fresh in spri ng 
Gurnnsey Cow 4 years old fresh in spring 
Shorthorn Cow 4 year* old fresh in spring 
Shorthorn Cow 7 years old fresh in Oct. 
Three yearling Calves 
Shorthorn Heifer 3 years old ^ 
Holstein Heifer 2-yrs-o fresh in spring 
Shorthorn Heifer 2 years old 

Sheep 

Eighteen head of good Stock Ewes 
One l>year old Buck 



Horses and Mules 

Bay Horse 7 yrs-old, weigh 1400 lbs 
Black Mare 12 years old, weigh 1200 



Brood Mare 10 years old 

Bay Filly 2 years old 

Brown Filly 1 year old 

Weanling Colt 

Team large bay Mules, 6-7 years old 

Jacks 

Jack 12 years old 
Black Jack 6 years old 
Jack 4 years old 



Farming Implements, Etc. 

Deering Mowing Machine, Hayrake, 2-h. Com Planter, 1-h. Corn Planter, Steel 
Land Roller, Disc Harrow, 62 -Section Harrow, John Deere Walking Cultivator, 
2-left handed Oliver Chilled Plows, 2 Joiners for Oliver Chilled Plow, 5-shovel 
Cultivator, Single Shovel Plow, Double and Singletrees, Cross-cut Saw, one-man 
Saw, 2-h. Sled, Old Hickory Road Wagon, Spring Wagon, Haybed, Cow Chains 
Garden Hoes, Iowa Cream Separator, 2 5-gal. Cream Cans, set tug work Har- 
Collars, Briddles, Saddles and Check Lines, 2 sets Buggy Harness, set Double 
Carriage Harness, 2-h. Carriage, Tobacco Canvas, Mowing Scythe, etc. 



Terms of Sale— All sums of $10.00 and under, cash ; all sums over $10 a cred- 
it of 6 months without interest will be given, purchaser to execute note with ap- 
proved security before removing property. A discount of 3 per cent, will be giv- 
en for-cash. Notes payable at the Equitable Bank & Trust Co., Walton, Ky. 

Lunch Served by Ladies of Big Bone Baptis t Church 

R. M. MOORE. 

Lute Bradford, Auctioneer. , Sale to begin at 9:30 a. m. 



songs and recitations composed by 
our pastor. Rev. Geo. A. Rover, 
also a iplay entitled "Playing urday's 



Shooting JAatch Scores. 

At the shooting match held on 
Christmas day scores were made 
out of a possible 26 as follows: 

L. C. Weaver, 21 

Albert Pettit, 16 

Earl Smith, 

Irven Rue 

Newton Sullivan 

Rex Berkshire 

Wend el Easton 
' Joe Berkshire 

Garnett Tolln 

George Porter 

Lester Gulley 

Lutie McMullen 

William Nixon 

Bert Berkshire 

Fonnie Easton 

Lewis Beemon 

Harold Conner 

Carl Cason 

James Smith 

Thomas Cason 

Julius Smith 

Ralph Cason 

Thomas Rice 

Hazel Popham 

.Geo. Blythe 



Kentucky News Gullins 



New Year's eve in Burlington 
was very quiet, even the oldcus- 
tum of ringing the bells, announc . 
ing the departure of the old and 
the arrival of the new year, was 
abandoned. This habit has been 
in vogue through generations, and 



13 
10 

5 
Hi 
18 
16 
18 

3 
12 

1 
II 
23 
22 

1 
18 

6 
21 
If) 

9 

ii. 



M. S. Beasley, the expert fisher- 
man of Cummins' Ferry, on Ken- 
tucky river, set a muskrat trap a 
few nights ago at the edge of the 
™ water and caught a four pound V , * u *""' l " ruu K 14 K* «»«"»•» *"« 
" bass. He should now set his trout- )»* wh .? n0 °° e k ° owa , LUte . *" 
19 i,„r.nH ho. miwhfr r*t(»h n mi, at- ' habits it had its adherents and its 
St^rrod.bufg'SJiw I -dvtarle.. Very few, if any,, of 

*" • /V. our citizens sat up unttil midnight 

The big ash tree near the Neal > »P eed * he S oin S of 1 , 92 ? 00 , or<0 
Bennett We. West Main Street, *t lco . m « th « ^i"? of . 192l -* n 
recently partially destroyed by ! oeca«on, upon which, in years 
fire, hasten the home of aquir- | * one ^ th » c £ ,zen , 9 »' : a * vill *£ 
rels for more than a quarter^ a : ° r ^ ommun J t l £, ou,d f &* th *-* *% 
century, it is said. Despite the 8.^ * n * ho * watcn-meeting* 
fact that the tree has been , bidding the old year adieu an* 
ablaze several , times, the squir- I !:"?. ! n ? 
rels retain their quarters and thus ' yy W ', 
far have remained undisturbed.— ! " nv • 

Richmond Register. „ „ ,, . . , i 

+++ Gov. Morrow, addressing a joint I 

The meanest individual over session of the Kentucky Judge* 

brought to the attention of The ! Association and the Ky. Com 



Santa Claus,"g iven by , some of 25: 
the Sunday school pupils under 
direction of Mrs Jessie Hossman. 
A large hCristmas tree added to 
the entertainment for the little 
folks, after which the regular 
Christmas treat was given. 



Following is 

shoot out of 



the score of Sat- 
possible 



The next Congress will be called 
upon to pass two tobacco bills 
that had fheir origin in the Bur- 
ley district. One is an amendment 
to the Canttrill tobacco census 
bill and the other a "pure tobacco 
bill," and the Secretary of Agri- 
culture will be asked to gjvo the 
Burley tobacco growers a\ con- 
ference regarding the recommend 
ation to Congress, to pass th 



Rex Berkshire 22 

Wendel Easton '< 

L. W. Gulley U 

N. Sullivan, Jr., « 

Earl Smith IS 

L. A. Conner W 

B. B. Hume 16 
Irven Rue 

Lewis Beemon 13 

W. D. Cropper 10 

H. Conner 19 

G. W. Tolin 1* 

L. C. Weaver 22 

Geo. Porter 1* 

D. R. Blythe " 

Omer Porter 11 
Berkshire and Weaver tied for 
high honors, both doing good 



a good welcome to the 
times have changed. 



— « 



News is the one who Ftqle a mito j wealth Attorneys' Association, . at 
box from the Wabash Restaurant | Lomsv'lle, one day last week, saitf 



which was placed there bv the i th f * *he illicit manufacture and 
Salvatton Army for the purpose " »* le of whisky in Kentucky is 
of collecting funds for the poor of ! m °re widespread than ever ba- 
the city during the Yuletido.- ! fore has _ reached a point, h» 
Middlesboro News. 
+++ 



said, where its suppression pre- 
sents one of the most serious 
Lonnie Quire, living at the mouth, problems confronting the State. 

State' Promising the most active prose- 
cution of liquor law violators, he 
asked the energetic co-operation 
of his auditors In suppressing the 
traffic, and said that one of its 
features was the 
eniperance among 



of Elktiorn, brought to the 

Journal office a pig foot with five 

developed toes. The pig which 

grew the five toes was a good 

sized porker and was well develop 

ed and was normal in every other rn°** alarming 

respect, and was one of a number i spread of intf 

of hogs raised by Mr. Quire and I youths of the State 

butchered during the past week.— I ■■ 

Frankfort State Jour.vil Mild weather in October 



and 

well into November lead to. hopes 

1921 ' of a mild winter Nature offer* 



bills, as well as other measures shooting, 
that will put the tobacco grow- 
er in a position to raise Burley at jj you 

a reasonable profit— a price in con cheap funeral I have'" it for you. 

forraity with the land* recently c . Scott Chambers, Walton, Ky. 4 

purchase d. ' l]an-4t 

NOTICE. Will the person who p.rke'l ftp 

All persons owing th« estato of tho pair of wire pliers at th«* t.»i- 

aura Clore, droeaswl, pleaim com* of Idlcwtld hill plea*** return 



Hurling- 



r 



forward and settle same at once, them to 
Also all persons having c|»im» ton, Ky 
agalntt said estats present them P m m 

to met at once for settlement Mr*. R J Akin, «»f th* Wool 

II M 1 I.OHK, Agn.t !p»r neighborhood, sold tfev tut 
Laura Clor* Fktatr V< y* ah* raised in i*n> fur *«M 



A movement to curtail the 
tobacco crop in Henry county was ! b a«»a 'or this hope. Beavers, squir 
launched at a meeting of 400[ rel » » nd other wild creatures ap» 
farmers at the court house. | parently are not preparing for * 

The plan adopted by vote of, severe winter. The gulf str-arn ap 
the meeting is for a county-\vid<> j P«ar* to be running closer to 
pledge that farmers shall grow 1 our Atlantic shore than usual. In- 
only five acres of tobacco for the! deed, weather bureau scientists ob- 
are looking for a real first 100 acres they own and two serve much th.»t is new and In- 

and one-half acres for each addl- tereating in the minor movement* 
tlonnl 100 acres The agreement I* °' the golf stream Warm weath- 
to be binding only in the eveut «r 
other burley producing counties 
take similar action. 

l'W'dgea will be printed and the 
i count v will bt« canvassed at once. 



I>r M W Glascock was fleeted 
president uf the Ho<\ry <»tui*ty i»- 

•otiitton 

No a<«i<>ii w*e taken toward af- 
filiating with the Rurlsy Tobacco 
*'•(-*' Association 



increase* 
prices are lower especially ii bit- 
uminous and fuel prospects bettOff 
for eonaumrr 



supplies in night have 
lees ar 



Jcs«e Kddins, of Locust OroV* 
neighborhood,' sold hi* erop of 
banco one day last week, to 
per Smith, of Bsllsvhsw, *t jBR 
pound 



buoNE COUNTY 8ECOHDHH 



A boss Is the oUier fellow's leader. 

I Is there nny reason why the farm- 
jft Bhoiili] not be a happy man? 

t 1 

The woman with n 15.000 word vo- 
cabulary often consumes it in a day. 

D'AnnunzIo might be given the Job 
Of making Newport part of America. 

To mnny the bumper apple crop is 
Interesting only as it promises more ci- 
der. 



• ♦ 

• UNION. * 



•Inns far the women have managed 
to keep ihe secret of how they intend 
to vote. 



A few more patches on the old sum- 
mer suit and it may shiver through the 
winter 1 



Potatoes are coming down to where 
one again speaks of a peck rather than 
a pound. 



TNT instead of tea and toast is 
the coal miners' idea of an afternoon 
blowout. 



Jazz music Is said to be dying out. It 
sounds as if It were being horribly 
murdered. 



Mustafa Keuial I'asha. whose name 
once sounded like a cigarette, is now 
a discarded butt. 



At nny rate the campaign cigar has 
always been a great help to the anti- 
nicotine movement 



Miss Elaine and Johnnye Dick- 
erson spent last week with Jose- 
phine Terrill, of Brian ger . 

Santa stopped at our little vil- 
lage and delivered a lew presents. 

Miss Marietta Riley is tho guest 
of her sister, Miss Irene Suertiley. 

A few of our young folks at- 
tended the Legion dance at Flor- 
ence, Friday eve. 

J. M Herndon and wife spent 
the week-end with Mrs. J. M. 
Herndon, of Owenton. 

School opened Tuesday after a 
pleasant Christmas vacation. 

R. Feldhaus and wife entertain- 
ed Rev. Oarber and Harry Riley, 
at dinner, Sunday. 

Miss Lucy Newman was the week 
end guest of Miss Addle and Tina 
Norman, of Covington. 

Claude Tanner and wife spent 
Saturday night and Sunday with 
J. T. firistow and wife. 

The Ladies Aid Society will meet 
at the home of Mrs. John Criswell 
all day Friday. All members are 
urged to be present as consider- 
able work is to be done. 

Rev. Garber has accepted a call 
to preach at Union and Florence. 

D. W. Newman and wife enter- 
tained with a delightful New- 
Year's dinner. 

E. J. Rouse aiiJ wife gave the 
young folks a dance last Tuesday 
eve. 



»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦•♦♦♦ 

» e 

• PRANCB^VILLB • 



Some people are singularly careless 
where and how they permit them- 
selves to be murdered. 




It is not in the power of mortals to 
command good weather, but like suc- 
cess, we have deserved it. 



Moscow is accusing the allies of 
propaganda, probably on the ground of 
Infringing their copyright 



Ina Ogden spent Xmas week 
with Leon Ayldr and family, near 
Hebron. 

Jake Sleek and family enter- 
tained several of their relatives, 
last Sunday. 

A. J. Ogden and family spent 
Sunday with Leon Aylor and 
family, of Hebron. 

B. J. Aylor and wife spent sev- 
eral days last week with relatives 
at Hamilton, Ohio. 

Mir. Lea Miller and Mr. Pierce 
spent New Year's day with John 
Cave, Jr., and family. 

R. L. Day and wife spent Sun- 
day with John Whitaker and wife, 
who are entertaining a little eon. 

Misses Sadie Rieman and Mary 
Eggleston ate Xmas dinner with 
Mrs. Nellie Markland and son, 
Graham, 

J. S. Eggleston and family had 
aa guests Sunday, Rev. Swindler, 
of Petersburg, Frank Bates and 
Arthur Eggleston. 

Will Keitmann and wife enter- 
tained a number of friends and 
relatives from Cincinnati, from 
Friday until Sunday. 

R. S. Wilson and family and 
Mrs. W. L. Brown and children, 
visited Jerry Estes and daughter, 
Catherine, last Wednesday. 

Misses Mary and Elnora Eggles- 
ton spent Saturdav night and Sun 
day with Misse* Louise and Eliza- 
beth Grim, of Taylorsport. 

Fred Reitmann wife and daugh- 
ter, spent last Monday night and 
Tuesday with her parents, S. C. 
Eggleston and family, of Woolper. 



THE 

KITCHEN 
CABINET , 

((E). 19J0, \V>e<*rn Ntwatoaper Union.) 

"- " "* ■■■■ii. . ■■■ 






True, the ancients got along very 
\well without sugar, but then it Is hard 



to be an ancient nowadays. 



The high cost of living may oppress 
the hearts of men, but the shopping 
districts are as lively as ever. 



The mighty has fallen. Zoebrugge 
Is now a show place which anybody 
can visit for so much a head. 



"Horse sense" was well enough in 
the old days, but what one needs now 
for safety is automobile sense. 



The price of brooms is coming down, 
but you have to raise more dust to 
get the maid to sweep the room. 



C. C. Sleet and family were in 
the city Friday, shopping. 

Our local merchants seemed to 
enjoy a good holiday trade. 

T.r We , are g,ad to report Mrs J 
W. Conley, who has been quite- 
ill is much improved. 

J. O. Griffith, who has been at 
Martinsville, Ind., for his health, 
has returned home much improv- 

Mrs J. C. Hughes and daugh- 
ter Miss Emily, left last Tuesday 
for Orlando, Florida, where thev 
will spend the winter. 

lli!Sf„n r * d Mr * Jno - S Taylor de- 
lightfully entertained with a 

S?„ 18t t! 8 d . il J. uer Thur «iay, Dec. 
30th. Ihe following guests were 
present: Mr. and Mrs . Jno C Bed- 

ri n « g . e M and <f au * hter . Mary Aman- 
da, Mr and Mrs. John Delahunty 

Mrs aD C W C S - S. n °, C ° n J ey : **••« 
£Lr» t. C. Sleet and daughter 

Rebecca; Mr. and Mrs. jf o' 

?nn m &n £ t 30 "' J - ° Jr-> Mr 

Tr JP 9 -,. 1 - J - Hut8eU and Mr 
J. t. Hughes. 

Out in the State. 



The wife who goes away for the The Democrats will not feel a. 
summer to be renovated runs the risk ; badly over the offices the 
of ha ving her h usband revamped. to lose as those— thous nds ^f 

== /te -t: u at haVe continued to be 

The election is not going to turn on :!,•„.., y Republicans all durihg 
the increased number of qualified vot- v„ ™j, Ison Administration— Owena 
ers, but on the way the voters vote. b ° r ° Monger. 



sent by airplane are likely to go up 
faster than | the ships are coming 
down. 



Why should Lenlne and Trotzky 
worry about "allied propaganda" If 
bolshevism is the wonderful success 
claimed for It? 



What a lot of emotions can be stirred g&S^^^JSftfiZ*** 
up in a man who hasn't gotten in his using it in making curare > aeain 
coal yet by the song of a wee cricket t — Elizabethtown Mirror 

The fire Insurance rates on letters K «T *• 5 /? I * M people would 

be satisfied to considerable degree 

»™!^ mn i igration experts could 

V h e » «* «» *fl U x of gentlemen 

with ? e S Ve J to Certain us 
™i. r a • handa or S an and da 
monk— Lexington Herald. 

+++ 

Young man old man, throw 

k-nSL- y ° U -1 J . hamraer a* stop 
knocking; it disturbs the rest of 
us Buy you a saw and saw wood 
aw hue > u is not so noisy, and is 
a darn sight more useful— we can 
lurn the wood.-Mayfield Times 
+++ 
R. M Fields of Concorn says that 
In spite of the nasty record made , uf mers and fruit growers will 
by the submarine, this style of boat ^th - *a °l* heir »™ittrees 
is still being constructed in various ' hog jiverthP llll'l ° T -« P ^ e ** 
parts of ^obe^ jh« ^^/TJLf-ViX 

[tried this for six winters and his 



Those who anticipate nn enforced 
reduction in restaurant prices will do 
well not to postpone their lunches In 
that expectation. 



_ T i: '""» '"» »«x winters and his 

T*ext to a newspaper, there Is prob- ! trees nave never been bothered 

'—Falmouth Outlook. 
*++ 
Lexington, Ky. - Horace Stausi- 
fer Cleveland, an end, waa chosen 

Once It was sugar that we couldn't | veSfty f2t 'SimS.? ^"th,"'!, 1 " 
get; now It is hard coal. Doesn't It Una] football banquet here ^ 

beat all how we are kept searching ; has played three years on the 



ably nothing the ordinary citizen 
thinks he could run with greater suc- 
cess than a public utility. 



all the time for a spoonful? 

Rent profiteering makes not only 
Bolshevists, but old bachelors and old 
maids of young folks who cannot af- 
ford to murry and set up homes. 



team and will graduate next'June, 
but has announced his intention of 
returning in the fal! to take up 
work as a post-graduate. 
+++ 
Washington has put a ban on 
Jamacia ginger. The Department 
of the Interior most have done 



Elmer Dye and Jas. BeaU are 
visiting at E. J. Aylor's. 

E. J. Aylor and wife entertain- 
ed quite a number of relatives 
Sunday. 

J. S. Eggleston and wife enter- 
tained Rev. B. F. Swindler and 
Frank Estes Sunday. 

Miss Amanda Koons spent sev- 
eral days last week with friends I 
near Rising Sun, Indiana 

Miss Jessie Gordon, of Hebron, 
spent Sunday with Misses Aman- 
da Koons and Sadie Rieman. 

Misses Mary and Florence Eg- 
leston entertained quite a num- 
er of the young folks New Year's 
eve. 

Mrs. Raymond Goodridge and 
little son are visiting her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Morehead, 
at Taylorsport. 

Mrs. Carl Hunzicker and little 
daughter of Cincinnati, were the 
guests of Will Reitmann and wife! 
several days last week. 

Raymond Baker, wife and little 
son Ronald Lee, of Cincinnati, 
spent the Christmas holidays wi:h 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. D 
Scothorn. 

Jerry Estes and daughter, Miss 
Katherine, had as guests Sunday, 
Mr. James Beall and granddaugh- 
ter, Gladys and Myrtle Wilson and 
Alice and Florence Eggleston. 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

• ♦ 

♦ MT. 2ION. + 

♦ e 
•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Dr. R. C. Stephens spent Sunday 
right and Monday- in Ludlow 

Elmer Glackcr and wife Sun- 
dayed with Ber Northcutt and 
family. 

EElmer Surface, wife ar d son, 
Surdayed with Ira Tanner and 
family. 

Elmer Glacker and wife enter- 
taired a number at dinner New 
Year's Day. 

J. D. Robiiaon and wife enter- 
taiied a number at dinner Sun- 
day, Jar. 2nd. 

Miss Maymie Robinson spent 
last Wednesday afternoon with 
Miss Sarah Glacken. 

Henry Holtzworth and wife are 
the proud parents of a little 
daughter— Kathryn Agnes. 

There will be church services at 
this place Saturday night Jan. 8th 
Everybody cordially invited to at- 
tend. 

Miss Isabella Stephens entertain- 
**i in honor of her brother, Dr 
Robert C. Stephens, who is homo 
from Spring City, Tenn., Thurs- 
day evening, Dec. 30, 1920. 

Miss Maymie Robinson enter- 
tained a number of her friends 
Saturday evening, Jan. 1st, 1921, 
in honor of her 20th birthday She 
received several nice presents and 
everyone had a delightful time 
All 1 eft at a late hour wishing 
her many more happy birthdays. 



We imi»t flght our way onward. We 
must be brave. There are obstacles 
to be met and we must meet and 
crush them.— "Darld Oopperfleld." 

HOW TO PREPARE RICE. 

The black man's recipe to dress rice 
runs : "Wash him well, much wash In 
cold water ; the 
rice flour make 
him stick. Water 
boll already fast 
Throw him In ; 
rice can't burn, 
water shake him 
too much. Boll 
quarter of an 
bear or HttJe mere; rub one rice In 
thumb and finger; If all rob sway, him 
quite done. Put rice In collander, hot 
water ran away; pour capful of cold 
water on him, put back rice In sauce- 
pan, keep him covered near the fire, 
then rice all ready. Eat him up!"— 
Gertrude Morrison. In American 
Cookery. 

Rice may be used as a substitute 
for vegetables, as a thickening for 
soup, an addition to bread sponge, a 
salad, a main dish, a dessert. These 
are hut n few of the many accomplish- 
ments of this dainty food. 

Wild rice is obtained in abundance 
In many of onr states and those who 
have been treated to this wholesome 
cereal like It very much. It Is very 
similar to the tame rice except It Is 
not polished, which leaves the food 
value (which In the tame rice is pol- 
ished away) that Is so Important In the 
growth and health of the young. 

Rice With Meat— Take two cnpfuls 
of boiled rice, one cupful of chopped 
fresh meat browned In a tablespoon- 
fnl of sweet fat; remove the meat add 
a small onion finely minced, a tea- 
spoonful of minced parsley or half of 
a small green pepper cooked In the 
same fat Place a layer of the cooked 
rice In a baking dish, cover with a lay- 
er of the meat season well, add some 
of the onion and pepper. Repeat un- 
til the rice and meat are used, cover 
with one cupful of tomato and bake 
slowly for an hour. ' 

Baked Rice and Codfish.— Take one 
and one-half cupfuls of well-washed 
rice, one cupful of water and four 
cnpfuls of milk. Add the water and 
the milk gradually to the rice while 
cooking and cook half an hour. Re 
move from the stove and add one cup- 
ful of rich milk, two well-beaten eggs 
and thrte cnpfuls of shredded codfish, 
pepper an„ salt to taste Bake In a 
moderate oven forty-five minutes 
Serve with drawn batter sauce. 



L. T. CtORE, President. HUBERT CONNER, Sso'ty. 

J. L. KITE, Agent. 

Breeders Mutual Fire and Lightning 

«^^JN8URANCE COMPANY^^ 

Of Boone County, Ky. 

Insures Live Stock against Loss by Fire or Lighfcniug. 
WRIT! US FOR RATIS. 



V 



ft 

S 
8 
S 

# 

14V 

(6 



Automobile tubes and tirer repaired by the latest 
process. Brinj me your old tires and I may be 
able to get several miles idore service for yon out 
of them. 

Auto Accessories kept in stock. 
ICJoodrldge, Portage and Cupplet Tires and Tubes on hand. 

GEOEGE POUTER, 

BURLINGTON, KY. 




Burlingti 



- ~~ " ~ — — — — • — ' — ^•»» »wy»^-^ ' «i'4r'#-#-#'#-j-j^ 
;♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦.♦ 

♦ 

♦ C. W. KERR, Proprietor 

| AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 

I GIVEN CAREFUL AND PROMPT ATTENTION. 

J ( Any size cylinder from jB} to 6 inches rebored. 

| SERVICES AT ALL HOUR8. 

| U. S. Tires Kept in Stock. <- Ford Accessories, 

Consolidated Phone Burlington 240. 

♦♦^^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦e "♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦«♦♦+»« 





asm 




(ffiX 1)20. Waatarn Newspaper Union.) 



When right you can afford to keep 
your temper; when wrong you can't 
afford to loae It.— Gordon Graham. 




Encouraged by reports of a bnmper that ^Pad^cX v?^* 1* 
engar crop Id prospect, the consumer i Fa ducah News-De mocrat, 

has formed a very distinct idea as to ' « j -. """" — 

whom he would like to see bumped. ; BM " TlUlt to Make 

\ Coal operators, retail dealers and ^Tttl Inventory. 

.mine workers bandy the buck bnfk I With o^^.u 
snd for* but the Public neeS *t v^uWS^S** ctJ'tE 
no doubt where It will ,and eventually. I United States Lpartment of 
— _ i Agriculture is urging that an an- 

il Herr Hohentollera should get ' , I' ro P'-rty list or inventory u- 
back to Berlin, as he is reported as m i y ever y f « r mer. It is the 
hoping, he will find the old town Is not « ,y m ^ aH - department specialists 
the same as when l,o win. mm,.™ „,.:'. V 1 *""^ farmers may know 



the same as when 
things. 



both his friends and his <n» -jiies will 
be with him In raising something 
other than what he has bet-n rulslnK 
for the last 15 years. 



r iS^7 ,l=B "-""»-"i* 

j worth, what progress they are 
"ig from year to year, ana 

in i - 



Pancho Villa has turned fanner and how their investment 



in 



farm 



Ths 8unday automoisi,. famnties 
■re fast beating the rscort oi n M - > im 
Cay sainmer drownings. Ami i n ,. re 
•re mors of the former, since tin > vl 
throughout the year. 

T 



Property is being distribute*!, 
l roperty lists, or Inventories ma<ir» 
in ace 0r ,| a wuh a 

ed m the Office of Farm Han- 
rtgement, V S Department of Ag- 
rieulture, are not difficult to make 
and are of great value to th-. 
farmer who 1* striving to better 

us condition, overcome oUtu 
t« mieeea*., and place In. l,u»irM«. 

"' "in uu u »4»c4irf loundatk/ii T. 
'inlt along year »f ter >r „„, 

kii«.»ln f whether to *W » u «^aa 



la ana hoar France succeeded. m , , P "f*!i ,,r W V**' ,< »*"»'«1 «mj«-«-. 
•r cauatrj In borrowbuj ItOU.OOU.Ow. inJEX^JZ wJih.ii''"?^.^ 
II if SB smash* atixsmataac* In tht •'• partment \. d t ° ,|'" 

" rm «"' • husiusaa basis 



♦ ' 7 

♦ WOOLPER HEIGHTS. ♦ 

♦ e 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦eeeeee^eeeeeeeee 

Henry Wingate and family vis- 
ited relatives in Petersburg Hun- 
day. 

Anna Mae Henry spent from 
Friday until Sunday with Zelma 
Betmon 

Raymond Henry aperot a few 
days the past week with Earl 
Mudman 

Elmer Goodridge and wifeapent 
a few davs the past week with 
Mrs. Goodridges parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Owen Beemon. 

A number of friends and rela- 
tives gathered at the home of 
Owen Beemon and wife, Saturday 
evening and enjoyed an oyster 
soup. 

Newton Sullivan, Sr., and wife, 
Mrs Sara Henaley and little daugh 
ter. Roberta, sod R J. Akin anil 
family, Sunday el with Kd Baston 
and wife. 

Henry Wingate and wife enter- 
tained with n music party last 
Thursday evening. Several rela- 
tives and friends were present, 
and all enjoyed the evening. 

Carl Alaje snd wife entertained 
with a dinner Sunday Those naae- 
eru war* Raymond Henry and sis- 
ter, Anns Mae, Zeima Beemon, Ms 
bet WttUaate and ff^rl Mudman. 

Cast Alee snd wife entertained 
some of their friends leaf Friday 
etgsft, sate*** was the shief l— 
lure of the evsttint At llO 'e Us h 
• aiee ittaeh was served, which 
van ee)oywd by all si m e t . 

* sessaw-« am, «e*" : ***aw>l 



SEASONABLE GOOD THINGS. 

A vegetable dish which Is well liked 
and may be prepared with either 
fresh or canned 
tomatoes Is — 

Scalloped To- 
mato and Green 
pepper. — Take 
abont half the 
balk of tomato 
in soft, fine 
bread crumbs 
For a cupful of crumbs, melt one- 
fourth of a cupful of batter, pat one 
or two tablespoonfals of butter in a 
saucepan, mix the rest of the butter 
through the bread crumbs To the 
butter In the saucepan, add a slice of 
thinly sliced onion and half a small 
green pepper shredded fine. Stir end 
cook antll softened, then mix through 
the crumbs. Arrange the tomatoes 
and prepared crumbs In alternate lay- 
ers In a baking dish, sprinkling ench 
layer of tomatoes with salt and pep- 
per. IIr.ve-the last layer of crumbs; 
bake twenty minutes. 

Russian Salad Dressing. — Mix to- 
gether one-fourth of a cupful of olive' 
oil, one teuspoonful of vinegar, one- 
fourth teaspoonful each df mustard 
and salt, one-half teaspoonful of pap- 
rika and one-fourth cupful of chill 
sauce; then gradually, using the egg 
beater, add one-half cupful of mayon- 
naise dressing. 

Pot-Roaated Pork Chops.— Choose 
chops with only a medium amount of 
fat and somewhat thicker than usual. 
After browning the chops on each side 
in a frying pan, add an anion cut fine 
and pepper and salt Cover with wa- 
ter and let simmer on the hack of the 
store for an hour and a half. Add a 
tittle flour to thicken the gravy, and 
serve. The flour If added while the 
chops are browning, will be of better 
flavor. 

Pecan Sausage*. — Mix together 
three-fourths of a cupful of hot cooked 
cream of wheat, one-fourth of a cop* 
fnl of finely crushed pecan meats, half 
a teaspoonful each of powdered thyme 
and sage ; mix all thoroughly, then add 
one egg beaten light and form lute 
shape to resemble link sausages 
Place In a pan well greased, and bake 
twenty minutes. Serve with bananas 
rut la halves snd then In quarters 
creaswlae. rolled In flour sad fried on 
both sides la hot fat. flervs with a 
cupful of tomato or cream sauce. 

fUleU-t /Hd^Matl 

■••a^aaataw 



WV 

3 
m 
m 

I 

tit 

\iV 



ITS a wise idea to place your order for a car now, yj 
so you won't be disappointed in the spring* yb 

s 

3 
5 
3 
1 
3 
5 
5 
5 



Phaeton Hudson $2538.00. Seven Pasaenger Hudson $2838.00 

Coupe Hudson - - $3445. Sedan Hudson ... $3574 
Essex Touring $1698. 

Essex Roadster $1698. 

Dodge Touring $1390. 

Dodge Coupe $2038. 

Dodge Sedan $2298. 

Cleveland Tractor $1395. 

The above price* are delivered at your door. 

If you want to place an order for any of these cars, J{j 

call * 



Call y^ 

BrB, HUME, BurHnffton^Ey. ~Hr 




No Interuption to Service 

Not withstanding Road Blockade at 
Florence, I cau still 

I Answer Promptly all Calls 

To any Part oi Boone County 
either day or night 

PHILIP TALIAFERRO, 

ERLANGER, KY. 



Best duality— Fair Prices 

Oar constantly increasing business 
proves conclusively that "Best Quality 
at Fair Prices" will win. We test each 
carefully by the latest and most accu- 
rate methods and grind lenses to ex- 
actly suit you. 

Phone South 1746 

DR. N. F. PENN,6i3 Madison Ave. - Covington. Ky 




m 



Why Worry? 



We know the price of Tires has gone sky high. But why wor- 
' ry? Ton can have your old Tires half soled and they will be bet. 
tar than new onea because they are guaroteed puncture proof for 
1 8,600 miles and they only cost one-half as much. 
This Hie bargain can only be hatl at 

The Conry Rubber Co. 

34 Pike Street, -:- Covington, Ky 



.^Va. ■■' 



— — — 



. ^♦♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ee e eese+e+ee ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦. 
♦eeeseaeeeeeeeeeeeee-eeeeae ♦♦♦eeeeeee e eeeeeeeeeeeeeee 

Subscribe for the Recorder. 

Try It One ¥e*r - Yotfll Like Ifc 

Only $1.50 the Tear 

'sail to Re***«* AH The Ada In This, latam*.-**!. 

>ew*#4>ee4 



»A4M» tW# /wMW 




* 



m 4 






•-I 



*$ 




m 



BOONE COUNTY R ECORDER. 



• 



Vol. XXXXVI 



Established 1875 



r f> 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY .JANUARY 20, 1921 



$1.50 Per Year 



No 16 



Am«I i|appei*m 9 s. STATE COLLEGE READY 






» 



Last .week the Recorder called 
the attention oi the tobacco grow- 
er to the practice of paying tome 
one $1.00 per hundred to "ginger' 
hie sales on the loose leai ikxjr. 
One of the oldest tobacco men 
La this part of the State after I tail* arranged 
Hading the article said that this 

Bctice was injuring the loose 
'. sale, and he characterized the 
practice as "like taking candy 
from a baby,'* and that the far- 
mer should not stand for that 
practice. Even directors and man- 
agers of loose leaf warehouses, he 
said, had been guilty of that 
practice, when it is the duty of 
these officers to see that the far- 
mer* tobacco brings every dol- 
lar it is worth. Some warehouses 
countenance the practice, and will 
pay the $1.00 out of the farmer's 
sale. Instead of helping the far- 
mer the warehouse is helping the 
"ginger'' leach to gouge the to- 
bacco raiser. 



For Farm Convention to Be HtliS 
et LexinQton, Feb. 1-4. 



patronize any warehouse 
countenance such conditions. 



thai 



The average price of tobacco 
ou the loose leai nours oi toe 
district has been arounu $8.00 per 
Juu.dred pounds, notwithstanding 
the reported averages oi *io.uu to 
124.00. The warehouses havo done 
everything in their power to 
spring the prices, but the buy- 
ers have a certain limit on too 
different grades and can not go 
beyond that limit. Do not look 
upon the buyers and warehouse- 
men as enemies to your interests 
as was done at Carlisle and Mjaya- 
ville. The buyers would racner 
have instructions to pay $50 per 
hundred than aio.oo, but the price 
is set on Wall St. months in ad- 
vance of the opening of the 
market, and they are the birds' 
who are to blame for the ruinous 
prices. The American Tobacco 
Trust buys and manufactures 85 
per cent of all the tobacco and . 
is in a position to pay a living 
j price for tobacco, as they con- 
trol both ends of the string.— Pal- 
mouth Outlook. 



Why The Editor Left Town 

Somebody sent the editor of 
the Polktown Gazette a tew bot- 
tles of home brew. The same day 
he received for publication a wed- 
ding announcement and a notice 
of an auction sale. Here ais the 
results: "Wm. Smith and Kins 
Lucy Anderson were disposed of 
at public suction at my farm one 
mile east of a beautiful cluster 
of roses on her breast and two 
white calves, before a background 
of farm implements too numerous 
to mention in the presence of 
about seventy guests, including 
two milch cows, six mules and one 
bob sled. Rev. Jackson tied the 
nuptial knot with 200 feet of hay 
rope and the bridal couple left 
on one good John Deere gang 
plow for an extended trip with 
terms to suit purchasers. They 
will be at home to their friends 



With the final program com- 

Sleted and all the necessary de- 
lila arranged everything is in 
readiness for the conclave of 2,- 
000 farmers and their wives who 
are expected to Journey to Lex- 
ington for the Ninth Annual Farm 
and Home Convention which will 
be held at the College of Agri- 
culture, University of Kentucky, 
Feb. 1-4, according to an an- 
nouncement made today by N. R. 
Elliott, leader of specialists at the 
coHege. 

Special care has beer, taken in 
the arrangement of the 1921 pro- 
gram and those in charge of it 

are responsible for the statement • with one good baby buggy and a 
that it is superior to any that I few kitchen utensils after ten 
has been outlined for a similar I months from date of sale to re- 



meeting of farm men and women 
in Kentucky. More than 20 out 



-The tobacco grower- should -not--®* state s p e aker s together with 



Dudley Blythe has moved his 
general store to the southeast 
corner of Washington and Jeffer- 
son streets, and is now occupying 
the building in which ihe late 
Dudley Rouse sold goods ior half 
a^ century or more. The Boone Co. 
Farmers' Bureau is occupying the 
store room vacated by Mr. Blythe. 
It has been many years since the 
rooms Mr. Blythe vacated were 
not occupied by a general stoie, 
the late N. E. Hawea having hau 
a store 'there for something TTkU 
seventy years. 

The time has come to ceaso 
all economic strikeB that tend to 
check the normal flow of trade. 
Now is the time for conservative 
optimism. The closing months of 
last year were markod by a con- 
sumers' strike against retail pri- 
ces, by a retailers' strike against 
wholesale prices, by a. wholesalers' 
strike against manufacturers' pri- 
ces and by a manufacturers' 
strike against the prices demand- 
ed by the producers of raw ma- 
tt-rials. 



the entire staff of the agticultur 
al college will take part in giv- 
ing the convention men and wo- 
men lectures and demonstrations 
on practically every phase of ag- 
riculture and home life. 

Special care will oe given to 
the women who attend, a special 
, program having been arranged for 
; I them. In addition to this feature 
there will be a four-day tractor 
school and meetings of seven im- 
portant agricultural organizations 
of the state. Topics of Interest to 
all farmers and their wives wheth- 
er they raise poultry or dairy 
cattle are included in ths list of 
subjects so that it may truth- 
fully be said that the 1921 con- 
vention will have a universal ap- 
peal for all farm mdn and wo- 
men of the state. 

State Has $7,700,000 to 

Spend on Roods. 

Denial of the recent assertion 
that the Kentucky highways pro- 
gram had broken down was made 
by State Highways Engineer, Jos. 
S. Boggs and H. G. Garnett, Win- 
chester, chairman of the State 
Highways Commission, at the clos 



sponsible parties and some 
chickens.'' 



fifty 



HOLD-UP MEN 

Toko 16 Cases of Whisky From 
Truck on Dixio Highway. 

Federal and local authorities ara 
investigating the holding up ana 
robbing W. K. Smith, driver, who 
was in charge of an auto truck 
filled with whisky, on the Dixie 
Highway, near Walton, one night 
last week by four armed men, 
whom Smith says took 16 cases of 
whisky from his truck and drove 
away. 

Smith was in charge of the truck 
being driven from Frankfort to 
Newport, where it was to have 
been stored. 

When he reachsd a point on the 
Dixie Highway between Crittenden 
and Walton, he told officers, four 
men who had been following him 
in another vehicle drove up beside 
his truck, and in true wild west 
fashion covered him with pistols, 
and while his hands were high in 
the air three of their number took 
charge of 16 cases of the consign- 
ment. 

Smith says there wer» two oth- 
er persons on the truck with him, 



BOONE COUNTY DOY 

W. W. Gaines Elected Mombor 

of Atlanta, Ga., School 

Board. 



Atlanta's board of education will 
be headed for 1921 by W. W. 
Oaii.es, a newly-elected member 
of the board from the second 
school district, comprising the 
2nd and 3rd wards. Mr. Gaines was 
unanimously elected to tha presi- 
dency at the first meeting of the 
new board. 

He is a well-known lawyer, 
and was for some time president 
of the board of trustees of the 
Carnegie library. He was in that 
office when elected to serve on 
the school board. A native of Ken- 
tucky, Mr. Oaines is a graduate of 
Washington and Lee University, a 
moderator in the Atlanta Baptist 
association and is prominently 
connected with the Georgia Bap- 
tist association. 

In his address of acceptance Mr. 
Gaines pleaded for adaqua.e com- 
pensation for teachers; br.tt"r 
school buildings; a business ad- 
ministration of the schools ; more 
money either through an emer- 
gency tax or a bond issue; and 
harmony between the school de- 
partment and the city government. 



1920 Cold Yoor. 

No weather records were broken 
during 1920, according to the an- 
nual summary compiled by the 
Weather Bureau, which character- 
ized the year as a cold one. No 
extrefne temperatures were re- 
corded, the minimum being 4 de- 
grees above zero, occurring Feb- 
ruary 16, and the maximum, on 
July 2i, was 96 degrees. Rainfall 
was below normal, despite exces- 
sive rains in January, March and 
April. Long, dry periods offset 
the downpours of these three 
months. Snowfalls totaled 6.9 tor- 
ches, but the white blanket did 
not lie on the ground for any 
length bf time. Other statistics 
show there were 108 rainy days, 
forty-four thunder showers, five 



PREPARE NOW FOR 
APPROACHING GARDEN 

If Cover Crop Woo Not Sown 

Plow or Spado 

The SoH. 



Whether it is conducted on as 
extensive scale to sap ply the 
market or whether it is to pro- 
duce food for the family the 
garden plot is likely to be the 
most profitable acreage on the 
farm. Gardening really begins in 
the fall. When the last vegeta- 
bles have been removed and stor- 



dense fogs, 134 cloudy days, eighty ed the -rudent gardeuer sets 



ing meeting of the Kentucky High i and they, too f were covered 



James T. Gaines and wife, of 
Idlewild neighborhood, who ex- 
petted to leave for Florida a week 
or ten days since, had to defer 
their departure on account of the 
illness of the parties they in- 
tended to look after their farm 
interests while thoy are in the 
sunny south. They expect to land 
in Florida in the next week or 
two. 



ways Contractors' Association at 
the Seelbach Hotel Wednesday 
evening. 

Mr. Boggs declared that Ken- 
tucky has $7,700,000 to spend on 
highways this year, and that con- 
tracts will be awarded for every 
penny of that amount, provided 
the prices are right. 

In explaining the sources of the 
jnrmey^iMr, Boggs said that $2,100,-? 



Everett Souther, of Pt. Pleasant 
neighborhood, was in Burlington 
one day the latter part of last 
week. Mr. Souther is a great fan- 
cier of cow-peas as food for any 
kind of live stock, and claims 
that they are very fine for poul- 
try of which he keeps a large 
flock. He says they facilitate th? 
egg producing activities very 
greatly. 

Mjore contributions to the Eur- 
opean Relief Fund of $33,000,000, 
with which to feed starving chil- 
dren in Eastern Europe, brought 
Kentucky's gift close to $75,000, it 
was announced at State Headqua 
ters. It is anticipated that wh* 
V returns from all districts 



of 



r- 
hon 
the 



State are in the sura will reach 

$100,000. \ 



000 of it is State money ; $3,000, 
000 is government money ; and $2,- 
600,000 has been contributed by 
various counties of the State. 

None of this fund will be ex- 
pended on Boone county roads. 

Two Old Citizens Gone, 

During Sept., 1920, within twen- 
ty-four hours, two of Union's val- 
ued and highly esteemed citizens 
?aased to their reward. W P. 
orbin and Mrs. J. H. Corbin. W, 
P. Corbin was born near Clarks- 
burg, West Virginia, Feb. 21,1831, 
was twice married. Dec. 30, 1867, 
he was united in marriage to Olive 
Knight, and to them were born 
two sons, Lyman and Homer. He 
was again married to Jennie San- 
ders, sind to them no children 
were horn. Mr. Corbin died Sept., 
12th, 19-20, and was in his 70th year. 

Mrs. J. H. Corbin was born in 
Boone county Sept., 17, 1838, -and 
was united in marriage to J. 
Henry Corbin, June 16th. 1881, and 
died Sept. 13th, 1920, in her 83rri 
year. These aged and venerable 
people wer* loved and inspected 
by all who knew them. They liv- 
ed consistent christian lives. Fun- 
eral services were held at Sardis, 
conducted by Revs. Potts, Hill and 
Spears, the burial took place in 
the Rice cemetery. The two sons 
Lyman and Homer, and brother 
Joseph Corbin, and two sisters, 
Mrs. Matilda Lane and Mrs. Sallie 
Anderson, are left to mourn their 
loss. Mrs. Lane has been an in- 
valid for many years and is now 
in her 94th year. Mrs. Anderson is 
in her 81st year. The agas of thiB 
family total about three hundred 
and fifty years. The caskets were 
taken into the church at the same 
time and lowered into the grave 
at same time. 

Contributed. 



The report of the all?ged rob- 
bery was made to E. C. Hall, Ken- 
ton county patrolman, who drove 
to the place designated by Smith, 
but found no trace of the* robbers. 

Hall says he saw broken glass 
on the road, indicating a few bot- 
tles had been broken there. 



Hustle or Step Down. 



la 



Approximately 4,320 
no were restored to 



acres of 
the Gov- 
ernment r\uring the last fiscal 
year, as a result of landclaim cas- 
es handled by the office of the 
Solicitor for the United States De 
partment of Agriculture The tim- 
ber standing on this land Is esti- 
mated at 22,235,00,1 feet, valued at 
$88,810. 

A dispatch from Washington 
states that a Republican Congress 
man from one of the New England 
States has a. bill ready to pro- 
vide a retiring pension of |25,oon 
a year for all former Presidents of 
the United States, th* same to be 
paid so long as they may Hvs. 

"At the dedication of a new 
fire engine in a llttta town of my 
*tate,'' says a Vermont man, "the 
following toast was orupuaed: 

"May she be like the dear old 
muids of our village— slways ready 
but never culled fori'' 



i 



■t the da*« 4»lL>*ui pa- 

atthgWrWloti iota 



Look 

per mid if your i 
•spired your chock will Us thank- 
fully received i j,n 21 nwanathit 
y<>ur subscription sKpirr 
fall. 



Judges Fees Whitaker, of Latch* 
er county, in announcing his can- 
didacy for the House of Repres- 
entative, says : 

"I am the speechless barefoot 
boy— never spoke u word until f 
was 12 years old— the industrious 
son of a noble widow, soldier, 
sailor, crack shot of the United 
States Army, one of the navys ox- 
pert and accurate gunmen, cham- 
pion pugilist of Whitesburg, mas- 
terful railroader, rough rider, po- 
litician, author, champion of the 
rights and liberties of the common 
people, a great factor in develop- 
intt Eastern Kentucky's coal fields, 
Jailer of Letcher county, a victim 
of unjust circumstances, a martyr 
for tho rights and libentiea of th» 
common people, Judge of Lotcher 
court and cundidate for Congress 
in 1922.'' 



There are two ways for a busi- 
ness man to become more pros- 
perous. The first is by active com 
petition among his neighbors. If 
he is a live one, he realizes to the 
full the law of life, that he must 
hustle or younger and brighter 
men will get ahead of him. He 
must get out after trade or he 
will get out of trade. But an ad- 
ditional prosperity can be acquir- 
ed, outside of whatever can be 
realized as the result of success- 
ful . competition with your neigh- 
bors, by united effort to make 
the home town grow. The ad- 
vance of a whole community 
brings an accretion to every one 
who owns real estate or a* busi- 
ness, or who has an income de- 
pendent on the prosperity of his 
neighbors. The increment brings a 
new prosperity without much ef- 
fort. As your houselot grows in 
value the more houses are built 
around it, so your business grows 
more valuable as more poople read 
your advertising or pass your 
door. 

No man is doing his duty by his 
own business unless he sets apart 
a certain modicum of effort to be 
voted to measures to make his 
home town grow. Any town can 
be made to grow by systematic 
and common sense efforts to at- 
tract new residents and industries. 

Communities are like stores; it 
takes advertising to attract in- 
terest and attention. Often i t is 
not advertising spread broadcast 
that lands new business. If every 
community does nil it canto help 
its young men who have new en- 
terprises to start, it lays the 
foundation for concerness that will 
become prosperous and bring peo- 
ple to the town. 

A dozen active business m^n 
with faith in the fu.ure of their 
own town, will give some time 



Old Hotel Oismontlod. 

Louisville, Ky. — The imposing 
drawing room, where royalty re- 
ceived, and its famous ballroom, 
where the 19th century belles of 
Kentucky danced with the swains 
of their day, dismantled, Louis- 
ville's most imposing relic of his- 
toric days, the Gait House, is 
nothing but a shell. Workmen, em 
ployed by contractors, are rapid- 
ly dismantling the inferior in prep 
aration for final razing of the 
walls to make way for a modern 
commercial structure. Standing at 
the corner of Main and Second 
streets and occupying the entire 
block, the hotel, for almost a half 
century, Was the center of Louis- 
ville and Kentucky's social life. 
There the debutantes were intro- 
duced to society and the disting- 
uished visitors entertained. Its 
lobby was one of the most impos- 
ing of any hotel in the country 
in the days when it was erected 
and its halls of the most spacious. 
But modern hotels, eracted in dis- 
tant sections of the business dis- 
trict took away business from 
the old hostlery and it was forced 
out of business last July. The build 
ing was sold and plans made for 
a modern commercial building on 
the site. The hotel, when it wus 
built, was said to be the finest 
in the United States and also one 
of the largest. Reports current here 
for many years have it that 1,- 
000,000 bricks were used to lav the 
first layer of walls. 

Grotifiod. 



To the School Boys and 
Girls of America : 

I have been gratified to hear of 
the fine record you made last year 
in saving money, and of your in- 
vestment in Thrift Stamps and 
War Savings Stamps. Your Gov- 
ernment is proud that the young 
people of the Nation are develop- 
ing these most practical habits, i 
can assure you that the money 
you are now investing in Govern 
ment savings securities is very 
helpful in meeting your country's 
great responsibilities. While vou 
are aiding your Government thru 
the purchase of the securities, 
you are forming habits which will 
be most valuable in the future in 
the mastery of your personal ana 
financial affairs. I congratulate 
you on your record and encourage 
you to continue this splendid 
work. Sincerely Yours, 

D. F. HOUSTON, 
Secretary. 

Tobacco Sales. 

New hurley sold in Kentucky 
last month averaged -ti.2c a pound 
compared with 47c a pound for 
that sold the previous December, 
the report issued at Frankfort 
by Commissioner of Agriculture W 
C. Ranna revealed. 

Sales of that type totaled but 
517,550 pounds against 47,253,977 in 
December, 1919, and the money 
involved was $57,040 compared 
with | 22.25 1.952 in the Dec pre- 



seven partly cloudy days, seven- 
ty-nine days when the tempera- 
ture fell below freezing point, 13 
days with temperature above !>0 
degrees, and 59 par cent, out of a 
possible 100 per cent, of sunshine. 
The last killing frost in spring 
oc c u rr e d April -H,- and— the — first 
autumn frost appeared October 30. 

HEAD DFFAMILY GETS 
$2,000 EXEMPTION 

Net Incomes of $1,000 or Over 

if Single and $2,000 or 

Over If Married Must 

Bo Reported. 

Single persons, though required 
to file a return if their net In- 
come for 1920 was $1,000 or more, 
are, if they are the heads of fam- 
ilies, granted a special exemption 
under the revenue laws. Such a 
person is defined by Treasury 
regulations as "a person who ac- 
tually supports and maintains in 
one household one or more indi- 
viduals who are closely connect- 
ed with him by blood relationship, 
relationship by marriage or by 
adoption, and whose right to ex- 
ercise family control and provide 
for these dependent individuals is 
based upon some moral or legal 
obligation.'' Such persons are al- 
lowed the exemption of $2,000 
granted a married person. In ad- 
dition, they are allowed a creoit 
of $200 for each dependent under 
18 years of age or incapable of self 
support because mentally or physi- 
cally defective. 

HUSBAND AND WIFE. 

A married person nving with hus 
band and wife can not claim an 
additional $2,000 exemption as the 
head of s: famil y-. His - or her ex- 
emption is based upon the mar-^ 
ital status, irrespective of the 
support of others living in the 
same household. The additional 
$200 credit for dependents does 
not apply to the husband or wife 
of a taxpayer. For example, if a 
married man supports a father 
who is incapable of self-support, 
he is entitled to the $200 credit 
for such person. If through force 
of circumstances he supports his 
wife away from home he is entit- 
led to the $2,000 exemption al- 
lowed a married person, but not 
to a $200 credit for a dependent. 

A son who has left home but 
who sends his mother more than 
one-half the sum required for 
her support is entitled to the 
$200 credit, provided the mother 
can not support herself. Other- 
wise, the amount must be considr- 
ered as a gift, and, therefore the 
credit is not allowed. A son liv- 
ing at home and supporting his 
father, mother or other relative 
may claim the $2,000 exemption al- 
lowed the head of a family, but 
not the $200 credit unless such rel- 
ative is under 18 years ofag? 
incapable of self-support. 



or 



bar of the Ways and Means Com- „f Mils county 



mittoe, Is not altogether pttaaatl 
with tho tariff hearings now 
In progress before (hut l>ody The 
Osoaa of Mi Ynunifa diapleaavure 
•'••*m« to, 1* the BCramble of man- 
tirer* to get some oMhetaMM 
aid las which the HouM 
luted to tho far 



Killed by A Train. 

Miss Julia White was run over 
and killed instantly at a railroad 
crossing in Chicago, last Tuesday 
evening. Her body was badly 
mangled. No one saw the accident 
the engineer, who stated he was 
within a very few foot of her 
when she stepp-d in front of the 
engine about 5 p. m and Udng 
dark, the engineer said he did not 
think Miss White heard the ap- 
proach of the engine. Miss White 
was a stenographer and had been 
employed in the office of thi' 
same attorney in Chicago for 20 

i rears. She was a daughter of tho 
ate H. Clay White and wire, who 
resided in this county some years 

arl'w 
to 
uty 

r leaves a brother, W.T White 
three slaters, MHt» h 
White, Mrs. A F Untsr, Mrs lln 
ry Webb, snd ■ Dumber >>< ottMMj 
relatives and fiiendt I l> > l-olv 
WW* interred In Highland o, 
t«rw last TuuimU) b*«Uki those 
of her lather sad mother. 



each week to working out plans i ceding. However the volumo of 
and taking advantage of oppor- | business would have been con- 
tunities that otherwise would pass siderably more had not the loose 
unnoticed, can work wonders— leaf floors been forced to delay 
Reformer. their openings. 

The grand total and average of 
all new tobacco sold last month 
was 4,603,125 pounds at 7.27C Old 
tobacco sales totaled 4,164,100 lbs. 
at an average of tl.38e. 

Ice-Harvest Time. 

Farmers who have not already- 
done so should prepare to lav by 
store of ice now for cooling milk 
and for household use next sum- 
mer. In places where .nature 
provides n sufficiently low temp- 
ernture, the cost of harvesting snd 
storing ice is low when com- 
pared with the saving effected Or 
dinarily, it Is safe to h irve^t 'i 
tons of ice for each BOW In the 
herd Thi» will allow for my It I n ■ 
mid leave enough for fsniilv 
nssda Where cream only i» told 
about one-third of that quant|t\ 
of ice will bf needed 

Two farmers' bulletins, No 
ice Hnuaee and the Vm> ol i 



on tho Kami, and No 
vesting and Storing Ice 
Farm, may be had 
the iHvhdon ol I'm' 
Department of Agi 



|07« 



llar- 
the 



Your Friend-Tho Skunk. ' 

A woman walked into a depart- 
ment store, according to a story 
the boys are telling, and said to 
the clerk, "Have you any skunk? » 

"Why, yes,'' was the answer 
"I'll call the floorwalker.'' 

Now why is it that the lowly 
polecat is held in such bad re- 
pute? True, you don't want him 
around when you are giving agar 
den party, but if folks would 
but realize it the skunk is one 
of the best friends th? food-pro- 
ducing farmer has. 

His assistance in destroying mice, 
grasshoppers, crickets and white 
grubs is considerable in a year. An 
employee of the bureau of biolog- 
ical survey, says that evory far- 
mer might well have twoorthrae 
dozen skunks working for him 
all year round with profit. They 
would yield, besides, from $50 to 
$100 a year in fur. 

Instead then of wiping out the 
skunk dens why not turn this win- 
ter to a very real ettemr? Yes. 
We are about to warm you that 
you ought to sawt the fly There 
is one buzzing about in most 
homes. She will be the grand- 
mother of myriads in July and An 
lust. Spare your friends and kill 
your endnttea. Lot the skunks 
alone and awat the winter fly — 
Tampa Tribune. 

Champion Corn Raisers. 

J. W Hutler, North Bend, Ohio, 
has been named champion of Ham- 
ilton count V in tho men's io-acre 
>>>ni contest, oonduetod l>v the 
Hamilton fount r irhi burr- tu and 
Ohio State |f \ Him aver- 

age yuid, when reduced to I 
moisture content of /o pt 

•7 ti buahsU an »er«« an hi 
acres Kihw Hay*, North Hem), rail 
ed TIM huihela to an sere 



about to prepare the ground for 
the next year's crop. 

Any rubbish, dead vines or plants 
and bean poles or tomato vines 
should be cleared away, says the 
'United States Department bf Ag- 
riculture, and the ground sown to 
rye or some other green crop to 
prevent the loose earth from 
washing under the winter rains. 
A clover crop also improves the 
physical condition of the soil. 
When a cover crop can not be 
supplied the next host thing that 
may be done is to plow or spade 
the soil and allow it to lie rough 
throughout the winter. This prac 
tice detstroys many insects that 
lie just below tho surface. The 
winter frosts have a lightening 
effect upon the soil, especially on 
clay soils. „ 

The earliest and choicest veget- 
ables are harvested by the man 
who maintains a few hotbed sash- 
es and uses them to Start his gar- 
den. He is able to handicap the 
frost line by several weeks, and 
to 'set strong, weD developed 
plants in his garden at a time 
his neighbors are planting seed. 

The farm income is at its lowest 
point in the early spring, but it 
can be increased considerably by 
the sale of young plants grown in 
the hotbeds and ready for trans- 
planting. Tomato, cabbage, egg- 
plant, and pepper plants are al- 
ways snapped up when the first 
warm planting days come, and 
they are easily grown in the hot- 
bed. A little more space and a 
little more seed than the grower 
needs for his own use are likely 
ly to bring good profits. Before 
the ground freezae in the fall is 
a good time to clean out the old 
hotbeds. 

Unless the soil used in the hot- 
bed is to be exchanged for fresh 
earth it should be shoveled from 
the bed and tossed into a pile 
near-by. The decayed manure from 
t h e bo tt om i a scatt ere d ov er t he 



pile and thoroughly mixed with 
it to form rich soil for next year's 
beds. Over this goes a coat of 
straw or leaves held down by bits 
of boards to keep it from blow- 
ing. 

Some farmers find it conven- 
ient to use evergreen boughs in- 
stead of straw for Ike outer cov- 
ering. 

New hotbed pits should be dug 
so that they will face the south, 
and the location should be select- 
ed so that the beds will be pro- 
tected from cold winds and late 
spring storms. Sometimes the 
earth taken from the new pit is 
suitable for use in the hotbed, 
but this is the exception rather 
than the rule. A few loads of leaf 
mold from the woods mixed with 
the natural soil will often form a 
smooth, rich, stoneless mass which 
gives an ideal hotbed filler 

The back or north side of the 
frame is usually from 12 to 18 
inches high, while the south end 
is about eight inches, so that 
the whole bed may have pitch 
enough to get the sun upon all 
parts. The standard hotbed sash 
is handled by most dealers, and 
measures three feet In width anO 
six feet in length. A frams just 
wide enogh to support the cash 
seems to be the most satisfactory, 
though wider beds are sometimes 
used with supporting ridges plac- 
ed at t>-foot intervals A well- 
painted cypress 6aeh, glazed with 
good double strength glass well 
set in putty should give the care- 
ful gardener 12 to 15 years' ser- 
vice. 

Heat for the hotbed is furnislv- 
ed by means of a bed of horse 
manure 8 to 16 inches thick in 
the bottom of the pit." Perma- 
nent hotbeds are oftentheated with 
coils of steam or hot-waiter pipes 
under the bed. 

Hotbeds require constant care 
to prevent their becoming over- 
heated, especially during bright 
weather 



The hr»t two «.*, 
r\ furnished some 
1'iuig like weather. 



■ aiitt- 

flas 



Candidates for county offices 
will find electioneering a much 
harder job this time thau ever 
before. As women havo been giv- 
en the right of-euffrage, and they 
will, for the first time, use this 
right at the coming August pri- 
mary. in selecting county officials, 
it will require the candidate to 
see just twice the number of vot- 
ers as heretofore—and to do a 
great deal more talking-as the 
wome " wiU b« harder to convince 
!?!. lC° lB * n * Proper person to 
ill the office to which he aspires 
It would pay a candidate to have 
his little "«pi«.| printed in 
pamphlet form anl mail them in 
advene* of his cmv 

From a recent mpurt ol ths As- 
sociation of American i <>li«fg« t ft 
ih learned that there art- 500,000 

mllege students, or one to every 

III person* In the l a I ted states, 

attending kitstttuiona of leara 

>»g in (hit eouittrv f lie re poet 

aoowa ihtt the growth ttt 

h'k'h *• I .^g 

< high 
srnuml »mU»u ,« aoiug t 
lege earn r «wr 



i 



feuoNK COUNTY XRCO*nJR 



A bow la the other fellow's lender. 

Ib there niiy reason why the furm- 
ahould not be a happy man? 

i 

he womnn with n 15,000- word vo- 
cabulary often consumes It In a day. 

D'AnnunzIo might be given the Job 
of making Newport part of America. 

To many the bumper apple crop Is 
Interesting only as it promises more ci- 
der. 



Thus far the women have managed 
to keep the secret of bow they Intend 
to vote. 



UNION. 



FRANCES VILLB 



A few more patches on the old sum- 
mer stilt and it may shiver through the 
winter 1 



Potatoes are coming down to where 
one again speaks of a peck rather than 
a pound. 



TNT Instead of tea and toast Is 
the coal miners' Idea of an afternoon 
blowout 



Jazz music Is said to be dying out. It 
sounds ns if it were being horribly 
murdered. 



Mustafa Kemal Pasha, whose name 
once sounded like a cigarette, is now 
a discarded butt. 



At any rate the campaign cigar has 
always been a great help to the anti- 
nicotine movement. 



Some people are singularly careless 
where and how they permit them- 
selves to be murdered. 



Miss Elaine and Johnnye Djck- 
erson spent last week with Jose- 
phine Terrill, of Erlanger . 

Santa stopped at our little vil- 
lage and delivered a few presents. 

Miss Marietta Riley is the guest 
of her sister, Miss (iene Sue Jttiley. 

A few of our young folks at- 
tended the Legion dance at Flor- 
ence, Friday eve. 

J. M Her mi on and wife spent 
the week-end with Mrs. J. M. 
Herndon, of Owenton. 

School opened Tuesday after a 
pleasant Christmas vacation. 

R. Feldhaua and wife entertain- 
ed Rev. Garbe-r and Harry Riley, 
at dinner, Sunday. 

Miss Lucy Newman was the week 
end guest of Miss Addle and Tina 
Norman, of Covington. 

Claude Tanner and wife spent 
Saturday night and Sunday with 
J. T. JBristow and wife. 

The Ladies Aid Society will meet 
at the home of Mrs. John Criswell 
all day Friday. All members are 
urged to be present as consider- 
able work is to be done. 

Rev. Garber has accepted a call 
to preach at Union and Florence. 
D. W. Newman and wife enter- 
tained with a delightful New 
Year's dinner. 

E« J. Rouse and- w ife gave the 
young folks a dance last Tuesday 
eve. 




It Is not In the power of mortals to 
command good weather, but like suc- 
cess, we have deserved it. 



Moscow is accusing the allies of 
propaganda, probably on the ground of 
infringing their copyright 

True! the ancients got along very 
(Well without sugar, but then It is hard 
to be an ancient nowadays. 



The high cost of living may oppress 
the hearts of men, but the shopping 
districts are as lively as ever. 



The mighty has fallen. Zeebrugge 
Is now a show place wjilch anybody 
can visit for so much a head. 



"Horse sense" was well enough In 
the old days, but what one needs now 
for safety is automobile sense. 



The price of brooms Is coming down. 
but you have to raise more dust to 
get the maid to sweep the room. 



The wife who goes away for the 
summer to be renovated runs the risk 
of having her husband revamped. 



C. C. Sleet and family were in 
the city Friday, shopping. 

Our local merchants seemed to 
enjoy a good holiday trade. 

v»r W £ a f e g,ad to re P° rt Mrs. J. 
W. Conley, who has been quite 
ill is much improved. 
iJ *£ Griffith, who has been at 
Martinsville, Ind., for his health, 
has returned home much improv- 

Mrs J. C. Hughes and daugh- 
ter Miss Emily, left last Tuesday 
for Orlando, Florida, where thev 
will spend the winter. 

Mr. ar.d Mrs. Jno. S Tavlor de- 
lightfully entertained with a 
S?h Stl ™ ^".Thursday, Dec. 
-10th. Ihe following guests wero 
present: Mr. and Mrs. Jno C Bed! 
rt n . g . , V nd dau « hter > Mary Aman- 
Mr' Si M d *! r8 - John Delahunty, 

Mrs C ?■ I™* Coa J B ' -' **■ ana 
u u L V S,eet afl d daughter 
Rebecca; Mr. and Mrs J. o 

?„ r H ffl M ai £ , son ' J " ° J'. Mr 
J. C. Hughes. 

Out in the State. 



Ina .Ogden spent Xmas week 
with Leon Aylbr and family, near 
Hebron. 

Jake Sleek and family enter- 
tained several of their relatives, 
last Sunday. 

A. J. Ogden and family spent 
Sunday with Leon Aylor ana 
family, of Hebron. ' 

E. J. Aylor and wife spent sev- 
eral days last week with relatives 
at Hamilton, Ohio. 

Mr. Les Miller and Mr. Pierce 
spent New Year's day with John 
Cave, Jr., and family. 

R. L. Day and wife spent Sun- 
day with John Whitaker and wife, 
who are entertaining a little son. 
Misses Sadie Rieman and Mary 
Eggleston its Xmas dinner with 
Mrs. Nellie Markland anil sod, 
Graham. 

J. S. Eggleston and family had 
aa guests Sunday, Rev. Swindler, 
of Petersburg, Frank Estes ano 
Arthur Eggleston. 

Will Reitmano and wife enter- 
tained a number of friends and 
relatives from Cincinnati, from 
Friday until Sunday. 

R. S. Wilson and family and 
Mrs. W. L. Brown and children, 
visited Jerry Estes and daughter, 
Catherine, last Wednesday. 

Misses Mary and Elnora Eggles- 
ton spent Saturday night and Sun 
day With Misses Louise and Eliza- 
beth Grim, of Taylorsport. 

Fred Reitmann wife and daugh- 
ter, spent last Monday night and 
Tuesday with her parents, S. C. 
Eggleston and family, of Woolper. 



THE 

KITCHEN 
CABINET , 

((S, lilt, WfitUm N»Wfl>apfr tTnfon ) 





We inuat tight our way onward. We 
mutt be brave. There are obatacles 
to be .jnet »«<> w« _.-it ....:>». fced 
crush them.— "David Cbpperfleld." 

HOW TO PREPARE RICE. 

The black man's recipe to dress rice 
runs : "Wash him well, much wash In 
cold water ; the 
make 




The Democrats will not feel as 
badly over the offices they are 

fh^h ft^-thousands of 

fnfi^ - ^ £* Ve ^"tinned to Be 

The election Is not going to turn on t ;{"***„ Y 7 "publicans all during 

e Increased ifled vot- P lB lir*" 1 Administration— Owens 



the Increased number of qualified vot- 
ers, but on the way the voters vote. 



Elmer Dye and Jas. Beall are 
visiting at E. J. Aylor's. 

E. J. Aylor and wife entertain- 
ed quite a number of relatives 
Sunday. 

J. S. Eggleston and wife enter- 
tained Rev. B. F. Swindler ana 
Frank Estes Sunday. 

Miss Amanda Koons spent sev- 
eral days last week with friends 
near Rising Sun, Indiana. 

Miss Jessie Gordon, of Hebron, 
spent Sundsy with Misses Aman- 
da Koons and Sadie Rieman. 

Misses Mary and Florence Eg- 
gleston entertained quite a num- 
ber of the young folks New Year's 
eve. 

Mrs. Raymond Goodridge and 
little son are visiting her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Morehead, 
at Taylorsport. 

Mrs. Carl Hunzickcr and little 
daughter of Cincinnati, were the 
guests of Will Reitmann and wife! 
several days last week. 

Raymond Baker, wife and little 
son Ronald Lee, of Cincinnati, 
spent the Christmas holidays wi;h 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. D 
Scothorn. 

Jerry Estes and daughter. Miss 
Katherine, had as guests Sunday, 
Mr. James Beall and granddaugh- 
ter, Gladys and Myrtle Wilson ana 
Alice and Florence Eggleston. 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

s 

♦ 



MT. ZION. 



a-nt^^u* that « ince tobacco has 
gotten cheaper they will take io 



What a lot of emotions can be stirred 
up In a man who hasn't gotten In his using itTn* ^makhTg cTB-ara^Jeain 
coal yet by the song of a wee cricket I — Elizabethtown Mirror 

+++ 
Fact is, American people would 
■t »£?< considerable degree 



The fire Insurance rates on letters 
sent by airplane are likely to go up 



faster 
down. 



than ( the ships are coming 



Why should Lenlne and Trotzky 
worry about "allied propaganda" If 
bolshevlsm Is the wonderful success 
claimed for it? 



Those who anticipate an enforced 
reduction in restaurant prices will do 
well not to postpone their lunches In 
that expectation. 



In spite of the nasty record made 
by the submarine, this style of boat 
Ib still being constructed In various 
parts of the globe. 



Next to a newspaper, there Is prob- 
ably nothing the ordinary citizen 
thinks he could mo with greater suc- 
cess than a public utility. 



Once It was sugar that we couldn't 
get; now It is hard coal. Doesn't It 
beat all how we are kept searching 
all the time for a spoonful? 



Rent profiteering iunkes not only 
Bolshevists, but old bnchelors and old 
maids of young folks who cannot af- 
ford to marry and set up homes. 



Encouraged by reports of a bumper 
sugar crop in prospect, the consumer 
has formed a very distinct Idea as to 
whom he would like to see bumped. 

, Coal operators, retail dealers and 

.mine workers bandy the buck bock 

and forth, but the public need have 



iL!^V nm u grat,on experts could 
even cut the influx of gentlemen 

Si °? e u OVe I to en tertain us 
with da handa organ and da 
monk.— Lexington Herald. 
+++ 

a j£ Ung man ' . old ma «. throw 
away your hammer and stop 
knocking; it disturbs the rest of 
us Buy you a saw and saw wood 
awhile } it is not so noisy, and la 
a darn sight more useful-we can 
Lurn the wood— Mayfield Times 
+*+ 

R. M Fields of Concorn oaysthat 
u* farmers and fruit growers will 
rub the trunks of their fruit trees 
with a dead rabbit or a piece of 
h u g hv » e /' the rab wts will not peal 
them. Mr. Fields says that he has 
tried this for six winters and his 
trees have never been bothered 
—Falmouth Outlook. 
++* 

Lexington, Ky. — Horace Stansi- 
fer Cleveland, an end, was chosen 
captain of the Transylvania uni- 
versity foot ball team at the an- 
nual football banquet here He 
has played three years on the 
team, and will graduate next June, 
but has announced his intention of 
returning in the fall to take up 
work as a post-graduate. 
+** 

Washington has put a ban on 
Jamacia ginger. The Department 
of the Interior must have done 
that— Paducah, News-Democrat 



Good Time to Make 

Farm Inventory. 

With another season of farm 
work fast drawing to a close.the 



e 
♦ 
♦ « 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦a 

Dr. R. C. Stephens spent Sunday 
rieht and Monday in Ludlow. • 

Elmer Glacker and wife Sun- 
dayed with Ber Northcutt and 
family. 

EElmer Surface wife ar d son, 
Surdayed with Ira Tanner ana 
family. 

Elmer Glacker and wife enter- 
taired a number at dinner New 
Year's Day. 

J. D. Robirso.n and wife enter- 
tained a number at dinner Sun- 
day, Jar. 2nd. 

Miss Maymie Robinson spent 
last Wednesday afternoon with 
Miss Sarah Glacken. 

Henry Holtzworth and wife are 
the proud parents of a little 
daughter— Kathryn Agnes. 

There will be church services at 
this place Saturday night Jan. Sth. 
Everybody cordially invited to at- 
tend. 

Miss Isabella Stephens entertain- 
ed in honor of her brother, Dr 
Robert C. Stephens, who is home 
from Spring City, Tenn., Thurs- 
day evening, Dec. 30, 1920. 

Miss Maymie Robinson e£ - - 
tamed a number of her friends 
Saturday ievening, Jan. 1st, 1921, 
in honor of her 20th birthday. She 
received several nice presents and 
everyone had a delightful time. 
All 1 eft at a late hour wishing 
her many more happy birthdays. 



rice floor 
him stick. Water 
boll already fast 
Throw him In ; 
rice can't burn, 
water shake him 
too much B ~ 11 
quarter of an 
hear or lit tie mora; rub one rice In 
thumb and finger; If all rub away, htm 
quite dona Put rice in oollander, hot 
water ran away; pour cupful of cold 
water on him, put back rice In sauce- 
pan, keep him covered near the fire, 
then rice all ready. Eat him up!" — 
Gertrude Morrison, In American 
Cookery. 

Rice may be used as a substitute 
for vegetables, as a thickening for 
soup, an addition to bread sponge, a 
salad, a main dish, a dessert. These 
are but a few of the many accomplish- 
ments of this dainty food. 

Wild rice Is obtained In abundance 
In many of our states and those who 
have been treated to this wholesome 
cereal like It very much. It is very 
similar to the tame rice except it Is 
not polished, which leaves the food 
value (which In the tame rice is pol- 
ished away) that is so important in the 
growth and health of the young. 

Rice With Meat— Take two cupfuls 
of boiled rice, one cupful of chopped 
fresh meat, browned In a tablespoon- 
ful of sweet fat; remove the meat, add 
a small onion finely minced, a tea- 
spoonful of minced parsley or half of 
a small green pepper cooked In the 
same fat Place a layer of the cooked 
rice In a baking dish, cover with a lay- 
er of the meat season well, add some 
of the onion and pepper. Repeat un- 
til the rice and meat are used, cover 
with one cupful of tomato and bake 
slowly for an hour. I 

Baked Rica and Codfish.— Take one 
and one-half cupfuls of well-washed 
rice, one cupful of water and four 
cupfuls of milk. Add the water and 
the milk gradually to the rice while 
cooking and cook half an hour. Re- 
move from the stove and add one cup- 
ful of rich milk, two well-beaten eggs 
and three cupfuls of shredded codfish, 
pepper and salt to taste. Bake In a 
moderate oven forty-five minutes 
Serve with drawn butter sauce. 

'The KITCnm 



t. T. CtORE, President. HUBERT CONNER, Seo'ty. 

J. L. RITE, Agent. 

Breeders Mutual Fire and Lightning 

^O^NSUHANCE COM PAN Y^>^ 

Of Boon* County, *y. 

Insures Live Stock against Loss by Fire or Llghtniug. 
WRITE U»rOR RATIO. 



Automobile ttfbes and tires repaired by the latest 
process. Bring me your old tires sod I may be 
able to get several miles more service for you out 
of them. 

Auto Accessories kept in stock. 
idoodrldge, Portage and Cupplet Tires and Tubes on hand. 

GEORGjJ PORTER, 

BURLINGTON, KY. 



♦ Burlington Garage 

♦ & W. KERR, Proprietor 

| AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING f 

I GIVEN CAREFUL AND PROMPT ATTENTION. 

J I Any size cylinder from 8J to 6 inches rebored. 

o SERVICES AT ALL HOURS. 

J U. S. Tires Kept in Stock. -:- Ford Accessories. 
< > Consolidated Phone Burlington 248. 

»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦ »*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦****«+«.««.«»«.« 

T* 







- i— w..» ..n U rare,""'" "am urav 

SO doubt where It will land eventually. I United State* Department of 

| Agriculture is urging that an an- 

If Herr Holnnzollern should get ua J P. ro Pwty list or inventory be 
back to Berlin, ns i, e ia reported as ! ",, by eVer y '»rmer. It is the 
hoping, he will find the oM town Is not W^ ™£ an ^ de P artm »n t specialists 



things 



worth, what progress they 
making from year to year, ana 
how (heir investment in farm 
property U being distributed 



Pancho Villa has turned farmer and 

both hlfl friends and his cnemlsa will i 

be with him In raising something i f ro P er ty lists, or inventories made* 

Other than what he 1ms i, ( . t .„ ru i,i n » in . ac «>rdance with a plan outlin- 

for the last 15 years. * lKi ,n # th ? r Office of farm ln>n- 

I . aganient, U. S. Department of Ag- 

•m. a ^ neulture, are not difficult to m ilo> 

•^•Sunday automotll, fatalities and are'of great value to tho 

are fast heating the recort .,i n„. Sim . farmer who Is striving to hotter 

Sty Hammer drownings. And (t, (re tun i-onditlon, overcome obstacles 

•IS mora «« the former, since (hey e»- '" •*»'"«*«*•». and place his husincsw 



tmd throughout the yon*. 



In sea boor rrnnca aucrssdsd in 
our country In borrowing 1 100,000. Kay 



..iitiirtt rm n senim foundation To 
drill along year after vear, not 
knowing whether toward success. 
"' failure, is not ths pruutlce of 
I'uM.Mvw mini &p*clalkits of the 



! is an auaalug drv-uiMtsast Is lha diriment ar* pruyared to give 
«a*Jou of a aiaa was kass'l t«» r £ ui>l '' lu( « directions Tor maatns a 
■Ma to |*t bla lasodry out jl"- 



r, » mv.-iitory that will ,.u: 
(ami on u buatuuM ba*U. 



Henry Wmgate and family vis- 
ited relatives in Petersburg Sun- 
day. 

Anna Mae Henry spent from 
Friday until Sunday with Zelma 
Beemon. 

Raymond Henry spamt a few 
days the 'past week with Earl 
Mudman. 

Elmer Goodridge and wifespent 
« fe w days the past week with 
Mrs Goodridges parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Owen Beemon. 

A number of friends and rela- 
tives gathered at the home of 
Owen Beemon and wife, Saturday 
evening and enjoyed an 1 oyster 
soup. 

Newton Sullivan, Sr., and wife, 
Mrs. Sara Hensley and little daugh 
ter, Roberta, and R. J. Akin and 
family, Sundayei with Rd Easto.i 
and wife. 

Henry Wingate and wife enter- 
tained with a music party last 
Thursday evening. Several rela- 
tives and friends were present, 
and all enjoyed the evening. 

Carl Alge and wifo entertained 

with a dinner Sunday. Those pros 

«»nt were Raymond Henry and sis" 

Anna Mae, Zelma Bocrnvn, Ma 

bel . William* and Rsrl Mudman. 

Carl Alge and wife entertained 
some of Their friends last Friday 
night, music was th# ohisf fea- 
ture of the evening At It o'clock 
a U»«w luaoh was Mrved, which 
wsa enjoyed by all present 



<©. 1920, Western Newspaper Union.) 

Wb«n right you can afford to keep 
your temper; when wrong you can't 
afford to lose it— Gordon Graham. 

SEASONABLE GOOD THINGS. 

A vegetable dish Avhicb Is well liked 
and may be prepared with either 
fresh or canned 
tomatoes Is — 

Scalloped To- 
mato and Green 
pepper. — Take 
about half the 
bulk of tomato 
in soft, fine 
bread crumbs. 
For a cupful of crumbs, melt one- 
fourth of a cupful of butter, put one 
or two lablespoonfuls of butter in a 
saucepan, mix the rest of the butter 
through the bread crumbs To the 
Gutter in the saucepan, add a slice of 
thinly sliced onion and half a small 
green pepper shredded fine. Stir and 
cook until softened, then mix through 
the crumbs. Arrange the tomatoes 
and prepared crumbs in alternate lay- 
ers In a baking dish, sprinkling each 
layer of tomatoes with salt and pep- 
per. Hnve-the last layer of crumbs; 
bake twenty minutes. 

Russian Salad Dressing Mix to- 
gether one-fourth of a cupful of olive 
oil, one teaspoonful of vinegar, one- 
fourth teaspoonful each df mustard 
and salt, one-half teaspoonful of pop- 
rlka and one-fourth cupful of chill 
sauce; then gradually, using (he egg 
beater, add one-half cupful of mayon- 
naise dressing. 

Pot-Roasted Pork Chaps.— Choose 
chops with only a medium amount of 
fat and somewhat thicker than usual. 
After browning the chops on each side 
In a frying pan, add an onion cut fine 
and pepper and salt Cover with wa- 
ter and let simmer on the back of the 
stove for an hoar and a half. Add a 
little flour to thicken the gravy, and 
serve. The flour If added while the 
chops are browning, will be of better 
flavor. 

Pecan Sausages. — Mix together 
three-fourtha of a cupful of hot cooked 
cream of wheat, one-fourth of a cup- 
ful of finely crushed pecan meats, half 
a teaspoonful each of powdered thyme 
and sage ; mix all thoroughly, then add 
one egg beaten tight and form lute 
ahape to resemble link sausages 
Place in a pan well greased, and bake 
twenty minutes, gerva with bananas 
cut In halves and then In quarters 
crosswise, rolled In fleer and fried aa 
both sides In hot fat. Ssrve with a 
cupful of tomato or cream sauce. 

i m i i iii i ii e « r ■■ i » i . 



iaV 

S 

IrV 

IS 



ITS a wise idea to place your order for a car now, 
so you won't be disappointed in the spring, 

Phaeton Hudson $2538.00. Seven Passenger Hudson $3838.00 
Coupe Hudson • - $3448. Sedan Hudson ... 83874 
Essex Touring $1698. 

Essex Roadster $1698. 

Dodge Touring $1390. 

Dodge Coupe $2038. 

Dodge Sedan $2298. 
Cleveland Tractor $1395. 

The above prices are delivered at your door. 

It you want to place an order for any of these cars, 




call 



B. B. HUME, Burlington, Ky. 




S 

5 
S 

s 

3 
5 

S 



No Interuption to Service 

Not withstanding Road Blockade at 
Florence, I cau still 

j Answer Promptly all Calls 

To any Part 01 Boone County 
either day or night 

PHILIP TALIAFERRO. 

ERLANGER, KY. ' 



Best Quality— tfair Prices 

Our constantly Increasing; business 
proves conclusively that "Best Quality 
at Fair Prices" will win. We test each 
carefully by the latest and most accu- 
rate methods and grind lenses io ex- 
actly suit you. 

Phone South 1746 

DR. N. F. PErOf ,613 Madison Ave. - 'covi'ngton. Ky 




Why Worry? 



We know the price of Tires has gone sky high. But why wor- 
ry? You can have your old Tires half soled and they will be bet. 
ter than new ones because they are guarnteed' punoture proof for 
' 8,600 miles and they only cost one-half as much. 

This tiie bargain can only be had at 

The Cotiry Rubber Co, 

34 Pike Street, -:- 



. .1 1. n ■ , ■ 



Covington, Ky 



■ * . . ■ ■ 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦ «♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦«♦««« 
eesssesssossesssssesesesse ♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Subscribe for the Recorder. 
Try It One Yetir - You'll Like It 
Only $1.50 the Year 



In Thlss Issue.-ei 



MSTUon't I Sill to RaXtU AH ThO Ad- 

*ee*eeoeo#e>ooee«ooe«oee«ee ♦eooooeoooooooasosseososss 
•eeeseoeo oeeooooosoot * 



J* 




I 

4 



«* 



vi) 






■ 



*> 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



Vol. xxxxvi 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY JANUARY 20, 1921 



$1.50 Per \ ear 



No 16 



tmmml ijappeamg*. STATE COLLEGE READY 



Last .week the Recorder called 
the attention of the tobacco grow- 
er to the practice of paying some 
one $1.00 per hundred to "gingen 
hie tales on the loose leai iQyor. 
One of the oldest tobacco men 

la this part of the State after Sito arranged everything 
reading the article said that this 



For Farm Convention to If Held 
■t Lexington, Fob. 1-4. 



m 



f i* 






ictice wa* injuring the loose 
* sale, and he characterized the 
ictice as "like taking candy 
frOm a baby,'' and that the far- 
nier should not stand for that 
practice. Even directors and man- 
ager* of loose leaf warehouses, he 
said, had been guilty of that 
practice, when it is the duty of 
these officers to see that the far- 
mer's tobacco brings every dol- 
lar it is worth. Some warehouses 
countenance the practice, and will 
pay the (1.00 out of the farmer's 
sale. Instead of helping the far- 
mer the warehouse is helping the 
"ginger"' leach to gouge the to- 
bacco raiser. 
- ' The "tobacco grower should not 
patronize any warehouse thai 
countenance such conditions. 



The average price of tobacco 
ou the loose leai no or* oi cue 
district has oeen around $b.0O per 
aui.dred pounds, notwithstanding 
the reported averages oi txa.uu iu 
924.00. The warehouses have done 
everything in their powor to 
spring the prices, but the buy- 
era have a certain limit on tno 
different grades and can not go 
beyond that limit. Do not look 
upon the buyers and warehouse- 
men as enemies to your interests 
as was done at Carlisle and Mjays- 
ville. The buyers would racner 
have instructions to pay $50 per 
hundred than $10.uo, but the price 
is set on Wall St. months in ad- 
vance of the opening of the 
market, and they are the birds 
who are to blame for the ruinous 
prices. The American Tobacco 
Trust buys and manufactures 95 
per cent of all the tobacco and 
is in a position to pay a living 
j price for tobacco, as they con- 
trol both ends of the string.— Fal- 
mouth Outlook. 



With the final program com- 
pleted and all the necessary de- 
tails arranged everything is in 
readiness for the conclave of • 2,- 
000 farmers and their wives who 
are expected to Journey to Lex- 
ington for the Ninth Annual Farm 
and Home Convention which will 
be held at the College of Agri- 
culture, University of Kentucky, 
Feb. 1-4, according to an an- 
nouncement made today by N. R. 
Elliott, leader of specialists at the 
college. 

Special care has beer, taken in 
the arrangement of the 1021 pro- 
gram and those in charge of it 
are responsible for tho statement 
that it is superior to any that I 



Why Tho Editor Loft Town 

Somebody sent the editor of 
the Polktown Gazette a few bot- 
tles of home brew. The same day 
he received for publication a wed- 
ding announcement, and a notice 
of an auction sale. Here ara the 
results: "Wra. Smith and Miss 
Lucy Anderson were disposed of 
at public auction at my farm one 
mile east of a beautiful cluster 
of roses on her breast and two 
white calves, before a background 
of farm implements too numerous 
to mention in the presence of 
about seventy guests, including 
two milch cows, six mules and one 
bob sled. Rev. Jackson tied the 
nuptial knot with 200 feet of hay 
rope and the bridal couple left 
on one good John Deere gang 
plow for an extended trip with 
terms to suit purchasers. They 
will be at home to their friends 
with one good baby buggy and a 
I few kitchen utensils after ten 



has been outlined for a similar I months from date of sale to re- 



meeting of farm men and women 
in Kentucky. More than 20 out 
of~state Speakers togather with 
the entire staff of the agricultur- 
al college will take part in giv- 
ing the convention men and wo- 
men lectures and demonstration*) 
on practically every phase of ag- 
riculture and home life. 

Special care will oe given to 
the women who attend, a special 
program having been arranged for 
them. In addition to this feature 
there will be a four-day tractor 
school and meetings of seven im- 
portant agricultural organizations 
of the state. Topics of interest to 
all farmers and their wives wheth- 
er they raiae poultry or dairy 
cattle are included in the list of 
subjects so that it may truth- 
fully be said that the 1921 con- 
vention will have a universal ap- 
peal for all farm mdn and wo- 
men of the state. 



sponsible parties and some 
chickens.'' 



fifty 



Dudley Blythe has moved his 
general store to the southeast 
corner of Washington and Jeffer- 
son streets, and is now occupying 
the building in which the late 
Dudley Rouse sold goods for half 
a century or more. The Boone Co. 
Farmers' Bureau is occupying the 
store room vacated by Mr. Blythe. 
It has been many years since the 
rooms Mr. Blytho vacated were 
not occupied by a general store, 
the late N. E. Hawos haying haa 
a store 'there for something p'ke 
seventy years. 



The time has come to cease 
all economic strikes that tend to 
check the normal flow of trade. 
Now is the time for conservative 
optimism. The closing months of 
last year were marked by a con- 
sumers' strike against retail pri- 
ces, by a retailers' strike against 
wholesale prices, by a wholesalers' 
strike against manufacturers' pri- 
ces and by a manufacturers' 
strike against the prices demand- 
ed by the producers of raw ma- 
terials. 



James T. Gaines and wife, of 
Idlewild neighborhood, who ex- 
pected to leave for Florida a week 
or ten days since, had to defer 
their departure on account of the 
illness of the parties they in- 
tended to look after their farm 
interests while thoy are in tho 
sunny south. They expect to land 
in Florida in the next woek or 
two. 



Everett Souther, of Pt. Pleasant 
neighborhood, was in Burlington 
one day the latter part of last 
week. Mr. Souther is a great fan- 
cier of cow-peas as food for any 
kind of live stock, and claims 
that they are very fine for poul- 
try of which he keeps a large 
flock. He says they facilitate th? 
egg producing activities verv 
greatly. 

Mk>re contributions to the Eur- 
opean Relief Fund of $33,000,000, 
with which to feed starving chil- 
dren in Eastern Europe, brought 
Kentucky's gift close to $75,000, it 
was announced at State Headquar- 
ters. It is anticipated that when 
I returns from all districts of the 
State are in the sura will reach 
$100,000 

Approximately 4,320 acres of 
land were restored to the Gov- 
ernment during the last fiscal 
year, as a result of landclaim cas- 
es handled by the office of the 
Solicitor for the United States De 
partment of Agriculture. The tim- 
ber standing on this land is esti- 
mated at 22,235,000 feet, valued at 
$88,810 

A dispatch from Washington 
states that a Republican Congress 
man from one of the New England 
States, has a. bill ready to pro- 
vide a retiring pension of $25,oon 
a year for all former Presidents of 
the United States, th* same to be 
paid so long as they may live. 

M At the dedication of a new 
fire engine in a littl» town of my 
state,'' says a Vermont man, "the 
following toast was proposed: 

"May she be like the dear old 
rontda ot our village -.'ilw.»yn . 
but never called fori 1 ' 

u.ok at the d%te OIL, jitir pa- 
per and if your suba+rMlon tins 
i einirsd your cheek Will be thank- 
fully recelved-1 Jan til means that 
your subscription expired Jan I, 
fall. 



Stato Has $7,700,000 to 

Spend on Roads. 

Denial of the recent assertion 
that the Kentucky highways pro- 
gram had broken down was made 
by State Highways Engineer, Jos. 
S. Boggs and H. G. Gannett, Win- 
chester, chairman of the State 
Highways Commission, at the clos- 
ing meeting of the Kentucky High 
ways Contractors' Association at 
the fSeelbaeh Hotel Wednesday 
evening. 

Mr. Boggs declared that Ken- 
tucky has $7,700,000 to spend on 
highways this year, and that con- 
tracts will be awarded for every 
penny of that amount, providea 
the prices are right. 

In explaining the sources of the 
money, Mr."B©ggs said that $2,100,- 
000 of it is State money ; $3,000,- 
000 is government money; and $2,- 
600,000 has been contributed by 
various counties of the State. 

None of this fund will be ex- 
pended on Boone county roads. 

Two Old Citizons Gone 

During Sept., 1920, within twen- 
ty-four hours, two of Union's val- 
ued and highly esteemed citizens 
passed to their reward. W. P. 
Corbin and Mrs. J H. Corbin. W. 
P. Corbin was born near Clarks- 
burg, West Virginia, Feb. 21,1831, 
was twice married. Dec. 30, 1867, 
he was united in marriage to Olive 
Kr.ight, and to them were born 
two sons, Lyman and Homer. He 
was again married to Jennie San- 
ders, dnd to them no children 
were born. Mr. Corbin died Sept., 
12th, 1920, and was in his 70th year. 

Mrs. J. H. Corbin was born in 
Boone county Sept., 17, 1838, and 
was united in marriage to J. 
Henry Corbin, June 16th, 1881, and 
died Sept. 13th, 1920, in her 83rd 
year. These aged and venerable 
people were loved and respected 
by all who knew them. They Uv- 
ea consistent christian lives. Fun- 
eral services were held at Sardis, 
conducted by Revs. Potts, Hill and 
Spears, the burial took place in 
the Rice cemetery. The two sons 
Lyman and Homer, and brother 
Joseph Corbin, and two sisters, 
Mrs. Matilda Lane and Mrs. Sahic 
Anderson, are left to mourn their 
loss. Mrs. Lane has been an in- 
valid for many years and is now 
in her 94th year. Mrs. Anderson is 
in her 81st year. The ages of this 
family total about three hundred 
and fifty years. Tho caskets were 
taken into the church atthesame 
time and lowered into the grave 
at same time. 

Contributed. 



HOLD-UP MEN 

Take 16 Cases of Whisky From 
Truck on Dlxio Highway. 

Federal and local authorities ara 
investigating the holding up ana 
robbing W. K. Smith, driver, who 
was in charge of an auto truck 
filled with whisky, on the Dixie 
Highway, near Walton, one night 
last week by four armed men, 
whom Smith says took 16 cases of 
whisky from his truck and drove 
away. 

Smith was in charge of the truck 
being driven from Frankfort to 
Newport, where it was to have 
been stored. 

When he reached a point on the 
Dixie Highway between Crittenden 
and Walton, he told officers, four 
men who had been following him 
in another vehicle drove up beside 
his truck, and in true wild west 
fashion covered him with pistols, 
and while his hands were high in 
the air three of their number t#ok 
charge of 16 cases of the consign- 
ment. 

Smith says there were two oth- 
er persons on the truck with him, 
and they, too, were covered. 

The report of the albged rob- 
bery was made to E. C. Hall, Ken- 
ton county patrolman, who drove 
to the place designat3d by Smith, 
but found no trace of the robbers. 

Hall says he saw broken glass 
on the road, indicating a few bot- 
tles had been broken there. 



BOONE COUNTY BOY 

W. W. Gaines Elected Member 

of Atlanta, 6a., School 

Board. 



Atlanta's board of education will 
be headed for 1921 by W. W. 
Gaines* a newly-elected member 
of the board from the second 
school district, comprising the 
2nd and 3rd wards. Mr. Gaines was 
unanimously elected to tha presi- 
dency at the first meeting of the 
new board. 

He is a well-known lawyer, 
and was for some time president 
of the board of trustees of th.» 
Carnegie library. He was in that 
office when elected to serve on 
the school board. A native of Ken- 
tucky, Mr. Gaines is a graduate of 
Washington and Lee University, a 
moderator in the Atlanta Baptist 
association and is prominently 
connected with the _flaorgia Bafr- 
tlst association. 

In his address of acceptance Mr 
Gaines pleaded for adaqua-Le com- 
pensation for teachers; b?.tt-»r 
school buildings; a business ad- 
ministration of the schools ; more 
money either through an emer- 
gency tax or a bond issue; and 
harmony between the school de- 
partment and the city government. 



1920 Cold Yoar. 

No weather records were broken 
during 1920, according to the an- 
nual summary compiled by the 
Weather Bureau, which character- 
ized the year as a cold one. No 
extrefne temperatures were re- 
corded, the minimum being 4 de- 
grees above zero, occurring Feb- 
ruary 16, and the maximum, on 
July 24, was 96 degrees. Rainfall 
was below normal, despite exces- 
sive rains in January, March and 
April. Long, dry periods offset 
the downpours of these three 
months. Snowfalls totaled 6.9. in- 
ches, but the white blanket did 
not lie on the ground for any 
length Of time. Other statistics 



PBEPABE NOW FOB 
APPROACHING GARDEN 

If Covor Crop Was Not Sown 

Plow or Spado 

The Soit. 

Whether it is condisc*^ ' ;»"<** 
extetisive scale to supply the 
market or whether it is to pro- 
duce food for the family the 
garden plot is likely to be the 
most profitable acreage on the 
. farm. Gardening really begins in 
show there were 108 rainy days, the fall. When the last vegeta- 
forty-four thunder showers, five bles have been removed and stor- 
dense fogs, 134 cloudy days, eighty ed the -rudent gardener sets 



|CSttiGat u ^'- 

occurred April 14, and the first 
autumn frost appeared October 30 



Old Hotel Dismantled. 



Judges Fees Whitaker, of Letch- 
er county, in announcing his can- 
didacy for the House of Repres- 
entative, says : 

"I am the speechless barefoot 
boy — never spoke a word until I 
was 12 years old— the industrious 
son of a noble widow, soldier, 
sailor, crack shot of the United 
States Array, one of the navyts ex- 
pert ana accurate gunmen, cham- 
pion pugilist ot Whitesburg, mas- 
terful railroader, rough rider, po- 
litician, author, champion of the 
rights and liberties of the common 
people, a great factor In develop- 
ing Eastern Kentucky's coal fields, 
Jailer of Letcher county, a victim 
of unjust eircumstsnees, a martyr 
for tho rights and liberties of the 
common people, Judge of Lotcher 
court and candidate for Congress 
in 1922.'' 

Representative- O M Young of 
North Dukutu, Republic m mem- 
ber of the Ways und MWm Com- 
mittee, la nut altogether piemen 
ulth the tariff hearings now 
In progress before that l»ody, The 
cause of Mi Young>a displeasure 
•rems to.be the- scramble of man- 
ufacturers to get some of <h* tariff 
subsidise which the House has 
■trsody fotad to the farmers 



Hustle or Step Down. 

There are two ways for a busi- 
ness man to become more pros- 
perous. The first is by active com 
petition among his neighbors. If 
he is a live one, he realizes to the 
full the law of life, that he must 
hustle or younger and brighter 
men will get ahead of him. He 
must get out after trade or he 
will get out of trade. But an ad- 
ditional prosperity can be acquir- 
ed, outside of whatever can be 
realized as the result of success- 
ful . competition with your neigh- 
bors, by united effort to make 
the home town grow. The ad- 
vance of a whole community 
brings an accretion to every ons 
who owns real estate or a busi- 
ness, or who has an income de- 
pendent on the prosperity of his 
neighbors. The increment brings a 
new prosperity without much ef- 
fort. As your houselot grows in 
value the more houses are built 
around it, so your business grows 
more valuable as more poo pie read 
your advertising or pass your 
door. 

No man is doing his duty by his 
own business unless he sets apart 
a certain modicum of effort to be 
voted to measures to make his 
home town grow. Any town can 
be made to grow by systematic 
and common sense efforts to at- 
tract new residents and industries. 

Communities are like stores; it 
takes advertising to attract in- 
terest and attention. Often i t is 
not advertising spread broadcast 
that lands new business. If every 
community does all it canto help 
its young men who have new en- 
terprises to start, it lays the 
foundation for concerness that will 
become prosperous and bring peo- 
ple to the town. 

A dozen active business m->n 
with faith in the fu.ure of their 
own town, will give some time 



Louisville, Ky. — The imposing 
drawing room, where royalty re- 
ceived, and its famous -ballroom, 
where the 19th century belles Of 
Kentucky danced with the swains 
of their day, dismantled, Louis- 
ville's most imposing relic of his- 
toric days, the Gait House, is 
nothing but a shell. Workmen, em 
ployed by contractors, are rapid- 
ly dismantling the inferior in prep 
aration for final razing of the 
walls to make way for a modern 
commercial structure. Standing at 
the corner of Main and Secona 
streets and occupying the entire 
block, the hotel, for almost a half 
century, was the center of Louis- 
ville and Kentucky's social life. 
There the debutantes were intro- 
duced to society and the disting- 
uished visitors entertained. ItB 
lobby was one of the most impos- 
ing of any hotel in the country 
in the days when it was erected 
and its halls of the most spacious. 
But modern hotels, eracted in dis- 
tant sections of the business dis- 
trict took away business from 
the old hostlery and it was forccci 
out of business lasfMuly. The buil I 
ing was sold and plans made for 
a modern commercial building on 
the site. The hotel, when it was 
built, was said to be the finest 
in the United States and also one 
of the largest. Reports current here 
for many years have it that 1,- 
000,000 bricks were used to lav tho 
first layer of walls. 

Gratified. 



seven partly cloudy days, seven- 
ty-nine days when the tempera- 
ture fell below freezing point, 13 
days with temperature above !<0 
degrees, and 59 par cent, out of a 



To the School Boys and 
Girls of America : 

I have been gratified to hear oi 
the fine record you made last year 
in saving money, and of your in- 
vestment in Thrift Stamps , and 
War Savings Stamps. Your Gov- 
ernment is proud that the young, 
people of the Nation are develop- 
ing these most practical habits, i 
can assure you that the money 
you are now investing in Govern 
ment savings securities is very 
helpful in meeting your country* 
great responsibilities. While vou 
are aiding your Government tn.ru 
the purchase of the securities, 
you are forming habits which will 
be most valuable in the future in 
the mastery of your personal ana 
financial affairs. I congratulate 
you on your record and encourage 
you to continue this splendid 
work. Sincerely Yours, 
D. F. liwUSTON, 
Secretary. 

Tobacco Salos. 

New burley sold in Kentucky 
last month averaged 11.2c a pound 
compared with 47c a pound for 
that sold the previous December, 
the report issued at Frankfort 
by Commissioner of Agriculture W 
C. Hanna revealed. 

Sales of that type totaled but 
517,650 pounds against 47,255,97 7 in 
December, 1919, and the money 
involved was $57,040 compared 
with | 22.25 1.962 in the Dec. pre- 



BEAD OF FAMILY GETS 

$2,000 EXEMPTION 

Not Incomes of $1,000 or Over 

if Single and $2,000 or 

Over If Married Must 

Bo Reported. 

Single persons, -though required 
to file a return if their net in- 
come for 1920 was $1,000 or more, 
are, if they are the heads of fam- 
ilies, granted a special exemption 
under the revenue laws. Such a 
person is defined by Treasury 
regulations as "a person who ac- 
tually supports and maintains in 
one household one or more indi- 
viduals who are closely connect- 
ed with him by blood relationship, 
relationship by marriage or by- 
adoption, and whose right to ex- 
ercise family control and provide 
for these dependent individuals i* 
based upon some moral or legal 
obligation.'' Such persons are al- 
lowed the exemption of $2,000 
granted a married person. In ad- 
dition, they are allowed a creoit 
of $200 for each dependent under 
18 years of age or incapable of self 
support because mentallv or physi- 
cally defective. 

HUSBAND AND WIFE. 

A married person nving with hus 
band and wife can not -ehwm an 
additional $2,000 exemption as the 
head of a family. His or her ex- 
emption is based upon the mar- 
ital status, Irrespective of the 
support of others living in the 
same household. The additional 
$200 credit for dependents does 
not apply to the husband or wife 
of a taxpayer. For example, if a 
married man supports a father 
who is incapable of self-support, 
he is entitled to the $200 credit 
for such person. If through force 
of circumstances he supports his 
wife away from home he is entit- 
led to the $2,000 exemption al- 
lowed a married person, but not 
to a $200 credit for a dependent. 

A son who has left home but 
who sends his mother more than 
one-half the sum required for 
her support is entitled to the 
$200 credit, provided the mother 
can not support herself. Other- 
wise, the amount must be considr 
ered as a gift, and, therefore the 
credit is not allowed. A son liv- 
ing at home and supporting his 
father, mother or other relative 
may claim the $2,000 exemption al- 
Jowed the head of a family, but 
not the $200 credit unless such rel- 
ative is under 18 years ofagp. or 
incapable of self-support. 



about to prepare the ground for 
the next year's crop. 

Any rubbish, dead vines or plants 
and bean poles or tomato vines 
should be cleared away, says the 



each week to working out plans j ceding. However the volume of 
taking advantage of oppor- | business would have been cpn- 



tunities that otherwise would" pass 
unnoticed, can work wonders.— 
Reformer. 



Killed by A Train. 

Miss Julia White was run 
and killed instantly at a railroad j a t"an"aVCTage *ofTlS8c 
crossing in Chicago, last Tuesday i B > 



over 



siderably more had not the loose 
leaf floors been forced to delay 
their openings. 

The grand total and average of 
all new tobacco sold last month 
was 4,603,125 pounds at 7.27c Old 
tobacco sales totaled 4,164,100 lbs 



evening. Her body was badly 
mangled. No one saw the accident 
the engineer, who stated he was 
within a very few feet of her 
when she stepp'd in front of the 
engine about 3 p. ra and U-ing j 8tore of Tee "now" fo7* coding m 

and for household use next sum- 



Ice-Harvest Time. 

Farmers who have not already 
done so should prepare to lay by 



dark, the engineer said he did not 
think Miss White heard the ap- 
proach of the engine. Miss White 
was a stenographer and had been 
employed in tlie office of the 
same attorney in Chicago for 20 

{rears. She was a daughter of tho 
ate H. Clay White and wife, who 
resided in this county some years 
ago She was a niece <>f Chariot 
White awd the |«U William Whim 
of this eouuty 

She leaves a brother, W.T. Whit!« 
and threw siatera. Ml** KaM< 
White, Mrs. A P Unter, Mn liar 
ry Webb, and a number <>< oth«i« 
relatives and ft lendi Th ■ i 
was interred In Highland «v 
tsrv last Thursday b«alde those 
of her father and mother 



raer. In places where .nature 
provides a sufficiently low temp- 
erature, the coot of harvesting and 
storing ic» is low when com- 
pared with the saving ef footed Or 
dinarily, it Is safe to harvest 2 
tons of ice for each cow in the 
herd This will allow fpr melt in; 
and leave enough for fannU 
tiee«»«, Wher<* enntm <*n»r t« nolrt 
about one-third of that quantity 
of Ice will be uesded 

Two farmers' bulletins, No < - 1. 
lee Housmi and the tJm of i. 
on the Parm, and No, I07«, Har- 
vesting and Storing ler- on the 
farm, may b» had by applying tu 
th* Division of Publication*, l' M 
J Dapartmsnt o» Agriculture, 



Your Friond-The Skunk. * 

A woman walked into a depart- 
ment store, according to a story 
the boys are telling, and said to 
the clerk, "Have you any skunk? > 

"Why, yes,'' was the answer 
"I'll call the floorwalker^' 

Now why is it that the lowly 
polecat is held in such bad re- 
pute? True, you don't want him 
around when you are giving agar 
den party, but if folks would 
but realize it the skunk is one 
of the best friends th? food-pro- 
ducing farmer has 

His assistance in destroying mice, 
grasshoppers, crickets and white 
grubs is considerable in a year. An 
employee of the bureau of biolog- 
ical survey, says that every far- 
mer might well have twoor three 
dozen skunks working for him 
all year round with profit. Thev 
would yield, besides, from #50 to 
$100 a year in fur. 

Instead then of wiping out the 
skunk dens why not turn this win- 
ter to a very real enemy? Yes, 
we are about to warm you that 
you ought to sawt the flv. There 
is one buzzing about in* most 
homes. She will be the grand- 
mother of myriads in July and Au 
lust. Spare your friends and kill 
your endmies. Let the skunks 
alone and swat the winter flv — 
Tampa Tribune. 

Champion Corn Raisers. 

J. W Butler, North Rend, Ohio, 
has been mimed champion of Ham 
llton county in the men-* lo-.ure 
iiirn contest, conducted by the 
Hamilton county farm bureau ami 
Ohio Slhtc l ; iMverid*y His svrr- 
age yield, when reduoed to a 
moisture oontoiU of 20 net 1 

Was B7 TA Initiels ati aert. on to 
acres Baa* H:iy*, North Hi 
ed 7H58 buihela to an a 



rtcutture, and the ground sown to 
rye or some other green crop to 
prevent the looso earth from 
washing under the winter rains. 
A clover crop also improves the 
physical condition of the soil. 
When a cover crop can not be 
supplied the next beet thing that 
may be done is to plow or spade 
the soil and allow it to lie rough 
throughout the winter. This prac 
tice dostroys many mseom that 
lie just below the surface The 
winter frosts have a lightening 
effect upon the soil, especially on 
clay soils. 

The earliest and choicest veget- 
ables ars harvested by the man 
who maintains a few hotbed sash- 
es and uses them to start his gar- 
den. He is able to handicap the 
frost line by several weeks, and 
to set strong, weU developed 
plants in his garden at a time 
his neighbors are planting seed. 

The farm income is at its lowest 
point in the early spring, but it 
can be increased considerably by 
the sale of young plants grown in 
the hotbeds and ready for trans- 
planting. Tomato, cabbage, egg- 
plant, and pepper plants are al- 
ways snapped up when the first 
warm planting days come, and 
they are easily grown in the hot- 
bed. A little more space and a 
little more seed than the grower 
needs for his own use are likely 
lv to bring good profits. Before 
the groundT freeaas in the fall is 
a good time to clean out the old 
hotbeds. 

Unless the soil used in the hat- 
bed is to be exchanged for fresh 
earth it should • be shoveled from 
the bed and tossed into a pile 
near by. The decayed manure from 
the bottom is scattered over the 
pile and thoroughly mixed with 
it to form rich soil for next vear»s 
beds. Over this goes a coat of 
straw or leaves held down by bits 
of boards to keep it from blow- 
ing. 

Some farmers find it conven- 
ient to use evergreen boughs in- 
stead of straw for Hto outer cov- 
ering. 

New hotbed pits should be dug 
so that they will face the south, 
and the location shoakt be select- 
ed so that the beds will be pro- 
tected from cold winds and late 
spring storms. Sometimes the 
earth taken from the new pit is 
suitable for use in the hotbed, 
but this is the exception rather 
than the rule. A few loadsof leaf 
mold from the woods mixed with 
the natural soil will often form a 
smooth, rich, stoneless mass which 
gives an ideal hotbed filler. 

The back or north side of the 
frame is usually from 12 to 18 
inches high, while the south end 
is about eight inches, so that 
the whole bed may have pitch 
enough to get the sun upon all 
parts. The standard hotbed sash 
is handled by most dealers, and 
measures three feet in width and 
six feet in length. A frams just 
wide enogh to support the cash 
seems to be the most satisfactory, 
though wider beds are sometimes 
used with supporting ridges plac- 
ed at b-foot intervals A well- 
painted cypress sash, glazed with 
good double strength glass well 
set in putty should give the care- 
ful gardener 12 to 16 years* ser- 
vice. 

Heat for the hotbed is furnisTT- 
ed by means of a bed of horse 
manure 8 to 16 inches thick in 
the bottom of the pit. Perma- 
nent hotbeds are ofteniheated with 
coils of steam or hot-water pi]>eB 
under the bed. 

Hotbeds require constant care 
to prevent their becoming over- 
heated, especially during bright 
weather 



I tit first ( ia . 
»M (ui limbed ..inn 
spring like weather, 



*eiv fillet 



Candidates for county offices 
will find electioneering a much 
harder job this time than ever 
before. As women havo been giv- 
en the right of suffrage, and they 
will, for the first time, use this 
right at the coming August pri- 
mary, in selecting county officials, 
it will require the candidates to 
see Just twice the number of vot- 
ers as heretofore— aid to do a 
great deal more talking-as the 
women will be harder to convince 
that he is the proper person to 
fill the office to which he aspires. 
It would pay a candidate to have 
bis little "spiel printed in 
pamphlet form and mail them in 
advunce of his eauVAaa, 

Krom a recent report of the As- 
sociation of iViuericuu Colleges it 
la learned thai there are 5O0.0M 
college Students, or one to every 
111 pcraojM in ^h t . United States, 
now utt.iiiloi,' inetttuioni of l*ara 
ing in (hi* country The report 
•how* > hit the growth of 
hqfh arhoola t, prodigi. 
UUl 1 tir<.-i portion of 
school atudwnt* ia goiug to 
lege eaeh y«ar 



•A 



' o^ 

hliJ 

«o|- 



BOONS COUNTY KICORDII 



T~ 




If You Have Been Waiting *> r Lower Prices 

You need wait no longer as prices are now back to the pre-war level and in some cases 

LOWER THAN THEY WERE BEFORE THE WAR. 



E 



t 



We are selling Men's and Boys' Work Pants, Overalls, 
Work Shirts, Etc., at greatly reduced prices. 



Men's $2.50 High Grade Union-made Blue 
Denim Overalls. Now 



$1.39 



Men's $1.50 Blue Chambray Work Shirts— 
with collar attached. Now 



98c 



Men's 25c Cotton Lisle Hose in all colors and 
sizes. Now 



12c 



Men's $1.50 Heavy Ribbed Shirts and Drawers- 
big - values — now selling at 



79c 



Men's 75c Dark Blue all yarn socks— double 
toes and heels. Now 



39c 



Men's 35c Dark Brown Jersey Cotton Gloves 
with knit wristlets. Special 



19c 



Men's Heavy $2 Cotton Coat Sweaters with collar 
and 2 pockets. Special 



$1.39 



Men's 15c White Hemstiched full size 
Handkerchiefs. Special 



6c 



Men's $4 All-Wool Flannel Shirts in dark 
brown. Special 



$2.50 



Boy's Heavy Ribbed Union Suits winter 
weight. Special 



98c 



We have built up a reputation for selling GOOD Shoes 

and are therefore carelul of the kind of shoes 

we sell our customers. 



Ladies* Fine Dress Shoes in dark brown or black 
in military style, medium heels; $5.50 values.. 



$3.98 



Ladies' $5.00 Dark Brown Oxfords, 
new spring styles at 



See these 



$3.49 



Misses and Children's Kid or Gnu Metal Work 
Shoes ; $3.00 values — Special 



$1.98 



Men's $5 Chrome Elk Hide Work Shoes ; strictly 



solid. Special, 



$3.50 



Boys' Fine Gun Metal Calf Shoes, made in 6ft QQ 

English style ; $4.00 values }>Z. UU 



Boys' and Girls 29c Black Cotton Ribbed Hose; 
all colors. Special 



15c 



Buy your "BALL BAND" Felt Boots, Rubbers and Rubber Boots here 
OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST. 




ERLANGER, KY 



We can save you money on Dry Goods and Piece Goods 
of all kinds— buy here and you will be sure of get- 
s' ting the right prices at all times. 



39c Pine Dress Ginghams 27 in. wide in beautiful plaids, 
checks, stripes, etc., in a big selection of colors and 4 Qf% 
designs of all kinds. Selling now at | Ut> 



40c Heavy Bleached Muslin, fine soft finish free 
from dressing, 36 in. wide. Selling now at. . . . 



18c 



We are selling the best grade of yard wide Percales in 4 A^ 
a big assortment of light figures and stripes at | J U 



CLARK'S O. N. T. Thread all numbers. 
Spool 



7£c 



30c Heavy Unbleached Muslin fine smooth finish 
Per yard, ~^. . 



15c 



St 



SAN SILK in all colors. Spool 8c 



Ladies' 29c Black Cotton Lisle Hose, double toes 
and heels. Special . . , , . 



19c 



Women's 75c Ribbed Vests or Pants, medium 
weight. Special * 



49c 



25c Linen Finish Toweling fine even weave. 
See this big value. at per yard , 



15c 



HAS ADMIRATION OF WORLD 



Capitol at Washington Recognized As 

the Finest and Noblest Building 

on the Earth. ■ 

Foundations for the central struc- 
ture of the present copltol In Washing- 
ton were finished on August 21, 1818. 
The old capitol had only two wings, 
connected by a covered wooden bridge, 
which was destroyed and the wings 
damaged by the British, who set fire to 
the building In 1814. Three years la- 
ter congress voted to remove the wings 
anff build the new central structure, 
which with Its dome was* completed In 
1829. 

-The two great marble extension 

wings In which the senate and bouse 

of representatives meet were begun In 

1851 and completed for occupancy in 

^or.n ffj, e „],} d on , e> made f wood 

and brick, was torn away in 1855. and 
the present dome completed In 1864. 
The great statue of the goddess of 
freedom, which rests upon the dome, 
was designed by Thomas Crawford, 
father of Marlon Crawford, novelist. 
Charles Bulfinch of Boston was the 
architect of the original central struc- 
ture and Thomas U. Walter designed 
the marble extensions and the present 
dome. He was a Philadelphia^. 
The total cost of the present capitol 
was about $10,000,000, and It has been 
pronounced by architectural authori- 
ties, both Id America and Europe, to be 
the greatest and noblest building in the 
world.— Chicago Journal. 



KNOWS NOW HOW IT FEELS 



Dentist, Given Emergency Toothache 

Treatment, Dreads Further Ordeal 

of a Session In the Chair. 

A haggard-faced man rushed Into 
the Park Emergency hospital shortly 
after 8 o'clock a few mornings ago. 

"For the love of mud will you give 
me something to stop a raving tooth- 
ache? It's bad me up all night, and 
rve tried everything," he moaned to 
the steward in attendance. 

The steward made the paln-rldden 
patient comfortable in a chair and 
then Applied soothing remedies to the 
offending molar. 

"Why, the pain's gone," the patient 
exclaimed after a while. 

"Well, that tooth won't bother you 
any more for a while, but you had bet- 
ter see a dentist In the morning," said 
the steward. 

"Guess I'll have to," said the patient 
gloomily. 

"Everybody hates to go to a dentist," 
remarked the steward. "Will you give 
me your name for our records?" 

"Yes," said the patient. "I am Dr. 
A. Karageorge." 

"Are you a physician?" asked the 
steward. 

"No, I'm a dentist," smiled the pa- 
tient "I have cured scores and scores 
of aching teeth, but this one of mine 
sure unnerved me. Guess I'll have to 
go to a dentist In (he morning. Geo, I 
bate to." — San Francisco Chronicle. 



c 



oeasssasasoi 

MAURER & RYLE 

GRANT, KENTUCKY 

Have the exclusive sale of 

Crown Overalls, Jackets and SMrts 

IN BELLEVIEW. 

Overall and Jacket 

$1.75 each 

Maurer & Ryle, 



I 



I 



Grant, 



Kentucky 




I 



School Notes. 

NOTICE— Examination* for Cum 
moo School Diploma* will be held 
in Burlington Jan. 28th and i'»th, 
lttl. All desiring to tuke this 
examination will pleaae report at 
• a m., January 88th. 

J. C. GORDON , Hupt. 



C 
and 



O. Hamptllflg, of Tayk 
John West, of Walton, 




oranort, 
vers 

y morning 
10 situation 

, ▼• fcttesdwd 

el ts# tobaooo grow 

and have 

l» thos* 



I ye£ Y I Aaf I ' Ml 

iTjSRT 



From three-fourth.* to seven- 
eighths of the mixed fertilizer sold 
to farmers consist of inert mat- 
ter which does not contribute to 
the fertility of the soil, but on 
which freight must be paid ana 
which must be ground and bag- 
ged and transported, is one of 
the fundamentals in the fertilizer 
industry. If a means were devis- 
ed by which farmers could buy 
practically" undiluted plant food 
and make up their own mixtures, 
an enormous saving would be ef- 
fected, and any method that 
would decrease the amount of 
inert matter carried in fertilizer 
would bo of great benefit to the 
agriculture of the country. The 
quantity of filler used is only a 
minor phase of this problem, but 
perhaps the part of it which in 
most easily susceptible of im- 
provement while the present gen- 
eral methods prevail in the in- 
dustry. 



Eating to Live Well. 

No one can have health who eats 
too much. 

No one dan have health who eats 
too often. 

No one can have health who 
eats when tired, hurried, worried, 
anxious or excited. 

No one can have health who 
rises late, gulps down a hearty 
breakfast, b wallows a sandwich 
and a glass of milk for lunch ana 
tops oft the whole performance 
with a late supper. When you hav« 
eaten, do not wonder if the food 
will agree with you. When you 
Legin to wonder, trouble begins. 
If you fear it, do not eat it ; if 
you eat it, do not fear it. 

Be cheerful at your meals. A 
sour countenance wUl give you a 
sour stomach.— Good Raaltti 



For Sale. 

2 10-gal. Milk Cans, one with faucet 

1 30-1 b. Cap Butter Worker 

1 15 gal. Stone Jar 

1 6-gal. Bucket, with lid 

1 Heavy 10-qt. Milk Pail 

1 Strainer 

All on sale now but dairy supplies, 
which can be had on Feby. 25th. 

2 Leather Halters (horse or cow) 
2 Tie Chains 

2 Tie-out Chains. 30 ft. long 

1 Plow, J ton Straw 

1 Harrow, Sewing Machine 

1 1 1-4 Gasoline Engine (Vim) 

1 Writing Desk, Lamp 

1 Dresser, cir walnut 

1 Extension Table— oak 

1 Oil Air Oil Stove-3 burners 

1 Oil Air Oil Stove Oven 

Several doz. Fruit Jars— i gallons, 

quarts and pints 

1 1-gal. Gasoline Can. 

* MICHAEL KAHR, 

Ludlow, Ky. f R. F. D. 



DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

v5s.DENTIST^S-* 

Will be at Burlington every Monday 
prepared to do all dental work- 
painless extraction, bridge and plate 
work a specialty. 

All Work Guaranteed 



The State of Kentucky will be 
divided into five districts with 12 
veterinarians in each district. 
This arrangement has been com- 
pleted by Dr. K. N. Simmons, State 
Veterinarians will carry on the 
work of eradicating hog cholera 
and tuberculoma of cattle. 

Dr. J. A. Winkler, with hcad- 
parters at Newport, and Dr Hick- 
man, with heudquartcts at Cov- 
ir.gton, are in churgc of the first 
district which comprises the 
counties, of Carroll, lloone, Galla- 
tin, Campbell, Owen, Grant, Pend- 
leton. Bracken, Harrison, Hubert- 
son, M#son, Nlt'huliii, Hath, Low la, 
Fleming, Kowan. Elliott arid Car- 
ter 

In the year p*e< the Araeiloaji 
*'**f Ion , doubled In mtranWrahU 
and added JU17 , M *ti, ar«>ordla| 
to National Headquarter* 



Resorts thruout Kentucky will 
not be given permits to open up 
next season, or, in the case of 
those which are open the year 
around, to continue to operate 
unless the drinking water that 
they use is absolutely safe, unless 
they have an adequate system for 
the disposal of sewage, and un- 
less their kitchens and dining- 
rooms are screened against files. 

Notice to this effect will be for- 
mally given all the resorts of the 
State by Dr. A. T. McCormack, 
State Health Officer, Louisville. 



Tuesday's Tobacco Market 

At Covington Tuesday 110,000 lbs., 
were sold at an avarage of $12 69. 
About 11,000 pounds was rejected. 
The "ale dragged and prices were 
lower at the close of the sals. Some 
farmers ware hauling their tobacco 
to their barns, while others were 
hauling to the market. 

At Aurora the sales were stopped 
because the bidders would not bid 
satisfactory prices. 

Ransom Ryle shipped a trnok load 
<>f fat hogs to market Tusada y. Ha 
received satisfactory prices. 



seNtaatjIl 



prase ut M.4 per oeutof the pep 
of America is 



> posses joA 

who live In towns Off elites* 

I So the 4M the* they oagat 

the land, far their own 



r ••'.■■-.. 



PUBLIC Sill, 



I will sell at public auction at the late 
residence of Geo. E. Rouse, deceased 

a* 

at Florence, Boone county, Ky., 



wi 



January 29th, '21 



The Following Property :* 



Three Diston Saws, Hack saw, 
Keyhole saw, 6-ft. Cross cut saw, 
3 1-2 ft. Crosscut saw, Stone hammer, 
Large steel bars, small steel bars, 
Wire netting, 2 lanterns, roof fastners, 
2 Posthole diggers, Carpet sweeper, 
Fence hooks and fastners, nail puller, 

2 Mole traps, Sycle, 2 tree prunners, 

3 hand augers, 4 whitewash brushes, 
2 garden rakes, 2 garden hoes, spade, 
Scoop, maddox 3 long handle shovels, 

2 post rammers, 2 hay forks, 2 plaJnes, 
Knife grinder, wood mallet, files, 
Chicken wire netting, pinchers, 

1-2, 1-4, 1-8 bushel measures, 
Boering machine and augers. 
Veterinary dose syringe, saw set, 

3 Steel ohisles, 8 wood chisles,, ax, 

2 Monkey wrenches, harness punch, 
Lot mixed nails, gimlet bitts, 



13 auger bitts, hammer, hatchet, 
Wire fastners, 3 morticing chisles, 
4 long augers, blacksmith pinchers, 
TrOwles. hayforks, wire holder, 
Large monkey wrench, rope, scythe, 
Potato digger, grubbing hoe, 
300 lb. stillards, foot adze, floor paint, 
Garden plow, lot lumber, scrap iroa, 
Hinges, paint brushes, wood stools, 
Wood bench, matting, sprinkler, 
Bu. willow basket, 5 .bu. basket, 
Potato hilling plow, lot old lumber, 
Grind stone, lawn swing, hand cart, 
18 2-bu. cotton sacks, 1-h. sled, 
Lot pine boxes, 2 wagon jacks, 
Buggy collar, spring wagon harness, 
Buggy harness, top spring wagon, 
14-ft. ladder, meat hogshead, 
Post puller, Rifle, coal tuckets, 
1-h. Oliver plow, and other articles 



% 



Terms Made Known on Day of Sale 



ut 



W. F. Bradford, 

Sale to begin at 1 o'clock p. m. 



Administrator. 



Efficient, Service and Economy 

IS MY SLOGAN , 

0. SOOTT.CH AMBERS 

Maimer and Funeral Director 





I ■. *sa..^m, 



w* 






• > 



w 






fioeaf and Personal 



n 



Foreign Advertising Rrpreeentatfr* 
THE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 



Boone Co. Urth trail Pastor it t 

Rbv. Geo. A. Royhb, P Aaron. 
Sunday, Jan. 23rd. 1921. 

Hebron, 9:80 a. m., Sunday School. 

2.80 p. m. regular service. 

Hopeful, 10,80 a. tn. Catechetical in- 

■tractiont, 
, 11. a.m. regular service. 

All are cordially invited to these 
services. 

__ I 

Boone Co. Christian Pastorate 

C. C. Otner, Pastor 

SUNDAY, JAN. Mrd, 1911. 

Pt. Pleasant, Snnday Sebool 10 a. in. 

Preaching 11 a. m. 

Preaching 7 p. m. 

The public is nrged to be present. 



Ed. Cloud la seriously ill at his 
Borne out on the Bellevtew pike. 

P. Walton Dempsey of Erlanger. 
made a business trip to Bur- 
lington laat Saturday. 

Mr*. B. B. Hume spent one day 
the past week with her daughter, 
Hiss Maud, in Covington. 

A. W. Corn and R. C. Gaines, of 
Erlanger, were transacting busi- 
ness in Burlington, last Thursday. 

If any plowing ha* been done 
in thiA countv for the 1M1 crop 
this writer has no knowledge of 
it. 



The Retail Merchants Associa- 
tion of this counity are discussing 
the question of selling for cash 
only. 

, Rev. D. E. Bedinger and family, 
of Richwood, have gone to St. 
Petersburg, Florida, to spend the 
winter. 

Congressman A. B. Rouae spent 
a few hours in Burlington, Satur- 
day. ,He returned to Washington 
Sunday. 

Several Burlington young men 
attended the dance at Hebron last 
Friday night and report having a 
gay time. 

P. 1 P. Hunter and wife, of Dixie 
Highway, left Jan. 15, on a south- 
ern trip to Porto Rico, Jamacia, 
and Venusela. 



James D. Acra. who has been 
quite sick for several days with 
something like grippe, is able to 
be up and about again. 

A great many county papers are 
carrying announcements of can- 
didates for conufcy offices at the 
coming August primary. 

If you are looking for a real 
cheap funeral I have it for you. 
C. Scott Chambers, Walton, Ky. 

ljan-4t 

By the end of this month it will 
be noticed that the daya are con- 
siderably longer than they were 
during the holiday period. 

Ben F. Bedinger and family, of 
Richwood, will spend the winter 
at Jensen, Florida. The Recorder 
will visit them every, week. 

• Mrs. Vina Kirkpatrick entertain- 
ed at dinner, last Sunday, J. M; 
Barlow and wife, W. C. Weaver 
and wife, and Lloyd Weaver and 
wife. 

Miss Margaret Hughes, who is 
employed in the Cincinnati post- 
office, spent Saturday night and 
Sunday with relatives in and near 
Burlington. 

Geo. E. McGlasson, of Hebron 
neighborhood, left Jan. 12th for 
Long Key, Fla., where h» Joinea 
Mr. and Mrs. Jay Stevens on their 
yacht, Oasis, for a month's cruise. 

' The county is constructing a nine 
foot boulevard on the southeast 
section of Union street over which 
to reach its' garage where it will 
store its trucks when not in use. 



=S= 



BOOWa COUWTT RBCORDBR 



Sam Pettlt delivered his tobac- 
co, to "Pep»' Smith last Monday. 

Misses Ruth and Elizabeth Kel- 
ly visited their sister, Mrs, Dean 
Stanley, of Lebanon, Ohio, last 
Saturday and Sunday. 

Tobacco is selling for a price 
much less than the eost of pro- 
duction, yet some growers want 
to cultivate a crop during 1921. 

Mrs. Fannie Snyder after a visit 
of several days with her sister, 
Mrs. Alice Snyder, returned to her 
home at Petersburg, Monday. 

Any farmer who raises a crop 
of tobacco during 1921 must make 
no complaint if he has to sell 
it for less than It cost to pro- 
duce it. ■ 

Mrs. G. W. Tolin and Miss Shir- 
ley Tolin spent one night last week 
with their aunt, Miss Dora Rich, 
in Covington, and attended the 
theater. 



Richard Penn and wife return- 
ed home laat Thursday, from a 
visit of several days-, with his 
brother and other relatives in 
Scott counity. 

Deputy Sheriff B. B. Hume and 
County Atty. B. H. Riley were in 
Big Bone bailiwick one day last 
week disposing of several impor- 
tant business propositions. 

Miss Kathryn Brown, who has 
been holding a government posi- 
tion in Washington, D. C, for 
the past three years returned homo 
last Sunday, having resigned her 
position. 

The last report from R. A. 
Brady, who is spending the win- 
ter in St. Petersburg, Fla., was 
to the effect that he was enjoy- 
ing life sitting before a glowing 
wood fire. 



C. C. Hughes and wife are mak- 
ing their arrangements to spend a 
few weeks at Dillsboro, Indiana, 
hoping to improve Mr. Hughe's 
health which has been very poor 
for several months. 



Superintendent J. C. Gordon and 
wife spent from last Saturday af- 
ternoon until Tuesday with her 
relatives in Walton, and Mr. Gor- 
don attended the tobacco sale at 
the Farmers' Loose L:»:if House. 



The Lexington tobacco ware- 
house men wero tht? fh'st to decide 
to open their warehouses, altho 
they had promised the growers 
that they would not do so until 
requested by them to begin the 
sales. 



One of the local tobacco grow- 
ers who signed the cut-out pliKige 
says he signed not only for the 
year 1921 but for all time !to come 
His experience in the tobacco field 
evidently has not been very satis- 
factory. 

Dont fear to patronize those 
merchants and business men whos? 
advertisements appear in our pa- 
per. They are all reliable firms 
and we will not, knowingly carry 
advertising matter for unreliabls 
business "fakirB." 



J. A. Barlow, of near Hebron, 
was transacting business in Bur- 
lington last Friday. While in town 
be called on the Recorder and had 
his subscription moved up anoth- 
er year. 

Thomas Abdon and family, who 
have been living in tho Hebron 
neighborhood, moved last Thurs- 
day to W. M Green's ffarm in 
Belleview bottoms, where Mr. Ab- 
don will crop the coming year. 

The stork visited the homo of 
Edgar C. RUey and wife, at St. 
Petersburg, Florida, and left with 
them a fine boy. This was the 
fifth visit of the stork and all 
were boys, four of whom are 
living. ^^ 

W. L. Crigler* from out on rural 
route No. 3 t and R. J, Akin from 
jout on rural route 1, sent us $1.50 
each Monday to boost their sub- 
scription up to January 1, 1922. 
These good friends have our 
thanks. 
. / i m 



Prospective candidates for Coun- 
ty Tax Commissioner should get 
busy studying the questions to be 
asked in the examinations which 
they must answer to qualify as a 
candidate for this very impor- 
tant office. 

Mrs. Fannie Adams, formerly of 
Burlington, but now living In 
liouisville, se-uls us a $ .'60 to ex- 
tend her subscription up another 
year. Mrs. Adams has been a mwn 
Lcr of the Recorder** reading cir 
cie> many years, and mav s£t be 
blessed with health and happiness 
many mors years, th*t she may 
tnjoy reading the news from her 
old hoaas 



We are always pleased to give 
space to any items of interest 
that may be handed us by our 
patrons and friends, and. we trust 
they will bear in mind that their 
favors in this direction are al- 
ways appreciated. Tell us tho 
news and we will herald it to th3 
public. 

Miss Sarah Crisler, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Glen Crisler, who 
live over on what is known as the 
C. L. Crisler farm, has been hav- 
ing a very serious time with ab- 
cesses in her throat. Miss Sarah 
is a nurse at Deaconess Hospital, 
Cincinnati, and being annoyed 
with her tonsils, she had them 
removed, since which she has 
been afflicted as abovo stated. 
She is at the hospital where she 
is receiving the very best of at- 
tention. 

Rev. Tomlln, the pastor, preach- 
ed two very interesting sermons 
at the Burlington M. FT church, 
last Sunday morning and evening. 
At the evening services he preach- 
ed upon "Thou Art weighed in the 
Balances and are found Wanting.'' 
This sermon was one of deep spir- 
itual character and should be an 
Inventive to all hearing it. Noth- 
incentive to all hearing it. Noth- 
preach at the above church on 
the fifth Sunday morning— there 
being no services at any of the 
other churches on that dav. 



A Week's News. 

♦ 

"Pep" may take the place of "vim" 
In the' dictionaries of future years 
according to Prof. Lynn H. Hurls, 
head of the English department at 
Franklin College, who sees no ob- 
jection to a moderate use of slang in 
conversation. 



When Elisabeth was Queen of 
England sbe was rsry partial to flhe 
gloves as presents, giving them to 
her friends and enjoying it very 
much when they were given to her. 



Per capita circulation of money In 
tbe country increased $8.28 last year. 
A Treasury statement today said 
tliaC on January 1, there was 96,810,- 
488,718 in circulation, or $69.12 per 
capita as compared with $5,960,882,- 
866, or $56.89 per capita on January 1, 
1020. 



The most active volcano in the 
world Ib Mount Sangay. It is 17,- 
196 feet high, situated on the eastern 
chain of the Andes, South America. 
It has been in constant eruption 
since 1728. 

♦♦♦♦ 

The British Navy is strong for the 
formalities, and when the naval 
cruiser Prince Rupert sank during 
the war, was to be raised, two div- 
ers went down ten fathoms and hoist 
ed the British flag into place, so that 
as the cruiser was hoisted the en- 
sign was in place and all raluted the 
colors. 



The essential difference between 
death and paying taxes is that a 
man knows he can finish dying. 
♦♦♦♦ 

The only woman's publishing house 
in the United States run entirely by 
women, with women as heads of all 
departments, is located In New 
York City in connection with the 
National Board of the Y. W. C. A. 



Savonth ft Madison 



How careless and forgetful the 
public can be is illustrated by the 
amazing collection of articles left 
behind in theaters. The manager of 
one playhouse is now awaiting claim 
ants for one set of false teeth, a bot- 
tle of whisky aud a pair of silk 
Htockings. 



Many farming communities in the 
United States have built commun- 
ity bouses within tbe last decade. A 
first hand Investigation of 260 of 
these community buildings has been 
completed by the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture during the 
last year. 

♦♦♦♦ 

|n olden times the yule log was 

always laid aside before it was 
burned out, so that the next Christ- 
mas Day the new yule log might be 
lighted from the charred-remains of 
its predecessors. 



For many months tbe little city 
of Coulogne, In the Aisue region of 
France, had only one chair, the 
property of the Mayor. Later the 
Junior Red Cross of America sent a 
great truck load of chairs and tables 
made by tbe boys in the manual 
training schools of this country. 



Bert Berkshire, from out on K„ 
D. one, was a visitor to Burling- 
ton, last Saturday, and while Tn 
town called at this office and 
left $1.50, for another year's sub- 
scription for his mother. He re- 
ports his mother, Mrs. Emily Ann 
Berkshire, who has passed her four 
score years in life's Journey or 
more aa enjoying the best of 
health. He said she ordered him to 
bring back some yarn that she 
might keep her knitting needles 
busy. This good old lady is one 
of our many readers who helped 
t.urse the Recorder white cutting 
its teeth. 

The ball has started to rolling 
for the offices in the primary 
election to bo hold on Saturday, 
August 6th. There will be many 
candidates for some of the offices 
and the campaign will be a long' 
drawn-out one. Every candidate 
will have ample time to meet and 
shake hands with the voters in the 
coming seven mouths, so do not 
spend all your powder early in 
the game. Make it a cfass cam- 
paign and refrain from knocking 
your opponents. The avers? > vot- 
er detests to listen to knocking. 
If you Win the nomination to which; 
you aspire, you will want rh*j 
support of your opponent In th« 
genera] election, so h- good sports 
now and say nothing you msy 
rog r* 



In the first two and a half months 
of prohibition San Francisco banks 
gained more than $666,640,000 in de- 
posits, which is said to be the swift- 
est Increase In bank wealth in the 
history of the city. 



Walking on tbe heel is the attitude 
of civilized man alone. The people 
of the woods who are much superior 
in their muscular development, all 
walk on the toe, as do the lower ani- 
mals. Taking this suggestion a 
French doctor prescribed a course of 
toe walking for patients who are de- 
ficient In chest development. 
♦♦♦♦ 

That much valuable material is 

being wasted annually by throwing 
away tomato seeds extracted In 
pulping, soup, catsup and canning 
plants Is indicated by investigations 
made by the United States Depart- 
ment of Agricnlture. Department in- 
vestigators have found that more 
than 1,000 tons of seed are thrown 
away annually in Northern tomato- 
pulping plants, with large enough 
output of seeds to pay for shipping, 
and that they may be made into ed- 
ible oil and stock food worth about 
$86,000 (December, 1919). Cost of col- 
lecting and preparing tbe seed is 
estimated at about $86,000, includ- 
ing all proper charges, and the cost 
of the necessary equipment is given 
at not lo exceed $50,000. 



It is said that near Thompson 
Falls, in Montana, there exists a 
well whence Issued a steady How of 
air. During tbe hottest days of 
summer, it is reported the tempera- 
ture of this curious well never rises 
above 66 degrees. Tbe man owning 
this well has put it to a good use. 
for over it he has built a small re- 
frigerating house in which to kesp 
the food for family use. From the 
well to his More be has also laid a 
pip*, ami through this eoinea the 
damp air of tbe well. The end of 
Ihsptps opens into a refrigerating 
room *4 tk-a store, »e> that this tea* 
ns%6s no ius to kerp his perishable 
NssfshaMtlM lo the best coudltkift. - 




Covington, Ky. 



NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S GREATEST STORE 



Coppin's 

and Lower Prices 



Many months ago, long before the recent price reductions, this 
store started a big downward price drive. "We took reductions, 
lots of them, and at that time seemed unnecessary, but have 
resulted in helping bring prices down to a normal level in the 
country. 



Note — We did not merely meet the low prices as they came, 
but rather COPPERS FORCED PRICES DOWN ; and with 
the aid of many other stores the nation over, leaders in their * 
respective cities, we have materially aided in bringing about the 
general reductions that have been given throughout the country. 

And, nowhere will you find in vague such low prices on ev- 
ery line of merchandise, as are awaiting you right here in 
this great 

January 
Clearance Sale 

Now In Progress 



~M 



3 






Sheriff's Sale lor Taxes 



Notice is hereby given that I, or 
one of my deputies will, on Monday, 
February 7th, 1921, it being Couuty 
Court day, between the hours of 10 
a. m. and 3 p. m , at the Court House 
door in tbe town of Burlington, 
Boone county, Ky., expose to public 
sale for cash in hand, the following 
property, or so much thereof as may 
be necessary to pay State, County 
and School taxes due thereon and 
unpaid for the year 1920, and the 
penalty, interest and costs thereon. 

For a complete description of prop- 
erty see assessors book for 1919, at 
tbe County Tax Commissioners of- 
fice. 

L. A, CONNER. 
Sheriff of Boone Counts. 



Burllneton Precinct— 
McCarty, Tobe, 46 acres $13.86 

Beaver Precinct- 
Boles, Cbas. S., town lot 209.82 

Roberts, Mrs. Agness, 66a 121.05 

Bellevue Precinct — 

Rice heirs, town lot 3.69 

Wlngate, L., nr 19 acres 11.12 

Constance Preclnot— 

Anderson, Bruce 8 aores 18.92 

Hood, John W., 40 acres 27.16 

Stephens, Jno. nr., 14 acres 6.15 

Teeters, Vesta, town lot 10.88 

Florence Precinct— 
Uiddell, P. B., 227 acres 385 95 

Hamilton Precinct- 
Black, Ben, town lot 9.97 

Kendall, O. C, nr. 294 acres 126.30 

Mclntyre, Geo., 9 acres 16.73 

Rice, Erastus, 2 acres 3.77 

Petersburg Precinct — 
Rector, G. W., town lot 15.74 

Union Preclnot — 
Hughes, Q. W., (col) 10 aores 17.04 

Verona Preclnot— 

Anderson, J. M., 18 acres 42.35 

Powers, John W.. 8 town lots 3.88 
Sturgeon, Lon, 73 aeres 48.74 

Walton Precinct- 
Franks, Wm., nr. IS aores 8 65 

Hopperton, Jos, town lot 15.07 

Kelly, E. L., 1 town lot and all 
personal property belonging 

to light plant 83.8S 

Morrison. Lissie, town lot 15.85 



Erlanger Garage 

WALTON DEMPSEY, Prop. 

Repair Work Absolutely Guaranteed. 

EXPERT MECHANICS. 
Full Line of Ford parts, Tires, Tube* 
and Accessories. 
F. W. DEMPSEY, Jan6tf Erlanger, Ky. g 



<a 




T|ou fail! appreciate 

% purine* $tvibtttb b$ 

|3Iftlip Taliaferro 






FOR SALE TCE. 



For Sale — First class family cow i 
with calf; Chesterwhitc pigs for! 
I. reeding stock and White and : 
Yellow seed corn. Robert Clore, I 
Burlington Ky. pd. 

For Sale — About 25 or 30 tons of 
hay, timothy and mixed. vi«i>r;j»' 
Black. Union. Ky. 

BALRSKBN WANTKD t » elicit 
orders for lubricating oils, groas- 
es aud paints. Hal-try or Commis- 
sion. Addresi -LINCOLN OIL CO, 
Cleveland, Ohio 



The days are growing longer 
and the nights shorter 



A Vault That Can Not Be Robbed. 

If you live within 125 miles of 
Cincinnati you are interested in 
the wonderful Safety Deposit 
Vault at Fourth and Vine Sta., 
built by The Central Trust Co. 
and guaranteed to be burglar, 
fire, mob and storm proof It 
sets in a hole in the ground, 50 
feet deep and is lined with ateel 
rails set in glass slag. It is 
guarded night and day. It con- 
tains securities worth millions 
of dollars in the Safest Place in 
the country. 

Don't Keep Your Valuables Where They Can be Stolen. 

Oat of town person, can afford to patronize tw v-aalt. A bom, with 
compl.te privacy, a. low aa S3 a year. Write «e fc» particular*. Fan*. 
er», Dairyman. Tobacco Grower*. Market Ga rd oaiar*, ate, tkie should in- 
terest you. 

The Central Truet Compary 

Fourth and Visa Sta.. CINCINNATI. OHIO. 




Start the New Year by Takinar Your County Paper, $1.30 



aUONK COUNTY RECORD** 



\ 



ARAB POPULATION INCREASE9. 
In the Kasbah, the native quarter 
of Algiers, there still are daggers In 
the -(!■••., nnd they still cut 
throat*, (lospiic the fact the French 
hove ruled the Arnhn here for nearly 
a eentury. The Arab* are Increasing 
In nimber and becoming richer. Tliey 
fought for the French, and the 
French cine their family head* a 
certain number of centimes n head 
for dally maintenance while the 
father was In the north fighting. 
Since there are many children In the 
native families, and each head was 
used to being sustained on no cen- 
times a day at all. the father re- 
turned home to find his family rich. 
Mow the Arabs have asked to he let 
alone, and necessity has compelled 
the French to grant the request, for 
It Is whispered up nnd down the win- 
dowless walls of the Arab city that a 
French policeman does not dare pene- 
trul* there at night, says Detroit 
News. Kven by day it is easy to get 
lost in the entanglements of the 
streets:' and |hero are places where 
no sound is heard saveHhe almost si- 
lent shuffling of sandaled Arab feet. 



CANT RUSH TO SAGHAUEN 



Japanese Government Bars All but 

Business Firms Approved by 

War Office. 



The laziest of birds is (he frosinoulh. 
He sleep s a ll <lnv. nnd at night, in- 
stoad of Hying about in senreh of 
food, he sits and literally waits for 
the insects to come and feed him. He 
is such a sound steeper that you can 
Ifiish hlin off his jierch with a stick 
anil not wake him, says Pittsburgh 
Chronicle-Telegraph. He Inhabits Aus- 
tralia and the islands of the Indian 
ocean. In size the frogmoulh resem- 
bles the wlilpinionvill. and he get* his 
anine from his wide mouth, which 
serves as his Inseei trap. Too lazy 
to fly for his food, like other hlrds. 
he crawls along the limb of a tree, 
opening his wide mouth and snapping 
It shut, catching what flies ami gnats 
eome Within his range. Only after (lie 
sun goes down rh es he show any In- 
dention to move about. 



There are undoubtedly acres upon 
seres of land in the eastern part of 
the United States too poor for either 
garden or pasture purposes, which 
would readily produce while pine 
trees. The professor of forestry at 
the Massaclnisctt.. Agricultural col- 
lege calls attention to the price of 
$30 to $35 n thousand feet for which 
pine logs are selling on the stump, and 

■ays that pine ■tumpaga will he u 
v a luable for the next thirty or forty 
years as it Is today. His advice to 
farmers who own large areas of unim- 
proved lands, to plant them with white 
pine, with g certainty of profitable 
sale, would seem fo be worthy of con- 
sideration. 



Secretary MniiiH* is right In say- 
f*>g thut men who will nnf obey are 
not fit to command, and that midship- 
men who refuse obedience to their 
lawful'y constituted authorities will 
he expelled. Obedience Is the founda- 
tion of all law and order, and espe- 
cially of military and naval disci- 
pline, and If It Is refused In the train- 
ing process, there is an end of effi- 
ciency in students as potential com- 
ma nders. 



When the Lithuanians fired upon the 
league commission advancing toward 
them under n white flag, a native 
woman crossed the field under Are 
to explain that the eominission wore 
allied uniforms, which explanation 
caused the firing to cease. It Is char- 
acteristic of the fate of the peace- 
maker that Ibis humble heroine did 
not even have her name mentioned In 
the dispatches. 






Ir. Denmark farmers are required to 
number and Initial each egg sent to 
market. If one or two eggs aro bad, 
the farmer Is fined ; If three are bnd, 
he Is boycotted. At (hat rate, the av- 
erage bunch of eggs the American con- 
sumer gets wontd get the producer 
Banged, 



For the benefit of those who are af- 
fected by the rule against the sale 
of hops in the ordinary commercial 
way somebody is sure to recall tbe 
fact thai hops used to be regarded as 
Invaluable In the trealmcnt of lame 
Joints. 



It Is intimated ihat the manufac- 
turers of "near beer" are trying to 
put "home brew" out of commission. 
The manufacturers of yeast cakes may 
be expected to line up on the other 
side of the argument. 



The Moscow terrorists sny the 
world Will he forced to recognize 
ttoera. but they draw the line at pre- 
dicting that the world will play 
poker with them (ill they mend their 
Manners. 



When the TurVtsn rev itiiippamrs 
from Constantinople nml queues from 
Oilna ihe world Is changing if It irui't 
progressing. 



The average debutant.- ha* twe 
petals of rnaatnhiauce to an all watt. 
BJM la a seeker sad aa parrful si s 



raaatg »ua 



»s ibe rateta 
ek-e. 



There will be no rush of adventur- 
ers to the new fields for exploitation 
opened up by the Japanese occupation 
of Russian Snghnllen. according to Mr 
Murakami, chief of (he fishery bureau 
of the department of agriculture and 
commerce, who Is quoted In the Yo- 
mluri: 

"None except those who really mean 
business and are In a position to se- 
riously transact business will find any 
place for them in Saghalien." said M. 
Murakami. "All rights there are In 
the hands of the military command, 
and anyone that wants to go there, 
now must obtain a permit from tbe 
war office. Certainly the forests there 
will yield plenty of wood pulp and 
other raw material, while there are 
rich coal mines and possibly oil wells 
But tbe chief product of that region la 
the output of the fisheries." 

Speaking of the fishing rights In Sag- 
hnllen. Mr. Murakami said that after 
consultation with the army command 
an auction was conducted at Niko- 
la levsk for those rights over which the 
I army command Is able to furnish pro- 
tection. No detailed report of the ape- 
tlon has been received. The bidders 
Bad to file their npplicaflons with n 
deposit to guarantee their good faith, 
and they had to be |»ersoiis who were 
qualified by long experience In fish- 
eries In that neighborhood. 

The Yomlurl says that many repu- 
table business establishments have 
been holding buck from enterprises in 
Saghallen for fear of the comi»etition 
of adventurers and the hurt their rep- 
ntatlons might suffer In a mad scram- 
ble for righrs and concessions. — Japan 
Advertisers. 



WE ARE RECEIVING TOBACCO 
We Are Selling Tobacco 

Come to Aurora 

Drop in at 101 Ridge way Stieet, wc 
will be glad to see you. 

We only charge 80c straight. 



For Sale 

One acre, six- room house, cement 
cellar, furnaoe heat, eleotrlo light, 
and ail kinds of fruit, at 4fi3 Krlang- 
•r Road, Krlanger, Ky. Jan. 16 



Notice. 



All who have nut paid the W per 
oeut of thoir subscription* for the 
Burlington and Looua Grove turn- 
vik are requested to do so at onoe. 

y order of the Hoard of Directors. 
B. T- KELLY, Secretary. 



For Sale 



Clevelaud Tractor, beau used bat 

in A 1 condition; wilt eell reasonable 

B. H..HUHE, 
dec» Burlington, Ky. 



H 



Aurora Loose Leai Warehouse Co. 

Aurora, Indiana. 



We Guarantee Satisfaction We will Satisfy You 



For dale. 

o room house and one-half acre lot 
In Mo V Hie, on the Ohio river. The 
bulldiugs are all in (rood repair. Will 
be sold by Belleview Lodge No. 554. 
For particulars apply to J. D. Mc- 
Neely, W. R. Marshall, Jeff Wllli- 
amaon. Burlington, Ky. jane 

Rural Route a. 



Sweet Clover and Honey 

Sow sweet clover, cheaper and bet- 
ter thau red clover. Buy direct from 
grower, special scarified seed for 
prompt germination. Prices and cir- 
culars free. Also prices on hone v . 

JOHN A. 8HEEHAN. 
R. D. No. 4. Falmouth, Ky 



HOLDING CHEMICAL TRADE 



Statistics Show That Uinted State. 

Has Been Able to Hold High 

Mark Set During War. 



oxx*%x^*xx*M**M)m*mxmxiO 



Official statistics for tbe fiscal year 
102<> demonstrate that this country 
has been able to keep Its trnde In 
chemical and allied products very near 
the high mark set during the war, de- 
spite tbe loss of markets for purely 
war supplies and despite the pressing 
demands that must he met In the do- 
mestic market. 

Such tec the conclusion reached by 
O. I'. Hopkins, a well-known statis- 
tician, writing in the Journal of Indus- 
trial and Engineering Chemistry. 

"In almost nil lines except muni- 
tions," he 'writes, "the exports In 1020 
exceeded In value those of 101 S, a fact 
that enn be explained In some cases, 
perhaps, by rislhg prices, but which 
nevertheless warrants the assertion 
that the position has not been weak- 
ened. These exports, which very 
grcntly exceed those of tbe Inst nor- 
mal pre-war year, ore made up almost 
entirely of manufactured products. 

"Imports have more than held their 
own and comprise raw nnd partly man- 
ufactured products required for fur- 
ther advancement by American chem- 
ical manufacturers." 



* 



LOGAN FOSTER. 



B B. ALLPHIN. 



Foster & Allphin 

Real Estate and Auction Sales Co. 

I am associated with the above firm and srlicit your busi- 
ness. List your farms with us. Give us youj sales of Live 
Stock and other Personal property. 

We do th* advertising, auction your Bale, clerk and col- 
lect. All you have to do is give ub property list. 



FOSTER & ALLPHIN 

Covington, Ky. Walton, Ky. Phone 37 Con. 

B. B. ALLPHIN, Local Agent, Walton, Ky. 



o^MW^^w^^^^mm^^^^w^^^^^^o 



Sea Lion Leather. 
Large numbers of sea lions on the 
British Columbia const which destroy 
nnnually vast quantities of fish food 
may be slaughtered nnd their hides 
placed on the world's leather market. 
If n proposition which comes from 
Premier Oliver nnd has the npprovaj 
of ninny experleneed fishermen, is car- 
ried out. The sen lion weighs from 
2,000 to 2.500 pounds, the hides being 
nearly an Inch thick. These hides 
make a tough nnd durable rough 
leu titer such as Is used In workmen's 
gloves nnd In saddles. If is stated 
thnt these animals will eat 50 pounds 
of fish in a day. Poor hunters recent- 
ly killed severnl hundred sea lions In 
one day In Charlotte Islands.— Scien 
title American. 




—AT HOME— 

DR. F. L. PEDDICORD 

1017 Madison Avenue, 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY. 
'Phone So. 1 148. 

Farm for Sale 



180 Acre, one mile south of 
Burlington, on the East Bend 
road, 15 acres in orchard, 25 
acres, in. timber, 30 acres in 
corn in 1920, 15 acres in mea- 
dow, balance in pasture 

6 room house, large barn 
and all necessary out build- 
ings, Well watered. Price, 
$75,00 an acre on easy terms. 

Oscar Hanna, Bellevue Ky. 



F. W. Kassebui & Sen, 

(EMITS & UMLB 

MONUMENTS, 

B Largs Stoeh on Display 
to 8«lect from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

IIS Maaln Street, 

AURORA, IN1X 



JAMES L. ADAMS 
DENTIST 

Cohen Building 

Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 



— Boik Paoxas — 

DR. K. W. RYLE 

GRADUATE V ETERI NARIAN 

«ssM«^6*»as«eBss»»s«»""»»— 
Been* float*, 
BURLINGTON, » RY. 
Prompt Attention to all Calla. 



Tbe Famous O. I. C 

I now have for sale registered 
O. I. C. Plga. gome of which are 8 
weeks old. Iheir aire la the famoaa 
C. C. Callaway Jumbo, and his sire 
is Callaway Edd, the world's Grand 
Champion Boar. All stock register- 
ed free. 

FRANK HAMMON8 

R. D. Florence, Ky. 



D. E. Castleman, 
A TTORNE Y AT LAW, 

— Office over—. 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, 

Erlanger, - Kentucky. 

List Vour Sales With Me Early ha 
The Season. 

LUTE BRADFORD 

Live Stock Auctioneer. 

Your Work Solicited. See me 
and get my terms. 
Phone Florence, Ky. R. D. 

Farmers oct-14 



WET FEET BRING COUGHS AND COLDS 

Until entirely rid of a cough or cold, look out They are a source of daager. 

PE-RU-NA 



Just m few do— of Pe-ru-na 
taken soon after exposure or 
Snt manifesta t ion of trouble 
will usually break • cold or 
eaanpats in a hurry tbe most 
persistent cough. 

TABLETS OR LIQUID 



Two f« Derations hare 
PE-HTJT-NA and Its 
las success in the relief of 
catarrhal diseassa. The pro- 
per medicine to have eat 
lor ever yday ID s. 

BOLD EVERYWHERE 



•^ KEEP IT IN THE HOUSE 



"Lotua Eaters." 
Few flowers have been more identi- 
fied with the world's history than the 
mysterious lotus of Egypt The phrase 
"lotus eaters" Is a common one in lit- 
erature, and Is used to describe those 
who live in a dream world. The food 
made from the dried seeds of the 
Egyptian variety seems to have had 
an effect similar to various opium 
products, and once in the clutch of tbe 
drug the lotus eaters forgot both past 
and family, urn] wont moonln* about 
oblivions of demands mode by society, 
kin, or even their own physical wants. 



Davy Jones' Rich Cargo. 
A diver waa sent down recently at 
New York to locate a case of machin- 
ery that had fallen Into the river. A» 
soon as he reached the bottom Ik 
signaled that he wished to come up 
When his helmet was removed, the 
first thing ba said was, "What'H the 
number of the case?" There were se 
many cases at the bottom of the riTei 
that he didn't know which one be- 
longed to his employers. The amount 
of cargo that Is lost In loading and 
unloading; ships Is *ecrfooas~PomlSJ 
Science Monthly. 



Mosquitoes Dislike Swamp.. 
Ilecent experiments prove thai eft* 

trury to the |*QsrS lief, mosquitoes 

do not Ilirlv.- sad multiply in r ul 
stngnant water. In feet, mOwOttltO lur- 

raa Betuallyatoaa vigor „ „,. whlMt 

aurroundwd by decani vegetation 

Whether this l* dun to bacterial «<.- 
lion on (he Ian no or ,„ M t . ltuM „, 
injurious gaadue to n,„ ,|, ,,„,„,, ,„„ 

has ii. .t bean u<4i,ri,!ln«Mt A , „„, 

r«i-. iwampa are nut «mu 7 „r ,.,„-»,„.. 

•ling IUO«gi||U.,.« alh | r | Mr |„- , h(i§# 

twanpa >i„... t, -ru , , 



•pui.H nd. 



State News. 



Fritz Meyers, 55 years old, far- 
mer, lower end of Bracken county, 
and his four sons, Andy, 28, Omar 
21, Corliss, 20, and Ray, 18 have 
been arrested on a Joint charge 
of arson and assault and battery. 

On Christmas night a etock and 
feed barn belonging to Wilford E. 
Cooper was destroyed by fire, to- 
gether with thrca cows, two hor- 
se*, twenty-five tons of hay aqrJ 
farming implements. 

Captain Mullikic, of Lexington, 
with his bloodhounds, picked up a 
trail, the dogs going directly to 
the home of Fritz Meyers, ana 
then to the home of his married 
son, Andy. 

The Meyers deny having any- 
thing to do with the burning of 
the barn but admit that they had 
a personal encounter with Al 
Taylor, a relative of Cooper. Th.3 
Meyers and Cooper f;imili -s are 
neighbors and bad feeling was 
caused when Andy and Omar 
Meyers each brought suit against 
John Taylor, a close relative of 
Mr. Cooper, for $10,000 nllcring 
that Taylor slandered them whon 
he accused them of stealing a 
hoe. 

Mr. Mevers and his four sons 
were placed in tho county jnil in 
default of $5,000 each, and will i>e 
given an examining trial. There is 
much feeling in the lowsr end of 
the county against the accusea 
men, although there is no danger 
of mob violence now. 
. +*+ 

The Franklin county grand Jury 
In a report criticised the discip- 
line at the reformatory and stat- 
ed that "smoking seema to b*> 
permitted in all departments of 
the prison, and we believe it will 
eventually lead to a burning of 
the State 1 * property If It is not 
stopped. •' 

8upt. William Moyer, when his 
attention waa called to the report, 
said, "No smoking is allowed in 
any of the shops.'' 

The grand Jury also referred to 
"complaints of the great number 
of trusties who are |>erm!tted fo 
be on the street* of Frankfort • 

The aujierinttMi.l >nt sitld they are 
not uarmilitsd to be on the aireeta. 

Thle rendition waa brought to 
the attention of Joaeph P Byertf 
Commissioner of Public Inailttir 
lions before flu xerl'i Undent ¥«* #r 
w«« appelated last summer, and 
Brers said the practise of send 
trusties uptown was atopped 



Mr 



■ r judgment,'' the greed ttftsr 



Jury reported, "discipline at the 
prison is very lax, and thiB in 
some measure accounts for tho 
enormous number of escapes.'' 

The grand Jury returned fifteen 
indictments for escaping, some 
from road camps and others from 
the prison itself. 

With regard to the latter, Sup:. 
Moyet aaid: "All the men escap- 
ed from guards, who since have 
been discharged. Thay were here 
when I came, and I discharged 
them as soon as they proved their 
unfitness. There was no laxity in 
discipline, but there was evident 
laxity on t he part of the guards 
assigned to watch the prisoners.'- 

The jury found the tubercular 
hospital unventilated, and sug- 
gested thait the patients should 
be removea. 

Insanitary bedding and a a'efec- 
tive stove at the county alms- 
house were called to the atten- 
tior of the Fiscal court by the 

Jury, which fourd the Institute for 
feeble Minded Children in good 
condition, excepting that the 
sleeping quarters ara crowded. 
♦♦♦♦ 

Capt. R. B. Terrill, who led Co. 
E. Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, 
in the Chenault Regimont, Mor- 
gan* command, for the Confeder- 
acy, died of paralysU at the Con- 
federate Homo, Peweo Valley, one 
day last week. 

Born in Madison county March 
5. 1839, Capt. Terrill enlisted in 
the Confederate army September 1, 
1862, rising to the rank of cap- 
tain in a short time. He came 
to the home to spend his last 
days on November 16, 1902. 

Capt. Terrill is survived by two 
daughters, Mrs. E. W. Rugsg, Cin- 
cinnati, and another living in Ok- 
lahoma, whose name is not known 
to attaches of the home. 

The remains wera sent to Rich- 
mond, Ky., Friday for burial. 

Lexington, Ky. — Eighty young 
men wertv enrolled In eight weeks 
short course in agriculture which 
is beingg iven by the State Col- 
lege of Agriculture at the eloaeof 
the enrollment, according to an an 
n (run cement made by Dean Thos. 
Cooper. The list of those taking 
the course Includes 63 ex-servU-o 
men who are reeelVlBg Lh£ work 
fir" the. cooperation of the atate 
TIC. C A. and the stftte college, 
three federal hoard student* end 
U regular short course student* 
One of the federal hoard etudesfti 
la from VVset Vlrgtnh, another of 
•aa aud the other from Kftft* 



eeoeeeeefteftoeeooeeeeeeeeee 

FOR SALE 

I Have for Sale 
2 International Trucks. 
2 490 Chivrolets. 
1 Ford Truck Chatis, 20- 

model. 

CASH OR ON TIME. 

L. C. CHAMBERS, 

Petersburg! Ky. 



IT'S A WISE IDEA. 

Do as Many Others are doing- 
send your cream to the 

CLOVERLEAF CREAMERY 

Burlington, Ky. 

I pay cash for cream and insu re 
you a square deal. 

I RECEIVE EVERY 

FRIDAY 

J. O. HUEY, Manager. 



TIME TABLE 



Borlingtoi - Erlanger Bus. 

Dally Except Sunday. 

Ijv. Burlington 6:15a. m. 4:00 p. m 

Lr. Erlanger 7:10a.m. 4-65 p. m 

SUNDAY. 

Lv. Burlington 7:10 a. m 

Lv. Erlanger 7:56 a. m 



Passenger Far* 



50c one way. 

Round Trip 75c 

Express Packages handled at Rea- 
sonable Rates. 

L. R. McNEELY. 



Canning PlantforSale 

The Farmers Canning Plant at 
Grant, Ky., will be aold on the 
grounds of the Company at 1 o'clock 
p. in., on 

Saturday, Feb. 12, 1921 

at ptiblie sale to the highest bidder. 
T lie plant oonsists of an engine, 
boiler, shafting, cookers, piping, 2- 
100 gallon copper kettlea, platform 
scales, building end one-fourth scree 
of ground. 

The plant, grounds, building, ma- 
chinery will be sold as a whole. 

Terms— One-half cash, remainder 
on time with good security. 
AL RODGER8, 
JNO. SMITH. Com. 

W. B. ROGERS, 



VICTIMS 
RESCUED 

Kidney, liver, bladder and uric acid 
troubles are most dangerous be- 
cause of their insidious attacks. 
Heed tho first warning they give 
that they need attention by taking 

COLD MEDAL 



The world's standard remedy for these 
disorders, will often ward off these dis- 
eases and strengthen the body against 
farther attacks. Three Sizes, all druggists. 
* the Bsuate Cold Medal I 



NOTICE. 

All persons owing the estate of 
Laura Clore, deceased, please come 
forward and settle same at once. 

Also all persons having claim* 
against said estate present them 
to met at once for settlement. 
H. M CLORE, Agent 
Laura Clore Estate. 



NOTICE. 

ell fteteoas who have claims 
against the estate of Oedrge at. 
Rou*« dsosna-d, will present them 
to sae, proven sa the law requires 
AU Fseeo a a owing said estate 
will eoiM fotwsrd J 

A*! 




Attention into Owners! 

I am prepared to do first-class 

repairing- on all makes or cars. 

Starter and generator work a 

specialty. All work guaranteed. 

Give me a t rial. 

Earl Ml. Ay lor 

HEBRON, KY. 

Phone Hebron 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 
Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by o4dver- 
tising. 



eeee^#e^eaeeeeee4>eeeoeeeee 



a 
e 
• 
e 
a 
e 
e 
e 
a 
♦ 
e 
e 
♦ 
* 



IMPORTANT NOTICB. 

Watch the date following 
your name on the margin 
of four paper sad If It Is 
aot correct please notify 
this office st once. If your 
paper has beea discontinu- 
ed by mistake before vour 
time expired do not delay 
notifying this office. All »r- 
rore are cheerfully oor rett- 
ed here. 



a 
♦ 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



— ••••*•**••• — 



_*eee e • ♦ • a 
he Tear County Paper. 
•*)• l i f t »§ « »»» « •»• i Mt ta a e a 



r* 



.4 



«* 



* 



<m 



■WJ l \fkVM . p m^f^v^m^^^^m 



.*> 



?> 
* 



*» 






BOUIftt CttaNTY RECORDER 



THE TOBACCO MARKET. 

The tobacco sales opened at the 
Farmers Warehouse, Walton, last 
Monday. There vfraa a large crowd 
of grower* present and a|l seem- 
ed satisfied with the prices Good 
tobacco eold well but there was no 
■market for common. 143,000 pounds 
•were offered, and about 6,000 lbs., 
•wpa rejected, leaving about 135,- 
TOO lbs,, that were sold for >25,- 
36J.7T. An average of $19.15 per 
ion pounds. Sales were held at the 
old 'house Wednesday. 

The sales at Lexington show- 
ed no improvement. The average 
per 100 pound* at the different 
Lexington 'Warehouses follow: 
Headley No. 2 f 11.90 

Kew Fayette $15.46 

Big Tatteratalls *W.00 

lad 



lependent 



IJ15.00 



The average at Paris was $13.80. 
The sales at Carrollton were stop 
ped by the growers. At Coving- 
ton, where a lot of bad tobacco 
was offered, had a low average. 
167,005 pounds was offered with 
rejections amounting to 32,195. The 
sales produced $18,044.56, repre- 
senting an average of $13.39. An 
ut usually fine crop belonging to 
E. B. Smith, of Hebron, sold for 
$35.87. 



♦ ♦ 

♦ PT. PLEASANT. ♦ 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Miss Gladys Jergens and little 
sister Mary Kathryn, have whoop 
ing cough 

Miss Edythe Carder and Miss 
Sarah Scothorn, spent last Thurs- 
day with Mrs. Keene Souther. 

MHsa Eleanor Walton entertain- 
ed with a shower -in honor of 
Mrs. Parker Bollis, nee Ruby Wal- 
ton, last Saturday afternoon. 

Allen Stewart and Melvin Louis 
Kenyon and Francis Keene South- 
er, are improving. Can proudly 
say when they go to school^ 
"I've had it." 

Mrs, Ben Michaels died Satur- 
day night Jan. lb, after aserions 
illness followed by pneumonia. Our 
neighborhood Joins in extending 
deepest sympathy to. the bereav- 
ed ones. 




At Maysville the buyers for the 
"Big Four*' would not bid on the 
low grades. Good tobacco brought 
fair prices. No salea were made 
at Cynthlana on account of a dis- 
pute between LeBus & Son and 
the Independent as to which one 
was entitled to the first sale. 
The 1920 crop will have to be sold 
to the Tobacco Trust at their 
price, which is below the cost 
of production, or held by the 
grower for a better market. 

Oil Business DulL 
Geo. Riley, who looks after the 
interests of the Big Bons Oil Co., 
in the Warren county field, near 
Bowling Green, returned to his 
post of duty last Sunday night af- 
ter having spent several days with 
relatives in this county. John 

Baldon, who had been engagod in 
the road department in this coun- 
ty for some time, returned to 
Warren county with Mr. Riley, 
and will take chat ge of the com- 
pany's machinery, a business for 
which he is especially well qual- 
ified, and he and Mr. Rilev will 
make a splendid team in keeping 
the company's interest in tact. 
Mr. Riley reports the oil businasn 
as rather quiet in the Warren 
county field just at present, but 
expects a lively tim:* there next 
spring, when numerous new wells 
will be put down. 

Their Machine Balked. 

Benry Mathers and Weindsll 
Keira, of Petersburg, were on their 
way home from Florence last Sun- 
day night, where they had been 
calling on some young ladies, when 
their automobile weat out of com- 
mission at the Geo. Rouse bridge. 
Bring unable to revive the dead 
machine they walked to Burling- 
ton, where they calbni their friend 
Albert Stephens from his slum- 
bers and borrowed his Ford and 
cortinued their journey on horns, 
where they arrived about the 
peep of day. The boys had a stren- 
uous night between Florence ana 
Burlington. 

"Pep" Bying Tobacco. 

Pepper Smith, Belleview veteran 
tobacco buyer made a tour of this 
territory one day last week and 
bought several crops of the weed, 
paying as high as 25 cents per 
pound for some. Among the 
crops purchased were thoso of 
Russell Smith, 19 cents, and Men- 
ter Martin, 20 cents. It is very 
seldom that Mr. Smith allows a 
season to pass without making a 
purchase of tobacco and has long 
been classed as one of the coun- 
ty's best buyers. 

Retail Merchants Organize. 
The meeting of the Retail Mer- 
chants of Boone county, Monday 
was attended by fourteen mer- 
chants, all doing business in the 
jorth end of the county. They 
organized by adopting by-laws 
and electing W. G. Kite, President, 
Edward Stofct, vice-President and 
Ralph White Secretary and Treas 
urer. The merchants were in ses- 
sion the greater part of th.3 day 
discussing questions of interest to 
the mercantile business. 



»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

• ♦ 

• GUNPOWDER. « 

• ♦ 
•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

E. K. Tanner has a very sore 
har.d, the result of a mash. 

Ernest Horton and family spent 
last Sunday with B. A. Rouse ana 
wife. 

Mrs. P. J. Allen was the guest 
of- her parents on Tuesday of last 
week. 

Owen Ross, one of our hustling 
farmers, did some plowing during 
the fair weather of last week. 

Mrs. H. F. Utz entertained th? 
Ladies Aid Society of Hopeful 
church on Tuesday of last week. 

H.. F. Utz, who is an expert in 
telephony, put in a *phone for 
Dr. T. B. Castleman, last Monday. 

N. A. Zimmerman butchered his 
hogs last, week, which completes 
that line of work in this neigh- 
borhood for this season. 

Stanley Aylor has accepted a 

Eosition in the Citizens Bank at 
rlanger. He is one of the boys 
who did service in the Navy dur- 
ing the world war and is mak- 
ing good as a business man. 

Charles, the little son of Ira 
Tanner and wife, was badly burn- 
ed last week, he fell asleep while 
sitting near the heater and acci- 
dentally put his foot against it, 
which caused a very painful sore. 



HEBRON. 



State's Rexenue. 
State revenues for the calendar 
year 1920, according to monthly re 
ports on the condition of the 
treasury, made by the Stats In- 
spector and Examiner, amounted 
to $11,415 898.90. This covers the 
period of the greatest State ad- 
ministration. There was a bal- 
ance of $125,946 when the admin- 
istration was checked January 5, 
1920, making a total revenue avail 
able for the year $11,541,844.90. 

An Octogenarian. 

The Recorder's friend of many 
years, L. S. Beemon, became an 
octogenarian last Monday and 
celebrated the event by sawing 
wood all day. Few men pass their 
80th year possessed of th» health, 
strength and mentality enjoyed 
by Mr. Beemon, and hero is hop- 
ing that ho may' enjoy many 
more birthdays in as good con- 
dition as he now ia. 

A Correction. 

In reporting the proceedings of 

the tobacco meeting In last week's 

Kecorder the nam? of J. S. Eg- 

gleaton was used as .opposing the 

cnt-out when the name oi w. H 

gleston should ha^le )>e»'i u»"d. 

c Recorder r .'grctsn tl»:\." the er- 

•r was made. 



Sunday school every Sunday 
morning at 9:30. 

Born on the 12th to Mr. and 
Mrs. Hubert Conner, a 10# pound 
son. 

Miss Alberta Mae Baker was pre- 
sented with an upright piano last 
week. ** 

. Harold Crigler sold his farm 
and has purchased the farm of 
Mr. Kennedy, known as the Jacob 
Tanner farm. 

W. R., J. C. and S C. Garnett 
received a telephone message last 
Thursday morning stating their 
father Chas. Garnett, had I par- 
alytic stroke and was very ill 
at the Jhome of his Bon Dick, of 
Ludlow. At last reports he .was 
improving. 

Myron, son of W. R. Garnett una 
wife, of this place, and Miss Ma- 
rietta Stephens, daughter of E. K. 
Stephens and wife, of Bullittsvill* 
were married at Rev. Omer's in 
Hebron, last Wednesday at 3 p. m , 
in the presence of a few of the 
near relatives. The groom is " a 
very industries young man of 
this neighborhood and the bride 
was employed in the Washington 
bank at Cincinnati, for several 
years. Mr. Clarence Herbstreit and 
Miss Hallie Hafer were th? at- 
tendants. They left immediately 
for Cincinnati, returning to the 
groom's parents on Thursday night 
where a reception was given them. 
They received many useful pres- 
ents. The good wishes of their 
many friends are extended to 
them. 



THE DEVIL AT WORK. 



IK -' ■ 



THE DEVIL KNOWS WHEN 

The Printer's "Devil" says that 
all this turmoil and unrest over 
the country will never cease un- 
til—the growers cut-out raising 
tobacco, so , the manufacturers 
cant get it; when the knockers 
cut-out loafing, and merchants re- 
fuse to sell on credit; when peo- 
ple cut-out joy riding, and throw 
away their car, then things will 
adjust themselves like they were 
before the war. 



♦ • 

♦ FBANCBSVILLB. * 

♦ ♦ 

•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Rev. B. F. Swindler spent Sun- 
day at Jerry Estes'. , 

A. J. Ogden and family visited 
R. L. Day and wife, Sunday. 

Franklin and Howard Ryle spent 
Sunday with John Whitaker ana 
wife. 

C. S. Riddell and E. J. Aylor are 
having acetelynp lights installed 
in their houses and barns. 

Mrs. Shultz and daughter, Miss 
Emma, of Cleves, are guests of 
friends in this community. 

Jessie and Gladys Wilson and 
Rhoda and Chas. Eggleston, spent 
Sunday at W. H. Eggleston's. 

By a unanimous vote Rev. B. F. 
Swindler was called as the pastor 
of Sand Run church for the fol- 
lowing year. 

W. L. Brown and family had as 
guests Sunday R. S. Wilson, wife, 
and son Bernard, and W. H. Eg- 
gleston, wife and son Harmon. 



IDLBWILD. 



Miss Roberta Randall has the 
mumps. 

Miss Zelma Bre'll, of St. Louis, 
is here for a visit with her friend, 
Mrs. Bernard C. Gaines. 

James T. Gaines and wife will 
leave for Florida in a few days 
to spend the remainder of the 
winter. 

Clyde Akin, a former resident of 
Boone, but who has been in In- 
diana the past year, will move 
here shortly and clerk fprtr^C: 
Scothorn. 

Wm. Terrell Berkshire and wife, 
and Miss Frances, were dinner 
guests, Friday night, of William 
Yates and wife, at their hospitable 
home in Petersburg. 

B. H. Berkshire and wife, J. B. 
Berkshire and wife, of Petersburg, 
and Mrs. Max T. Gridley, of In- 
dianapolis, were mid-week guests 
of Mrs. James S. Asbury. 




Tobacco Talk. 



Northwest Mo., tobacco growers 
disposed of the 1920 crop atf a 
sale at Weston, Mo., today, mjore 
than 250,000 pounds bringing \ an 
average of less than 14 cenw a 
pound. The growers said that T it 
cost them 20 cents to 25cenlla 
pound to produce the crop. \ 

The Louisville warehousemen 
seem jubilant that loose leaf sales 
houses closed down last week, 
and they expressed no intention 
to close, saying that the closing 
of loose leaf houses throughout 
Kentucky would be of great bene- 
fit to the Louisville market— or 
words to that effect. 



Cut-out is "the order of the day 
as some of the country corr, ., 
pondents sometimes say. The far- 
mers have cut out tobacco, the 
merchants have cut out advertise- 
ments, and The Democrat has cut 
out extra pages. Now, we will air 
be happy yet if the motor cars 
will cut out their cut-outs.— Cyn 
thiana Democrat. 

+++ 

The buyers, we presume, have 
orders to pay so much for tobacco, 
and can't pay over that amount, 
that's their side. The grower has 
to pay a certain amount for rais 
ing tobacco, and can't sell under 
that amount, that's his side. If 
the tobacco growers would let 
one season gof by, without raising 
any tobacco^/we believ3 that the 
price would get to a level where 
a good living wage could be made 
on it. 

++* 

The Blue Grass tobacco groov- 
ers were fortunate in having a 
good crop of the weed in 1913, 
and received a general average 
of around $45.00 for it. These same 
growers would not listen to the 
hill counties' talk of a cut-out 
or a curtailment of the crop in 
1920, but plunged headlong and 
blindly into producing an over- 
production' in 1920. The extremely 
low prices at the opening sates 
on January 3rd has made "Chris- 
tians'' out of the Blue Grass to- 
bacco growers and they are now 
ready to cut-out or do anything 
to get out from under the deadfall 
which they set themselves. 



n 



Everything in Wood 



FLORENCE. 



♦ 
o 



91! 



Wool 

The pooled w 
•tfuiity wi» sold for 

a few d.ivs sir 
fivo eei.u hat 
the markiM 
a!u«» tb* offer was ma 




Hopkins 

cents psr 

.rty- 

» «it 



♦ ♦ 

» RABBIT HASH. « 

• • 
•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Several from hera attended the 
Moore sale. 

Moving is the order of the day 
in this neighborhood. 

Wilber Kelly and family spent 
Sunday at Hubert Clore's. 
VMxs. Frank Scott was called to 
Newport last week on business. 

The young people attended a 
party at Roy Ryle's, last Thursday 
night. 

Eugene Wingate and wife visit- 
ed in Big Bone neighborhood, last 
week. 

H. M. Clore was transacting bus 
iness in Burlington, Friday and 
Saturday. 

Chas. Bachelo 1 ' has finished his 
new barn he built on the George 
Ward farm. 

Paul Cook and Ben Scott, are 
cutting logs for Stephens' mill on 
Lick creek. 

Tom Carlyle and son, of Idaho, 
have been visiting I. E. Carlyle, 
several da vs. 

Ben Wilson. C. G Riddell, Mr 
and Mrs Mode Scott, have be?n 
on the sick list- 
Clarence Rvle, of O^o-RPto'vn, 
visited his father and mother, Sat- 
urday and Sunday. 

Lee Stephens came down from 
the city Wednesday night to see 
his mother, who has been ill. 

Zack Kelly is the guest of his 
daughter, fly Stephens Glad to 
hear he is able to be out a:rau\ 

Harry Acra and wife entertain- 
ed Mrs. Thaddie Rvle, Bluf' Clore 
and wife and S. C. Wilson, last 
Wednesday. 

Mrs. Lou Van Ness receiv >1 tlr> 
oad news of the death of h r 
brother-in-law, Mr. <»et> Griffith 
last wosk, 

Hubert Hanainsen, ol Canada, 

wu» the '(ucat of hits fa. her ami 
mother, last wwik V. h.» i been (our 
years since he vlslul h 

Beverly Nelson, who lived at 
Rabbit flash, and w»nt to live 
with his sister at Madison % uie, la 
,%wry ill at this writing 



At Aurora, Indiana. 

The Farmers' Short Course to be 
held at Aurora, .Jan. 24, 25 and 26 
is for both men "and women. The 
program has a definite line of 
work for each. 

The men's program includes lec- 
tures and demonstrations, in the 
following subjects: Lime a Big 
Factor in Soill mprovemont, Se- 
lecting Good Cows for the Dairy 
Herd, The Importance and Uso of 
Phosphate, Choosing the Dairy 
Sire, Necessity and Methods of 
Increasing Acreage and Yields of 
Legumes, The Relation of Dairy 
ing to Community Welfare, Bear- 
ing of Young Dairy Stock, "Making 
Sure of a Supply of Choice Beea, 
Feeding for Milk Production, Se- 
lecting, Storing and Testing of 
Seed Corn, A County Corn Show. 

The women's program will in- 
clude lectures and demonstrations 
on the following subjects: House 
hold Decorations, The Canning of 
Meats, Feeding the Family, Dress 
Forms, Lavor Saving Devices, 
Short Cuts in Sewing, Hand Dec- 
orative Stitches and the Family 
Wardrobe. 

The work for both men and wo- 
men will include a concert and lec- 
ture on the night of Jan. 24 and 
the banquet on the night of th? 
25th. 



Get Our Prices 

WOOD AND ASPHALT SHINGLES, 

PULP AND PLASTER WALL BOARD, 

ORNAMENTAL SLATE ROLL ROOFING— MIXED 

COLORS—DIAMOND SHAPE, 

LIGHT, MEDIUM and HEAVY ASPHALT ROLL^ROOF 

^ING, BARN SIDING, GARAGE DOORS, 
HEAVY TOBACCO RACKING. 



I 



he A. M. ! ewiiL Lumber Company, 

COVINGTON, ICY, 

Madison Ave. and 24th St. Phone South 465-466 



• Madi 



1886 



1921 



Thirty-five Years 

Of successful banking is our record. Start the 

NEW YEAR 

by opening an account with us. 



Boone 60. Deposit Bank 



Established 1886. 

Burlington, Kentucky. 



N. E. RIDDELL, President. 
W. D. CROPPER, Cashier. 



W. A. GAINER, Vice-President. 
Q. S. KELLY, Ass't Cashier. 



Let's Stop "Kidding" Ourselves 

ITS ALWAYS BEST TO FACE 
THE FUTURE SQUARELY. 

We are doing this and have greatly reduced 
prices on all 

"i Suits and Overcoats 






For Men, Young Men and Boys. 

1 

Quality and service have build our business, and 
we will take care of your wants at a great sav- 
ing to you. 

We carry a complete line of Sweater Coats 
and Corduroy Coats and Pants. 



Miss Christina Renaker is visit- 
ing friends in Cynthiana 

Chas. Clarkson and wife spent 
Sunday with Jorin Swim and wife. 

Dr. fT. B. Castleman made a 
business trip to Cincinnati, Mon- 
day. 

Will Boyer spent Sunday with 
P. C. Schram and wife, of' Avon- 
dale. 

Edgar Aylor and wife spent last 
Monday with T. H. Tanner ana 
wife. 

Mrs. Carl Anderson entertained 
several of her friends at dinner 
last Thursday. 

S. H. Marshall and wife enter- 
tained Bert Clore and wife, of 
Buffalo Ridge, last Saturday night 
and Sunday. 

Miss Pearl Marksberry ent?r- 
tained several of her friends last 
Sunday afternoon. 

Ed. Rice and wife entertained 
Mrs. Will Rice and children and 
R. H. Tanner and wife, Sunday. 

Miss Lauretta Suddendorf and 
Miss May Suenbrock, of Cincinna- 
ti, spent Saturday and Sunday 
with Miss Florence Walker. 

Mesdamea C. W. Myers and L. 
E. Thompson had as their week- 
end guests Miss Jane Porter 
Shearer, of Georgetown College. 

J. R. Whitson and wife enter- 
tained, Sunday, Chas. Whitson and 
family. Mrs. Susie Adams and son. 
of Walton, and Lee Whitson and 
family. 

iChas. Clarkson and Fannv Weav- 
er were marri>l Saturday after- 
noon in the parlor of his nephew, 
George Swim. The witn , ««es were 
Geo. Swim and wife. The c»r~- 
mor.y was performed by Rev Tom 
Hi . pastor of the M*. E. church. 
A bour-tiful sunoer was served at 
the home of the brid«>. Covers 
were laid for twertv-thr^e. The 
iruesta left at a late hour wish- 
ing the bride and jr-oom mnpv 
years of happiness and prosperity 

Real Schankor's advertisement 
in this issue of rhe Recorder It 
contains many bargain* for the 
people of Boone county, and Is 
one of the most reUabM (inns In 
Northern Kentucky. Anything pur 

chased at BchsnlWfl h.i 1 Jf" 1 to 
?ht ^^^ 

Stmt Kirtli.v. eolorod, w%* ulv- 
. r. a surprise part v i<-i Hfnturd.tv 
nthft, J.»n. lAtH. *l his home in 
F.iirlii*ton ths' Mo* hi* ««th 
hlrthd^v Thf r»*rtv w%a glvi"' by 
Mr*. Chas I ol Hu«ltnttt»n. 

ami Cora Blackburn of RrUn<f>v 
It I • ■ < present* 



Marketing Farm Produce. 

An example of the part that 
quality plays in a business of di- 
rect marketing of farm produce is 
furnished by the experience of a 
man in Kentucky who markets 
eggs, dressed poultry, meats and 
fruits to consumers in Nai^hvillev 
Tenn. 

The business was established ov- 
er two years ago by obtaining a 
friend as the first customer. From 
this modest beginning the pro- 
ducer has obtained sufficient cus- 
tomers to buy all of . the high- 
grade produce he can supply Most 
of the shipments are made by 
parcel post. 

This business is conducted on 
the basis of high quality with 
adequate returns. Customers are 
selected with as much care as most 
consumers show in selecting a 
producer from whom to buy farm 
produce. Customers are regained 
by never breaking tho rule to 
supply only the best produce rais 
ed on his own farm. If, when an 
order is obtained, this farmer does 
not have produce of the highest 
quality, he informs the customer 
and states that unless o*herwis? 
instructed the produce will be ship 
ped at the earliest possible date. 



Selmar Wachs. 

605 Madison Avenue, 

Covington. Kentucky 



\\ 




Things Worth Knowing. 

Mississippi has more than 120 
species of forest trees. 

England is the heaviest buyer 
of American butter and chesse. 

Iceland is the largest civilizea 
country on the globe without 
railroads. 

Paper yarn that reeembh-s lin- 
en is being woven into bagsanu 
packing cloth in Japan. 

More than half of the Presidents 
of the United States have had ex- 
perience as soldiers. 

Nearly 80 per cent of the babies 
of Paris are born in hospitals and 
under municlpully aided care 

As a general rule it is accept- 
ed that the de*»p«»r a coal mine 
the moru dungurous is the oo»l 

dU!lt 

More than 100 commercial air- 
pluiictt nro in uso in Ktu'latul, and 
they have •• >r. i«><i mon« than •!', 
000 passenger* in *U inuntha 

Somr of the tobacco grn 

hnulin'f th«ir tobacco from 
irtfton snd Walton hie| to 
their own b|rn%, r*«fuii»,r to ac- 
cept th« |idc* olf-tvd b> Hi. 
buyer*, 



Lumber Prices Have Come Down! 

We have recently -put in a stock of Flooring, Ceil- 
ing, and other dressed lumber on a low coat basis, and 
this, with our stock of framing and rough lumber, both 
pine and hardwood, enables us to make a very attrac- 
tive proposition to cash buyers. 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUILD. 

If you are looking for a chance to save money on 
lumber, come and sea us. 

EDGETT & FULTON LUMBER CO., 

(Incorporated) # _ 

! 2 19 Crescent Ave. - Erlanger, Ky. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ •♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 
,,«.+*♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦««♦♦««««»♦♦** ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 



Subscribe for the Recorder. 

Try It One Year - You'll Like It. 

Only $1.50 the Year 

M-Don't Pall to R«a>d All Th* Ad* Irs Ihlalssus." 



>»es»* M S M ss ee o»>e«e»s«e» ♦mmw» MiHMKM ( 






BB^H BBBBfll 1 BKBSm 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



MieKIE, THE PRINTER'S DEVIL 



By duties Sughroe 

O Van Nmmo Um> ' 



Some Fellers Buy an Ant Hill and Expect a Mountain 




k 



3(1 ON F Pfl Rf- rfiffflFQt Joe M Ween&, for a number of 
SUUHL UU. ttL(,UHUtH\ yeaTB a re «ident of Burlington, 



PUBLISHED KVKltY THCRSDAV 

>N. E. RIDDELL, Publisher. 

■Lnteied at tlio Pcstofllee in Burling 
,an, Ky., as Second-class Mail 



NOTICE 

To Prospective Candidates For 
County Tax Commissioner 

Formerly Called Assessor 

• 

Before you name can be placed 
on the ballot as a candidaite for 
County Tax Commissioner (Asses- 
sor) you must hold a certificate I 
from the Staite Tax Commission i 
showing that you have been ex- j 
amined and that you are quali- 
fied to 'hold the office. The Stat? 
Tax Commission prepares the quos 
tions and they are mailed to the 
County Attorney, B. R. Tiley, who 
will hold the examination in the 
court house, Monday March 14th, 
1921, beginniag at 9 o'clock a.m. 
All questions arc to be answerea 
by the applicant in his own nana 
writing and are to be signed by 
him and mailed at o^ce to the 
State Tax Commission, who grades 
the papers and issues the certi 



but now of Kings Mills, O., sends 
the following: 

Kings Mills, Ohio. 

Jan. 11,1921. 

Secty. Burlington Masonic Lodge 
Dear Sir and Bro. 

In an old book that was given 
me by a friend who found it in 
his attic, I found the following 
officers of Burlington Lodge, No. 
264, for the year A. D 1872, A. L. 
5872. 

P. Riddell-Master. 

W. -P.- McKlm-Senlar Wafflein. 

G. O. Hughes— Junior Warden. 

J. M Riddell — Treasurer. 

A. B. Parker— Secretary. 

Dudley Rouse— Senior Deacon 



WISE 6. OTHERWISE 

A Combination of Sense, Non- 
sense, News, Etc. 

An Englishman advises picking! 
a wife by her walk. Some prefer' 
judging by her talk. A young man; 
is attracted by her looks, but, re-j 
gardless of walk, talk or looks, a! 
good cook can nail an old widower : 
any time. 

If the magistrates in this coun-H 
ty were not afraid that some oth- 
er magistrate would get a little' 
more money for his district for! 
I the working of the roads than , 



P 




Trade Where They All Trade. 



B. S. Kirkpatrick — Junior Deacon he did, there would be more work; 



Samuel Cowen— Steward 

W. T. German— Tyler 

PAST MASTERS. 

James W. Calvert, 

Samuel Cowen, 

Fount Riddell, 

Cyrus Riddell. 

MASTER MASONS 

Jos. G. Botts, Cyrus L. Crisler, 
John Carson, Chas. W. Kelly, L . H 
Voshell, Geo. Piper, Jos. Graves, 
Allen Goodridge, Omer T. Port?r, 
J. R. McKenzie, J. H. Henderson, 
W. L. Riddell, E. H. Scothorn, J 
C. Terrill, Wesley Quick, Oliver G 
Wooley, Robt. D. Jones, Jos. Rid- 



Lights In Six Weeks. 

The Walton town council mert in 
regular session Friday night and 
made a final disposition or the 
remainder of the £5,000 town 
bonds to the Watton Bank and 
Trust Company, the Equttable 
Bank and Truat Company having 
arranged previously to take the 
other $5,000 of bonds. 

Carl J. Kiefer, mechanical and 
electrical engineer, in the employ 
of the Reliance Engineering Co., 
of Cincinnati, is here making a 
survey of the plant and outlining 
the needs of the plant which will 
be advertised next week in the 
columns of the Advertiser and 
bids asked for, from specifications 
set fprth. There will be several 



Thinking perhaps this might be 
of interest to some of th? old 
members of your Lodge, I tak? 
pleasure in sending; it to you. 



ficate. The applicant will be ex- d ^tJI_™_ J h. r . gIer : 

amined upon the knowledge of 

the applicants experianeo as an 

assessor, his knowledge of tha 

revenue laws, his knowledge of 

the geography of Boone county, 

his knowledge of the industries 

and properties of Boone county, 

and his elementary training and 

business experience to fill the 

office.- The foregoing examination 

is provided for by Section 4042 A- 

11 Kentucky Statutes. 2t. 



Pendleton County. 

— — ♦ 

Three rows of tobacco was sold 
at the Burley tobacco warehouse 
last week. It was reported to us 
by the management of the house 
that the growers accepted the 
price on 6,000 pounds and the re- 
mainder was rejected. The aver- 
age price or that which was ac- 
tually sold was $24.53)$ per hur- 
dred pounds. 

A Pendleton county wag- who 
has a large crop of tobacco re- 
marked tb* ether -day that heAvas 
not excited over the tobacco sit- 
uation. He says that if the mar- 
ket closes and a cut-out is order- 
ed for 1921 he will vote with the 
women in 1922 for prohibition of 
tobacco, and this will give him 
the opportunity to bootleg his 
crop at ten times the present 
price. 

J. .J and Walter Austin, produce 
merchants of this city, sent to 



done. 

And by-the-way, who was the' 
gink who restricted the shooting! 
of rabbits? Surely he was someone! 
who was unfamiliar with the de- 
structive powers of Mr. Hare, for' 
about this time of year young j 
orchards, etc., suffer greatly from 
his depredations, 



Covington's Largest Seed and Grocery House 

Offers high grade tested seed at the very lowest possible prices consistent with 
quality. We do not carry any second or third grades as we figure the best is 
none too good for a good farmer an4our experience has beenthat 99 out4>f «very 
100 want the best seed obtainable. 

When we quote you on seed you may rest assured we are quoting the best 
grade. Our TIMOTHY, CLOVER and ALSIKE tests 99.50 per cent, pure 
or better. 

Our Alfalfa is American, northern grown, and we will rurnish, tree, euough 
inoculating bacteria for what you buy. 

Blue Grass, Orchard Grass, Red Top, Alstke, Sweet Clover, Lawn Grass. 
All high grade. Send your order or write for prices. 



items to be bid on separately so Cincinnati Wednesday by truck 
it js not expected to put the! 5,100 dozen eggs which were 
whole matter in one general bkf. I bought in three days. Eggs are 
um t0Wn co,,nci1 ' aD, . v assisted more plentiful this January than 
by Town Attorney Jno. L. Vest, | during any previous winter month 
have worked hard to get the best | in years, The old hens seem to 
features of an up-to-dajte light know that they have to gei busy 
plant, one that will not only be and help out whil etobacco is sell- 
very efficient but economical as i ing so low 

well, and it is anticipated thai I 

the cost of operating same will be We tobacco growers have been 
1?* ,i ow wh - at >* c »s* to operate going tobacco wild for the past 



the old plants in the past 
'council expects to have 

plant in operation in about 
weeks — Walton Advertiser 



The 
the 
six 



Big Banquet at Aurora. 

A big banquet will be one~o7 
the principal features of th© Au- 
rora Farmer's Short Course. The 
purpose of this banquet is five 
fold, namely, to enjoy first class 
music and other entertainment, to 
better (the acquaintance between 
the farmers and the city or town 
business men, to listen to the ed- 
ucational addresses and to enjoy a 
first class dinner. All these ideas 
could be sumed up in the phrase. 
"A good, big, profitable timeftor 
all.'' 

The farmers will have an excel- 
lent opportunity to become ac- 
quainted with those from all 
parts of the county. 

The farmer and the town busi- 
ness man will have an excellent 
opportunity to become better ac- 
quainted 

This will be tlu> biggest and best 
banquet ever h?ld in Dearborn j jated, anyway! So" if we don* 
county and no farmer or 6usiness want it, cut *it out; but if folks 
man can afford to nw this op-! enjoy the use of it, be temperate, 
Th.* banquet will be don't be hogs. It behooves the 



two years by biting off more tharr 
we could chew. By over-produc- 
ing, especially of non-descript ar^ 
ticle, and now we are about to 
get it in the neck, like the 
chicken got the ax. Last year we 
had a surplus that the factories 
did not want, so, by the way, the 
speculators picked it up, so it 
is still a drago n the market Mr. 
S. is making a hard fight for u 
big profit by hoodooing the grow 
ers into a complete cut-out, then 
they will be able to dump at a 
big profit. Most folks can be 
fooled some times, and we are 
afraid that this is one of them. 
In our opinion the sensible and 
most reasonable way would be 
to curtail the crop at least one- 
half and then hold for a fair 
price. It can be done with more 
profit and less hardship than a 
cut-out entirely, and a vast ma- 
jority will acknowledge the fact if 
they will only use that portion of 
the anatomy called the brain. So 
we are hoping that if the cut- 
out prevails that it will follow suit 
with John Barleycorn and never 
return. The two are a little re- 



Jan. 25, 6:30 p. m. 



folks that make their living by 
the sweat of the brow to not 
be led about by the lads that 
spit over a white collar daily. 
So, farmers, be quiet ; don't lose 



Harry T. Hartw.«ll, of Mobile, 
Ala., was defeated in his race for 
Congri-HMnan in th? First District. 

Acturding to his statement fileu j your heads, and learn to attend to 
with the secretiiry of State, his j your own business. 

expenditure of money was ihe, hi 

least of all his statement shows: | Here's what it costs to operate 

"I lost six months and 10 day* ' a "Tin Lizsie.'' Valuing the Ford 
canvassing, lost 1001 hours' sleep at $500, the taxes on It are jb 
worrying over the results of tn?| follows: War tax, 122 50, State 
election, lost 20 pounds or flesh, j horse-power tax, $13 50, state coun 
kissed 500 babies, kindled 100 kitch ty and school taxes, $7 00 Total 
•n fires, put up 10 stoves, cut 11 1 $43 00 The tax upon a team of 
floras of wood, carried 60 buckets J mules worth $600 is $7 00 You can 
of water, walked 1,100 miles, <diook ; therefore w«e that it costs besioVs 
hands 20,000 times and talked up-keep and ,repairs, $3600 more 
-swough to fill on* moothn IMU4) to own h Knrd. worth $600 than it 



Few intelligent people in this 
day and generation have sym-l 
pathy with the man who savs! 
that the world owes him a liv-i 
ing, but much more is to be said 
in support of the dictum that so- 
ciety owes to the man who is will- 
ing to work opportunities for eon 
tir.uous employment. 

There are thousands of boys 
today who would grow in splen- 
did types of manhood if they 
were obliged to gat out into 'ac- 
tive business life instead of 'be- 
ing indulged by parents with an 
automobile and too much spend- 
ing money. Such as these are 
nothing more or less than paras- 
ites. They are supported by ev- 
ery one who works, for jf every 
body did likewise thero would be 
nothing produced. 

If every man and woman would 
cast off their bondage of anhap- 
piness and envy and determine 
t o rise out of their present en- 
vironment by diligent study ana 
application of efficiency methods 
so as to earn for themselves 
whatever things thev desired— I 
say we would then have a nation 
of nobler men and women not 
domirated by self pity and lead- 
ers to incite strife that brings 
misery upon themselves and thorn 
ands of innocent people. 

garroll" county. 

Owners of dogs have taken out 
650 license tags. 

County Clerk Wm. Deatherago 
has issued so far, Auto licenses on 
cars. 412; trucks, 22; dealers, 4. 
Up to Saturday $6,224.78 was re- 
ceived from this source. 
SM 

The big Hudson speedster car of 
Logan Gaines was burned while 
enronte from his home above town 
last Friday evening, but no one 
suffered any bur^ns, though Mrs. 
Oaines clothing was scorched. The 
tank had five gallons of gasoline 
in ft, but it did not explode. 

The Volstead law is now a good 
thing for Carroll county boya/ftve 
being employed at th» wrecked 
distillery plants at a wage of 
$146 a month each, and another 
Carrolltoii man in Covington at 
the same salary, making $870 per 
month for these four Carrollton 
and two Ghent people. 

From expressions of the pessi- 
mists one is led to believe that 
tobacco growers are on the verge 
of starvation, and that unless they 
sell the present crop at once the 
doors of the county infirmaries 
are yawning for the grower ana 
his family. To harbor any such 
thosght is a sin. Tobacco grow- 
ers, even of the tenant class, 
have more m one y, m ore c lutki' s 
more to eat, even more to sell, 
than ever before in their lives. 
Don't suppose for one moment 
that because of the tobacco crisis 
that all business 'houses will close 
their doors. A little fright of this 
variety is not unusual, and it 
could have happened at a more 
imopportune time. The tobacco 
problem will be solved by the wis- 
est and safest heads in the coun- 
try, and will end well. In the mean 
time the grower -will keep on buy 
ing and living well: 



GOLDEN BLEND COFFEE, pound 35c 



5-gal. Can New Orleans Molasses . $4.00 

100 Lb. Half Bbl. Lake Herring . . 8.00 

50 Lb. Half Bbl. Lakr Herring. . . . 5.00 

20 Lb. Pail Lake Herring 2.40 

25 Lb. Bag Blatchford's Calf Meal 1.50 

KANSAS CREAM or ARCADE FLOUR 

Barrel in wood, $12.00; Barrel in 98-lb. Cotton Bags 



100 Lb. Bag Blatchford's Calf Meal 5.50 

100 Lb. Bag Navy Beans. 5.00 

150 Lb. Bag Potatoes 3.00 

100 Lb. Bag H. & E. or Jack Frost 

Granulated Sugar 8.75 



$11.50 



f 0€de^^^unifi^ 



# G ROGER /ES. FLOUR SEEDS. MEDIC /NES 
1 1 J9-2IPIKE ST. 18 20W.jm ST. 



V 



WHOLESALE-'Covington's Largest Seed and Grocery House' 

Covington, Kentucky. 

Phones South 335 and 336. 
United States Wheat Director License No. 03005 7- Y. 
U. S. Food Administration License No. G-1770. 



RETAIL 




ATTENTION TEACHERS 



We have the following copies of 
books on hand Dor sale. Will parcel 
post same to you on receipt of order 
by letter or phone. 

( 'op v English Literature. 

Copy of Great Cities of U. 9. 

Copy of Graded Classics 5th Bead- j 

«FS. 

2 Copies Winston's 2nd Readers. 

7 Copies Studies in English Book I 

8 Copies World ©eegraphy Book I. 
8 Copies Mastery of Words. 
6 Copies of Copy Book No. 2. 
19 Copies of Copy Book No. «. 
2 Copies of Copy Book No. 3. 

2 Copies of Copy Book No. 4. 
8 Copies of Copy Book Beginners. 

8 Copies of European Histories, 
Webster's III. 

3 Copies Biology, Plant, Animal, 
and Human. 

10 Copies of Written and Spoken 
English. 
2 Copies American History. 

9 Copies of Good Health. 
R. H. CARTER, 

Petersburg, Ky. 



O <IU|I 



Of the New York World, bapti/ieu; does t 

four different times, made love to worth the ».i m 

•Ine trass widows, got dog bit 

Tint times, then got defeated > \ Tuko Your 




pair of muloa 
amount 



sty P»P*r, 



Chicago — A petition protest- 
ing against the emplloymeint of 
Judge Kenesaw M. Landis as na- 
tional base ball commissioner has 
been prepared by Thos. J. Suth- 
erland, a Chicago lawyer, and 
sent to members of Congress 
from Illinois, it was learned today 

Muskegon, Mich— Afber several 

[iracties shots at the family cat 
rvlng Morton, of Muskegon, Mich 
Igan, forced his wife to be come* 
Ms target and spsrrt thirty min- 
utes in firing 12 ih>ti inito her 
body. Then he turned th> rlfl»* 
on himself snd • fired once, dying 
instantly. 



Report Red Cross, 

Report of Anaeriesn Red Cross, 
Boone Country Chapter. 
Bui. Nov. 1 (.date of last re- 
port) «4,804 72 

Receipts — 
By Boone Co. Memorial . . 29 00 

Union Aux. funds in full 548 21 

Int. on time dep. to I)ec. 15 28 00 

Membership Drive 158 00 

/ Total $6,557 

Exp Ai>a<»ft— ; 1 

Exp. to Mem. Tablet S 

Co. Nurse, salary and exp 

Machine, repairs, Ac 

Cleveland A. R. J mem. . 
Chap, and drive expense 
6 per sent U. 8. Certificate 

of Indebtedness dated 

Deo. 1&, 'SO, due Dec. 16, 

1921 4,500 00 

Bal. in bank 857 47 

Total 6,567 ■ 



I Have Moved my Stock into the D. Rouse Building, 
where I will be glad to meet all my Customers. 

My Prices Have Been Reduc- 
ed to Low Market 
Conditions. 

30c Apron Ginghams, Reduced to 18c 

40c Dress Ginghams, Reduced to , , 23c 

50c Dress Ginghams, Reduced to 28c 

Shoes 10 c"< Discount 

Automobile Casings, guaranteed 6000 miles, 30x3 Cat- 
end Tube, $17.00; 30x3^ Casing and 
Tube, $19.00, 

—GIVE ME A CALL— 

D. R. BLY 

Burlington, Ky. 



HE 




154 44 

866 90 
50 18 
76 00 
54 00 



LULA TOLIN. 8eoty. 
O. 8. KELLY, Tresfl. 



Sfiid Thttn to Mo. 

Send all new and renewal sub> 
•oriptlonB to me for The Country 
Oentlemsn, $1.00 per year; Ladies' 
Home Journal, $3 00 per year; Sat- 
urday Evening Post, 12.60 per year. 
Promrft ssrv lee. ROBT. CLORE, - 
Agent Burllngtou, Ky. 



READ YOUR 
COUNTY PAPER 

$1,50 The Year. 



Are You Shipping Cream Direct? 
If so, are you shipping tons? 



Our Price this 
week Is 



And we pay the 
Transportation 
EachCanofCream r whether large or small, u given the 
most careful attention 

The Can is Thoroughly Cleaned, , Sterilized and 
Returned Immediately 

Each Can i. Caratul and Propnrly W.i f hed and T M ud, and 
within 24 hour* th. Check is mailed. 

We protect you against loss of Cans or Cream in trans- 
it. Make the BEATRICE your permanent home. 

THE BEATRICE CREAMERY CO. _ 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



A 



<4 



IV 




BOONS COUNTY RECORDER 



**4 M ■ *»*»*,• u.A- i v i 



nnMnn -w-.f 



•*». ek.*^;** . 



. A*r ' » « «w »J -<'.- «**#-* w^a» 



V 



■> 



♦ • 



Public Sale 

BR ! J i — — 7 

We will offer for sale at public auction on the G/H. 
Arrowood farm, 2 1-2 miles from Flor^nc? and 1-4 mile 
south ot ' Gunpowder Store, On Gunpowder Creek, 
farm formerly known as the W. H. Rice farm, Boone 
County, Ky., on 

Saturday, Jan. 22/21 

The Following Described Property: 

Gne^ba3r Horse 12 years oid, sorrel Mare lO^ears old- 
lady broke," pair black Horses 8 and 9 years will work 
anywhere, 3 cows all giving milk, one with calf by her 
side, one Heifer, registered Duroc Sow, 7 75-lb. Shoats, 
Wagon, Buggy, 50-tooth Drag Harrow, two breaking 
Plows, Mowing Machine, Hayrake, and other farming 
Tools, 300 bus. sorted Corn in crib, 150 shocks fodder, 
1 1 tons Timothy Hay baled, some Household Goods. 

»• . 

TERMS OF SALE: 

All sums of $10.00 and under, cash ; all sums over $10.00 a credit of 9 months 
will be given, purchaser to execute note with approved security before removing 
property payable at bank. A discount of 4 per cent./ will be given for cash. 

S. L. and J. E. ROUSE. 

Lute Bradford, Auctioneer. Sale to begin at 12 a. m. 



CLEMENCY 

Is Deny ed By The President— 

To Remain In Prison For 

The Present. 

Washington — President Wilson 
has denied the applications for 
pardons of Henry Jfeltman, Henry 
Kruse and Ben Schoborg, of Cov- 
iigton, Ky., who are serving 
prison sentences in the Federal 
penitentiary »t Moundsville, W. 
Va., for violations of the espion- 
age law. The papers were sent 
back from the White House to 
the Department of Justice. This 
means that there will benohope 
of clemency while the present Ad- 
ministration is in power. It is 
expected that ther? will be a 
renewal of the effort to obtain 
pardons for the men under the 
new Administration. 




NOTICE TO GROWERS. 



PUBLIC 



SALE! 



At a meeting of the County 
delegates at Lexington, Ky., ot 
Burley Tobacco Growers definite 
action was taken on the forma- 
tion of a permanent organization 
and a committee of five was se- 
lected to draft resolutions and 

, - law s . A be iter. nick, Clark cuun 
ty, Harry Hartke, Kenton county, 
G. A. Brooks, Mason county, N\ N. 
Bacon, Clermont county, Ohio, E. 
O. Meeks, Carroll county, wera sr?- 
lected members of this commitet^. 

This committee has invited to 
confer with them the Marketing 
Department of the College of Ag- 
riculture, State Farm Bureau Fed- 
eration, Farmers Union, Grange 
ar.d other organizations. This 
meeting will be held at the' La- 
fayette Hotel, Lexington, Thurs- 
day, Jan. 20th. A meeting of all 
county delegates will raec* at the 
same place at 11 :0Q a. m., Friday 
January 21st, and every county 
delegate is urged to be present. 

The delegates of the Burley To- 
bacco growers in session at the 
Lafayette Hotel strongly recom- 
mend to the owners of tobacco 
crops now on hand to withhold 
the same from the present low 
markets. They also adopted the 
following form of pledge for a 
cut-out in 1921 and it will be cir- 
culated over the whole Whit" 
Burley district of the scates there- 
in named for signatures of the 
growers. The pledge so recom- 
mended is in the following form: 

Whereas, it is desirable to cut- 
out the tobacco crop of 1921, now 
this form of pledge a nd all copies 
thereof shall be considered as one 
instrument of writing and one 
agreement and the undersigned 
subscriber, binds himself to every 
other subscriber of this form of 
pledge that he will not grow or 
permit to be grown on his land 
or any land, under his control, any 
tobacco in 1921. 

But thi&p ledge shall not be 
binding unless at least 75 per cent 
of the growers of the White Bur- 
ley District of Ohio, Indiana, Ken- 
tucky, Tennessee, and VV"st Vir- 

inia sign this pledge or copies 

y March 1, 1921. 



:kxs2?2k:k:&2-5k:k:kx« 



A Word to the Farmer. 

This bank is your friend. We stood by you in a 
tobacco pooj several years ago and you made good 
every promise. We believe our efforts were appre- 
ciated. 

You will find us your friend now within reasona- 
ble bounds of safe banking. , 

Our large Capital and Surplus affords 
perfect safety both to the depositor 
and borrower. 

Come in. and talk your business mat- 
ters over with us. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 

CAPITAL $ 50,000.00. 

SURPLUS 100,000.00. 

KW. L. B. ROUSE. President. A B. RENAKER, CaaMsto 

NELL H. MARTIN, A«t. Cashier. 



a 



1 
i 



I will sell at public Auction at my farm, 4 1-2 
miles south of Burlington, Ky., on the 
Burlington and Big Bone Road, on 





5th, 1921 



The Following Property: 



Black Mare 12 yeors old, bay marc 4 years old, both first-class farm mares lady broke, 
thornhfll Road Wagon, good as new; Iron wheel truck wagon, Hayframe, Rockbed, 
new 2 -horse Sled, Rubber Tire Buggy, Oliver Riding Cultivator, 2 -horse Corndrill, 1-h, 
Corndrill, Disc Harrow, 'A' Harrow, E. Breaking Plow, No. 20 Breaking Plow, Hill- 
side Plow, 2-horse Jumping Shovel Plow, 1-h. Jumping Shovel Plow, Double Shovel, 
McCormick Mowing Machine, Hayrake, Fairbank Platform Scries, Sorghum Mill and 
Pan, 2 sets Leather Tug Harness, 4 Leather Horse Collars, 2 Work Bridles, Riding 
Bridle, ^Leather Halters, 2 sets Buggy Harness, set Breast Chains, Man's Saddle, Hay- 
fork and rope, Blocks and Ropes, 3 Pitchforks, Single and Doubletrees, set Stretchers, 
Log Chain, Log Bolsters, and other articles too numerous to mention. 



TERMS OF SALE. 



All sums of $10 and under, .cash ; on sums over $10, a cred- 
it of 12 months without interest, will be given purchasers to 
give notes with good. security payable at the Peoples Deposit 
Bank, Burlington, Ky., before removing property. 

W. L. Stephens. 

LUTE BRADG0RD, Auct. Sale to begin at 12:30 




HEBRON THEATRE 

NEXT SATURDAY 

Wallace Reid in Less than Kin 
2-Reel Comedy 

Fir.t Show 7:30 P. M. 
22 Cento. m Children, 11 



H 



Evenings weddings at the Cav- 
vnry Protestant Episcopal church 
at Pittsburg, aio banned by or- 
der of the Rev. E. J. Van Kthen, 
the | Mist or. 

Thia actton, made public con- 
forme with the Hev Mr Rttenm 
New Year's sermon, when, in n 
review of the tlm*a, he paid much 
attention to evening gown* worn 
by women 

lie commented oo "tho lack of 
deooruai often avwHastad»' *nu 
esld that some of the gowns <lla 
nut conform with) the sacred char- 
acter ot marriage. 



POULTRY RAISERS ROTICE 

We are starting a Register or 
Directory of all Pure Bred Poul- 
try Breeders in Northern Ken- 
tucky. If you are a Breeder of 
Pure Bred Poultry of any variety 
on a large or small scale and have 
eggs for hatching or stock for 
sale you are invited to send us 
your name. State the variety or 
varieties you breed, your price 
per setting of 15 eggs and per 
hundred. If you have stock for 
sale state what it is and price 
asked. If you have a special 
strain you might not the fact. We 
will keep your record for refer- 
ence and any one asking for your 
breed of poultry will be given 
your name and address and price, 
if you desire. 

"""Our aim is to make this a clear- 
ing house and getting together of 
Pure Bred Poultry Raisers. 

This service is absolutely free. 
No charge of any kind will be 
made. 

Let's see if we can make North- 
ern Kentucky 100 per cent Pure 
Bred Poultry Raisers. 

GOODIE & DUNKIE, 
Covington, Ky. 

FOOD SUPPLY. 

Orly one third of] the world's 
potertial food producing area is 
urder cultivation, and the crops 
raised on that third, thanks to 
agricultural science, can yield in- 
creasing yearly results. 

The United States has bit 400,- 
000,000 of its 935,000,0oo acres of 
land under cultivation, yet we 
raise, amoi.g other things, one 
sixth of the worlds corn sup- 
ply and could raise enough on 
land that is now lying unused to 
meet the needs of Europe. 

Russia produces only 10 bushels 
of corn to the acre, but when 
science has access to her millions 
of acres and brings their capacity 
up to the standard, say of Eng- 
lish farms, then she alone will 
be Able to supply the world's 
cereal needs, with the exception of 
maize and rice. 

Less than a third of the earth's 
population gets what we call throe 
square meats a day, nevertheless 
the working capabilities of the, 
from our point of view, underiod 
continents of Asia and Africa will 
compare quite well with Hther 
Europe or America. The average 
ir.eat consumption of the world is 
SO pounds a head, yet both the 
Americans ~ enir A uetr attaint est" 
nearer ISO pounds per h;»«d, and 
the Englishman is not far behind 
with about ISO pounds 

It is evident we can tighten our 
belts a hols or two vet without 
soy undue danger of starvation 

Joe Walton and family, of Com- 
missary, spent the day Sunday, 

Mrs Robert, Whits 



REDUCTION 

SALE- 

WE ARE REDUCING OUR STOCK 

Shoes, Hardware. Overalls 
f and Jackets— 

in fact our entire stock will be reduced at 

t 

least 10 per cent This sale will con- 
tinue for 10 days, starting 

Jan y 14, '21 

R. & C. WHITE. 

Cash Merchants Petersburg, Ky 






Now Is The Time, Mr. Farmer, for You to 

Think of the Seed You are Going to 

Plant This Winter. 

What are you going to plant? 
tiow many acres will you plant ? 

What kind of seed will get you the best results ? 

Think It Over. 

We are now prepared to take your order for 
variety of Winter Seed — 

FANCY NEW TIMOTHY 

KENTUCKY BLUE GRASS 

ORCHARD GRASS 

RED CLOVER 
ALSIKE CLOVER 




Washington - Kentucky »• thir- 
teen electoral votes for tto v cr no rj 
Jamu* If, Cox were delivered to 
Vice-President Murnhall by MHa i 
Sarah Hays, Mudleonvillr, aptyMal I 
messenger ot the Kentucky BIw- 
toral <\>lleg* 



TJ»» man that dot* the vol urns 

of business Is the Ma toot eani 

roa yw mm * r* worth 

lltiMt 



Lexington.— Kentucky now has 
18 aOcredit.-d herd, of cattlo which 
means that t hey ■ucooaafully pas* 
ed two annual toaU and srefreO 
from tuberculosis, according to 
Dr. W H Simmon^ now atpMr 
veterinarian but formerly 
seated with the State 
Station 

Attorney D. 

•t the tourt hopes 




rent profiteer has no conscience. I ENGLAND HAS A NEW CLASS 



KOONS COUNTY XBCOADRK 



shevlsm cannot improve with 



rr The pedestrian has no rights that 
*tbe reckless motor driver will respect. 




Lemons are reported as cheap, at 
present, partlcuJarly_politlcal lemons. 



Bay rum still leads In the race of 
toilet water drinks. 



Poland fears Dot only the soviet 
armies, but the theories they feed on. 



It Is a pity that the man with time to 
kill cannot make it ragtime. 



Alwavg remember thwt *dnr, health 
Is about your greatest asset. 



Avoid the tempting country pump 
and spring if you would escape 
typhoid. 



What a quiet campaign it would be 
If it were not for people who are eat- 
ing corn on the cob. 



Have you dropped In on a sugar 
dealer of lute and found him singing 
sweet and low? 



What the nation needs is fewer men 
with something up their slecrwi and 
more with sleeves rolled uptheir arms. 



There is a lot of romance in n canoe, 
but It is often dangerous, as romance 
i» likely to be. 



War calls for war substitutes, but it 
calls principally for a substitute for 
war. 



The world is facing a dark outlook. 
Even brunettes are again to become 
the fashion. 



You cannot interest a man in poli- 
tics when his collar is wilted and per- 
spiration dampens his brow. 



"New Poor" Is the Problem There 

Now — Humdrumness of Life Is 

Their Tragedy. 

England has no nouveau riche — the 
"new poor" Is the class most referred 
to in England today, according to Miss 
Clarissa Spencer who lias Just re- 
turned from London as representative 
of the overseas department of the Y. 
W. a A. In addition to England 
Miss Spencer visited European coun- 
tries to further the work of the Y. 
W. 0. A. in explaining their peoples 
one to the other through the medium 
of their women. 

"Mot starvation, nor homeliness, but 
the humdrumness of life is the tragedy 
of a gr«**" portion of English young 
women." Mlas Spencer says: "Young 
men are few. 

•'For most of the girls who had 
been engaged to be married and for 
many who had just married at the 
opening of the war, life now holds 
little but the long years ahead. Some 
of them, of course, will marry. But 
many more will brave the endless suc- 
cession of days, each the same color 
as the hist" 

Few English girls are idle. Most of 
them earn their living now. What 
has struck Miss Spencer so forcibly Is 
that work, food and shelter become 
meaningless to the vast number of 
England's girls who no longer look 
ahead to homes of their own. 

Miss Spencer believes that not so 
many English girls are coming to this 
country as are going to England's own 
colonies. 



&! 



GOOD CONTAINERS OF 
HIGHEST IMPORTANCE 



Those With Handles Are 
Likely to be Changed. 



Net 



TELESCOPIC CAMERA IN ANDES 



"Bridegroom a suicide." — Headline. 
Invariably the opinion of his bachelor 
friends. 



The return of warm weather enables 
one to keep his mind off the hole 
where the coal pile ought to be. 



One advantage In buying potatoes by 
the pound is that their price per bushel 
thus remains mercifully hidden from 
you. 



Now that trade has been reopened 
the best thing Russia can import from 
America Is a constitution and a bill of 
rights. 



The bolshevik political policy Is re- 
garded as a trifle too variable and un- 
defined to be reckoned with as an ele- 
ment of International relationship. 



The sugar profiteer takes the same 
delight in saying he is just out that a 
lot of people would take in observing 
that he has just gone up. 



When little boys and women begin to 
take their place in the news of a mod- 
ern army there remains little to be told 
of the doom of that army. 



Largest Photographic Apparatus in the 
World Has 24- Inch Lena 

The South American station of Har- 
vard university's observatory, tucked 
away In the Peruvian Andes, near the 
city of Arequlpa, in the old Inca em- 
pire, boasts of the largest photo- 
graphic apparatus In the world. It is 
a huge telescopic camera with a 24- 
Inch lens which has been of great aid 
to science In its observations of the 
southern skies. 

The station was founded 30 years 
ago, and is located near the base of 
the famous Andean volcano, Mistl. 
The Arequlpanian Indians, descen- 
dants of the Inca civilization, fre- 
quently speak of themselves as the 
sons and daughters of old Mlsti. It is 
said the Indians in the surrounding 
country still worship the mountain 
with much reverence, regarding It as 
the source of earthquakes which oft- 
en are felt in the region. The volcano 
erupted seven years ago. 

Superstitions in regard to the moun- 
tain date back to prehistoric times. 
The ruins of the ancient pagan tem- 
ples, a writer says, have been found In 
the crater of the volcano, and even to- 
day near the top may be seen a great 
iron cross, placed there In 1677, when 
a party of Spanish priests exorcised 
and pleaded with It not to erupt again 
and destroy their cities. 

The clear atmosphere of the Arequl- 
pa region is said to have afforded an 
excellent site for an observing station. 



Bamboo Baskets Serve Purpose Quite 

Satisfactorily and May be Used 

Long Time — Ordinary Splint 

Vessel Is Good. 

One important requirement for par- 
cel post shipping and marketing is a 
proper and satisfactory container, the 
United States Department of Agricul- 
ture points out. Somattmes the con-. 
Burner can secure containers more 
readily and economically than the pro- 
ducer. Those with bandies are much 
less likely to be damaged in transit in 
the malls than those which are not 
thus supplied and which are likely to 
be tossed or thrown or handled by the 
string or twine used in tying them. 
A bamboo basket serves the purpose 
very well and may be used a long 
time. Ordinary splint baskets made of 
strips of veneer may also be used, and 
if they can be secured at a price suffi- 
ciently cheap a new one for each ship- 
ment is more economical than having 
them returned, unless they -are- sent 
back In lots Sf ten or more under one 
cover. This, of course, necessitates 
using them without a wooden hnndle. 
In which case a heavy twine should 
be used for a hnndle. This twine can 
be untied and the baskets nested, or 
placed in one another, for return ship 
ment If a basket with a wooden 
handle is used, care should be taken 
to see that it Is securely nailed, not 
only at the rim of the basket but furth- 
er down toward the bottom, so as to 
prevent undue leverage which may 
break lose the nailing. 



HOME 
TOW 

WILL HAVE CITY 



CERTIFIED SEED IS FAVORED 



Potatoes Are Treated Before Planting 

With Corrosive Sublimate or 

Formaldehyde. 

Certified seed potatoes are now de- 
manded by all good farmers. Such po- 
tatoes are grown from certified seed 
trented before planting with corrosive 



With cheaper sugar and the prospect 
of preserves, jellies and jams In house- 
holds, life Is regaining some of the 
sweetness lost in the war. 



If the railroads ask 44 per cent 
freight raise to take care of the wage 
advance, the public will — oh well, 
you've beard It all before. 



One good thrashing would teach the 
bolshevists a 'lesson and drive them 
back to the holes from which they 
.came. 



There's one consolation, the modern 
names given some diseases and the in- 
struments to detect and measure them 
are really the worst part of it 



Whether the excess profits tax Is the 
cause or excuse for high prices makes 
little change in the rough current of 
the consumer's agitated life 



There must be something feminine 
about the labor group that glorifies the 
bolsheviki. Inasmuch as the bolshevikl 
promise labor nothing but enslavement. 



8o far as Martens Is concerned the 
soviet government Is a success. There 
never appears to be a moment when 
fie 



German "Booby Traps." 
At the start of the reconstruction 
work in the devested coal region 
about Lens, France, the French were 
taught by several disasters that the 
retreating Germans, before flooding 
mines, had concealed along the walls 
unnumbered "booby traps," says Pop- 
ular Mechanics. Consequently, In or- 
der that the divers, charged with pre- 
liminary Inspections, may "look be- 
fore they leap," the government re- 
cently purchased from England an In- 
teresting apparatus for submarine 
photography. Lowered down the 
flooded shaft, this apparatus illumi- 
nates a ten-foot zone ; then, as switch- 
es are pressed nt the mouth of the 
shaft, it photographs simultaneously 
each of the four walla 




Montreal's Experiment In Government 
Will Be Interesting to Many Com- 
munities In the United State*. 

That American cities have no 
monopoly in political mlsgovernment 
Is ahown by the record of Montreal, re 
marks the Plttst- ^b Dispatch. Twelie 
years ago the old-style council of two 
members from each at the SI wards 
provoked a scandal and investigation 
that led to a recasting of the form of 
municipal government. Ever since the 
ward politicians bare been trying to 
get back and to restore their discred- 
ited system, which was at first sup- 
planted by a smaller council of one 
member per ward without authority 
over money matters and a body of four 
appointed commissioner* with the 
mayor as the fifth. Two of the new 
commissioners and the mayor were 
soon charged with practices akin to 
those of the old- s ys te m a n d ~rhfrcom» 
missioners were removed and the 
mayor reduced to a mere figurehead, 
while charge of the city was given to 
four newly appointed commissioners, 
their chairman being empowered with 
managerial authority. The politicians 
naturally made the most -of this im- 
position of an appointed city admin- 
istration by the provincial f&vern- 
ment and recently the prime minister 
named a committee of leading Mon- 
treal citizens to draft a new charter 
on a representative basis This body 
has uow received the report from Its 
sub-committee favoring a council of 
nine members elected at large, the 
election of a mayor by council and tbe 
appointment of a genuine expert city 
manager. 




s 

s 

i 
i 



Automobile tubes and tife* repaired bj the lateat 
process. Bring me your old, tires and I may be 
able to yet several miles more service for you out 
of them. 

Auto Accessories kept in stock. 
laoodrldge, Portage and applet Tire, and Tabes on hand. 

GEORGE PORTER, 

BURLINGTON, KY. 




an 



The Average Acreage Yield of Potatoes 
Has Increased 36 Per Cent During 
the Past Twenty Years. 

sublimate or formaldehyde. The crop 
gets the best of care. The fields are 
visited twice during the summer by 
the state inspector and all foreign 
varieties pulled out At harvest they 
are carefully assorted, only sound stock 
true to name being sacked. After 
each bag is Inspected to make sure that 
It Is true to type and not mixed with 
other varieties, It is tagged with the 
state label. Wisconsin, Maine, -Min- 
nesota and New York state potato 
growers are doing an Increasing busi- 
ness raising certified seed. 



The linseed oil trust is- being prose- 
cuted because oil went from W) cents 
to $1.80 a gallon In two years. We 
know qf stuff that's taken a btgger 
Jnmp than that per gallon. 



The king of Belgium is going to 
the Atlantic again, but this time 
ha will visit the United States of Bra- 
•ft. Be seems partial to nations whose 
name begins that way. 

, 

English girl who changed fiances 
r voyage across the ocean was re- 
perratsalon to land. It American 
fbis were treated that way there 
would Dot be steamships enough to 
take them out of the country. 



The Best TNng He Did. 

A melancholy looking man entered 
the establishment of a photographer. 

"I should like to have a picture of 
myself weeping beside my wlfe'a 
grave," he explained. 

"I fear I have not the necessary 
accessories here," said the pho- 
tographer. Then he added, faceti- 
ously, "Couldn't we arrange to have 
the portrait made at the grave It- 
selfr 

"No," said the man ; "that's In New 
York state. It would be too expen- 
sive to go there. Just you fix up 
some kind of a grave here In the 
shop. I could weep on that It's no 
trouble for me to weep anywhere."— 
Everybody's Magazine. 



It Is foeliah to worry nhout the fu- 
ture, bat now and then some of us 
can't help wondering If the fall turnip 

ap will be up to the requlrementN 
Jnmimt Ike hl|« cmt Of dyes wilt 
•sake cirrus lemonade saore expensive. 



Revised Version. 

Little Bert had been to Sabbath 
school by himself. When he returned 
his mother tried, rather unsuccessfully, 
to find what he had learned. But all 
she could elicit after much questioning 
wss tbst his teacher said Jesus wss 
going to send him a quilt Tbst he In- 
sisted, was all they learned. 

When mother consulted tbe Sundsy 
school quarterly, she found tbe gold* 
en text for the day was: 

"Behold, I send you the Comforter." 



HOGGING OFF CORN IN FAVOR 

North Dakota College Secured Return 

of $45.54 Per Acre by tiling 

Herd of Shotes. 

While corn usually Is considered 
not as a money crop but one to clean 
up the land, yet the North Dakota 
Agricultural college received a re- 
turn of $45.54 per acre by using 48 
shotes to hog off 16 acres of flint corn 
In 1918, according to J. H. Shepperd 
of the experiment station. 

"The liogs were turned In the field 
September 6, when they averaged 109 
pounds In weight, and left there un- 
til November 12, making an average 
gain of 94 pounds, or a gain of 281.75 
pounds per acre. They were market- 
ed at 16.31 cents, which, allowing for 
shrinkage, gave a return of $45.54 per 
acre." 



DETROIT VALUES ITS TREES 

Newspaper Pays Tribute to Thought- 
fulness of the Early Settlers 
Who Planted Them. 

If a woman's crowning glory Is 
her hair, a cfty's Is its trees. De- 
troit is particularly fortunate in the 
preservation of Its splendid tree- 
lined corridors, and It Is a proof of 
the thoroughness of earlier citizens 
that they saw the beauty which nature 
had provided, and carefully preserved 
It for the glory of the metropolis to 
come. 

Imagine, for one minute, Second 
boulevard, or any other prominent 
thoroughfare ^of your _ J&cqunlntjnceL 
stripped of Its curtain of leaves and 
boughs! It Is too harsh even to con- 
template. 

If you could view the city from the 
top of one of Its tallest buildings, yon 
would obtain an even more impressive 
lesson in just bow much of Detroit 
Is sheltered and enhanced by its 
trees. 

The department of parks and boule- 
vards declares rescue work Is Imper- 
ative to save the elms; It Is a matter 
on which every citizen can unite. The 
work should be done, and doubtless 
will he done, with the Indorsement 
and eager co-operation of every citi- 
zen. 

For Detroit to permit her band- 
some trees to perish would be nothing 
less than a crime against the bounty 
6f nature.— Detroit News. 



fy IT'S a wise idea to place your order for a car now, X 
•£ ■ so you won't be disappointed in the spring. 

W Phaeton Hudson $2538.00. Seven Pssaamgor Hud.on $2538.00 

Ifl Coup. Hudson - - 83445. Sedan Hudson . . . $3874 * 

0fk Essex Taurine $1698. 

tji Eaaem Roadster $189$. 

yv Dodge Touring $1384). 

7 Dodge Coupe $2035. 

Dodge Sedan $2295. 
Cleveland Tractor $1395. 

The above price* are delivered at your door. 

II you want to place an order for any of these cars, 

8 



B. B. HUME, Burlington, Ky. 




Best Quality— Fair Prices 




Our constantly Increasing business- 
proves conclusively that "Best Quality 
at Fair Prices" will win. We test each 
carefully by the latest and moat accu- 
rate methods and grind lenses to ex- 
actly suit you. 

Phone South 1745 



DR. N. F. PENN.sxaM.dSirrr 



Covington. Ky 



II! 

Why Worry? 

We know the price of Tires has gone sky high. But why wor- 
| ry? You can have your old Tires half soled and they will be bet 
ter than new onea because they are guarnteed punoture proof fo r 
1 8,500 miles and they only cost one-half as much. 

This the bargain can only be had at 

i The Conry Rubber Co. 

34 Pike Street, *. Covington, Ky 






USE SUNFLOWER FOR SILAGE 

When Grown With Corn Yield Was 

Considerably Increased— Feed 

Value Not Impaired. 

Considerable interest has developed 
In the past two or three years in sun- 
flowers as s silage crop. A number 
of farmers In Michigan hate grown 



lOMMtiaf shark, 20 feet long, 
raptured 0*1 (he Hew Jersey 
U is see though* that the 

■tilth 



Washing Machine Activity. 
Next to the automobile manufactor- 
srs, the makers of washing machines 
sre now the grestest consumers of cop- 
per. The utility companies. Wulck 10 
normal times sre large users of cop- 
per, cannot buy much now because 
they can't get the money. lint wash- 
Ing machines are betag turned out by 
thousands. In an effort to meet the 
snort UK* of labor, sad copper eaters 
lergafy lata the construction of ssost 
ef Ike washing machine* 



cultural college They claim that the 
yield was considerably increased and 
the feeding value was not Impaired. 
Most of them, however, said they pre- 
ferred that sunflowers should not take 
up more than one- third of tbe silage 
material. 



Keep on Planting Trees, i 
As an asset to any piece of proper- 
ty, a tree or trees can not be overes- 
timated. The moment a tree Is plant- 
ed the value of a piece of property is 
increased. As Mr. Kennedy says to 
the boys, "time goes on Just the same." 
so why not plant some trees. The 
tree-planting campaign that is occupy- 
ing the attention of the country right 
now has taken on many phases, and ha 
each of these pbsses the value of the 
property Is being Increased whether it 
be a school yard or a "Road of Re- 
membrance," such as Is being planted 
with memorial trees In many parts of 
tbe country. A properly planted road 
means better transportation to or from 
or between towns. That all means 
better business, better living condi- 
tions, and a better country, — Sheldon 
Ridsdnle In National Property Owner. 




sunflowers with corn, says the quar- 
terly bulletin of the Michigan Agri- fa height of three to four inches; other. 



Preparation of Annual Lawn. 
Tbe annual lawn, which Is neces- 
sary in some cases preparatory to the 
making of the permanent lawn, may 
be made by seeding with Italian rye 
sown either in fall or spring at the 
rate of two bushels per acre. When 
properly cared for this will make a 
beautiful green six to eight weeks 
from seeding. It is Imperative that 
this grass be cat when It has reached 



Getting Together 

One of the biggest problems facing farmers and 
bankers today is that of providing ample farm 
credits on reasonable terms. They can solve 
it only by working together, says 

ISe COUNTRY 
GENTLEMAN 

• 

Our credit system is based on a 60-day paper 
intended to serve commercial interests with 
a quick turn-over. It doesn't serve the farmer, 
whose turn-over comes once a year. How can 
he be supplied with the capital he needs to 
run his farm business? 



1 



HANDLE SQ UASH C AUTIOUSLY 

Extreme Care Is Essential If They 

1 ' ■u^sjav up nam- o»sne^suj WW aa>s*nuBBBSsS)e*^se^Bw w ^^Fv - 

tilstlen la 



Squash should be carefully handled 
from tbe field to storage If they art 
to keep well Place oo wooden reeks 
la storage boaas one ( Uynr deep. The 
housej snwaM he wsjm and tare a 




wise the lawn will be unattractive. 



Find Old Roman Tombs, 
Four Roman tombs built In the 
third century and containing golden 
objects, urns, glass work, pottery and 
bones, hsve been found in a gravel pit 
near Heerlea In Dutch Ltmborg. 
Msny of tbe things are of great scien- 
tific vslue snd further excavations are 
being made. • 



Killing riles With formaldehyde. 

To kill flies with a solution of forma- 
lin or formaldehyde In wafer the 
method Is: Pat s tsaspoenful of for- 
mtldshyde lute a quarter of a pint of 
water sad espoee bi the room. Thte 
quantity if enough to kill sll (he files 

•aw VusjsJP 



Because the problem ef fur- 
niahing the farmer with ample 
credit facilities is one of such 
vital interest to the whole farm 
Industry and to our national 
welfare. The Country G«n- 
TLSMAN has many trained in- 
vestigators working on the 
puus offered for aoTving the 
difficulties. Their articles will 
keep you informed on devel- 



opments toward easier farm 
credits. For an example, nest 
Week'a issue carries a story by 
X. V. Wilcox on financing the 
marketing of a major farm crop. 
Other competent articles are 
coming soon. 

To make sure of getting them 
all, you'd better send me $1.00 
today for the next 53 big issues 
of this dominant weakly. 



The real fact stuff about farming 

Robert Clore - 

Burlington, Ky. 



aeletrtotla* •eeeassetailve ef 



• haw IsaVusu^W F^Pua* ™ sSev'^s^puul f uW 



it 



^^s(e™se^e 



UfP 



^ a nnm i » m a h i 



■eaaaw. 



,, . ,„.,,,.. & 



:,-,.,,._..;_...,,,, 



f 1 



BOONE COUNTY RE CORDER. 



Vol. xxxxvi 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY .JANUARY 27, 192 1 



$1.50 Per \ ear, 



No 17 



Ueal i| appS Ri»gs. NEW "BOY CORN KING" 



Estimating that repairs on the 
Dixie Highway In Kenton county 
between Bracht station and Wal- 
ton will coat $1,000 a mile, or $20,- 
000 for the distance of five miles, 
Kenton county Commissioner* om» 
day lost week adopted a rssolu- 
ti'vi offering to turn ^ver to the 
KenUfcky State Roads Department 
this sum if the Ata:e depart- 
ment will take over and recon- 
struot this section of the road- 
way. 

The proposition was made, it 1 
was explained, to relieve tho 
county of the expense of kecy>- 
ing jnp the pike until such time 
as the staite may -.ake it over for 
maintenance under the law pass- 
ed by the Kentucky Legislature a: 
its last session. 
t i Until the roads of the state 
are taken over by the State Roads 
- Department, each county must pro 
vide funds for maintenance of tho 
__ road* within its limits 



15 Year Old Rocastle County 
Boy Awardod Prize, Produc- 
ed 150 But. From an Acre 



Chester White Brooders Form SPECIAL BLANKS FOR j Federal AJd _ F -°- Ky ' *****' \ MEMBERS OF CABINET 



Messrs. Hen Jonnaon and A. B. 
Rouse, Repi-esentative.s in C'on- 

fres* from Ky., voted against the 
ill to increase the sifce. of the 
House, notwithstanding the facj 
that the defeat of tha measure 
meant tho loss of one member oy 
their State. Not many of their 
colleagues from States which 
would thus lose by the bill's fail- 
ure were broad enough and stanch 
ei-ough to stand with them in the 
performance of an important puW 
lie service rather than for thj pro- 
motion of sectional and selfish po- 
litical interests. Kentucky's grate- 
ful acknowledgements are due tho 
Representatives from the Fourth 
and Sixth Congressional- Districts. 
-C.-J. 



ing 
belli 



Oentlc reader 
for this i] 
as well as 
tors. Did you 



who owe us 
are readin 



you 
paper, you are reaaing, 
'for several of its smevs- 

ed- 



ever s< 



an 



* Everett Reynolds, M£. Vernon, 
Rockcastle county, is the new 
"Boy Corn King'' c~, .Kentueky. 
Bis accession to the throne was 
announced here by C. W. Buckler, 
State leader of Junior club work, 
at the State College of Agricul- 
ture; who ihas just completed a 
summary of the junior club work 
for the year. 

Roscoe Kash, St. Helens, Lee 
county, was awarded the prize for 
making the most money off an 
acre of corn, and Glennus Croley, 
Jellico, Whitley county, for the 
best all-round club member' grow- 
pigs. Elizabeth Smith, Camp- 
Isviue, Taylor county, was an- 
nounced as winner of the contest 
for the best all-round club .mem*- 
ber growing poultry. 

Master Reynolds, the new •'coin 
king,'' is 35 years old He produc- 
ed 105 bushels of corn .rom one 
acre of land. Besides winning a 
silver cup and a trip to the 
State Pair at Louisville for ihe 
greatest production, he also hot 
the prize of a silver cup for be- 
ing ' the best all-round club boy 
growing corn and placed seventh 
in the contest for a story on 
"Your Favorite Animal Seen This 
Year.*' 

Roscbe Kash however, beat the 
"corn, king'' as a money maker. 
Roscoe raised 100 bushels of corn 
on his acre at a cost of |15.20 
He sold the crop lor $1 a bushel, 
leaving him a profit of $81. 80. He 
will receive a silver cup ofleri l 
by the Lexington Board of Com- 
merce. 

Glennus Croley, winner of •.!>* 
pig raising contest, is 10 years oil 
He raised a pure bred Duroc Jer- 
sey that won three first prizes at 



An Organization 

The Chesterwhite and O. I. C 
breeders of Boons county met at 
the court hoffse last Friday ana 
perfected an organization, adopt- 
ed a constitution and by-laws and 
elected the following officers: 

Chester Tanner, President. 

S B Ryle, Vice-President. 

Robt. Clore, Becty-Treasurer. 
, The membership dues were 
fixed at $2.50. This organization is 
boosting the Chesterwbites *and 
trying to improve the, breeding 
stock in the county. It ia expect- 
ing to organize a pig club in the 
spring ana by fall or winter to 
have an auction. 4 



FARMERS' TAX 



Under the Federal aid road la 
Kentucky was allotted |5,37il,0(i),- 
79 There has beon expended Oi 
this $71-2,373. _.i, leaving a balance 

Internal • Revenue Bureau unexpended of tiu? allotment. oi 

. _ . -.„ ,14^57,691.5* These figures shov 

Makes It Easier tC Fill the amount of Federal aid TOW 

n..» r»nM i fund at disposal of the Agrieul- 

OM rOrmS. , tura , department Nov. 30';h, 192) 

— I The tn*_M allottment for the L 

Thousands of farmers whose net J S. amounted to *-J6«S750,<rW Th" 
income for 1920 equaled or exceed | *&*&£*?»**> _3P*SK? ( 
ed the exemptions of $1,000 



Party Lines To Be Tightly 
^ Drawn In Matters Of 

Patronage 

— i» 

Federal job seekerj , the number 
of whom is said to be legion, can 
save khemaelves much inconven- 
ience and perh-ips disappointment, 
if they will devote their energies 
solely' toward obtaining the in- 
dorsement of their respective 
county organizations for the posi- 
tions to which they aspire. 

The word has gone forth unoffi- 
cially, but none the less authorita- 
tively, that alt appointments will 
be made on the recommendation 
of the duly authorised party com- 
mittees. 

Repeatedly throughout the cam- 
paign President-elect Warren U. 
Hardirlg pledged himself, if -elect- 
ed, to give to the country a par- 
ty government. 

News dispatched from Marion 
quoting President-elect Harding, 
established beyond question tha. 
he intended to make good hb, 
campaign promise. 



itor's pocketbook? Well, it is hie; the Saxton fair last fall His tro- 



i> 



as fallible and prone to emptiness 
as those of other common mor- 
tals. The newspaper business 
hasn't yet been brought tQ thai 
degree of perfection thai it can 
be run without expense, an I un'il 
that is successfully done wo sh ill 
be under the painful necessity of 
asking you for a little cash now 
and then, especially flow. W> 
have been patient— in some cases 
long suffering— knowing thutyvour 
pocket books were about as lean 
and lank as were our own. 



Where Children Are Starving. 



The Census Bureau informs id 
that more thai: 5tt per cciuoi'.h' 
inhabi t ant s of '-he U R live — i**- 
urban settlements of 2,500 and up- 
wards. The same report shows, 
however, that in Kentucky . h^ 
proportion of rural inh.ibitae '..* So 
city dwellers is ne irly thrive to 
one. Kentucky is still largely an 
agricultuial State Our people de- 
pend, and must depend- very large 
ly, upon what they bring out of 
the ground. And. if we are to 
have a "cut-out'' of tobacco this 
year we should be certain to put 
i'u other crops to produce weal.h. 



phies included, first on boar un- 
der one year of age. first on any 
pig under one year of age, and 
first on club pigs His .silver tro- 
phy was offered by the St.u:> Col- 
lege. 

Elizabeth Smith, winner of the 
poultry prize, is 11 years old. Shi 
hatched 31 Plymouth Rock chicks 
last spring, thirty of which she 
raised at a cost "of $!VJ0. Ninon, 
these wen 1 sold to b reed e r s for 
$19. Her total profit for the year 
was $72.94, her chickens Winning 
$39 at the State fair, and $71. 50 
at the Campbellsville School Fair 
and Club show. She won three 
firsts in club exhibits at the State 
fair and fifth in the Breed ns' 
class against grownup competition. 
She will receive a silver cup. 



II V 

from 



• 



Th«j Sheriff of Boone eourty 
has paid into the State Treasury 
at Frankfort $19,53699, being? the 
amount of taxes he collected for 
state purposes. $7,000 of this fund 
was collected for st.a,to roads The 
countv has paid into the State 
state 'road fund $10,000, being the 
amount he has collected for auto- 
mobile and truck licenses. Boone 
county hasp aid into the Suite 
road fund $17,000 to date, and Shis 
nmount will be Increased as other 
auto and truck licenses are issue. T, 



The old saying, "talk is cheap, 
but it takes money to buy whis- 
ky," has at last come true to 
form. We belie V 3 that there is 
more idle talk !>ci'ig indulged in 
now than at any o'.her period in 
the world's history, and to this 
gossip much trouble is result! eg. 
"Knock, knock $" seems to be the 
slogan. People should bo more 
conservative and sober In their 
remarks about others and never 
repent gossip that has a tinge 
of yellow in it. 



WALTON TO HAVE LIGHT. 

The members" of the town Board 
met as a committee with the elec- 
trical engineer Monday night and 
selected the type of outfit to be 
installed in the new electric light 
power house. The selection was 
made from several different styles 
of installations. It will be of i 
three unit type, consisting of a 
ten, twenty-fiye and thirty seven 
horse power oil engine belten to 
generators of the proper siz^ for 
each engine, \vith th? necessary 
switch board and equipment to 
furnish both 110 and 220 volt cur- 
rent. This outfit will furnish 
twenty-four hour service, 7 days a 
week, With street lights from dark 
until dawn, and will be operated 
by one man. 

This was selected on account of 
its low yearly operating cost. How 
ever the installation pries of ap- 
proximately twelve thousand dol- 
lars is somewhat in excess to the 
amount expected to bo used.— r 
Walton Advertiser. 



In Austria-Hungary and Czecho- 
slovakia, there are 1.000,000 war 
orphans. Five thousand of these 
have been wandering lik ' ani- 
mals in the Ruthenian mountains 

In the Baltic Republics, .hei • 
are 150,000 orphans. Many thout 
adns will be unable to 
school next winter for lack of j 
shoes and other necessary cloth- \ 

ing. 

Poland has 50(!,"'n» orph ros, th • 
majority living in refugee earn-ps 
instead of homes. 

I:i Roumania there are 2OO,OJ0 
orphans. 

Jugo-Salvia has 600,900 some 
ing in devastated villages 
which adults have fled 

In Soviet Hus^ia there ai 
to four million orphans. 

These figures vouched for 
Bulletin of the American 
Administration reveal a tragedy 
of childhood probably unequaled 
in the history of the world. 

Through the F.uropean Relief 
Council, Herbert Hoover is asking 
Americans to give $33,000,000 with 
which to save the lives of 3,500,- 
000 children. A contribution may 
be sent to any Bank in Kentucky. 
Address Richard Bean, Kentucky 
Treasurer .Eurojiean Relief Coun- 
cil 

Has 600 Members. 



single persons will be required to 
file on or before March 15, 1921, 1 
income tax returns for the year ; 
1920. 

As an aid to farmers the Bureau j 
of Internal Revenue has prepared 
a special form, 1040F, for record- 
ing sales of live stock, produce, 
and a summary of income and ex- 
penses. This form should be at- 
tached to the taxpayer's indi- 
vidual return on Form 1040 or 
1010A. Full instructions for making 
out 'the forms are contained in 
each. 

Under gross income a farmer is 
required to include all |.ioc • I 
derived from !he sale <<f f ir n 
products whether produced on i 
farm or purchased for resale 
When he exchanges his produc* 
for groceries, clothing, or ot he- 
merchandise he musi includ • i.i hi , 
income the value of tho articles 
received and exchanged. Profit 
received from th> sal of farm 
land or rent received for the us:> 
thereof- must also be included 
NET INCOME. 

In determining his net ineom.', 
upon which th:- tax is assise t. 
the farmer may deduct all neces- 
sary expenses incurred in tho op- 
eration of his farm during the 
year. These include cost of culti- 
vation harvesting, and marketing 
of his crops, the co.-^t of seed aid 
fertilizer used, a mount sp'ntin 
repair to farm buildjjigB other 
than the dwelling, aad to fenc . r. 
and machinery The cost of farm 
tools -.used up in the course of 
the year, wager, pa'.d to e mplo y ! i 
other than domestic servants, and 
rent paid for farm land a. d build- 
ings, other than dwelling, are d - 
ductible items. 

Farmers who kceo no records o: 

it^tve ' only records of cash receipts ami 

disbursements should make their 

returns on the basis of actual >-v- 

ceipts, but farmers who ke-pcon 

i plete accounts and who take in- 

' ve/tories at the beginning and 

! end of the year to determine their 

! profits should report on the ac- 

j exual basis. Both methods are fully 

| explained on Form lOtOF. copies of 



this by about $300,000,000, making 
a total of over $5«t,75O,OO0 lor Fed- 
eral aid road buildi :g to Nov. ffl K 
1920. 



Men of Wilson's Portfolio Easi- 
ly Able to Take Care 
Of Selves. 

Washington— Members of Presi- 
dent Wil.vts.i ./ cabiik'S .'„■ — *'.'7 ■ 
to the four points, of die «:om- 
pasb after March I it is not ex- 
pected thait the wolf will hang 
around the door of any one of 
them during the future years, as 
all are noted as vigorous workers 
and sufficiently skilled In various 
lines to warrant remunerative em- 
ployment. 

Six of the ton are law y rsan i 

Did you get your grass seeds j £ OUC f the six have given tlu- 

through the Farm Bureau? | better part-of their matur.- years 

Don't miss the floor We have to their profession, and have at- 

moved just across the atreet, butltained such success and distinc- 

come in and talk things ovir ] tion in it that they find opporV 

with us when you are in town, j tunities awaiting thorn in that 

How about your neighbor'? Does > strictly legal field ii which abil- 

he bulong to the Farm Bureau? [|y alone counts. Then' a#e Secre- 

lf not see that he doss t a ,y f State Colby, Secretary <>■ 

The fir>t shipment of clover Baker, Secretary of Intarior. Payii" 

and grass seed was reesived at a nd Attorney Qeneeal F'alm.'r. 

the Farm Bureau Tuesday, the 23 i oi the* two lawyers who were 



Farm Bureau Notes. 



Please call and get your order im- 
mediately, as th" Farm Bureau is 
paying cash for this shipment. 
During this spring we want to 



not actively engaged in tluur 
profession, Secretary of Comm-rce 
Alexander ond Postmaster <rcneral 
Burleson, both of whom had been 



sow lo acres of alfalfa where w„-ji n the House, of Representatives 
now have but one We need ai- 1 rnuny years before bethg called to 
falfa more ihan any other crop the Cabinet, it is understood that 
We have thousands of acres fill- , >£ r Alexander will open law of- 
ed with fragment rock that will fices in Washington while Mr. 
go to alfalfa readily, and at lit- , Burleso':, a man of independent 
tie or no cost. It would be next | means, has no.t disclosed what he 

will do. Burleso :'s is a large land- 
owner in Texas, and may, devote 
his time to the management of 
his estates 

There is a possibility that be- 
fore Mr. Alexander geta his law 
oKice started he* will be named 
on the Shipping Board. He knows 
much aboui. its affairs, having been 
chairman of th^ House Committee 
on Merchant: Marine many years. 
Inasmuch as the law requires re>i>- 
resertation of the minority party 
on the board, it is generally be- 

.. -j I-,*— * ii..., f ", «.v«l .!« r» *■ TJ .»wli r, cr 



■ i liree 

by a 
Relief 



to impossible to grow ( nough for 
the local demand for our dairy- 
herds and sheep. The Farm Bu- 
reau is buying the best of alfalfa 
seed at $11.00 per bushel for its 
members. 

The Farm Bureau has just or- 
dered another car load of mixed 
feed. 

Poultry Flocks Culled. 

J H. Bardsley, Poultry Expert 
witlr County Agent Sutton, culled 
o\ it lb flocks of j>oultry thruout 
the county htst Breek. This work 
was confined largely to pure-brel 
flocks,' where eggs for hatching 
purposes will DC 6old this spring. 
Breeding pe_ns inada up of the 
ichoice birds in a flock were start- 
led' at a number of places. In one 
season these persons will make 
long strides in the improvement 
of their flocks. This eliminates all 
j chances of hatching eggs from 
j common, off-type and boarder 
1 hens. Unfortunately for future 
! gei orations in the chicken world, 
j the poorest layers in your flock 
which may be obtained from tnei w m bo laving some eggs at hatch- 
offices of c ollector s of interna l in g time,' and. of course, on the 

reven ue. , j average farm a great many pul- 

INCOME TAX IN A NUTSHELL. 1 let* that go to make up next 
WHO' Single persons who had | years flock will be hatched from 
net income of $1000 or more for j such eggs Extensive culling work 
the year 1920; married coupl jk who | will be doi.e in the county- 
had net income of $2,000 



WHEN? March 15, 1921. is the 
final date for filing returns and 
making first payments. 

WHERE? Collector of Internal 
Revenue for district in which th? 
person resides. 

HOW? Full directions on Form 
1040A and Form 1010; also the law 
and regulations. • 

WHAT? Four per cent normal 
tax on taxable income up to $4,000 
in excess of exemption. Eight j>er 
cent normal tax on balance of tax- 
able income. Surtax from one per 

on net in- 



next 
August. This is a poor time of 
year to cull just average farm 
flocks, because they have been fen 
all winter and soon practically all 
hens will be laying, at least a few- 
eggs. August is* the l>est "month in 
the year for culling work 



Educational Steps Needed. 



Our oh! friend, 
while assisting J. 
fodder, one dav 



L. S. Beemo'i, 
Jl. Rouse haul 
last wook, f"ll 



♦ 



from a loaded Wagon and bruisi d 
himself* up considerably Fortu- 
nately no bones wrr ' brok?n, but 
it was u narrow escape for one 
who has passed his fou r-score 
years in life's journey 



Prospective candidates for Coun- 
ty Tax Commissioner should not 
take the examination required, in 
order to get their nanr-s on the 
ballot until the/ have given some 
time arid study to the subjects 
upon which they will be examin- 
«"d . 

Holland requires from the Unit- 
ed States, coal, cotton, fruits, hay. 
grains, lumber, canned fish ana 
meats, groceries, surgical goods, 
textiles and wines. HoIIhii.I is not 

the only country that wants 
wines 

The Willi on tobacco market last 
Saturday was reported from five 
to ten (Jollars a hundred lower, 
i ban pit-ceding sales. At Coving- 
ton, very little tobacco liasl>eeii 
Hold and at a low average. 



i lie Bible tells abuul i. uing 
h words into plowshares, Bui im 
American people seem more m 

< lined to beat them into |tgj in 
t»li nun nts , 

The (allow wlu» wtops on the 

ei* la lucky, if Ulvi he u u>>U< 
■tep ilttO Chr operstlnn roum 



From St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lasting en- 
tertained the members of the Fri- 
day evening club and a few oth- 
er guests at a charmingly ap- 
pointed dinner gives last nigh', at 
Polly's Tea Room The guests Were 
seated at small tables w hic'h w -re 
artistically (iecoratcd. Centering 
each, was a vase of deep pink 
roses from which a streamer of 
tulle was tied to the gild ni nut 
baskets at the places marked for 
the ladies, and jrere at. th:> close 
of the dinner given as favors For 
the men lioutenu'rcs of rlul'J.Cs 
were found at each covar, Th % 
place cards Were original in de- 
sign, and further suggested the 
color scheme of lavender and pink 
Following the delicious course din 
ner the. party was taken to th v 
Gold Dragon where the evening 
was passed in dancing.— Si. Pet- 
ersburg Times. 

Tho Value of Tears. 

A Grecian philosopher being ask- 
el why he wept for the death of 
his hoi , since the sorrow was in 
Vattt, rrpbeo. "I woop on that 
accrr.r t " And his answer became 
hi* wic.lom Ii^ is only for s»>- 
ph'st* to contend .hut we, whose 
eyes centals the count ain of .••.its, 
need never give way to them It 
would be in. wise not to do no on 
some oc-UHions. Sorrow unloeks 
them in her balmy moods liio 
first bursts may in" biter ;uid i» - 
erw helming; but the houl 4n 
which they pour would be w oi 
without them Thi-v reft -sh II 
lever of the soul th >j »Iin n 

which parohes tho countenaite* in 

to furrows, add ii'inli ih us |ii> l< 
to OUT mo*! leiiPIc "(leohquik 



I'nion Countv Farm Bureau, with 
headquarters "at Morganfield has cent to b5 per cent 
reached second plac ' in mem- comes over $5 ,000. 

bcrship in. Kentucky having a "™ 

membership close to th> six hun- ] 1 DfUID 1 1 II U'CI AQQfllU 
dred mark Jefferson county holds | A l\ 1 1 11 1 IJ A I If fll tlLAuUUUl 
first place. 

Six hundred members is unusual- 
ly large when it is taken Into 
consideration that the farm popu- 
lation of Union county, tenants 
and owners, is only 1300. In the 
past few weeks renewals of mem- 
bership have totaled 202 and ev- 
ery day adds to the number. 

In the matter of coal alone, far- 
mers were refunded their, memi er 
ship dues, plus a handsome divi- 
dend besides. 

From twenty-dx to six-.een cants 
tells the story of. coal ii 



Boone County Boy One of 
Court In Balloon 
Inquiry. 



county. Coal operators 
ing twentyy-six cents 



The special Board of Inquiry 
appointed by Josephus Daniels. 
Secretary of the Navy, to ascer- 
tain the facts in connection with 
the loss of the ^iaval balloons nea:- 
Moose Factory, Canada, in which 
l'nion>Lieutenants Ktoor, Hinton and. 



Kentucky is the land of thoro- 
bred horses, horses raised to the 
height of perfection, animals as 
perfect as man's intelligence can 
produce them. Is our State of Ken- 
tucky the land of thorobred chil- 
dren? Has our State become as 
famous for the intelligent rais- 
ing of fine children as it has foe 
the raising of fine to! acco ann 
perfect horses? It has r.ot. 

Very few parents apply th • in- 
telligent principles to .h> rearing 
, of their children that they ap- 
^«»»ly to the rearing of 'their stock 
and crops or to the conducting 
of their business 

'Most children) like Topsy, "jn->. 
grow.'' The thoroughbred horse is 
fed with extrem? car", his 



lieved herd that Prr^sident Harding 
will name Mr. Alexander as a mi- 
nority member. 

Secretary of the Treasury Hous- 
ton, although known as a educa- 
tor, is also a graduate inlaw, anO 
like President Wilson, was admit- 
ted to the bar in his younger 
days. While he has never practiced 
there is a story to the effect 
that the President once remark- 
ed that Mr. Houston is the best 
lawyer in his cabinet. 

While a number of fine posi- 
tions, both in financiil and educa- 
tional circles, are open to Mr 
Houston, it is rumored here he 
may carry out the ambition of his 
life" by opening ap office to pr*c, 
tice law 

However, if any plans Mr. Hous- 
ton may have to begin the prac- 
tice of "law now, when heisaear- 
ly 55 years old, do not work out, 
he will not need to worry. He has 
received, it is stated, flattering' 
offers to return to the educa- 
tional field or to head a trust 
company. 

Of the remaining three mem- 
bers of the cabinet two are ed- 
itors and owners of successful pa- 
pers, Josephus Daniels, who has a 
dailv in Raleigh N. C, and E. T. 
Meredith, who has i farmers' 
weekly in loWa. The other mem- 
ber of the cabinet is tho sturdy 
old former miner, William B. Wil- 
son, Secretary of Labor, who plans 
to return to the farm he owns in 
Pennslwania. 



were ask- 
and for 
awhile stubbornly held to that 
price Then the committee from 
the Farm Bureau went to work 
in earnest and the price went 
down finally to 18 cents, where 
it hung for a short time and the.: 
reached the sixteen mark. 

In the same section of the State, 
in a nearby cou nty, where ther e is- 
jio— Parm—Ruretlti" organization, coal 
opened at 28 cents, wmt then to 
34 cents and then to 38 and fin- 
ally touched 10 cents and has re- 
mained there up to th* prescn 
moment and not so- much as a 
hope of. reduction held out. 



st a 



.' 



Farrell were rescued fcom the Ca- 
nadian wilds, included Lieutenant- 
Commander Archibald McGlasson. 
of Boone county. Ky. He was judge 
advocate oT the court of inquiry 
which was held at Roekaway Sta- 
tion. Lieutenant Commander M«'- 
Glasson is a son of George M - | 
Glnsson, of Bullittaville, Ky He 
attended the Covington Hi School | 
and is 'well known in Kenton an i 
Ro6ne counties. He is now sta- 
tioned at the Philadelphia Navv 
Yard as aki to the Commander. 



js kept at 
erature, h« 
cised with 
how long 



just the | roper t >mp- 

[s systematically exer- 

proper concern as to 

lis exercise comes after 



Hotel-Keepers Must Remit Fees 

_____ i 

The Bureau of Food. Drugs 
Hotels of the State Hoard 
Health called attention in a state- 
ment issued in Louisville this 
week to the fact that the inspec- 
tion fee which the law requires 
to be paid by each hotel, boar I- 
ii.g and rooming house in Ken- 



tucky now is duo and must be 
paid immetli\teU to avoid pro.e'- 
cution 

As this fee is paid receipts iiv 
isstutl by the Bureau to show that 
hotel keepers and the proprietors 

of boarding and rooming houses 

and restaurants ha\e Compiled 
with tho law, ami lalei M ben b I 

bureau's representatives have 
mad* their \i*its <»f Inspection 
the t ■ ! Uftuat ee r, " ,; wwp l ***^ bw 
ieTi- siutu.e will i«> luuvd rhes* 
ni tlflcutea are * nid u t-ttl 1> c in 

llsl ol lint V' 



Our Men on tho Rhine. 

Fifteen thousand Amori i' 

troops are still encampmi on tit* 
Khine, wii.li headquarters at Cob- 
lenv., but of these six thousand are 
to be brought home within thirty 
in i | days, the Secretary of War au- 
of j nounces. The incoming President 
j will deckle if the remaining ".- 
i 000 are to stay or come horn.* 
Coder the Peace Treaty terms 
the German government is ptedg- 
j cd to pay the expenses of this 
i ir.aiy ol oCCupatiOi, which in the 
i American case amounts to gffWi'l 
a day Bub. as we have not ae- 
cipte i that treaty, it is pnesibl 
that (iii.ufl.iy will not pay for oil- 
men Ami all the Other Ani.'iinn 
claims, including those 
out of the sinking of 
tuiiia are dormant Pin 
i , hit \ .d St ite will, «>\ ■ 
tlsteo b) Mr Pein iae, 
busy time Htrul'rhU nine 
Gimd ...it Uuimilli- I' i 



Johll Uuilovoi ii III 


eel 


l>u! 


l\«nl>e l» v 


ii ill lo .i one It, pi - 


id nl * but be has l>eoii b 


III n-d 


in 


[•rlUutiv 


( ongetiiH und -i t b 


th«- teller, 






il ill. now _M 


(bat butly, 



x ri » wit 

the I. in 



Ii |V 

.ill 



feeding lie is watched for "\ i- 
dence of disease and th*m receives 
pro m | '. medical attention 

V law was recently passed m 
^Kentucky requiring all school chil-l 
[dien to Vc taught the fundaiii a- I 
tal principles of hygiene and phy- j 
sical development. A similar law j 
for the entire country is peiei- j 
ing passage at the present time. 
Such legislation is prophetic of 
the growing appre<'i.iiioii -ui. _the | 
value of health and human life. 

It won't be long before we w ill 
be willing to enact laws ami speed 
money for the health in I physi- 
cal welfare of our child re i as We 
are for that of hogs and ca.tle 

It may happen in the near fu- 
ture, it is to be Iiojh'iI for, at 

least, that the University of K n- 

tueky will offer a course in the 
proper nurture and care of human 

beings similar to those it is of- 
fering in the cure and nurtur ■ of 
stock animals and field crops The 
institution that organizes a de- 
partnn nt for the thorough physi- 
cal culture of man on the sam' 1 

intelligent basis as it is organise i 
in the department foa ih v outturn 
of animals m)>\ products ol th • 
soil w ill be a leader in th.> fie! 1 
of education worthy ol wholesonw 

emulation 



t 
ih 



Illness a Blessing. 

Strange as it may seem, many 
diseases prove a boon and bless- 
ing after we have recovered from 
them Even those maladies which 
remain with -us often guard us 
from ailments far more deadly. 
Rheumatism is most unpleasant, 
but sufferers from rheumatism are. 
as a rule, otherwise perfectly 
healthy persons. 

Typhoid fever cures Indigestion. 
On recovery from typhoid the pa- 
tient usually finds himself wi.h a 
new stomach that will '-.ake 
nails and bolts'' 

One who reco\*ers from small- 
pox enters seemingly upon a new 
base of life. II- seldom is serious- 
ly ill again and generlly lives to 
a ripe old age. Gouty persons al- 
most inva riably pass the Hotted 
span of years viou- tends to pro- 
mote longevity thru its germs in 
the blood keeping oth r bos il" 
[ germs from entering tho system. 
Boils, as every o.nC knows, areex- 
ctedingly hard* to bea' - , y^et there 
is no doubt that to the persons 
afflicted with them they are ver- 
itable life preservers. 

We are apt to be careful after 
Nature has once given us a sharp 
warning, particularly if it be in 
the region of the heart, and among 
persons troubled with heart com- 
plaints for every one who dies 
young there are h undre ds who, 
by living carefully, attain a Life 
longer than the* aver ig • of 
manity, 



Some reel who can nut 
to put moder 1 cunve.iienc 
is ilectric lights, rur ning 
v ueuum 



Mioi I 

. such 

water, 

ileinern and other laixir 



i: 



Leonard Rewett, on < 
•■order's good rrtehos < tile I ii 
I i iday and had | hi subi in ipl i "i 

ids siit> i 'i p ipi* Mtoi i " "■ 

u( Cl«v u »s Dliio, moved up a 'olb 
or fsar. 



viv nig eqillJimclU, ill the eouiltiy 
» ill upend ii lot of money 
iii a few years lor doctors an ' 
i n raea for thrir o ver work ed wl 

'the words "p«-u»e Him \ i« i,> < -« ■ 
wiii nave ■ hoslff ma+eleg when 

i)wii tun- p-ui yuviV iiiaoius tu\ 



lltl- 



To Study Mining. 

Junior* in the De|»artme tt of 

Mining and Metallurgv at the l'n- 
iversity of Kentucky will 1*0 given 
ii chance to study method* <>f min 
ing und treating a numt ei of dif- 
ferenl kinds of metal tins spring, 
according to an announcement bj 
Prof. A B ('mil'.'', who isairaug- 

hig a triji to mining renders Tea* 



th 



rip 



titix e Diana f« 

KlIDW lib I | 

hi .uh'uai U i I 
Will Visit II 

•OL l*eiines«< 

will go io th< 

sulphuric acid pi mi ii i u|i|j«i iuii 
Teiiii . (oil ii 1 1 in n u net blast fur- 
nn'i' Work .ilso "tit L_ (uili*«U, pos 
•ibu iiti. iu.,i _rj. i'eae. 



call for 

to irf' IIIJlil.' 

llai cluuih. 'I'tmy 

mince a4 M*«- 

t i W huh iln-v 
ppi r ml lie* u ud 



'ii^m^^MiMti^mi'^i&^'^&S^^^aK^^i^ 



-Vr^r-^f^f""-' ■l'ir-^' v ^^- : hT- ,J H^"W- ? '^W i ^ l ii"'^ 



r&-MWS^*N0%em& 



■OONB COUNTY K1CQ1DI1 




YOU CAN NOW FIND AT SCHANKER'$ T 



The Best Values «? Before the War 

IT WILL PAY YOU TO COME AND-fiUY NOW 

EVERYTHING SELLING AT THE OLD TIME LOW PRICES 



i 



WE HAVE MANY CUSTOMERS IN BOONE COUNTY WHO GO TO TOWN REGUL AR EVERY WEEK TO SELL THEIR 
FARM PRODUCTS, BUT STOP TO BUY HERE ON THEfe WAY BACK' HOME----TiSy ^OW ^HAT 

THEY CAN GET QUALITY MDSE. HERE AT THE RIGHT PRICES ! 

$125 



r i 



35c 



Children's Stockings Fine Rib- 
bed Cotton, in black all sizes- 
Special per pair 



15c 



Men's Large Size Fine White 
Hemstiched Handkerchiefs. 
Each 



/ 



25c 



Men's Socks in black, brown 
or blue, double woven toe 
and heel. Per pair 



Men's Fleeced or Ribbed 
Shirts and Drawers at per 
garment 



79c 



We have made tremendous price reduc- 
tions on our entire stock of Men's, Ladies 
and Children's Shoes. Whether you need 
shoes or not it will pay you to buy now. 



25c 



Linen Finish Toweling ; fine 
" even wea+e made with red 
border. Per yard - 



14c 





ERLANGER, KY 



35c 



Dress Ginghams in pretty 
plaids and checks of all col- 
ors; 27 in. wide. Per yard 



19c 



We arc selling at extremely low prices Mus- 
lins, Sheeting, Ticking, Percales, Outings, 
Gingnams and Piece Goods of all kinds. 
Buy here as our prices are always the 
LOWEST. 



Joseph Maurer Dead; 

Joseph Mauper died at the home 
of hia daughter Mra. Jas. Smith, 
in Belleview, Tuesday at 1 p. m. 
Mr. Maurer was in his 78th year, 
aid was born in Baden, Germany, 
coming to this country ^ when he 
was Bix years of age. He was unit- 
ed in marriage to Rebecca Cook, 
who preceded him to the great 
beyond. To this union five chil- 
dren were bprn— Charles Maurer, 
John Maurer, Edward Maurer, Willi 
Maurer and Mrs. Jas. Smith. All 
are living except Wm. Maurer. 

Mr. Maurer was one ofourmo^i 
respected citizens, liked bv all 
who knew flnm and was at all 
times, ready to assist others. He 
had b»en a sufferer for several 
years and bore his burden without j 
a murmur. The funeral will be i 
held Thursday, and burial will be I 
in Belleview cemetery by the sio> ! 
of his wife. 



GOV. MORROW, 

tfrfas People To*Un?te In Put- 
ting Dewn Bootlegging 

An appeal to the people of Ken- 
tucky "to unite; to oo-operate ana 
to v throw their irresistible power 
upon the side of law, Order and 
decency," in putting down boot- 
begging and moonshining in Ken- 
tucky, is made in a proclamation 
issued by Governor Edwin P 
Morrow. 

The proclamation in part is as 
follows: 

"I call upon the people of Ken- 
tucky, upon its men and women 
-upon the leaders of thought and 
and conduct— to unite; to co-oper- 
ate and to throw their irresistible 
power upon the side to law\ or- 
der and decency. 

"The will of the people of Ken- 
tucky must, and shall be made 
superior to the purposes of an I 
outlawed traffic. The power of 
the bootlegger and the moonshin- 1 
er must be made to bend before 
the authority of the sovereign law 
. of the Commonwealth. 

A STATEMENT 

FromjC. W. Myers, Florence, K? 

In retiring irom the General 
t Merchandise business in Florence, 
Ky., I want to express mv great 
appreciation and thanks to the 
many friends of Boone and Ken- 
ton counties for their kind pat- 
ronage. 

In rhoosing ' mv successors, i 
waa very careful to turn the bus- 
iness over to people who will con- 
tinue to carry out my policv of 
doing business and to give you 
the best of service h * J 

I feel that Mr. Wm Brown ana 
Mr. I. Dunson, who are mv suc- 
ce3flojr^JwilM>e aerrkiff vou hon- 
estly and faithfully, 2 th! v are 
very .reliable and highly lecom- 

tanks from Cincinnati 
tnWiV'fJ* the »*o«*fprawhHe 
to /assist th-ra in any capacity 1 
can and acquaint them with the 
managing of the business, and am 

fKnce° remai " a «■** * 
Again thanking you for your 
patronage and assuring vou "that 
any favors extended to mv suc- 
ceaaore will be appreciated by me, 
I am Very Sincerely Yours 
< ' W. MYEKS 

THANKS! 
Boone County Recorder 

Endoae you will find check for 
the weekly viaitor, th<- Recorder 
May it be ae Bucceaeful in the fu- 
ture aa in the past. 

Youre Truly, 
RLMBR K (JLAtKKN, 
Flortwt-, Ky. 

♦««£. Hw »i» f »"Ii ol Tayloraport, 
temporary chairman of the new 
tobaoco g rowers aaaociation. waa 
in Burlington laat Monday trana- 
acting bueineaa in thr Inftvnwt of 
•he aaeootatlon 

torn rettery, haa >«*• ptovtZT 



Kentucky Authoress Dies. 

Louisville, Ky. — Miss Margaret 
Steele Anderson, 15 vears old, 
writer, lecturer and mthor of th- 
"Flame in the Wind'' an3~ other 
poems, died at her home here of 
burns suffered two Ave^ks ago. 

Miss Anderson's clothing be- 
came ignited while standing be- 
fore a fire. 

Miss Anderson for several voars, 
was a member of the staff of 
McClurcs Magt^ine and was a 
frequcn£ contributor to other put 
lications. She was known as a critic 
of poetry and often lectured in 
the East. 

She was a" native of Louisville 
One sister survives. 

Willis Dolph, of Florence R. 1) 
made this office a pleasant call 
last Friday afternoon Mr. Delpn 
says he cannot get along with- 
out the Recorder so h» moved nis 
subscription up another year. 



DEVON 



C. D. Carpenter and wife an 
nounce the marriage of their 
daughter, Idella May, to Omer Lee 
Easton, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 19-21,' 
Covington, Ky. 

Mrs. Blanche Bagby and nephew, 1 
Paul L. Tanner, spent last Satur-: 
day and Sunday with her brother,' 
C. L. Northcutt and family, at 
Madisonville, Ohio. 

C. E. Rector and wife entertain- 
ed for their .son and daughter, 
Douglas and Sarah, last Thursday 
night. Twenty-foUr guests W«ro 
present. 

Joseph Schadler and wife enter- j 
! tained the young folks with a 
i dance Saturday night. All had a 
: delightful time. 



Quite a number of our friends 
have called in since last week ami 
renewed their subscriptions. 



-SUCCESSORS TO- 



C. W. Myersl 



Florence, Ky. 



We have bought all the goods from C. W. Myers at present 
market prices and are therefore reducing the prices on mpst| 

j all merchandise to give you the benefit of this transaction. 

We will handle the same line of high-grade Groceries, Meats, 
Drugs, Dry Goods, Chinaware, Shoes, Rubbers, Hardware, 
Oils, Feed and will aim to have e/erything you want, if not 

[ we will get it for you. ^ 

SPECIALS FOR 

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 



Groceries 

I Gran Sugar, 1 lbs 85c 

I Schul tze's Butter Nut 

Bread 9 C / 

Large loaf J. 14c 

Table Meal, 3 lbs 10c i 



Coffee 

Diamond Brand 24c I 

Diamond Brand B 29c 

Diamond Brand C A . v 34c 
^Fine Mixed Candy, lb ! . 24c 
"Applet, lb. 7c 6 lbs for. 40c 



Werk's Tag Soap, 7c, 3 for 20c 

Rinso i . ,Y gj. 

jvory • 8c 

[Telephone Flour, bbl $12.20 

IN SACKS 
J2Ub- •»<* 77c 244 lb. sack $1.53 



—DRY GOODS.— 

Fine Calico, per yard 4 ^ 2 

| Dress Ginghams, per yard /. 25c 

| Muslin, per yard 14c to 22*c 

WE BUY YOUR EGGS AND BUTTE'Rl 

shoes ~ ""7 rz 1 

rubbers Reduced ° ~ . 

boots Per Cent 

WE BUY YOUR EGGS AND BUTTER | 

WE HAVE WHAT YOU WANT, IF NOT— WE 
WILL GET IT. Watch U. Grow. Thank You. 

BROWN & DUNSON 

SuoeMwr* I* C W. MYERS 

[FLORENCE, >. KENTUCKY 



PUBLIC SALE. 



-JL 



I will sell at public auction at the late, 

residence of Geo. E. Rouse, deceased 

at Florence, Boone county, Ky., 

January 29th, '21 

The Following Property : 



Three Diston Saws, Hack saw, 
Keyhole saw, 6-ft. Cross cut saw, 
3 1-2 ft. Crosscut saw, Stone hammer, 
Large steel bars, small steel bars, 
Wire netting, 2 lanterns, roof fastners, 
2 Posthole diggers, Carpet sweeper, 
Fence hooks and fastners, nail puller, 

2 Mole traps, Sycle, 2 tree prunners, 

3 hand angers, 4 whitewash brushes, 
2 garden rakes, 2 garden hoes, spade, 
Scoop, maddox 3 long handle shovels, 
2 post rammers, 2 hay forks, 2, plaines, 
Knife grinder, wood mallet, files, 
Chicken wire netting, pinchers, 

1-2, 1-4, 1-8 bushel measures, 
Boering machine and augers. 
Veterinary dose syringe, saw set, 
w 3 Steel chisles, 8 wood chisles,, ax, 
2 Monkey wrenches, harness punch, 
Lot mixed nails, gimlet bitts, 



, 13 auger bitts, hammer/hatchet, 
Wire fastners, 3 morticing chisles, 
4 long augers, blacksmith pinchers, 
Trowles, hayforks, wire holder, 
Large monkey wrench, rope, scythe, 
Potato digger, grubbing hoe, 
300 lb. stillards, foot adze, floor paint, 
Garden plow, lot lumber, scrap irom, 
Hinges, paint brushes, wood stools, 
Wood bench, matting, sprinkler, 
Bu. willow basket, 5 bu. basket, 
Potato hilling plow, lot old lumber, 
Grind stone, lawn swing, -hand cart, 
18 2-bu. cotton sacks, 1-h. sled, 
Lot pine boxes, 2 wagon jacks, 
Buggy collar, spring wagon harness, 
Buggy harness, top spring wagon t 
14-ft. ladder, meat hogshead, 
Post puller, Rifle, coal buckets, 
1-h. Oliver plow, and other articles 



Terms Made Known on Day of Sale 



W. F. Bradford, 

Sale, to begin at 1 o'clock p. m. 



Administrator. 



3# * &%,, 

KANSAS 

ream 



FL0UF 



WM Mar *tyUi la ttai 

Maoat atxa to mo* ■«. 



Efficient, Service and Economy 
is my slogan 

0. SCOTT CHAMBERS 

Maimer and Funeral Director 



WALTON, KENTUCKY. 



n i 




fake Your County £ai*i\ SI. 50. 

Our A4vcrMM»c*t*ft*0 Profit ft* mini. 



t 

4 




r 



fc 



4 



V 



v * 



1921. 



J.C.Hahkina President. 



Boone Co. Lutheran Pastorate 

Kmv. Geo. A. RoVkb, Pastor. 
i Sunday, Jan. 30th. 1921. 

f. Hebron, 9:80 a. m.. Sunday School. 
2.80 p. m. regular service. 
Hopeful, 10,80 a. in . Catechetical 
lecture. 

11. a.m. regular service. 
All are cordially invited to these 
services. 

Boone Co. Christian Pastorate 

C. C. Otner, Pastor 

SUNDAY, JAN. 80th, Ittl. 

Pt. Pleasant, Snnday School 10 a. m. 

BulllttHville PreacMug 1 1 a. ro. by 

RevC.E.Shepperd. 
Evening services Hebron hall 7 p. pa. 
The public is urged to be, p resent, 

\ Brothers & Leidy have installed 
* electric lights in the residence of 
R. S. Cowcn. 



Personal Mention 



It looks like the business of the 
country will bo transacted on a 
■cash basis in a very short time. 

Wednesday night the Aeolian 
m Concert Co., gave the tmrd nurn- 
r*Sber of the Boone High Lyceum 

Course. -.' - : ,. . ._ * 

William Satchwill, of near La*-- 
• renceburg, Indiana, spent a few 
hours in>ilurlington last Wednes- 
day week. • ./* 



IFimil settlements of the estates 
o'f D M. Bagby and Julia t. Bag* 
by were Tiled in tfe county con.-c 
Ifcst Frid ay 

fjame* Mitchell fro n over, on 

iinpowder, made thjfi, office » 

feasant -call last Friday after- 

jon, and moved his. autycripUun 

another year. 

JSzra Beemon from down Oil 
oolpcr creek, called ii last Hi- 
«Jay and- bought another , 01.50 
wo'rth of Recorder. 

There will be preaching at tho 
M E church next Sunday morn- 
irg The public is cordially invit- 
ed to attend the ssrvico 



Mrs. Omer Porter has mumps. 
She does not know where she got 
them. 

Mrs. Alice Snyder has about re- 
covered from her recent attack of 

illness. 

M. I. Baker, of Limaburg, wa» a 
businesB visitor to *» Burlington 
last Friday afternoon. 

Hubert Rouae and wife, of near 
Limaburg, spent -Sunday with El- 
mer Kelly and wife. 

Jacob Cook, of Waterloo neigh- 
borhood, spent a few hours in 
Burlington last Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. H W Shearer, of 
Newport, were Saturday night and 
Sunday guests of F. A. Hall and 
wife. 

Mrs. Eunie Willis spent last 
week on the farm with her son 
Albert and wife, near Bullittsburg 
church. 

Elza Poston and wife spent last 
Saturday night and Sunday with 
his (parents, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Poston, near Limaburg. J 

A W. Gaines, of Erlanger, call- 
ed on the Recorder last Saturday 
i morning and pushed his ajubaerip- 
I tion up another year. 
I Miss Lizzie Leo Ric?, of Water- 
loo neighborhood, has gone to 
the bedside of lu?r aunt Mrs. P. 
C. Huey, of Plymouth, 111., who is 
! in a critical condition. 
i Dr and Mrs. L. C, Cowen are 
entertaining Mrs. Cowen>s liRtar, 
! Mrs W. M McKay, of Willow 
i Grove, West Va., who arrived lastl 
| Tuesday for an indefinite stay — 
! Ohio County News. 



of the imagination, but an animal 
inhabiting the marshy waters of cer- 
tain areas In South America. It is 
capable of discharging enough elec- 
tricity to kill a dog or to knock a 
man down and leave him partially 
stunned for several hours. 



So venth ft Madison 




Covington, Ky, 



NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S GREATEST STORE 

* -^ 



*» 



If you are looking for' a real 
^ cheap funeral I have it for you. 
C Scott Chambers, Walton, Ky. 

ljan-4t 

The Ford Motor Co., has on ] 
hand $30,000,000 worth of unsold 
automobiles -in the plants and dif- 
ferent agencies of the company. 

Supt! J. C. Gordoi. attended tho 
meeting of School Superintendents 
of Kentucky, at Frankfort, Tues- 
day and Wednesday of this week 



♦ ♦ 

+ UNION ♦ 

• ♦ 

•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

1 Mrs. E. J. Rouse is the guest of 
friends in, Cincinnati, 

The W. Ml U. will meet with 
Mrs. J T. Bristow, Friday after- 
noon. 

Mrs. J. S. Head spent the week- 
end with Mr. and Mrs. Clarence 
Tanner of Covington. 

James Williams, Wife and littlr- 
son, J. C, Jr., spent Sunday with 
John Dickerson and wife. 

Sam C. Hicks, Jr., entertaine.1 
quite a number with a delightful 
party and luncheon Friday eve. 

Mrs. J. T. B,ristow spent Satur- 
day and Sunday with her sister, 
Miss Marietta Riley, of Cincinnati. 

Tho Y. W. A. will meet with Miss 
Eugene Riley, Thursday afternoon. 
All members are urged to be pres- 
ent as important business -must be 
attended to. 



It's a shallow brand .of patriot- 
ism that doesn't burn as bright- 
ly in time of peace asintime of 
stress. Have you paid your income 
tax. 



Taking ypur &at ,*>ff wJjen 
the national 



the 
anthem 



band plays 

doesn't get you anything with 
Uncle Sam unless you pay >' our in_ 
come tax. 



Will Caseldine, of Constance, 
serds us $150 to renew his sub- 
scription Mr Caseldin* has been a 
member of the Recbrder's -reading 
circle many years. 



Tobacco Hold on the loose leaf mar 
kot, Tuesdy, with the following av. 
ages. Covington, $11.90 Carroll tyn. 
$17.68. Frankfort, $13.15, Lexington, 
$15.16. Mavsvillt-. $16.86. Falmouth, 
$18.75. WALTON. $28 12. 

Dr. H. Horace Grant, 67, noted 
surgeon, difd at his home in Louis- 
ville, Monday night, of apoplexy. 
He was' a native of Petersburg, and 
a son of the late Dr. E. L. Grant. A 
widow/ and one son survive. Dr. 
Grant had performed an operation 
he day he wuh stricken. Burial was 
in Caye Hill cemetery, Wednesday 
morning. 



Although Stone county has fur- 
nished many examples of patriot- 
Ism during the last few-years, none 
has equaled that of Jack Williams, 
Jr., of Bond, Miss., who voluntarily 
had his finger cut off in orde* that 
he might join the United States 

»rmy. 

♦♦♦♦ 

The Australian government is en- 
couraging the cultivation of the cas- 
tor oil plant, in the belief that the 
suitability of the country to the cul- 
ture of the tree should enable it to 
provide the commonwealth require- 
ments, amounting to about 4,000 tons 
of beans a year, and a considerable 
biirplus for export. The growing de- 
mand for cahtor oil is due largely to 
its use in connection with airplanes, 
and the value of the beans range 
from $97.20 to $145.80 a ton, accord- 
ing to analysis. The Queensland 
beans contain from 46 to 52 per cent 

oil. 

♦♦♦♦ 

Work on the east end extension to 
Galveston's great sea wall, designed 
to protect this island from gulf 
storms, will proceed with redoubled 
vigor this winter, according to Ma- 
jor L. M. Adams, United States en- 
gineer in charge. 

♦♦♦♦ 
The wives of prominent BullgarJ 
ian politicians and generals are be- 
ing called to acoount by the Bulga- 
rian government wherever it is prov- 
ed that their influence over their 
husbands lias caused a political or 
military disaster to the nation. 
♦♦♦♦ 
The smallest known species of hog 
are the pigmy swine of kustralia. 
They are exactly like other hogs in 
every particular except size, being 
no larger than a good sized house 

rat. 

♦♦♦♦ 
To make others happy is the joy 
of living. The person who seeks to 
relieve the oppressed, who extends a 
kindly hand to the needy, who ex- 
changes love for hatred, and leaves 
the world happier and better than 
he found it, has discovered a secret 
of a happy life. , 



The officers of the North Ken- 
tucky Fair have begun making ar- 
rangements for the fair to bo h?lu 
at Florence beginning th:> last Wei 
nesday in August. 

The first month of the now 
year has abefct gone. \f next medtK 
furnishes as gdod weather as t6e 
past month everybody will tie in 
good shape for spring. 

R C. Green, President of tho 
Walton Bank and Trust Co., ana 
Atty. Chas. Strother, of Walton, 
were transacting business in th? 
court house, last. Friday. -> . 

Rev. Conley, of Beaver, occupied 
the pulpit at the Baptist church 
last Sunday ^norning and evening, 
for the pastor Rev. DeMoisey.who 
was unable to be pressnt on ac- 
count of sickness. 



Mrs. Ben Snyder, of Erlanger, is 
improving after a serious illness of 
bronchial pneumonia. Miss Sasso, 
of Cincinnati, special nurse, has 
been nursing her. 

Emil Bassett sold a basket of to- 
bacco at the Farm «rs Tobacco ware- 
house at Walton, for 63c a pound. 



DEVON. 



t 



Elbert Scott, of Rabbi; Hash, 
was a business visitor to the 
county seat last Friday. While in 
town he called at the Recorder 
office and had his subscription 
moved up another year. 

F. H. Rouse, Superintendent of 
the County Infirmary called in 
one day last week and paid his 
subscription fbr another year. He 
also paid a year's subscription for 
the inmates of that institution. 



The Mabley & Carew Co., Cin- 
cinnati's Greatest Store, ars clos- 
irg out their sltock of House Fur- 
mshing, China, Glasajware and 
Lamps at extraordirary reduc- 
tions. Your attention is called to 
their advertisement in this issue. 



(1 

Misses Nellie and Lucy Schadler 
and brothers entertained delight- 
fully at their home Saturday even- 
ing with music and dancing. A nice 
crowd .was present. Some from Cin- 
cinnati, and Ludlow. All enjoyed a 
good time 

Mr. and Mrs. Ollie Rouse Sunday - 
ed with Dr. Svmpson and faniily. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Elliott visit- 
ed friends in Covington, Sunday. 

Mr. aud Mrs. T. J. Hutsell visited 
their sister Mrs. Anna Keiuiey, of 
Beaver, Sunday. 

W. W. Woodward and family 
Were delightfully entertained by 
Theo. Carpenter and family, of the 
Rich wood neighborhood, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank McCoy had 
for guests Wednesday evening, W. 
W. Woodward and family, Norbert 
Scheifer and James Bristow^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Woodward enter- 
tained with music and cards Tues- 
day evening.! Those present were 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank McCoy, Mrs. 
Wulfeck and nephew, Norber.t Sohei 
fer, Jas. Bristow and James Symp- 
son. 

. Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Rogers en- 
tertained Mr. and iMrs. Woodward 
-andson Robert, Mr. and Mrs Frank 
McCoy, Mps. B. F. Bristow aud son 
James. 



t ♦♦♦♦ 

Did you ever hear of the Billity 
family? It must be quite an inter- 
esting group. An exchange intro- 
duces its various members as follows 
and commends them to the friend- 
ship of the public : A. Bility, Relia 
Bility; Adapta Bility, Depend* Bil- 
ity, Capa Bility, Equa Bility, Plausi 
Bility, and No "Bility. 
♦♦♦♦ 
The church which seeks to com- 
pel all people to observe Sunday, ir- 
respective of belief, under duress of 
civil law, has not progressed beyond 
the Jewish church which sought to 
slay Christ because He refused to 
conform to their human precepts 
and traditions which made void the 
law of GooV. 

♦♦♦♦ 
For preparing stock feed in quan- 
tity a machine has been invented 
that cuts fodder into short lengths, 
mixes it with molasses thoroughly 
and delivers It into a wagon. >. ' 
♦♦♦♦ \ 

Members of the Reichstag in Ber- 
lin are he ing / forced to eat the same 
plain food that Is served to the com- 
moners pf that city, black bread 
without butter land coffee without 
sugar or milk, because the employes 
of the Government refused to sup- 
ply these luxuries when they them- 
selves did not receive them. 
♦♦♦♦ 
There are about 180 species of bats 
and these are distributed over near- 
ly every quarter of the glofce. The 
larger bats are found in the warmer 
regions. 



Exceptional Saving 

Opportunities the 

Entire Month of 

• ■ * 

February 

PRICES ARE DOWN. And no where will you find them> 
as far down as right here, at Northern Kentucky's Greatest 
Store: Not a store in the entire country has surpassed this 
great growing store in value-giving the past few months of 
critical price conditions. No store has taken such a decided 
stand for lower prices as this. And for the month of Febru- 
ary, we offer — 

A Series of "By Request" Sale 

Featuring Tremendous 

Reductions. 

WATCH THE KENTUCKY EDITION OF THE TIME-STAR 
AND POST FOR FULL PARTICULARS. ALSO 

A "Bull's Eye" Special Each Day— Needed 

Merchandise at Sensational 

Low Prices: 



1 



l 






Sheriffs Sale for Taxes 

—sss=, — - ♦ - ■ 

Notice is hereby given that I. or 
one of mv deputies will, on Monday, 
February 7th, 1921, it being County 
Court day, between the hours of 10 
a! m. and*3 p. in , at the Court House ! 
door in the town of Burlington. I 
Boone county, Ky., expose to public j 
sale for cash in hand, the following 
property, or so much thereof as may 
be necessary to pay State, County j 
and School taxes due thereon and 
unpaid for the year 1920, and the 
penaltv, interest and costs thereon. ^ 

For a complete description of prop-^ 
jartv see. assessors book for 1919, at 
the County Tax Commissioners of- 
fice 

L. A. CONNER. 
Sheriff of Boone Counts. 




J 



Deputy Sheriff B. B. Hum.- is laid 
up with a cold. , 



A Lskf* Division man, John Crav 
a, engineer on the Chouapeako 
Ohio Railroad, has been awara- 
, the second cash prize? of ,$75 
from the William Howard Taft 
Fund of the American Red Cross 
lor the beat first aid porforms-'i 
by railroad men during 1920. 
'On Dec. 15, 1919, Cravens Rtoj>- 
ped his train at Duckers, Kv., 
nbout eight mile* east of Frank- 
fort, and rescued from drowning, 
u boy, who had fallen through the 
Ice while ak'iting on a pond. 

With the aid of the train crew 
$1 glneer (.'ravens throw • r >p:> tw 
the boy a id drew him to safety 
The report of his heroic f»nl 
*u» reported to Wuflhir g.'.on hen l- 
quartsr* of the Re * Cross by Mary 
K. Coady of the.. Louisville, Ky,. 
•chapter. 



Notice. 



Unclaimed Deposits in Erlanger 
Deposit Bank, Erlanger, Ky., over 
live years: , 



Nairn-*. Crrdit 

D.O. (lark f «">•) 00 

C. H. Oarvey .„ 310 00 

Marv Crlsler Border* B BO 

J. Qi Klston - r » (Hi 

John Ohiicr, \t r,u 00 

J. W. NVad, Chairman , 21 fin 

I, W. P. Gardner, cashier, of the 
\ above I>hi*U, <!.. certify thrtt (licitliovo 
! list I* eofreet to the best of my 
< knowledge and belief. - * i 

W. rVUARIKHMl. 
Hulmerlbed aud sworn en before we 
t*iinX4ihday of Jan-y. MNti. 

\.. A HKEOTLMR. 
Ef utm-jr FuWJe Kearny Co. 
It> AHiaraktoeWe •spirt* J»n. M, MBS 



The civ41 authorities were not call- 
ed on to investigate the death of old 
John Barleycorn when he was killed 
by the Eighteenth Amendment, but 
it takes* all the police, sheriffs, and 
prohibition ofWcers^o keep the daru 
old cuss from digging out of the 
grave and peddling moonshine. 
♦ ♦♦♦ 
A dead mau voted in Maine and 
bis vote has been declared legal. The 
voter was ill In a hospital and mail- 
ed his ballot in due form to the man- 
agers of his pixeinct. He died omthe 
morning of election day before the 
polls were opened and the vote was 
quertioived. The couuty election 
commissioner ruled that the vote 

was legal. 

»♦•» 

In Chlcagoa marriage license costs 

91. GO and a dog lU-eiuso oosls fci.00. 

The clerk wants them nlado equal, 

not we hope, on the theory that a 

internet! man leads a dog's life.- 



Beaver Precinct— ' 

Boles, Chas. S., town lot 209.82 

Bellevue Precinct— t 

Rice heirs, town lot 3-69 

Constance Precinct— • 

Anderson, Bruce 8 acres 18.92 

Hood, John W., 40 acres 3716 

Stephens, Jno. nr., 14 acres 6 lo 

Teeters, Vesta, town lot 10.88 

Florence Precinct — 
Riddell, P. B., 227 acres 386 95 

Hamilton Precinct- 
Black, Ben, town lot 9.97 

Kendall, O. C, nr. 294 acres 

. Petersburg Precinct- 
Rector, G. W., town lot 

Verona Precinct— 

Anderson, J. M., 18 acres «42.85 

Poweia, John W.. 8 town lots 

Walton Precinct — 

Franks, Win., nr. 13 acres 8 65 

Hopperton, Joe, town lot 16.0 

Kelly, E. L., 1 town lot and all 



personal property belonging 
to light plant 



33.83 
-I 



PUBLIC SALE. $ 

8. 



K yoa w«nt to mtke • 

good »*k write v 

A. L. LANCASTER, 
AUCTIONEER 

•OftMeduen Ave^ Covin«t«n, Ky 

Sattofaetloa Guaranteed 

Phone 8. 6048-x 8007-x 

DR T. a CASTLEMAN , 

«fca*»i:MEINTIST-e£-^ 

Will be at Burlington every Monday 
prepared to do all . dental work- 
painless extraction, bridge and plate 
work a specialty. 

AH Work Guaranteed 



0>J BEGIN NOW W 

WITH A BANK ACCOUNT S) 

Your own prosperity depends on your ability to 
SAVE — not on what you can earn. 

Many men and women become rich by first putting 

certain portions of their earnings into a bank 

where it draws interest. 

A Time Deposit at 4 per cent with this bank 
is a nest egg which steadly accumulates and 
leads its owner on toward independence. 

YOU ARE WELCOME AT THIS STRONG BANK 
THAT RENDERS SERVICE TO 
ITS CUSTOMERS- 
CAPITAL & SURPLUS 150,000 00. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. , u 

ROUSE, Prr.ident. NELL H. MARTIN, Aast. Cuhier. 

LEWIS C. BEEMON, At.t. Cuhier. 



A. B. RENAK.ER,' Ca.hier 



§KxgKX^K:K2icaggcaK3 





"What. MT« y<»UKV. ln K to ll "''" 8 *'d 
a Burl hi (dowed down 

th .*..^t r L Iwu an in 'Jury. .,,,,„- 
Tmn They were travel 



A! 



were 
_iml were (lylnj 
ai iivc the r-loii'lv 



Wanted— To reut WOaereaor tin i. , 
\vlll pay o«eh or sham of crfop. ht-st 
of reference. K- Heger, Krlnnger. 
Ky.. Route 4s *»j"» * 

WOOD Ft>» 8ALB-Two dollar* 
per rank, sift doUarii per eord. Call 
or write H. 8. Taumw, Burllogboa, 
Ky., R. D.Ot Wslironjjbon^ 



HEBRON THEATRE 

NEXT SATURDAY 

Douglas Fairbanks In "Bound in Morocco" 

Comedy "The Great Nickle Robbery" 
First Show 7:30 P. M. 

Admission 22 Cents, Children 1 1 Cents 

Including War Tan 






YOU /I RftADER OF THE RECORDER? 




On 




>♦♦**#♦*««** 



e 



>eee e e» M # » e l 




mm 



Bis MM Hriktag ta* ••*,( 



M^vr* f\ rr . urotcrilon and fewer flr*es 



Two extremes nrc represented h.v 

'red" polities, nnil "hliie" laws. 



"No nrririPTif week" should he eon- 
verleil into n "no-accident yenr." 



A jtuiter differs from a jackpot In 
that It can he opened witlt one spade. 



Just when It is supposed the Irish 
sit 11:1 Hon cannot get any worse !t 
does. 



linputcnt ifxa.11 aiiu.~ 

the Omnipotent One 

By REV. GEORGE E. GUILLE 

1 

Ks tension Department. Moody 
Ulble Institute. Chicago. 



OfcKS 



W 3»»tt-«S SSSS 



p ******-*** 



mm&*mmi 



TEXT.-Wilt thou 
John 5:8. 



be mado wholaT— 



The spoil vocabulary has m>\v shift- 
ed from touchdowns to baskets and 
spares. 



"How condescending and how kind 

Was Ood'e eternal Son; 
Our misery reached His heavenly mind 

And pity brought Him down. 



where I will be glad to meet all my Customers. 

My Prices Have Been Reduc- 
ed to Low Market 



To modernize an old sayinc: If 
wishes were in..*,— • ilMpwor would buy 
fliilnmnhiles. 



The mother of hard limes is rt'lu.'- 
tane'e, both In work and in baying the 
frnils of work. 



Doesn't it jar your faith In hittnnn 
nature to hear Ihtil the HohenzoMerOfl 

are smugglers? 



Prii-os ;trc now being repulated h.v 
flip new economic law of overstipply 
ati'l uiMlerdeiiiarnl. 




The proof of ihc pudding used to 
be in in> eating thereof. Now it Is in 
iln 1 raisin thereof, 



.lii'lRiuj.' from recent events the 
lucky Turk .should hummer the cres- 
cent Into :i horseshoe. 



We would sec Mime point in raising 
winter strawberries [f you could ex- 
change a i)nar( for a ton of coal. 



The woman jury which brought in :i 
verdict in 17 niiniiics (oust have been 
due at home to conk dinner. 



Victories of the Itolshevlki have 
caused the housing problem* to become 
peculiarly acute in Constantinople. 



They jnny camouflage sweet spirits 
of nil re. but nobody lnis yet placed on 
the market n:ty castor nil poeklallB, 



A huge increase in the number of 
strikes is reported, inn. fnrnmnfcli 
Ihey are only in the bowling scores. 



e adveft iscs wool 



A store advertises wool socks for 
laddies, |)ui sonic of the ladies seem 
to haye been unable to see the extra 
"d." 



» Instead of listening at the keyhole, 
the mother who has caujjht the spirit 
or projrefs hide* a dictaphone in the 

room. 



As a chronicle of current history it 
may not be amiss to state that those 
who drink their own home brew 
rook It: 



/ 



The dry law docs not Increase the 
number of dope fiends, it is reported, 
hut it certainly increases the number 
of liars. 



Those tierniiin chemists who were 
rocking the boat with a process for 
making diamonds have gone back to 
something useful. 



The official abolition of money pro- 
posed in Hussia may be in the nature 
of recognition of a fact that is al- 
ready accomplished. 



Chop suey prices are being probed 
in Chinese restaurants. If they were 
probing the chop suey we should ex- 
pect some startling results. 



The only way to mediate between 
the Turks and the Armenians is to 
give the latter n good supply of guns 
and then *llsarin the former. 



In old-fashioned legalized whisky 
there were fist fights, but in illicit 
hootch there seems to be the poten- 
tiality of murder in everv drink. 



.To please France the Germans who 
mobbed French army officers were 
given severe sentences. Now the 

rioters are to be purdoued to please 
Germany. 



The mayor of Tokyo resigned when 
an investigation into graft scandals 
was marled. Perhaps thv*e effete 
Orientals might give us a |M>iiit or two 
on suctn matters. 



The scientific gentleman who advo- 



tales varnishing the soles <»f shoes-to^ -everything for you and who by 



make 1 Iiimii wear longer 
hasn't been reading the 
lions on varnish. 



apparently 
late quota- 



Mont Blanc Is doing Its best to live 
op to the text which says that the 
mountains shall be brought low mikI 
the viillcy exalted, 

«• 

An international Organisation Is 
proposed of all the men who fought 
against Germany. When they come 

te , led H paid «oc rein s unother 
world war Is likely 10 be precipitated 



Inasmuch as It seems to he neces 
*ary for the automobile Industry to 
release a good twutiy employees It, Is 
honed that *th<\\ are all good refin- 
ers. The count n needs good farmers 

The dispatches, relate I lie death of 
aiiUU! "••Iglilti*' +■•;> puuntUl.. It U. p»l 

I tool 



Imp*, unnecessary .0 add 
h*#n chef In s rtstaurm 
sdsa. at prevailing prh. 

*»ts «o SJ^^^^HR 



<, II would 
tS SAiUiUU 



And here at the sheep market— how 
fitting a place In which to show us the 
shepherd , seeking 
the sheep — we !»e- 
hold an example 
of that compas- 
sion of whieb 
Isaac Watts sang 
In this familiar 
hjron, and pat- 
tern of the out- 
flow I n g of the 
Savior's grace to 
every needy sin- 
ner. 

What brings 
Jesus to Jerusa- 
lem at this feast day? Not the feast 
itself, we may be sure, for, no longer 
"a feast unto Jehovah," it had degen- 
erated into n mere "feast of the Jews," 
and He who had come from licit ven to 
save and bless was outside this empty 
formalism. In contrast with It is the 
feast that lie will spread for hungry 
hearts. No, not the feast attracts Him 
but wretchedness and misery. "A 
great multitude of Impotent folk, of 
blind, halt, withered, wailing." Oh, 
what a picture of the whole race. 
The Pool. 
Bethesda, with its Ave porches- 
number of grace and redemption— 
with its spring of healing water, and 
with its very name, bears witness that 
God, "in wrath remembers mercy," 
aud testifies to that mercy which ac- 
companied the second giving of the 
law. P.nt Its story is one of misery. 
"A great multitude lying." And there 
It leaves them. Not all are healed, but 
only those who have the strength to 
get themselves into the water. For 
moment there is healing virtue In the 
pool, ir one Is able to avail himself of 
it. And so the law promises life to 
the one who would keep its require- 
ments, saying: "The mnn that doeth 
these thing's shall live by them." Even 
so! But what if one is "without 
strength" for this, as this Impotent 
man at the pool, and as you are, and 
as I am? Ah! for such, a Savior has 
come to Bethesda' and He shall make 
it Bethesda indeed, for mercy is flow- 
ing out of Him without measure for 
every one that will receive Him. 

"And a certain man was there, 
which had an infirmity thirty and 
eight years. And when Jesus saw him 
He, and knew that he had hern now a 
long time In that case, be salth unto 
him. Wilt thou he made whole?" 

The Patient. 

'The Impotent man answered him, 
Sir, I have no man, when the water Is 
troubled, to put me into the pool ■ hot 
while I am coming, another, steppeth 
down before me." And God writes it 
down as a part of His word, for this 
impotent man Is making confession 
for ail the world anil describing the 
helplessness of every nnrogeueratc 
sinner. For. "when we were yet with- 
out strength, In due time Christ died 
for the ungodly." No strength had he 
to plunge into the water, nor money 
to hire carriers, and the bystanders 
had no mercy or sympathy. Yet, day 
by day he came seeking help. "While 
I am coming." Oh. how many are thus 
coming! Coming to anything and te 
everything exqept to the unly Savior, 
seeking for something tc supplement 
their deficiencies. And here is One at 
hand "mighty to save," bnt no mere 
helper for those who are trying by 
their own efforts to help themselves. 
He Is the Savior of sinners, the Savior 
of the lost, the Savior of those who 
look away from all self-help to Him 
alone. Bat still Bethesda is thronged 
and He is despised Or disregarded. Oh, 
soul. He has come to heal and save 
yon and yonr sin and Impotence are 
your only claim upon Him. 

The Physician. , 
Tes, "The Great Physician now Is 
near." and the moment this helpless- 
ness is confessed He turns the eyes of 
the poor mnn away from the pool and 
from his own Impotence to !-.ave them 
fixed upon Himself. It Is enough. To 
look away from all things to that 
Blessed One who has already done 



<m 

Corn, per can 12J6 to 25c 

Peas, per can 10 to 15c 

Lexox Soap, 5 Bigs Bars fbr 25c 

Clean Easy Soap 6 Big Bars for 25c 

All Other Goods in Proportion. 

Shoes 10 c/nt Discount 

If you are not a customer «*"" hr- gJassV to have you 

-GIVE ME A CALL— 

R. BLYtH 

Burlington, Ky. 




One acre v six- room house.* oehih'nt 
cellar, furnace heat, electric light, 
and all kinds <>f fruit, at 458 Krlang- 
er Road, Erlanger, Ky. • Jan.* 15 



Notice. 

All who have not paid the 25 per 
cent of their subscriptions for the 
Burlington and Locus Grove turn- 
plk are requested to do so at once. 
By order of the Board of Directors. 
B. T. KELLY, Secretary. 



For Sale 



Cleveland Tractor, been used but 
in Al condition ; will sell reasonable 

B. B. HUME, 
dec9 Burlington, Ky. 



Are You Shipping Cream Direct? 
If so, are you shipping to us? 

Our Price this And we pay the 

week is Transportation 

Each Can of Cream, whether large or small, is given the 
most careful attention 

The Can is Thoroughly Cleaned. Sterilized and 
Returned Immediately 

Each Can ii Careful and Properly Weighed and Tested, and 
within 24 hours the Check is mailed. 

We protect you against loss of Cans or Cream in trans- 
it. Make the BEATRICE your permanent home. 

THE BEATRICE CREAMERY CO. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



For Sale. 

G-room house and one-half acre lot 
in McVilie, on the Ohio river. The 
buildings are all in Rood repair. Will 
be sold by Belleview Lodge No. 664. 
For particulars apply to J. D. Mc- 
Neely, W. R. Marshall, Jeff Willi- 
amson. Burlington, Ky. jan6 
linral Route 2. 
> 

Sweet Clover and Hooey 

Sow sweet clover, cheaper and bet- 
ter than red clover. Buy direct from 
grower, special scarified seed for 
prompt germination. Prices and cir- 
culars free. AIho prices on honey. 

JOHN A. SHEEHAN, 
R. D. No. 4. Falmouth, Ky 



""' IRilffBTlfiliLB 

MONUMENTS, 

3 L»rg« 8toefc on Display \ 
to BcUet from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

118 Main Street, 

AURORA, IND. 



JAMES L. ADAMS 

DENTIST 

i Cohan Building 

Pike Street, Covington, Ky 



— Botb Paoass 

DR. K. W. RYLE 

GRADUATE VETERINARIAN 

Booa« Jloute, 

BURLINOTON, u # KY. 

Prompt Attention in All Calls. 






-AT HOME 

DR. F. L. PEDDICORD 

1017 Madiion Avenue, 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY. 
'Phone So. 1148. 



The Famous O. I. C. 

I now have for sale registered 
O. I. C. Pigs, some of which are 8 
weeks old. Ibeir sire is the famous 
C. C. Callaway Jumbo, and his Hire 
is Callaway Edd, the world's Grand 
Champion Boar. All stock register^ 
ed free. 

FRANK HAMMONS 

R. D. Florence, Ky. 

_ yj| 

D. E. Castleman, 
A TTORNE Y AT LAW, 

— Office over — 
Erlauger Deposit Bank, 

Erlanger, - Kentucky. 



MK2K:K2K:^K2iCSK2KX»K:KK 



WE ARE RECEIVING TOBACCO 
We Are Selling Tobacco 

Come to Aurora 

Drop in at 101 Ridgeway Street, we 
will be glad to see you. 

We only charge 80c straight. 



H 



AurorajLoose Leaf Warehouse Co. 

Aurora, Indiana. 

We Guarantee Satisfaction We will Satisfy Ton 



t """" :" 



none 
His 



word of power raises np dead souls to 
live before Him and to wnlk forever- 
more In newness of life. If still the 
Impotent man thinks of the pool ss 
the source of healing, as so many now 
think of the church or ordinances or 
of anything and everything save 
Christ, he Is to And, as every saved 
one finds, that It is the Infinite word 
of the Savior that gives life and sal- 
vation. "Jesus saith unto him, Blae, 
tske up thy bed, and walk." And the 
work Is done ! For this Is the word of 
a sovereign God. 

One blessed word clones the story 
In so fur as it concerns the subject 
of the Savior's gruec. "And <>n the 
same day was the Snlthnfh,". for His 
perfect work leave* the heart In per- 
fect rest. Of old Qod wrought In cre- 
ation, and' rented. So now In the new 
creation, the result of His work I* 
rest for the hear! of the S nvlof and 
re^i fur lbs sinner who hears His 
WOfd 

"As h* •p»Hi> In Hi* nufftiW 

tt I 11 lay at tn* pool, 
H« t« •• rt»g ibis, ntwnShi 

Wl l tfeAM Sj» fWJl w\ 



g" Made Me Well asi Strs»g" 



ANOTHER WOMAN WHO IS THANKFUL FOR 

PE-RU-NA 



"1 >iivi' >KkFnicver»lt>otUa«o; >Y ru-na 
ami i;ml Ii mrdlhfwllt. I hail palaala 
ijit numarh and tx>weU, bnf. by Ui»B«*of 
I'.' run* and Man-a-IID, 1 " nt w *tt and 
-T'.iiKinaiti. lalwaytkeepafewbottlea 
in tv- home." Mas. UaoaB Okay, 

it, r Duo.!. box \*. 

Hie tula, lon-a 



Mra. Gray's exparirore (« jus* nwaa tvWenrp that Pf>-ru ni 
la i|urt<- iu Rood a reniixiy for ratarrai al thaatnmarh. bowrU i„ 
other orguns aa it ia for cougha, cold* and naaal catarrh. 
I'- rn ii» i. .1 nomii'rfully rlne mcilicioo to have Iu I ha houae 

- ivt-ryiiay Qif, 

Send to the Ptrvas Compmay, Colamtwt, Ohio tor free 
uooklei end mtdtcel advice. 




Tablet* or Liquid ■ 
Sol*! Everywhere 9 



l»Ki 



smrjt 



The American Legion, which was 
quick to offer its aid to the po- 
lice at the lu'ifzht of the crimi' 
Wave, i* now establishing employ 
ment agencies and aiding ex-ser- 
vice men during the present low 
tide of industry. A national sur- 
vey of unemployment is 
made by the American 



legion 
Weekly nnd all posh have been 
encouraged to ontahllfth employ- 
ment agencie by P W (lalbralth, 
Jr., Nation il Commander. 

can Legion haft started a 
to bold tho 1W. Log ion 



A marriugc license was isaued at 
the county clerk's office. last 
Saturday afternoon, to a couple 
from the city, who reque*'-"5'l that 
the fact he kept a secret for^hrep 
or four weeks, us thes/ did not 
want their relatives and frionds 
**''"* to know of It. They were mar- 



ried at Krlaugar. 




parts of 
getting 
eo situs- 
»o-l 



Farm for Sale 

180 Acre, one mile south of 
Burlington, on the East Bend 
road, 15 acres in orchard, 25 
acres, in timber, 30 acres in 
corn in 19207^5 acres in mea- 
dow, balance in pasture 

6 room house, large barn 
j and all necessary out build- 
ings, Well watered. Price, 
I $75,00 an acre on easy terms. 
Oscar Hanna, Bellevue Ky. 



x FOR SALE 

I Have for Sale 
2 International Trucks. 
2 490 Chivrolets. 
1 Ford Truck Chasis, 20- 
model. 

CASH OR ON TIME. 

L. C. CHAMBERS, 

Petersburg, Ky. 

TIME TABLE 

Burlington- Erlanger Bus. 

Dally Lxcept Sunday. 

Lv. Bnrlirtjrtorrflrloa. m. 4:tXTp. in 
liT. Erlanger 7:10a. in. 4-65 p. in 

SUNDAY. 

Lv. Burlington 7:10 a. m 

Lv. Erlanger 7 :66 a. m 

Paaaenger Fare— 50c one way. 

Round Trip 75c 

Express Packages bandied at Rea- 
sonable Rates. 

L. R. McNEELY. 

Canning Plant for Sale 

The Fanners Canning Plant at 
Urant, Ky.. will be sold on the 
grounds oi the Company at I o'clock 
p. in., on 

Saturday, Feb. 12, <921 

at public sale to the highest bidder. 
The plant consists of an nngine, 
boiler, shftftTng, cookers, piping, 2- 
100 gallon copper kettles, platform 
scaleB, building and one-fourth acres 
of ground. 

The plant, grounds, building, ma- 
chinery will be sold as a whole. 

Terms— One-half cash, remainder 
on time with good security. 
AL RODOER8, 
JNO. SMITH. Coin. 

W. B. ROGERS, 



List Your Sales With Me Early In 
. The Season. 

LUTE BRADFORD 

Live Stock Auctioneer. 

Your Work Solicited. See me 
add get my terms. 
Phone Florence, Ky. R. D. 

Farmers oct-14 



IT'S A WISE IDEA. 

Do as Many Others are doing 
send your cream to the 

CLOVERLEAF CREAMERY. 

Burlington, Ky. 

I pay cash for cream and insure 
you a square deal. 

I RECEIVE EVERY 

FRIDAY 

J. O. HUEY, Manager. 



~TOO 
LATE 

Death only a matter of short time. 
Don't wait- until pains and aches 
become incurable diseases. Avoid 
painful consequences' by taking 

GOLD MEDAL 



Th« world's standard rtmedy for kidnay. 
liver, bladder and uric acid trouble*— tho 
National Remedy of Holland since 1696, 
Guaranteed. Three sices, all druggists; 
Look for Ike mom Gold Medal on every bo* 
SOaSSlkaate 



4 



NOTICE. 

All persons owing the estato of 
Laura Clore, deceased, please come 
forward and settle same at once. 
Also all persons having claims 
against said estate present thom 
to mot at once for aettlemont. 
H. M OLORB, Agent 
Laura Clore Estate. 



Attention Auto Owners! 

I am prepared to do first-class 

repairing on all makes or cafs. 

Starter and generator work a 

specialty. Allwork guaranteed. 

Give me a trial. 

Earl M. Ay lor, 

HEBRON, KY. 
Phone Hebron * 



You Can Trade 



the /5rticTe You 
Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by c4dver- 
tising. 



t 
4 



NOTICE.. 

all iutsoiih who havo claims 
against the, aetata or George. B. 
Rouse deceased, will present them 
to me, proven »e the raw r**quiroe. 
All tporsons owing said estate 
f 



^> 



m owing said est 

mnty 1 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



IMPORTANT'' NOTICR. 




Watch the date following 
your name on the margin 
of your pa nor and if It is 
not correct please notify 
this office at once. If your 
paper has been discontinu- 
ed by mistake before your 
time expired do not d«dny 
notifying thiir offlre. Alt er- 
ror* sro •hiMriully correct- 
ed here. 



* 
♦ 
e 
♦ 

♦ 
o 

* 



♦♦♦♦*>e*eeeeeeee*a>ee>eeeee*e 



_| Yew CoaMy T*aner 
I ♦*♦*♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦eeee-e 








i 




r 


t 







V. 



if) 



pA» 



i 



WALL Wll 




Pettit 



And inspect their line of General Merchandise 
you will find their prices 

J-U-S-T R-l-T-E. 

Blue Work Shirts... , $100 

240 Weight Blue Denim Overalls 1 2.0Q 

240 Weight Blue Denim Jacket. 2.00 

Comfort Batting 3 l-4.1b. roll 1-25 

Our Line of Groceries Is Complete. 

Table Meal, 12 lbs ;••. 35* 

Romeo Flour, highest grade patent, 24 Vi lb. bag- • • 1.50 

To wn Talk Flour, as good as the best, 24-lb. bag ■ 1 .60 

1 Pure Cane Bulk Sugar, per 1004b. bag 900 

Gold Bar Pine Apple, No. 3 can, 1 lb. 14 oz ...... • 40c 

Wisconsin Early Selected June Peas, per can 1 5c 

Sorghum Molasses, per gallon 1*25 

Franklins Golden Syrup, made from cane sugar, 

lib. 9 ocean 20c 

Franklins Golden Syrup, 1 lb. 2 oz. can 15c 

New Orleans Molasses, per gallon 90c 

Jiff- Jelly and Jell-O, all flavors 10c 

7 Bars Swift's Pride Soap 25c 

Blue Bird Bread-fresh every day. 

Fresh Meats of all Kinds 



s 



We want all of yV>ur Eggs, Poultry and Cured Meats. 
Bring them to us and receive the Highest Price. 

GULLEY & PETTIT, 

H Burlington, Kentucky. *- 

H-i b ■ ■* ica o i a n 




C 

■ MAURER &. RYLE 

GRANT, KENTUCKY 

Have the exclusive sale of 

Crown Overalls, Jackets and SMrts 

IN BELLEVIEW. 

Overall and Jacket 

$1.75 each 

Maurer & Ryle, 

Grant, - - Kentucky 



A Combination of Sense, Non- 
sense, News, Etc. 

"Why is it Sam, that one nev- 
er bears of a darky committing 
suicide?" inquired the Northerner. 

"Well you see, it's disaway boss 
When a white pusson has any 
trouble, he sets down and gets to 
atudyin'- bout it an' worrin. Then 
first thiok you know he's, done 
killed hisse'f. But when a nigger 
eels down V> think Trout his trou- 
ble*, why (he Jes nacherly goes 
to sleep. '—Life. 

+++ 

A Topeka Kan., man provided; 
in his will for a 20-year subscript 
tion to bis favorite newspaper 
and directed that a copy be left 
each morning in the grating of 
the vault where h-> reposes. That 
seems unusual, but, as a matter 
of fact, before The Democrat went 
on a strictly cash-in-advance sub- 
scription baais, this great family 
Journal was left at the door of 
many a dead one. They have to 
will us something to get it now. 
— Cynthiana Democrat. 

, The contract was signed. A cer- 
tain gentleman in Owenvilh> con- 
tracted with his fiancee to remit 
$7,000 when the lady fair Would 
become his bride. Th.-> day came 
when the marriage was to take 
place and the man inquired of his 
lady love why she was marrying/ 
him. Very honestly the woman inJ 
formed him she wanted the dol^ 
lars. He became indignant • and 
wanted to call it off. She al- 
ready had. his money and offered 
to give him $1,000 to, stop where 
the>y were. 

He took the thousand and is 
now suing the lady for $6,000 for 
not keeping her contract —Bowl- 
ing Green News. 

*++ 
A celebrated revivalist cam** to 
address his flock and before he 
began to speak the par-tor said : 
"Brother Jones, before you be- 
gin this discourse there are some 
powerful bad negroes in this hare 
congregation, and I want to pray 
for you," which he did In this 
fashion : 

"O, Lord, give Brother Jones the 
eye of an eagl.', that he 1 may s'e 
sin from afar. Glue his ear to 
the gospel telephone, and con- 
nect him with the central skies. 
Illuminate his brow with the 
brightness that will make the 
fires of hell look like a tallow 
candle. Nail hi* hands to the 
gospel plow, and bow his head 
in some lonesome valley where 
prayer is much wanted to be sairl, 
and anoint him all aver with the 
kerosene, all of the salvation and 
set him afire."— Pickup 
♦+* 
I am the Telephone. When 
am not broke, I am in the hands of 
a receiver. I have a mouthpiece, 
>.ut, unlike women, I never use it. 
Fellows use me to make dates 
with girls, land girls use me to 
break said dates. Husbands call up 
their wives over no and wives 
call their husbands down over 
me. In ever go anywhere, but 
some times the company comes 
takes me out— it all depends 




THE DEVIL KNOWS 

As the devil sat In his eaaj 
chair, trying to write the news; 
the grouch came in sat down by 
the stove with mud nil over his 
shoes; he criticized everybody, of- 
ficials, merchants and teachers, he 
kicked about the town, churches 
and preachers; he rapped every- 
thing in and out of sight, ana 
when he went out th» door, he 
devil said, ,g-o-o-d nigh'.. 

Permanent Officers Elected. 

Lexington — Pormanent officers 
of the Burlev Tobacco Growers, 
Incorporated, who prepared arti- 
cles of incorporation, were elected 
at a meeting of county commit- 
teemen in the Lafayette Hotel. 
Acting President Prank McKe.e, of | 
Versailles, who called the meet- 
ing to order, resigned, saying ill- 
ness in Ins family kept him from 
serving. 

The new officers ar\ J. N. K n - 
hoe, MUvsville, President; Judge 
Henry Prewitt, of M,t. Sterling, 
Vice President; E. L. Harrison, 
Lexington, Secretary-Treasurer. 

A resolution was passed which 
read as follows: 

"In view of the falling mar- 
ket and lick of suoport of the 
buying interests, and the failure of 
warehouses to bring about a sat- 
isfactory price, as proiWlsed by the 
big four, we, the Burley Tobacco 
Growers, Incorporated, stand for 
a complete cut-out of the " 1021 
crop and hold the remainder of 
the crop until satisfactory prices 
can be determined and we request 
co-operation of the warehouses 
with this in view 

"Pledges have been prepared 
and will be sent to the county 
committeemen representing the 
association in 40 principal burley- 
growing counties of Kentucky, In- 
diana, Ohio and Tennessee. Th" 
pledge must be sign?d by 75 per 
qent of the growers by March 1. 
to make the cut-out effective. A 
resolution was passed urging that 
the caper Volstead bill be passed 
as originally passed by the House 
and not as amended by the Sen- 
ate.'' 



•tveryxning in noouj 

Get Our Prices 

WOOD AND ASPHALT SHINGLES, 
PULP AND PLASTER WALL BOARD, 
ORNAMENTAL SLATE ROLL ROOFING-MIXED 
COLORS— DIAMOND SHAPE, 
LIGHT, MEDIUM and HEAVY ASPHALT ROLL ROOF- 
ING, BARN SIDING, GARAGE DOORS, 
HEAVY TOBACCO RACKING. 

The A. M. Lewin Lumber Company, 

COVINGTON, KY, 

A Madison Ave. and 24th St. Phone South. 465-46* 




1886 



1921 



Thirty-five Years 

Of successful banking is our record. 

NEW YEAR 

by opening an account with us 



Start the 



Boone 60. Deposit Bank 

Established 1886. 

Burlington, Kentucky. 



N. E. RIDDELL, President. 
W. D. CROPPER, Cashier. 



W. A. GAINER, Vice-President. 
Q. S. KELLY, Ass't Cashier. 




'J' 



■^ 



Germany May Help Tobacco 
Men In This State. 

and 

on "Whether you pay your bill or t] 1( , German government may re 
not. lievp the Kentucky farmers of a 

I am not a bee, but I often J large part of their low grade to- 
buzz in your ear. I am the bell|b a p CO 
of the town an I while I do no. 
wear jewelry I oft.Mi get rings 
Whether I do things or not lo 
of people nail me to th> wall 
I like music, but the only kind 
ever hear is chin music— I g?t all 
the popular airs, and the mosc 
popMlar one is HOT AIR. C 



Merchants Creamery 

OF CINCINNATI 

Has opened a Cash Buying Cream Sta. at Petersburg, 

Ky. We test and pay for your cream while 

you Wait. Start in and give us your next 

trial can. We are located in the , 

Post Office Building. 

J. C. BOLEN, :-; Operator 

Petersburg, kyt~ 



Pendleton Gounty. 



-♦♦- 



HI 



1 




DANCE 



Glengary 





Saturday, Jan'y 29th, 



G. W. Carter, well-known farmer 
residing on the Carpenter farm, 
on the Harrods Creek pik \ has a 
freak pig that was born on Dec. 
lith, at Vanceburg. The pig has 
four fully developed ears, the two 
extra ears being located Just be- 
low the regular ears, and are 
but a trifle smaller in size. 
+*+ 
A great deal of complaint has 
been registered in Pendleton coun 
ty recently of dogs being atohth. 
A number of these dogs ha v. » been 
I traced by their owr-ers to men 
I who seem to be making t living 
\ stealing dogs and selling them. It 
i is just as much a violation of the 
law to steal a dog as it is to 
steal a cow, a sheep or a hog. 
Dogs are valuable now, and those 
who have been imposed upon by 
these thieves are going to re- 
sort to the law against the of- 
fe I'.lers 

**+ 
When John Smith, HP. recluse. 
IsouglK admittance >o the Ashland 
comity poor farm, he was told he 
could' enter but could not oring 
his dog, which had been his only 
companion tor years. Later Mr 
Smith's bodv was found beside 
of- his- dog in :i lonely shaek 
the woods. His hand still graso 
ed the gun that hadi end m! their 
lives. 



Representatives of th* Ken- 
tucky growers have be^i in con- 
ference at N»W York *"his week i 
', | with a spokesman of the German 
' government, which wishes to bid 
for a large order of Kentucky low- 
grade tobacco. 

If the German government gets 
possession of this tobacco it will 
control it as a government mo- 
nopoly and will sell it to German 
subjects. 

The depreciation of ths German 
mark is the greatest obstacle in 
the way of working out the trans- 
action along practical lines. 

Representative Cantrill, who was 
culled to New York to giveadvitv 
concerning the matter, declines to 
talk for publication at this time. 



Ill 

Let's Stop 'Kidding" Ourselves 

IT'S ALWAYS BEST TO FACE 
THE FUTURE SQUARELY. 

We are doing this and have greatly [reduced 
prices on all 

Suits and Overcoats 

For Men, Young Men and Boys. 

Quality and service have build our business, and 
we will take care of your wants at a great sav 5 - 
ing to you. 

We carry a complete line of Sweater Coats 
and Corduroy Coats and Pants. 



605 Madison Avenue, 

Covington; Kentucky 



I 



I 



At I. 0. 0. F. Hall, Florence, Ky. 

GIVEN BY 

THE GLENGARY CLUB 

- DANCING 8 to 12 

Music— Piano, Traps, Banj o 
and Saxaphone. 

CHAS. M. CARPENTER, Adv. Mg r 



*t Que 

tiimws » 



Out in the State. 

— T 

Lexington— Four Kentucky boys 
and one girl have be^n named 1920 
champion* in the various line9 of 
Junior club work and will each re- 
ceive n handsome Bilvar cup as a 
result of n summary ot the paRt 
veur's work which has just been 
completed, according to a state- 
ment Issued by C. W Buckler, 
state leader of tho Ju'dor club work 
for Kentucky. 

♦♦+♦ 

Frankfort, Ky. -State Treasure- 
.1 A Wallace c die i ii school war- 
rants worth *5lt.'»ltf7-' Issued prior 
to Septemuer n. IM0, sn l oh ►? 

Wart* <1 tS, ISMltf l luUvon Ma\ l, 

loi", aiii Orioher Jo, Is) 19, amount- 
ing t I ', 'Mill,!! HI 



To Assist In MarketingTobacco 

The Bureau of Masters United 
States Department of Agriculture, 
arnounced that its regtlation3 for 
the warehousirg of tobacco un- 
der the Federal warehouse act 
are ir the hands of the printer 
and will soon be ready for gen- 
oral distribution. In ihis connec- 
tion its specialists will begin in- 
vestigations for the purpose of es- 
tablishing tobacco grades as a 
basis for aiding growers and ware- 
housemen \n the prop'r market- 
ing of tobacco. Under the present 
system of selling by private con- 
tracts on the farm or by auction 
in warehouses, without grading 
tobacco, they can have no stand- 
ard for fixing prices. it is declar- 
ed. The bureau states that 300 a p- 
plicationa ,for ware house licenses 
have been received. The act pro- 
vides for negotiable warehouse re- 
ceipts on which loans can be 
made. It is pointed on that to- 
bacco ranks fourth among the 
crops of the United States, that 
the tobacco crop is worth more 
than • a billion dollars a year and 
yields a i eve mi • of *.10;» .ooo.ntn a 
year to the Government. 




Lumber Prices 



We m\ve recently put in a stock of Flooring, Ceil- 
ing, and other dressed lumber on a low cost basis, and 
this, with our stock of framing and rough lumber, both 
pine and hardwood, enables us to make a very attrac- 
tive proposition to cash buyers. 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUILD. 

If you are looking for a chance to save money on 

lumber, come and see us. 

EDGETT & FULTON LUMBER CO., 

( Incorporated > 



219 Crescent Ave. 



Erlanger, 



T«u ah obi an 
town last Monday altf>ut 11 s. m. 
They wart traveling due north 
and wen- flyinjc quite ■ distance 

l»t nVr the < loilJV 



Reports from Lexington itoifi 
that masked men, heavily armed, 
dashed thru portions of Bath and 
Fleming counties on horse back 
Sunday morning and warned to- 
bacco growers to haul no more 
tobacco to Carlisle and Flemings- 
burg markets. 

The "night riders' 1 threat! >n i 
violence if the farm t-. Hsobe* i 
their orders and dema'id mI that 
no prepa ra.ii m I be nvt le for plant 
ing burley tobaQcn this rear 

Wood Maxwell, ot < " x >' f* *' 
sendi as gi.bo to renew i> «--* sub- 
wer+ptlow **#, Muxwjdl UU I l,! 
good Um.ly formerly resided n ■> 
Burlington, but moving to Covlnt- 
ton several years a«ro, « l> r • l» 
and hi* family »rr doing well 



•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 

disease »»• nil n 1 1 n *«■««* ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



Subscribe for the Recorder. 

Try It One Year - You'll LikQ 

Only $1.50 the Year 

starOon't e ? «ll lo Read All Tha A*ls» Jn Trslss 



j ♦♦♦••< 
•"♦TeZ* ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ •••• »♦♦♦< 





>ng tns saw.i 



| fc&NWOONfe OVE HEV4 YOtGWS VAOvXfc 
AfcOOY TW VjmUSfe OP A!DV»E«rV3\UQ 
TUN* SOWte kAEftfcWfcVtfCS 




e<§<5, Sue vaduers west u£M> o?? 
Swell ess it as, awo wwo iaxovh 



TAKE A 




fciSki A Few 



V^SANIVMS A, \0Qftp -g> AMNSOPW ~~ 






AMO NOU MAV 
MAVdE A FORTUNE! 



acra. 



oeuient 



DueK£<s<3S* a 



BOONE CO. RECORDER to Bur ley Tobacco Growers. I 





House 
\WVVO S.\)ER VA£*\R.O 



'^ S 



'l^^Vv*., 



////* 




HCBLISHRP KVKUY THURSDAY 

N. E. RIDDELL, Publisher. 



At a meeting of tobacco grow- 
ers at Lexington, articles of incor- I 
poratkra were prepared, by-laws I 



■%.nftied at the Poblefflee .in Burling, adopted and officers were "elect 
■■>"• Ky>, as Secopd-cla as Mail j e d, that we hope will bo effective 

I in bringing together the Burlev 
Tobacco growers of the Stafte in 
:a)i organization from which they 
will derive much benefit. That a 



' Jealousy 



If the re is one thin# mo it .'irt:i 
ar other that makes 'or roistJry, 
that retards growth, that causts 
small towns and village? iovit.h- 
er, it is jealousy Gossip ard slan- 
der are the cuis» of muchuiihap- 
Ipiness, hut jealousy latvJs g"nu- 
ine'misery. From the woman who 
hides behind drawn blinds ilfA 
"watches the guests who visits her" 
ireighbor's home, to the man 
(of power, who drops the I light- 
ing insinuation thit some compet r . 
itor's credit is not sound, much 
of ",the meanness of small twi 
life is inspired by jealousy. TU. 
■pitiful thing about the " suffer*" 
who is afflicted with this mnladv 



cut-out of the 1921 crop is abso-, 
lutely necessary .th?r;» can be iv.»P 
doubt. The holding of the pres- 
ent crop is urged by this assoc- 
iation. 

•It is advisable that a meeting 
of growers be called at each school ' 
house .'in the county not later than ' 
Saturday. Jan. 29th, where pledg-i 
es can be taken and by which tim >j 
we hope to have copies of tlrv 
constitution and by-laws, and re-l 
cei]>ts foV. annual clues of $1.50. *1 
of which goes to the central of-, 
fief at Lexington, and 50 cents «r> : 
remain with your county Treasur- . 
er. The Chairman (pro torn* of 



Lucky 
Strike 

cigarette 



, your couutv urges each and ev- 
W , S at '*.." the neeulwr nature • ery gro wer of tobacco to attend 
of this evil to swell small things t \ iew loCa l meetings and have a 
to great, to make a false . situa-; ta j k with his neighbor, an i ge. 
tion out of nought, to ima tine him to attend and sign the pledge 
much and then to lose all reason together with his address, and n * 
amid the hideous phantoms it I r.umber of acres he cultivated last, 
has formed Did you ever hear a \ yea r, after which a general meet- 1 
Jealous woman rave about her : ing win be CnUed at Burlington,] 
popular acqummenee? Did you at which time yon will be asken j 
ever hear a <i unsuccessful busin?ssjt select voiir Chairman and Sec- 1 
man mahgn his competitor? Of | retary-Twaaurer, Executive Com- 1 
course you have and you know • m ittee and other offic-rs 
What we mean. Lct oach and eVfTy man 

We often wonder why, in this! Boone county come into your or- 
Bhort life we should" devot? so garization and let's make old 
touch time to the bitterness of | Boor e 100 per cent strong 

(' O HEMPFLINO. 

Chairmar Pro Tern. 



Its toasted 




•r. - VitiitV-V, 



NOTICE 



. i To Prospective Candidates For 

in i ' ■ 

Founty Tax Commissioner 
Formerly Called Assessor. 



jealousy? What difference after all 
does it make if Mrs. So-and-Co 

% has a closed car while your auto 
is a last year's model and has 
jiffy curtains? The fragrance of 
(the new-mown hay is just as sweet 

ok a* you drive through the country 
on a summer's night. 

What difference, aft<*r all, if Mr. 
3aB. has a steam heating system in 

#jhis home while you carry ashes 
out every morning? The ruddy 
glow of ^your open fire is far more 
cheerful than Smith's sputtering 
radiator. Mrs. So-and-so glides by 
__your home on the^wa,y to her 
euchre party and you sigh as vo: 
think what an easy time* she has 
Perhaps if you only knew it Mrs. 
So-and-So would be glad to ex- 
change her place in th? fuchre 
club for your place in the Mpth- 
v er* Society. We always chuckle to 
I ourselves to hear som? one knock 
Ing some one else, for jealousy is 
at. the foot of it. Trifles, light 
as air, are to the jealous confir- 
mations strong as proof of Holy 
Writ. You can make yourself be- 



of the 1920 crop of tobacco is 25 
s cents a pound, and that the grow 
Heve anything mean of the person ; ers are only • getting about half 
Of whom you are jealous. If we t that price for the tobacco so-ld. 
Could rid ourselves of the spirit ' By holding the 1920 crop Gov. 
of jealousy we could make the Morrow thinks a better price will 
town one of the best in thM^e secured Ha said; 
Itate Sn less than a year Poor,' "I am now and have ly?end.>«p 



Before you name can bo placed 
j on the ballot as a candidate for 

Holding Of Tobacco Advised ' County Tax co«imis«ianer ca*««- 

p — »1 '••" sor) you must hold a certificate 

By Governor Morrow ! frnm tlu ' s, - itt ' Tax commission 

| showing that yon have been ex- 

Frarkfort. Kv.-After an extend- ?. m l n " i V 1 ^ th . at you are . quali " 
ed cor ferenco-' with a committee I £ ed *° ho . ld . the ofl ' c *? Thebtate 
of the Burlev Tobaco Growers ' T ax Commission prepares tl»e ques 
incorporated, comprising Abe Re- ! * lon8 . an< ? * hc >' ltr f, n ,\ ai !Si to *£* 
nick, of Winchester; Gus BrookB r I C ? 1 l J n 'J r 1 ^" orne . v ' H . ". Tfley,w-ho 
of Miyslick; C. O. Hempfling, of j*' 111 . h< ? ld tl^ examination in the 
Boone countv ;i Charles Ix>ng, of I c ««rt bouse, Monday March 14th, 
Carroll countv: N. W. Bacon, of I 1 . 9 ' 2 , 1 ' be g' nnm g at 9 o'clock a.m. 
Nevil, Ohio, and E. L. Harriaoa.of ^11 questions are to be answeren 
Lexington, who is President of thei by .J he applicant in his own hanu 
Farmers' Union and Secretary of ! £ ritin & , and .f re to be signed by 
the burlev organization, Governor 5» m . a "? mailed at o-ce to the 
Morrow issuetf a statement advis- ?* ate Tax Commission, who grades 
ing the growers to hold their 1920 * h * pa £f. rs and . 189 "^ the 
crop of tobacco until a fair price [ 1 ? I t _ e :. I T 5*. a PP»c»nt will ^ 
could be secured for it. 

The delegation presented figuies 
from the Department of Agricul- 
ture of the University of Ken- 
tucky, to the effect that tfc- cost 



certi 
he ex- 
amined upon the know-ledge of 
the applicants experience as an 
assessor, his knowledge of the 
revenue. laws, his knowledge of 
the geography of Boone county, 
his knowledge of the industries 
and properties of Boone cownty, 
and his elemerrtarv training and 
business experience to fill the 
office. The foregoing examination 
is provided for bv Section 40»2 A- 
11 Kentackv Statntes. 2t 



weak mortals that we are 
■today and gone tomorrow 



H , r .i ly interested in and distressed #v- POULTRY RAISERS NOTICE 



( .Ve,make ourselves wretrii- I ove. 

the petty jealousy of our neigh- 

- -bor. Honestly now, is ttr Worth 

while to envy Mrs. So-and-So's 

ei^y little social position when 

'there is so much work to be 

,Jone. Why not feel sorry for her 

i-that her life is so empty? Am 

.what about Smith and his big 

j,* .home and successful business? He 

l .oanit take it with him when he 

% takes that long journey in'a few 

t yea*e and he is missing the real 

*oy of living in the struggle he 

to putting forth to hold his posi- 

tior. Jealousy? Bah, it is to laugh 



•♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

» ♦ 

• " CONSTANCE ♦ 

P . ♦ 

• ♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦«♦♦»♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦» 

W.'A. Kenyon and wife entertain- 
, ed Mrs. Flora Weir, of Texas. Snii- 
v Sunday. 

L._John Klaserner and family at- 
tended the funeral of their niece 
'-Mrs. Mamie Michaels, last Wednes- 

Frank Whitcomb is the guest of 
lis niece, Mrs. Titos. Kenynn. 

pjrsy Flora Weir returned to her 
lome in Texas, last Wednesday af- 

jr a viBit with relatives here. 

A. Ken.von and wife had as 

isir guests Wednesday, their coub- 

^-Willard Kenyon. of Oregon, and 

T m. Gregg, of Felicity. Ohio. 

Cbas. Oarnett, who wa.-t stricken 
with paralysis, Ik Improving./ 

Mr* Tb n Ziinmwr < nt<-rl»ined her 

{»Hi«r Mrs. Myei^aiul cinldren, and 
Ifs. Sam Williams, of Kiverside, 
►io, last Thursday. 



Yei ' e r the tobacco situation in Ken- 



tucky. There is no doubt .ha. She We Me sta , t ii« a Register or 
price now being paid for tobacco; Directory of ajl Pare Bred Poul- 
thremghoutirhe^state does noHr, try Breeder* "'in' Northern Ken-' 
represent more than half the cost tacky. If vou are -a Breeder of 
° f <^ tS P rodu f* lon : Pure ^fred Poultry of any variety ! 

"To place the present crop up- ^"a large OT smaI1 scalean^ha.ve 

:ions,.| gg^j for hatching ^or stockk for 



on 

it appears to me will not result 
in bettering their financial condi- 
tion, but will a{ld only to the dif- 
ficulties of the situation. It ap- 
pears to me that the farmer has 
much to gain and nothing to lose 
by withholding his present crop 
from the market until the- grow- 
ers of the state have had an op*- 
portunity to take stock of ,the 
situation and perfect an organiz- 
ation and plans to meeit ft. 

"I am very anxious to be of ser- 
vice in every way possible to the 
great tobacco growing industry oi 
the state, to be helpful to those- 
interested in th» production of tkc 
crop and to assist in. a solution 
of (he situation which will bring 
to the growers a fair snd equit- 
able price.'' 



"Cut Out" The 19*1 Crop 



sale yom are invited to sencfc- us 
your name State the variety or 
tarieties you breed, your price 
per setting of 15 eggs ant* per 
hundred. If you have »to<dt for 
•ale state what it is and price 
asked*. If yoa have a special 
strain* you might note the fj«et. We 
will keep yoar record for refer- 
ence and any one asking tee yo»r 
breed' of poultry will be given 
your name and" address and! price, 
if you desire. 

Owr aitm is to make this a clear- 
ing house and getting together of 
Pore Bred Poultry Raisers. 

This service is absolutely- free. 
No charge of any kind win be 
made. 

Let's see ff wo can make North- 
ern Kentucky 100 per i-eA t , Pure 
Bred Poultry Raisers. 

OOODE & DUNKIE, 

Covimfton, Ky. 



Lexington, Ky., Jan. W.— A 
lution calling for a complete "cut- 
out'' of t he 19,21 hurley crop was 
adopted among others ait the or- 
ganization meeting of the Cat-out 
Association of Burley Tobacco 
Growers of Kentucky, Tennessee, 
Ohio, Indiana and West Virginia 



Wireless message was reciiv- 
this office Mbndiv announc 
that the stork had left at the 
pOf Capt. Edward Maun-r, in 
ML Utft Saturday, a i.ine 
Mvalf pound young lady 
Board. 

ipatrick Inatnlled (or 

kitchen pump «u i 

ih utMi+r is pump- 

M«l*rit Into the 



23 Kentucky Cows Make OH 
Honor Roll. 

A seven year old 1 Jersey cow,. 
New Year's Frolic 2nd, owned by 
the Allen Dale Farms at Shelbv- 
vilte, led the list of 23 Kentucky 
here yesterday. Constitution » and j dairy cows including 15 Jerseys, 
by-laws were adopted, articles of seven Holsteins and on^ Guernsey j 
incorporation prepared and per- which won a ofciee for themselves 
marent officers elected. J. N. Ke-jon the December Honor Roll of' 
hoe, Maysville, was elected presi- the state by r*roducing marc t h.»n 
dert; Judge Henry Prultt, Mt. three pounds of butterfat during' 
Sterling, vice president, artd E. L. the two days that they were; 
llarrisor, Lexington, secretary ana) tested undee the supervision of; 
treasurer. I the State Collegi* of Agrictdture, 



The reMon for the "cut -out** 
plan, resolutions pointed out was 
the iailure of. Warehouse* and "Big 
Four 1 ' liuyers to bring alxiut siiti.s- 



according to an announcement 

made today by J. J. Hooper in 

charge of the college dairy. Thp| 

December champion produced fH'i 



factory price* as promised. A com- pounds of milk and 173 |M>uudsoI 
mittee was named to confer with butterfat during the t wo days. 



Governor Morrow Concerning the 
legality el the cut-out movement. 

Every dollar of your income tu\ 
goes into the I'mmtin 'ill foi lie 
common good 1'ay It toda\ 



lays 



getfabtet/ and (ohm (a 

CINCINNATI'S GREATEST STORE. FOUNDED 1877 

CINCINNATI - - . OHIO 



Closing Out Our Entire Stock 
of House Furnishings, China, 
Glassware and Lamps at 
Extraordinary Reductions 

. ■ ■ ■ i' 

An Unprecedented Money-Saving 
Opportunity for Thrifty Housekeepers 

Mablcy r s is essentially a store of apparel and apparel accessories for men, 
women and children. 



, * 



The tremendous growth of the sections devoted to these various articles of dress 
compels us to discontinue our basement section of household and home necessities, that in- 
creased space may be secured for the other departments. 

Wc do this most reluctantly, but feel that satisfaction in so doing lies in the knowl- 
edge that we will be able to serve our friends so much better and so mucJi more satisfac- 
torily in other parts of the store. " 



Every housekeeper who reads this advertisement owes it to himself or her- 
self to come to Cincinnati and purchase household necessities at tremendously 
reduced prices. 

. SOME OF THE PRICES 

i REDUCED ONE-HALF 

"* SOME OF THE PRICES 

| REDUCED' ONE-THIRD 

f. Z , SOME OF THE PRICES 

i : REDUCED ONE-FOURTH 



GREAT REDUCTIONS ON ALL ITElMS 



Never before in the history of our business have we been able 
to make such tremendous price reductions. # 

Come to Mabley's, in Cincinnati, and save a great 
deal of money. Tell your friends abo # ut this great sale. 

This sale will continue until our entire stock of housefurnishincs, china 
glassware- and lamps is sold. 



We urge everybody who is interested to come to Cincinnati as quickly as 
possible for these great money-saving items. x 

It will pay you handsomely to come. Every purchase means thrift for you. 



Every Article In Household Goods Reduced 
Excepting a Few Patented or Restricted Articles 

fhe^abUy fond (anew (a 

CINCINNATI'S GREATEST STORE. FOUNDED 1S77 

CINCINNATI - - OHIO 



Home o( tho old-timer* woe 
l>uy whisky i«l t)x> pr u mM priu* 
mv thit It wnn rtwwsj ■ frorth •lO 
n iiu.tit, hut thi» WHBSWt otver 
had the gall t> «%k It 



Wonderful Human Bona*. 
Human booM bav» a wooderful 
power of roalaUuca. It baa beoo 

proved tbat tboj will bear a prowuro 
threa tlruao greater than oak and al- 
moat aa macb aa wroujittt Iron be/uro 
being eruabed 



•n Prvsa of Wrltlnga. / 
Hooks are our BTOVBlBI privilege In 
modem civllizmiou. WHb a tanio for 
hooka and uiuale, let every pareoa 
thank G«*d, nlgbt and mom log, that 
be waa not born earlier Id blatory — 
T, Starr Kln«. 



<« 



/. 



\ 



Identifying Mar. 
Donald had a new pnlr of tun ahoee 
of alilch he waa very prond. Ue cane 
Is the houao out* day after playt&s 
with two little flrta. one of*whom bad 
re J hair, ami »uM. "llotber, the girl 
with the taa hair la very croea." 



I 









^ 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 






i 



I 

I 



PUBLIC 



I will sell at public Auction at my farm, 4 1-2 
miles south of Burlington, Ky., on the 
( * Burlington and Big Bone Road, on 



V' 





5th, ' 1921 



The Following Property: 

Black Mare 12 yebrs old, bay marc 4 years bid, both first-class farm mares lady broke, 
Thornhill Road Wagon, good as new; Iron wheel truck wagon, Hayrrame, Rockbed] 
new 2-horse Sled, Rubber Tire Buggy, Oliver Riding Cultivator, 2-horse Corndrill, 1-h, 
Corndrill, Disc Harrow, 'A' Harrow, E. Breaking Plow, No. 20 Breaking Plow, Hill- 
side Plow, 2-horse Jumping Shovel Plow, 1-h. Jumping Shovel Plow, Double Shovel 
McCormick* Mowing Machine, Hayrake, Fairbank Platform Scries, Sorghum Mill and 
Pan, 2 sets Leather Tug Harness, 4 Leather Horse Collars, 2 Work Bridles, Riding 
Bridle, 4 Leather Halters, 2 sets Buggy Harness, set Breast Chains, Man's Saddle, Hay- 
fork and rope, Blocks and Ropes, 3 Pitchforks, Single and Doubletrees^-set Stretchers, 
Log Chain, Log Bolsters, and other artic les too numerous to mention. 

TERMS OF SALE. ~ 

All sums of $10 and under, cash ; on sums over $10, a cred- 
it of 12 months without interest, will be given purchasers to 
give notes with good security payable at the Peoples Deposit 
Bank, Burlington, Ky., before removing property. 



w 



' <> LUTE BRADFORD, Auct. 



Sale to begin at 12:30 




"Trade Where They AH Traded 



Covington's Largest Seed aid Grocery House 

„° ffcrs hi & h & rade tested ^d at the very lowest possible prices consistent with 
quality. We do not carry any second or third grades as we figure the best is 
none too good tor a good farmer and our experience has been that 99 out of every 
100 want the best seed obtainable. 

When we quote you-onseed you may rest assured we are quoting the best 
grade. Our TIMOTHY, CLOVER and ALSIKE tests 99.50 per cent, pure 
or better. < 



'^ 



CARE OF HARNESS IS 
OF tyUCH IMPORTANCE 

Wash Thoroughly With Soap and 
Water Before Oiling. ., 

It Will Last Longer If Kept Clean and 
la Less Liable to Cause 8ores en 
Hortei — Collan Should Be 
f - Examined Often. 

H«rae!>« should be kept clean and 
well oiled. It will then be less liable 
to cause sores on the horses and will 
last longer. Before the harness Is 
oiled It should he taken apart and 
thoroughly washed with soap and 
water. When nearly dry apply neats- 
foot oil with a sponge or a woolen 
rag. Do not hang harness In heat or 
In the sol) to dry. A tablespoonful of 
lampblack with two ounces of melted 
beeswax may be added to the oil for 
a black dressing. Pish oil may be used 
on harness, or prepared oils may be 
secured at harness shops. All parts 
of tho harness should be strong. 

Every horse should have its own col- 
lar, which should fit snugly to the neck 
from top to bottom. Most sore neeks 
are caused by large collars or by 
riraqght being too low on the point of 
the shoulder. ' To fit a new or an old 
collar to a horse soak the collar over 
nlgfcit In water, wipe It off In the 
morning, and fit It op the horse. Work 
moderately through the day. The col- 
lars should be examined every morn- 
ing and the bearing surface kept clean 
and smooth. The horse's neck should 
be kejtf clean. A good plan In hot 
weatlie} is to wash It every night with 
a weak solution of salt water. Keep 
the collar and hames buckled tight. 

Before hitching to a' wagon be sure 
that the neck yoke Is safe and that the 
traces will not become unfastened. 



SEEDS 

S Timothy, Red Clover, Blue Grass S 
E Alsike, Alfalfa, Sapling, Sweet E 
E Clover, Orchard Grass, etc that E 
D satisfy the most exacting de- D 
3 mands for purity, germination S 

AND PRICES 

HILLS SEEDS DO GRpW. 

Little Giant Seed Sower* and Bacteria for 

Iaoceulatmc Seed. 

GET OUR PRICE LIST. 



BUY GROCERIES FROlff HILL'S 



At Wholesale Prices. 
m _Rarua Flour in wood, per bbl 
' Two 98-lb. Cotton Bags (1 I 



bbl. 



DEVICE TO DESTROY STUMPS 

Burner Made of Sheet Metal Has Been 

Tested and Fdund Practical 

Easily Operated. 

The use of dynamite to draw tree 
stumps from the ground may lie sub- 
stituted by a new device recently In- 
vented which does not break up the 
ground. This invention to burn out 
the tree stumps has been tested and 
proved practical. The burner is rootle 



Pure Cane Granulated Sugar, per 100 lbs. . 
Potatoes, Michigan White, per 150.1b. bag. 
Lake Herring, per 100 net weight, 1-2 bbl. 

Holland Herring, pe* 6-lb. keg 

Fat Irish Mackerel, per kit 

Michigan Navy Beans, 100-Ib. bag 

Best White Corn Meal, 100-lb. bag 

Open Kettle N. O. Molasses, per 5-gal can 

Bulk Rolled Oats, 6 pounds 

Oram Hominy, 3 pounds 

Scratch Feed, best grade, 100 pounds 

Oyster Shells, crushed, 100 pounds 

Meat Scrap, 1 00 pound bag 



Northern Kentucky's 



$11.75 

. 11.00 

8.65 

3.00 

7.75 

1.00 

3.50 

5.00 

2.25 

400 

.25 

.10 

2 85 

1.35 

575 

I LEADING GROCER'S 
j AND SEEDSMEN. 



we will rurnish, tree, euough 



Our Alfalfa is American, northern grown, and 
inoculating bacteria for what you buy. 

Blue Grasa, Orchard Grat. Red Tep, Alsike, Sweet Clover, Lawn Gra... 
All high-grade. Send your order «r write for prices. 



GOLDEN BLEND COFFEE, pound* 35c 



5-gal. Can New Orleans Molasses • $4.00 
100 Lb, Half Bbl Lake Herring . . . 8.00 
50 Lb. Half Bbl. Lakr Herring. . . . 5.00 

20 Lb. Pail Lake Herring 2 40 

25 Lb. Bag Blatchford's Calf Meal 1 .50 
KANSAS CREAM or ARCADE FLOUR 

Barrel in wood , $12.00; Barrel in 96-lb. Cotton Bags 



100 Lb. Bag Blatchford's Calf Meal 5.50 j .! 

100 Lb. Bag Navy BeausT 5.001/ 

150 Lb. Bag Potatoes , 3.00J \i 

1 00 Lb. Bag H. & E. or Jack Frost 

Granulated Sugar 8.75 



$11.50 



WCd&<w!M unifies 



^ ; GROCER IBS FLOUR SEEDS. MED I C /NFS 
/S-2/ P/KE ST, AS 20W.7I»ST 





Rainbow Bob's 

Poland 
China I 



Closin out sale at farmers prices— 9 Big Sows. Bred and 
open guilts, 2 200-lb. Boars; 5 60-lb. Guilts. 

W. M. BALSLY, - Burlington, Ky 

Rural Route 3 




:\ 




WHOLESALE— "Covington's Largest Seed and Grocery House"- RETAIL 

:_ Covington, Kentucky . 



New Device for Burning Stumps. 

oC black sheet metal in three sections. 
It Is operated by placing the bottom 
section over the stump and igniting 
the stump at the base. The top sec- 
tions are then connected and the burn- 
er will do its work. According to the 
Inventor, thirty burners a flay can be 
operated by one man, each burner ob- 
literating three or four stumps. 



I 



^ 



^' 



Phones South 335 and 336. 
United States Wheat Director License No. 030057- Y. 

U. S. Food Administration License No. G-1770. 




O^^^^^^^K^K^l^^^^^^^^^^^o 



* 

* 



LOGAN FOSTER. 



Why Mr. N. Windsor (R. 1.) Put Up 
with Rats for Ye 



B B. ALLPHIN. 



I Foster & Allphin 



* 



Real Estate and Auction Sales Co. 

I am associated with the above firm and Hrlicit your busi- 
.uess. List your farms with us. Give as youj k»»Vh of Live 
Stock and other Personal property. v 

We do the advertising, auction your sale, clerk and col- 
lect. All you have to do is give us property list. 



"Years ago I got some rat poitaa. whfci, nearlr 

killed our fine watch dog. W« pit up with rati 

until a I rirnd told me about Rat-Sup. It rareJr 

kJUt rats, though house pets won't tewch k." Satf 

- dry up and leave no smell. Prices. Me. 6Sc.SI.2S. 

Sold and guaranteed fey 

Gullejr dr. Pettit, Burlington, Ky. 



SUPPLY OF EGGS INCREASED 

Animal Food Essential to Diet of Fowl 
Must 6e Supplied in Winter as 
Well as Summer. 

A bone cutter Is nn important part 
of the eqnplment for every farm poul- 
try department In summer wheu the 
fowls can range over the farm they 
can supply for themselves the animal 
food so essential -to their diet. But 
In winter the supply of eggs will be 
greatly increased If attention Is glvea 
to this part of the fowl's ration. 



COAL 

Plenty of Coal-Coal that Burns ^ 

We have on hand the 'following - 'grades which we can sell to 
you at the right prices 

Stearns Black Coal Domino Black Coal 

Now Rivor Smokoloss r o m Coal Ky. R. 0. M. Coal. 

; We are the Lowest in price of any one in Erlanger. It witt 
pay you to give u^a call when in need of good coal 

OUR COAL HAS NO SUPERIOR, . k 

T. W. SPINKS Co. Erlanger, 

LYMAN RICE, Mauser. 



| FOSTER & ALLPHIN g 

& Covington, Ky. Walton, Ky. Phono 37 Con. * 

J? B. B. ALLPHIN, Loca l Agr.nl, Walton, Ky. £ 

■ — ___ a*. ___^_ j^' ..... . . * 



♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦« «♦««*««♦•♦«•••«*•+*•«*„«» 

DO YOU TAKK THE U&CORUKKf 

If Not Tit It One year. 

«Oo » l»» • tOO tOO Ot t M +Ofto+a 



For Sale. 

1 2 10-gal. Milk Cans, one with faucet 
1 80-U». Cap Butter Worker 
1 1 16 gal. 8tone Jar 
1 6-gal. Bucket, with lid 
1 Heavy 10-qt. Milk Pail 
1 Htraii.er 

All on sale now hut dairy supplies, 
which can be had on Feby. 26th. 
I Leather Halters (horse or cow) 

Tie Chains 

Tie-out Chain* so ft. long 

Plow, i ton Htraw 

Harrow, H«wing Machine 

1 1-4 Uasolliui hlnglim (Vlnii 

Writing Desk, Ijuiip 
■ l>rMt»r, clr walnut 
I Eitoosion Table—oak 
| <»« Air Oil Htu?«--i bunion 
I Oil AlrOllgtov«.Oren 
Several dos. Fruit Jars- I gallons 



INJURY BY MITES AND LICE 

Pests Sap Vitality of Fowls end Pre- 
vent Growth or Lessen Produc- 
tion of -Eggs. 

Mites aad lice rVett^eutry sup, the 
Tltallty of the fowl and prevent growth 
or lessen the egg production. A thor- 
ough cleaning of the house, regular 
application of disinfectants to the 
roosts and nests, sod a frequent dust- 
ing of the fowls will control these 
pests. 

FOWLS IN WWTEfl QiMRTERS 

No Sudden Change In Feeding Should 

■e Msde far Pullets After They 

Are Ones Moved. 

All oiirly hatched pullet* should be 
moved to winter quarters bj (lie tuld 
die of October ami after once moved 
do sodden rasagoa k» 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

« ♦ 

• RABBIT HASH. • 



R. M. Wilson has a' horse with 
lock law. 

Joe VanNess has been breaking 
rock OH Ihe pike near J. H. Wal- 
ton's. 

(.'has Bachelor finished the hog 
killings in this community Wed- 
nesday. 

The young people enjoyed a 
party at Louis Mirriek's last Th.ir 
day night. » 

R H and H Telephone Co hart 
a meeting at J. L Stephens-' last 
Tuesday night. 

Pink North and niece, of Au- 
rora, are apendiug a few days with 
B. L. Stephens 

Oene Wingute went to Aurora 
TuihmIuv to attend the tobaced 
market ami said the) lt.ul a live- 
ly time 

Raymond Rodyoa and wif«* of I 

Kitting Mini, OajaO over last Mutm , 
day night and leuuuiu'l over Sun 

da) uniting rotative* 

Mooes Beott eaine very i uar h*v 
ti g a serious aeeidmit last Hi.n 
day evening He waa helping his 
aon saw wo<.d with a power aaw 



♦ O' 

♦ I IN ION +, 



The home of J. L. Frazier was 
the scene of a lovely social af- 
fair on the evening of Januar y 12. 
The occasion being in memory of 
the "Squires'' birthday Time in 
ita flight has dealt gently with 
tbia very distinguished* gentle- 
man, and in the hearts of his 
many friends he never gets any 
older, but as the years go bv ho 
truly "make* the world better by 
having lived in if Mr Praiier » 
an affable hoat ami his friends are 
always delighted with th« honor 
of being hia guest At six o'clock 
a beautifully appointed dinner waa, 
served. The following friends re- 
sponded to the invLuioii: Hev 
und Mrs, Sp^ra, Win Mmkh mtm 
wlf^ l) Dugat and wife, W, Ml 
Kaehal and wife, John J tlarifcaut 
and wife, Julius llrastow and wlla, 
Juinea Hrtatow and wife, Mr Lutl- 
wick, Miaaee LUlUn Hrlatow. Nor- 
ma Haehal, Sue hrlatow, Anaa 
HriaW and Jarua Hrlatow 



» V^^lJt^^ •U •stsUkmOlislw 
^ ■**..■•* •*•• aUnaullan an .aosssa 




! ' V IP 



■■*»-— 



% O O N E CO UNTY SRCO&PEft 



FLICKERTOWN. 



County News Items 



Interesting 



Facts Gathered Durina the Week by Our 
Regular Correspondents. 



3 




♦♦♦♦ 

♦ 



PETERSUURC1 




day guests of J u wnm •«. uo r n, wom.m 




,-wsi>»i>«"r I'nton.) 



!♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦ i •♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦!*.!*•** 

**w*^in visited our «0wn A large cowl attended he *e- 
„f e tho JSfVS by taking from, .,,,, -give* at the home of W 



who; u ' ("iarnett and wife, in honor of 
ati m o^neSSa P ^S remain, gj? r wn Myron and br.de on h. ; 
;>.,«> iiil to re*t in the PeterBhurg; ,.ight of Ja.i. 13. Qtrte a nu.n • r 
ceStlry SundSv in the present of B n|CP and uaefu presents *ere 
of a large assembly of relatives ; iVt . n them as follows: 
Sid friends. ] Washington Bank chest of s- 

TW rP nv,ins of Frank Collin. ,, ,, r containing one dozen MJ£PS 

H^hJd b'n r^£> »i »*• .hell ud '.utter knife: BttM Xr- 
t H o» n tor .everal >v.r«. l.,r, diver gravy Udto • f ^ 

■ '''isr-i-S-'- 

^iGeo Gordon and wife, silver hu- 

returned Jw ih3 and butter knife; Jessie 

Slt '" Gordon" silver gravy ladel: Rev d. 

Omer and wife, silver n»at fork , 

1 Clarence Herbstreit and Halhe Ha- 
Listr-n for the wedding , "' 11; ; 1 f Cr , pie forks; Win, England Ml i 
^hich will ring shortly. We will [ v ..^ O j, -haU dozen sflyer tea- 
report their names later. I spoons; Lester Aylor and wife, sil- 

meat fork: Norma and Henry 



Phillip Klop]> 
Lawrenceburg, were the 
Jioliver Shinkle«and wife, 
of days the past we 'W 

Mrs Fannie Snyder 
home last Week from a 
her sisters in an I near 
ton' 



family. 

Henry Deck and family \ sit. t 
Win Hums and mother, Sum. »\ L 

Ed. Maxwell and family, Floyd 
«nd Herbert Snyder and All.-' 
Grant, were Sunday guests of J., 
H Snv.icr and family I 

( J Henslev and son, Hichard, 
fttade a trip to Milan, lnd ., Sun-j 

C Miss Virginia Berkshire and Mi** 
Opal Eddington, were the guests 
of Miss Alice White, Sunday 

Several real estate deals were 
made near here last week 

James E. Gaines visited his aunt, 
Lucy Cloud and family, Sunday 

Clay White visited C, E. and 
Hubert White and family, last 
week. 



The thlnjrs ttmt never happen aire 
often aa mu.-h realities to «■ ln l V ,,e ' r 
citecta as those that are ncitimpllslico. 



SEASONABLE GOOD THINGS. 

ood atuffed uud baked 



Fish is so 
that It should 




-wsxsvxxw ««*« ^x^x^x^X^ar^x^:^! 



T. CLOffE, Presldemt. 

J. 



HUBERT CONNER. Sec'ty. 
KITE, Agent. 



•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦J 

1 . BEECH GROVE. ♦ 

♦ • 

•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦ 

We are havirg some very fine 
weather. 
Miss Lutie Ryle has beer very 




Burling* 



Hugh McMullen is suffering from 
an attack bf appendicitis. He is 
better at this Writing. 

The farmers are through strip- 
ping tobacco and are hunting s 

Mrs Ella Sullivan has been quite 
sick for the last two weeks. 

Mrs. J. M. Botts was shopping 
in Aurora, last Saturday. 

Mrs. Burton Yates is on the sick 
list at this writing. 



♦ ♦ 

♦ BEAVER LICK. ♦ 

♦ * 
•♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

Robt. Green sold his crop of 
tobacco of 1300 pounds last Wed- 
resdav on Walton Loose L"af mar 
ket at an average tot a little over 
$30 00 per hundred 

Dr *t B. Ryle and wife enter- 
tained a number of the young 
folks last Sunday with an elegant 
dinner, K being their son Will- 
iam's 15th birthday. 

Mrs J. M. Jack, Mrs, A. A, Ro- 
te* and Mrs G W. Ossman, spent 
Friday of last week with Miss 
Levenie Moore of Union pike. 

J. W. Conley and wife enter- 
tained a number of their neigh- 
bors and friends hist Sunday with Graves 



MicGlasson, hand painted van* 
Blufe Wingate and wife, glass 
bowl; Mrs. Mai tvllus Rouse, table 
rover- Dorothv Rouse, cake pi it •; 
\ J Ogleu and a ife, tablecloth: 
Mrs Hattie Aylor. guest towel; 
Gladys Wilson, guest towel; Mrs. 
Bessie Ernst, aluminum ket:l»; A 
D Hunter and wife, table cloUl 
and one-half dozen napkins; Stan- 
lev Graves and wife, cut glass 
vase: Wm L Crigler and family, 
clock; Rov Tanner and wife, glass 
butter tub; Wm. Graves and wife, 
easerole: Lea Nora Graves, cut 
"■lass bowl; Earl Aylor and wife, 
aluminum percolator: Jemerson Ay 
lor berry set : Chas. Riley and wife 
towels; " Leon Aylor and wife, 
granite kettle: Nannie Lodge, 
cream ifld sugar set; Mrs. Alice 
Hunzicker, towels; Mrs. R. Carl- 
| son, carpet sweeper; Mrs. Annie 
McGlasaon and Miss Carol White, 
'8500; A M Rice and wife, $5.00; 
Lowell and Claud Tanner, $-5.00; 
Ed Baker and wife $1 0Q ; »lar- 
eellus Rouse, $1.00; Paul Poston, 
$1.00. 

Wm Crigler and family had as 

their guests last Sunday, Dr. L. 

C Hafer and family, of Ludlow, 

James Bullock ind family, William 

nil wife. and Edgar 



Miss Artie Stephens spent Sat- 
urday night and Sunday with her 
cousin, Miss Lutie Ryle. 

Chas. Stephens and wife were 
Sunday guests at Mosby Pope 3 *. 

Wm* Presser and wife were the 
Sui dav guests of her parents, M.r 
ard Mrs. Mat Ryle 

Miss .Blanche Williamson spent 
several days last week with 
and Viola Stephens 



make Us appearttnee 
served with stuff- 
often upon the 
family table. 

Baked Stuffed 

Fish.— Either salt 

or fresh water 

may be used, a 

whole fl s'h o r 

slices can be 

lr.g. When Eh* sliced flsh Is used the 

stufflag Is placed between the slices 

with strips of salt pork above. The 

fish may be filled, sewed and wrapped 

In strips of bucon before putting in 

to roast. When the bacon has become 

crisp, remove It, cover the rh<h with 

cracker crumbs and brown in a quick 

oven. 

Choice Dreeeina for Baked Fish. — 
Chop nue one slice of oulou and half 
a green pepper, let cook In two table- 
spooufuls of fat until soft, add one- 
fourth of a pouud of fresh mushrooms, 
and let them cook three minutes; add 
a lableapoonfu! of finely chopped para- 
Mis* ; ley. half a teaspoonful of sweet basil. 
1 a scant half-teaspoouful of salt, two 



| Breeders Mutual Fife and Lightning j 

^v^JNSURANCE COMPANY^--^ 

•» Of Boone County, Ky. 

Insures Live Stock agahiBt Loss by Fire tr Lightning 
WRITE US FOB RATES. 





m 
m 
* 
S 
S 

3 



VUL CANIZ ING. 

Automobile tube* add tiie» repaired by the .latest 
process. Bring me your old tires and I may be 
able to get several miles more service for you out 

of them. 

Auto Accessories kept in stock. 
'doodridge, Portage and Cupplet Tires and Tube* on hand. 

GEORGIE PORTER, 

BURLINGTON, KY. 



m 
m 



MiL B Haael , Rvte "spent last Sun-'oilpfuls of soft bread crumbs anil one- 

. . . . i , ' . /..: I TM;.^ ...■_. * _ r..\ „t ,,,..lt..,l chnl'tt>Il- 



day night with her friend, Miss 
Carrie West. 

Lawrence Pope and wife spent 
Sundav with her mother, Mrs. Ag- 
nes Ryle. ., f 

Hogan Rvle and family were 
Suidav guests of Mrs. Agnes Kyle. 




i 



S IT'S a wise idea to place your order for a car now, y^ 
ft I so you won't be disappointed in the spring. \k 



a good dinner 

Howe Cleek and wife aj )etrt last^ 
Thursday in Burlington neighbbr- 
liood looking for a farm to rent 
or purchase. 

James Allen's daughter Kather- 
ine, fell and broke a •bone in her 
left arm, last Monday. 

G. W. Ossman and wife spent 
last Wednesday with Joseph W. 
Cleek and wife. 

S. ( C. Denham and wife, of Chic- 
ago, are visiting J. C. Griffith 
and wife 



Graves 



IrftrMoUle Slav-back is visiting' calling on Elmer 

*-.m • _i 1 I*. Mir Gal 



and family. 

Quite a number gave Mrs. Leon 
Aylor a surprise. — FrsT Thursday 
night, Jan JOth. it being he* 

birthday ' . 

Earl Avlor and family entertain- 
ed Lewis Kiddell and family, and 
Miss Thelm:i Aylor, o! Ludlow, last 
Sunday. 

Cullum (iarnett and family visit- 
ed relatives at C'roflcent Springs, 
Saturdayn ight and Sunday. 

Mike Kahr and family were 
Miller and fam- 



. A. Slayhack and wife 
A. A. Koter spent Saturdav 
the city. 



♦ ♦ 

♦ BEECH GROVE. ♦ 

♦ • 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Mrs Oscar Brown, who has been 
dangerously ill at the home of 
her mother in Constance, is much 
improved and will return home 
soon. 

Miss Blanche Williamson was 
the guest of her uncle, A U. 
Williamson and Wife a few dayi 
last week. 

Tony Rue and wife* of BellevieW, 
were guests of David Williamson 
and wife, last Wednesday 

Courtney Pope, of Union, visit- 1 
ed his parents her:* Friday antt 
Saturday of last week. 

Lawrence Pope, wife and son; 
Russell, were guests of Stanley i 
Ryle and wife, Sunday 

Our school is closed on account 
of the illness of our teacher,! 
Miss Lutie Ryle | 

Huey Kyle and wife are enter- 
taining a fine son, bom Jan r Jth I 
Eidon Wayne I 

Clifford Pope andvwife are noa 
residing on (J. A iivh's hum <,n ! Vls,t '" 1 '.' " IX ' 
(iunpowder ll >' Sunday 



ily, Sunday afternoon. 

Douglas Fairbanks in "Bound In 
Morocco" at the Hebron Theatre 
next Saturday night. 

Church services at Hebron Sun- 
day afternoon at 'Z:'i0. 

Reba Clair Walton was ill with 
tonsilitis last week 



,♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦• 

» GUNPOWDER. • 

; ♦ 

••*♦#♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•••♦•• 

N C Tanner, of Union, made 
this writer . a brief call last Sat- 

urdsy. ^ . lkA 

Mrs H F Utz entertained the 
Ladies Aid Society of Hopeful 
church last Tuesday. 

L. H. Busby sent his crop ot 
tobacco to Lexington, last week 
to be sold on the loose leaf mar- 
ket. 

N A Zimmerman sent a truck 
load of hogs to market, last week, 
ar.d the price received was satis- 
factory. 

John Miers and family ana Mr. 
Gerhardt, of Walton precinct, al- 
ter ded church at Hopeful, last 
Surdav. 

At the meeting of the council 
of Hopeful church, last Saturday, 
£ A Floyd wa s elected Secretary 
and J. S. Surface, Treusurer. 

C W. . SCvers is now a retired 
merchant, having turned the bus- 
iness over to the new firm of 
Brown & Dunson, last week. 

Harvev Rouse sold his tobacco 
on the "Covington loose leaf mar 
ket, last we?k at an average of 
eight arid one-half cents a. pound. 
The roads are in a very bad 
condition, and if the parties who 
have cortrol of the road money 
would visit Boore county now, 
they would see the necessity of 
appropriating some of it to bet- 
ter the condition of our roads. 



third of a cupful of melted shorten 
lug; mix well and stuff the fish. 

Ragout of Venlton With Sweet Po- 
tato Border. — Any portion of the ven- 
ison may be used, but steaks from the 
upper portion of the round are usual- 
ly selected. Cut the steak lu small 
pieces, roll In flour and cook In hot 
fat until slightly, browned on both 
sides. Add broth from the trimmings 
and bones of the venison, or simply 
acid boiling water, let slnnuer nbout 
nn hour or until tender. For each pint 
of liquid add one-fourth of a cupful 
of Hour, half ft teaspoonful of salt and 
one-fourth or n teaspoonful of paprika ; 
stir these with cold water or broth to 
a smooth consistency ; add to the dish 
of meat and stir until bolllmr; cover 
ami simmer ten minutes, nave ready 
linked or boiled sweet potatoes ; press 
them through a ricer; add salt, butler 
and a little hot milk ; beat thorough- 
|y over the fire. WHh a pnstry tube * 
pipe In a ring around a hot serving 
dish. Turn the ragout Into the center 
of the ring and set cooked prunes In 
groups of three as a garnish around 
the potato. Serve the prunes with the 
potato and ragout. 



\i/ Phaeton Hud»on $2538.00. Seven Passenger Hudson $2538.00 

$ Coupe Hudson - - J3445. Sedan Hudson - - - $3574 

ft\ Essex Touring $1698. 

L Essex Roadster $1608. 

'"* Dodge Touring $1390. 

ilil Dodge Coupe $2035. 

i|f Dodge Sedan $2295. 

9\ Cleveland Tractor $1395. 

ff? The above prices are delivered at your door. 
(0 



Or 

S 
f 

v./ 



S It you want to place an order for any of these cars, ^ 
• • call is/ 

& B. B. HUME, Burlington, Ky. * 




jib- 



Best Quality— Fair Prices 




''* THE lt 

KITCHEN 
CABINET 

IIII, Western Newspaper Union.) 




Do We Close the Factory 



pop- 
live 



♦ ♦ 

» FRANCESVILLB. • 

♦ • 
•♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

J. S. Egglestou and wife enter- 
tained, Saturday eve in honor of 
their daughter," Miss Khoda's 15th 
birthday. Quite a number of the 
young folks were present an 1 all 
had a delightful time. 

Kev. K K Swrfidler will preach 
at Sun I Hun next Sunday morning 
at 11 o'clock All are cordially in- 
vited to come 

Earl Brooks and wife, of Mays- 
ville, s])c t the week-end with the 
Misses A mar tit K otitis and Sadie 
Hiemai 

Carl Beaeom. wife and daughter, 
of Taylorftport, spent Sunday at 
Manlius tioodiidgrs' 

Leon Avlor and wife, of Hebron, 
in this ctimmtin- 



Manley Kyle and family visit' 
Elmore Kyle and wife. Sunday. 



I 




C. I> 

tained 

Smrrhrv 



Scotborn 
several 



and wife enter- 
>f ths&lr relatives 



Fiftv-ore per cent of the 
ulatior of the United States 
in cities. 

Thirty per cent of our popu- 
lation grow crops and raise stock 
and furnish the necessaries to 
faed and clothe not only those up- 
on the farm hut all thereat. The 
farms are the factories where all 
of- this is produced and the pop- 
ulation is increasing, the demand 
for produce is increasing, one 
short crop and then the rush for 
produce. 

Are you going to close. down 
the factories Mr. Farmer and not 
be prepared for the shortage? 
Now is the time to build up your 
land and Improve your output. 

You have plenty of feed, the 
ration is short on live stock and 
farm aid field seeds, and Unprov- 
ed soil will grow better yields ard 
finer stock 

The Dtrmer who <(uits now Will 
find next season that he made 
a mistake. Keep the factory going, 
grow a variety of stock and 
crops and t he world cannot cor- 
ner vou — Owe:t Co. Democrat. 



One may wish for a return of Kden. 
Wishing will not change the scheme of 
tbe universe. Men must sweat or dte. 
One may, at his pleasure, change the 
nature of his task. This Is a free coun- 
try. But toll he must If he would live. 
In sweat Is salvation from all eco- 
nomic tils. There 'Is no other.-Tlie 
Saturday Evening Post 




_.■■ w« -n-n-aTaT WITH MO I 

DR. N. F. PENN,6i3 Madison Ave 



Our constantly increasing business 
proves conclusively that "Best Quaiity 
at Fair Prices" will win. "We test each 
carefally by the latest and most accu- 
rate methods and grind lenses to ex- 
actly suit you. 

Phone South 1746 

MOTCH, Jeweler. 

Covington. Ky 



"K3Kx?scsxs:cs:iKXS2Kxs:Kxsa; 

Why Worry? 

We know the price of Tires has gone sky high 



ry? 



But why wor 
B your old Tires liftlf soled and they will be bet 



ter than "new "ones because they are guarnteed puncture proof fo* 
3,500 miles and they only cost one-half as much. 
This tite bargain can only be had at 

The Conry Rubber Co. 



34 Pike Street, 



Covington, Ky 



WINTER GOODIES. 



KK^^KXgcacaicacg&gKSK: 








• * 

♦ FLOKEN'CE. ♦ 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ I ♦ ♦ 

Robert Moore and Connor car- i ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 
roll have moved to this village.! Mis'- Christina Henaker has rp- 
They have an up-to-date store tamed after an extended trip in 

J. M. Baker and Mrs. Charle*! Tennessee and Virginia, her cousin, 
Melvin and little s'»n visited rela-j MisH Ina Renuker, 'if (ynthiana, 
ti\es in V'^n iugctm, Sunday. j returned with h -r for a short 

Miss Rose Krause and Miss Ka«' Vi s i t; 



lie 
ji.i 



BTuetA 

Bagby 



tie Binder were guestl of John 
Binder, Jr., Sunday 

Poke Hamilton is tl 
his daughter Mrs T 
near Inucjiendeii'i. 

Everett Judge, wife and 
Visited C E. Miller and wif< 
Burlington, Sunday. 

Chas. JttiMull Mill, i an d 
were guests of ttuii moth 
day lust week 

Jean Allphin entertaim I 
•young folks with a dance 
day night 

Mr Abdon ahipned a 
of tuuimj lu M 
Friday 

(hse Baker truefced a 

of tobMCeo tt> Fulinoull 
d«v. 

J (» Finnell inudt u 
trip to WaKon VVtKiue^J.' 

Itoee Kraue* jpedr 
trtu to the city ThuimJ.^ 
Berry ftheeee m am u hu*in<*« 
te «Uat iV«< geudvr 

returned trum ih. 
rrtdsr 



Mrs. A .1 
was talletl 



Kihy 
ll 



■family 

•r, iinr 

11,, 
Satin 



big load 

i, In i 

big load 

. \\ i lues 




Renuker, of Frankfort, 

here Sundav to the 

ifjiietiside of her son, G T Renaker, 

ifjwho is very si- - k 

Flora Alice- Millet ,ol Cincinnati, 
was the guest of bar parents, Mr. 
and Mrs Ceo U Miller, of price 

pike, re'vntly. 

Mrs. Anna Buyer ami daughter, 

of Brlanger, vera guests «d Bert 

lloier and f imily, Sunday 
lift .li hhi Coohj of Erlanger, was 

Ike guest oi ,l r Whiteon and 
tie, Monday 

Mild 1 1 il Eddjns e nlertnhied nev • 
erul id In i frtendi, Sunday after- 
noon 

J it 
i iliietl 
dai 

Ml» ivum 

In i brother, John 
111 

U in 

itaiUug lit. ' 

Ihi^f Will Im> i.ivailUiil 



New tomes from Iwejtingloih. 
Va, that Owen B, (Pete) Hisle, tM 
Richmond, a student in setnior 
law class of Washington and Lee 
(.Diversity, was elected caj»tainof 
the Oenerals' 1921 base ball team 
at the last meeting of the base 
hall monogram men. "Pete," as he 
is known in college* played thira 
base on the 'varsity team Inst 
spring and in considered one of 
the beat third basemen Washing- 
ton and Lee ever had. Hisle is do- 
ing fine work jn the law «chool 
aa well as in baee ball and is 
very popular among hia fellofw 
fttudeiits — Richmond Register 



V\ lotHoli and 
Me.* Bthel M 



wife antei 
irqulaa, Hun- 



ts I he 

Huim 



Koct of 
anil dim 



The tobacco sales at the Far- 
mers House, Walton, last Mtonday 
were the heat sales mado ain«» 
the opening. 93.030 pounds were 
offered, 1,0»0 pounds were reject- 
s4| leaving u net «al«» of 90,0i<) 
iponiitls, which brought gao.lW'i.fa, 
an average of *2s 12 Tin- sales 
at the old house last Huturday, 
Wees lower than tin* above uvor- 
age, hot a vrry inferior lot of 
tobaCeO was offrred ToUueeu is 
brlRftng jilgh'-r prie*.» ..ver th«' 
two wnrehoiUM* flOOrt at Wtdton 
than 't ui\ othei place In I he 
Htat \ 



IS«^* will l* pre4t-|tlng at 
M B ehuroK Bunday nlgkl. 



• Is vera printed In (l| i* " f 

healer, is (tea la*t w«rk do t'haa Maiurer, 

Itonaker aanouuK-ing him *• • candidate far 

lb* Bkortfr st 4h# Augaat l*B» P«* 

'mary 



Cakes and cookies which will keep, 
are In great demand during the win- 
ter months. The 
following are a 
few of the good 
ones : 

Molasses Drop 
Cookies. — Take 
one-half oupf at of 
butter, otie-hnlf 
cupful of Bumir, 
one half cupful of molasses, one-half 
cupful of sour milk, one egg, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, two cupfuls of flour, 
one-half cupful of raisins or currants, 
and cinnamon, nutmeg and ginfcer for 
spices. Mix and set away to bake the 
following day.' Drop by spoonfuls on 
baking sheets and bake In a quick 

oven. 

Date Cake.— Take on«* cupful each 
of sugar and dates, one egg, one cup- 
ful of boiling water, one toasptx.nful 
-of-soda,- two tnblespo onfuls of buttei 
one and'"twt»-tnlro8~cnTJfutB-tTf- 
one teu!*p»<>nfiil of baking powder, one 
teaspoonful of vanlHa. one-half cupful 
of walnut nieata- Pour the boiling 
water over the seeded dates, add the 
soda. Mix the other Ingredients as 
usual and bake In a sheet. Frost with 
one-half cupful of sour cream and ..ue 
half cupful of brown sugar boiled to- 
gether until creamy. A half-cupful of 
hickory-nut meats added to tbe frost- 
ing improve! It. and the nuts In the 
cake may be omitted when they are 
useti In the frosting. 

8plce Nut Bars.— Take four egg" 
two cupfuls of sdgur, one cupful of 
molasses, one pound of blanched and 
chopped almonds, one cupful of fruit 
Jam four cupfuls of flour, four ten- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, one-half 
teaspoonful of salt, one-fourth tea 
npnonfnl each of cloves, allspice, (rin 
ger, nutmeg ami cinnamon ; the grate-: 
rind of one lemon, one orange ami M ■ 
•ouar« of limited chocolate. Mil 'n 
gradients In ths order glvmi snd jw.ur 
Inta a |wper-lln*<. dripping pan. Rake 
In a mode-rule <»ven »« minute*. Re 
„■•.,«• fn.m •»■• pan and ftllM *h»n 
enoi in Bngee-artH "irtf. *<*-<■ w 
a ttahl thi has 



,^^*@j mm^^&%&&^&?^-& «5«-gaj 

A Vault That Can Not Be Robbed. \\ 

If you live within 125 mile9 of || 
Cincinnati you are interested in 
the wonderful Safety Deposit 
Vault at Fourth and Vine Sts., 
built by The Central Trust Co. 
and guaranteed to be burglar, 
fire, mob and storm proof. It 
sets in a hole in the ground, 50 
feet deep and is lined with steel 
rails set in glass slag. It is 
guarded night and day. It con- 
tains securities worth millions 
of dollars in the Safest Place in 
the country. 

Don't Keep Your Valuables Where They Can be Stolen. 

Out of town persons can afford to patronize our' vault. A box, with 
complete privacy, a. low ia $3 a year. Write u. for particulars. Farm* 
ers, Dairymen, Tobacco Growers, Market Gardeners, etc.. this should in- 
terest you. 

Trust Compary 

Fourth and Vine St*., CINCINNATI, OHIO. 






Erlanger Garage 

WALTON DEMPSEY, Prop. 

Repair Work Absolutely Guaranteed. 

EXPERT MECHANICS 
Full Line of Ford parts, Tires, Tubes 



and Accessories. 
F. W. PEMPSEY, 






jsjbj f. VV . J-fJ2<W**~ wjii* * , jiiii i> 1 1 . " o ' **" 



.TIujuc 7vw**^ 



Iff act of Wrong Books. 
Soma wroug food at the right mo- 
ment, at every mother knowa, may 
aeod • child Into convuffeloiie Ths 
wrong book at the right time doeaot 
have even an immediately apparent ef- 
fect, hat It may later be the cause of 
a mental convulsion which Will eerv* 



tnough Said, 
yreauently a question contulna Its 
own answer. Huch a question was the 
ens put recently by a Kansas young 
woman who had failed, to qualify for 
a pealtlen as teacher. Fecllog that 
aha bed not been considerately dealt 
ith, she wrote: "I think I am an* 

of 



• menial convulsion wn.cn w . . -.£ ^ egclaniatloo of wh, I 

ensly war the child's whole Ufa, says j^ tayway.--Beste» Trtoscrtpt 

I Metkers* Magaslee. A ""** V 1 *^ 9 " *"""• rao«rnp«. 



-L_ 



* I 



*> 



A 



i 



H 



a* TJ 



7* 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



V6I. XXXXVI 



Established 1Q75 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THUR8DAY .FEBUARY 3, 1921 



$1.50fer\ear 



No 18 



m 



I I i I I ' - i ■ • , . . . r I | ] 

Have you ever taken not© of 
the smile of a homely girl? We 
have in mind a woman whose 
•mile always remind* us of a 
faftat of sunshine in the midst of 
an. April storm, for there ia some- 
thing in her smile that brightens 
her face and changes it complete- 
ly. It 'is character. The woman 
to not pretty ; in fact she would 
be considered downright -homely 
fay many, but when she smiles her 
homllneas become s insignificant. 
Ood seldom gives all to some and 
liothing to others. There is nor- 
mally a fsir distribution of. His 
favors, though wo may not be 
able to see the wisdtVw of Hie 
a. The homely girl is invar- 
endowed with a character of 
goia, and beauty of soul ia far 

J;reater than that of all other 
eat urea combined. 



U. S. STATES APPROV- 
ES MAD PBO JECT 

Federal AM Hiahways Would 

Connect Lonleville With 

Many Parts of Stito. 



/ 



Steps looking to the boosting 
of the dairy business in Carroll 
county as a money maker, in- 
stead of raising tobacco, are un- 
der way. Farmers have been offer- 
ed the vuae of space in the ice 
plant for storing dairy products, 
and a railroad agent has promis- 
ed to send a truck into different 
parts ipf the county twice a 
week to gather up milk and 
cream. An association of dairymen 
is being organized under the a«- 
rection of" J. O. Barkman, dairy 
specialist from the College of Ag- 
riculture. The organization of the 
association is expected to be com 
pleted about March 1. 

Farmers in thiB County lost con 
siderable money on their tobacco 
this year, and many are planning 
to eliminate it completely from 



their system 
ed. 



of crops, it is stat- 






Altho February is the shortest 
month in the year It has two. 
very important holidays. They 
are events of .general interest, 
February 12th is Lincoln's birth- 
day, and on the 22nd Wash- 
ington's birthday. Two other im- 
portant days of the month are arc 
on the 2nd when the appearance 
of the Ground Hog wili settle 
the question as -to whether . we 
will have an early or late spring; 
the 14th is St. Valentine's day— a 
pleasing occasion which inspires 
romance in the young and awak- 
ens it in the old. While there are 
only twenty-eight days in the 

_ month— four Sundays and two na- 
tional holidays— there will be but 

"^twenty-one walking days. The 
13th will be the first Sunday in 
Lent. > 

. Lucy Clore Huey died at her 
home in Plymouth, 111., last Fri- 
day. She was the daughter of BenJ. 
Clore. She was born near Bullitts- 
- ville, this county. She was twice 
married, George Walton being her 
I first husband, and after his death 
' she was married tp Mr. 
Huey. She Is survived by her hus- 
band, two sisters, Mrs. Wm. Hed- 
fea and Mrs. Ezekiel Rice and two 
rothers, Yancey Clore and Cave 
Clore, to mourn her loss. Burial 
at Bullittsburg last Monday. 



While the eastward extension 
of the Ohio River Road from 
Louisville to Milton acJ the 
Richmoud-Hardyvllle project were 
disapproved by the Federal Bu- 
reau of Highways because they 
parallel Federal aid projects al- 
ready under cortract or oonetruc- 
tior, the department approved 
other projects that, whet> com- 
pleted, will connect the Purchase 
with the Sandy Valley by direct 
route and make Louisville the cen 
ter of a system reaching nearly 
every section of Kentucky. 

The mountain road from Mount 
Sterling thru Frenchburg, Menifee 
county; West Liberty, Morgan 
county, and Salversville, Magonin 
county, to Paintsville in the San- 
dy Valley opens up an isolated ter 
ritory and affords a direct route 
from the Sandy Valley to Louis- 
ville, where it connects with the 
Ohio River project to the Pur- 
chase and the Jackson and Dtxi2 
High w lays south. , 

The Louisville-Milton project, 
the department said, parallels a 
Federal aid projects on the In- 
diana side of the river and would 
be a duplication of expense 

The same objection was raise.i 
to the RichmoTid-Hardyville pro- 
ject, which would have connect- 
ed the Eastern Dixie with the 
Jackson Highway in Hart county. 

There will be a great disap- 

§ ointment over this rejection, it is 
elieved, because the money was 
raised and the proponents of tho 
road were the first in the Stare 
to offer contribution;* to meet Fed 
era! aid. A large delegation went 
to Frankfort to. confer with Gov. 
Edwin P. Morrow about it. They 
were willing to undertake the 
project, asking the State only to 
improve the road with a -hard 
surface as soon as funds were 
available. 

The Federal bureau, however, 
has consistently held to the pol- 
icy of aiding only thru routes and 
insisting upon the completion thru 
out of projects already under- 
taken before new ones are com- 
menced. 



foe European Rf lief . 

David Wark Griffith, who la do- 
ing Ma bit with the moving pic- 
ture peof* In the interest of the 
European Relief Council partici- 
pates in tho special matinee on 
Saturday/ Jan. «»th with fifteen 
MOductTona of his new photoplay, 
"Way Down Bast.'' In some cities 
there will be two performance* of 
the Griffith Play instead of one 

(riven aa a benefit for the starv- 
ng children of Buropey tne total 
proceed* **»«"; iflrarated. 
■Mir. Griffith who ia a Ken* 
tuckian expected to be in Louis- 
ville [for the opening of "Way 
Down East'' at Macauleys this 
week but failing to keep this en- 

fragement has sent word that he 
s cooperating with the European 
Belief Council and with Mr. Hoo- 
ver with the' deepest interest 
and hope that every 4tentuckian 
who is able is sharing in the 
cost '..of saving these little Eur- 
opeans lives. 

A check for $10.00 or more to 
Richard Bean, Kentucky Treasur- 
er, addressed to any bark in 
Kentucky will make the donor a 
member of the Invisible Guest 
Club snd will bring a certificate 
signed by Herbert Hoover, chair- 
man. 



OPTOMISTIC OUTLOOK 
FOR FARMERS HELD 

Organization Dioouosod at A 

Mooting of County Agents 

Of State. 



To Tobaoeo Growers. 



■'♦* 



Some crops of tobacco are sell- 
ing ao low on the markets of the 
State that it takes 500 pounds of 
the Weed to pay the growers ex- 
panses, (over night in the town 
„*here he sells nis tobacco. It is 
^a common ' occurance for crops t^ 
sell for less than the, floor char- 
ges, and in this case the farmer 
had better have a little of "ma- 
ma's'' egg and chicken money in 
his jeans if he wants to stay in 
town over night. 

In renewing his subscription to 
the Recorder, Dr. W. O. Rouse, of 
St. Petersburg, Florida, says: 

"We are having fine weather 
this winter and lots of tourists; 
property selling all the time anu 
mom building going on than ever 
before. We have Weber's band 
from Cincinnati, playing two cou- 
oerts each day in the park— free 
for the entertainment of our vis- 
itors, and they turn out well to 
hear them." 



A number of agents for various 
fire insurance companies in this 

state have received instructions 

from their home offices to im- 
mediately cancel all outstanding 
policies covering tobacco in barns 
and lalso liability on tobacco 
barn buildings. The action is tak- 
en, according to instructions, ow- 
ing to the unsettled conditions of 
the tobacco marke.s ■ and the 
large number of losses off tobacco {'would 
in narns. 

—■ — ; nr 

Up to and including last Satur- 
day the county olerk had collect- 
ed from automobiles and - trucks 
owned by Boone county citizens 

J 13,6*4.28. He bad also issued 838 
og licenses out of about 1300 aa 
shown listed .by the Tax Com- 
missioner. 



W R. Feldhaus, of Big Eons, 
was a business visitor to Bur- 
lington, last Friday, and called at 
this office and enlisted for a 
year with the Recorders reading 
circle. We are pleased to have 
Mr. Feldhaus as one of our read- 
em 



Your industry needs yous assist- 
ance, you undoubtedly know that, 
as, unorganised producers, you can 
rot compete against highly organ- 
ized capital. No markets-are get- 
ting you anything near what it 
cost you to produce last year's 
tobacco. Buyers have utterly fail- 
ed to make, you a satisfactory 
market, so why insist on trying to 
sell something for which there is 
no market? 

Your organization needs a Cap- 
tain in each school district in the 
county in order that we can 
make a thorough canvas, and thai 
'ho one be overlooked. Remember 
you have an organisation of Bur- 
ley Tobacco Producers. Article 
111 of your corporation reads as 
follows : 

The nature of the business ' and 
objects, and purposes proposed to 
be transacted, promoted and car- 
ried on are aa follows: 

The growing, manufacturers, per 
servation, drying, storing, hand- 
ling, utilizing, marketing and buy- 
ing and selling of Burley tobacco, 
and acting as agents for growers 
of Burley tobacco and as agents 
in buying and selling and hand- 
ling Burley tobacco and to encour 
age better and more economical 
methods of production to pro- 
mote a co-operative spirit, to in- 
vestigate and report methods of 
decreasing, cost of production, to 
so advise growers and members as 
to quantities of tobacco or to- 
bacco products to. be handled, that 
there may be an adequate supply 
of those products at all times for 
the consumer. 

The organization is made up of 
Farmers only, and we are willing 
to abide by the will of the peo- 
ple, and," for that reason we are 
anxious to encourage county op- 
eration. The organization is not 
for profit, we have no capital 
stock. 

To those who have canvassed 
their districts and have .unsigned 
pledges on their possession f 
suggest - t ha t th e y r e tu r n 
them to me in care of 'Boone Co. 
Farm Bureau, as our supply of 
blanks is not large, and those Want 
Ing pledges can get them there. 
I would further suggest that 
there be a Mass Meeting of Bur- 
ley Producers at Burlington on 
Saturday, Feb. 5th at 12 o'clock, 
noon, for business purposes, and 
we expect you all to attend. Re- 
member this is your fight and un- 
less you exert yourself the enemy 
will win. This ia the time for 
serious thought and instant ac- 
tion. Should there be any pre- 
cincts In which I cou^d be of ser- 
vice I will be glad to do all 1 
can. C G HEMpFLING, 

Chairman Pro Tern, 



TRAVELINGUBRARIES 

Boosts Ready For Any Group of 
People in Any Part 
Of the State. 

The Kentucky Library Commis- 
sion has, some new Traveling Li- 
braries and ia ready to send 
them to any group of people any- 
where in the State who wants 
books \jto read. These may be had' 
by writing to the Commission at 
Frankfort. The libraries are sent 
out in cases, fifty volumes in a 
case, and may be kept for six 
months. The only cost is $2.00 to 
cover shipping costs. Stories, 
books of travel, history, children^ 
books, are some of the subjects 
covered. Some libraries are mad? 
up entirely for children's use in 
the schools. Any teacher can get 
one. There are also Boy Scout li- 
braries and Farmers libraries. Tho 
latter contain fifteen books and 
may be borrowed in addition to a 
general library of fifty volumes. 
The State furnishes these books 
for the education and recreation 
of its citizens. 

Books are being written to help 
in almost any business, trade oi 
profession. The Kentucky Library 
Commission has many of these 
and lerds ..them to any one in the 
State -wishing to use them. The 
collection ir eludes books on the 
following and many other sub- 
jects: 

Automobile Repairing. 

Carpentering. 

Dry Cleaning. 

Electric Railway and Engineer- 
ing. 

Farming 

House Planning. 
'Oil and Coal Mining. 

Retail Buying and Selling. 

Road Building. 

Salesmanship. 

Sign Painting. V 

Steam and Gas Engines. 

These may be borrowed by writ- 
ing the Kentucky Library Commis 
sion at Frankfort. The only ex- 
pense is cost of postage. 



Lexington, Ky.— In speaking be- 
fore the opening meeting of the 
conference Of Kentucky's sixty- 
seven county fsrm agents at the 
State College, of Agriculture last 
Thursday, Thomas P. Cooper of 
the college, declared that in spite 
of the apparently depressing con- 
ditions there were many factors 
which should , cause farmers to be 
•ptimistic /in their outlook on 
another year. 

Many things, he said, indicate 
that prices for farm products are 
more likely 'to go up than down, 
labor will be more plentiful ana 
legislative measures will have a 
tendency to benefit the farmer, all 
of which, he said, should he of 
direct benefit to farmers of the 
State. ' 

Other things, such as a de- 
crease, .in ocean freight rates anu 
the return to normal conditions 
in the near future, were pointed 
out as favoring agricultural inter- 
ests in Kentucky. 

In speaking of the period of re- 
adjustment on the farm the speak 
er emphasized the importance of 
farmers speedily returning to a 
sound conservative basis of busi- 
ness, which, he said, included the 
curtailment of nonJ-essential crops, 
the practice of greater thrift and 
the promotion of such projects as 
dairying and poultry. \ 

In closing, the speaker made a 
plea for farmers of the State to 
"live k>ff their farms" in a 
greater measure than they had 
in the past. 

Lucius E. Wilson, vice president 
of the American Cities Bureau, 
Chicago, pointed out the necessity 
of farmers organizing and the reas 
onablo cost of such .v movement. 

Octogenarian 

Celebrates Birthday With Rela- 
tives and Friends-Receiv- 
es Many "Presents. 



-» Farm Bureau Motes. 

The Farm Bureau Headquarters 
was kept busy last week— taking 
-and filling orders for the farmers 
from different parts of the coun- 
ty, and kept Mr. George Penn, 
president and manager, on the 
hustle. During the week two car 
loads of feed and about 400 bush- 
els of grass seed were received 
and distributed among the far- 
mers from various parts of the 
county at a great saving in cost. 
Quite a number of new members 
were added to the list, while 
a great many of the old members 
were in and paid up their dues for 
another year. When the farmers 
realize the benefits to be derived 
from the Bureau the membership 
will gradually increase. The far- 
mers, as a class, are from Mis- 
souri— "have to be shown." 
+** 



MUST PAY INCOME 

TAX ON BONUSES 

Sifts to Employees Not Deduct- 
ible from Employers' Re- 
Returns. 



Only single persons whoso net 
income for 1920 was less than $1,- 
000 and married persons liv- 
ing with husband or wife whose 
net income was less than 2&OO0 
are exempt from the requirement 
to file an income tax return. 

The obligation to consider his 
own., case and to file an income 
tax return on time, if one is due, 
is laid equarely on the shoulders 
of every resident of the United 
States. Guesswork is barred. The 



The Farm Bureau is laving plans returns are sworn statements, and 
to inaugurate a membership drive accuracy is essential. Salaried per- 
Borne time during this month sons and wage earners, must as 
prominent speakers will visit f certain the actual compensation 



and 

every precinct in the county. 
Their slogan will be "1,030 mem- 
bers during 1921." 



Another order for two car 
loads of feed and grass seed has 
been sent out, which is expected 
to arrive at headquarters this 
week. 

++* 

Quite a number of farmers left 
orders lest week for -clover ana 
alfalfa hay. 

*++ 

Those farmers who are buying 
their clover «/ed thru the Farm 
Bureau are saving $2.50 on the 
bushel. What others have done 
you can do by joining the Farm 
Bureau. 

Stay At Homo 



in 



Income Tax Returns Must Be 
Filed Before March 15th. 

All single pdrsons, or married 
persons not living with wife or 
husband, jrhoee net Income for 
the year 1920 was $1,000 or more, 
and married persons living with 
wife or husband Dec. 31st, 1920, 
whose net income was $2,000 or 
more, must file an income tax 
return. To assist taxpayers a de- 
puty collector of Internal Revenue 
will be at, the Covington Postof- 
fice building every day, and at the 
court house in Burlington Feb. 18 
and 19th. ■ 

Famous Hen Starts Fifth Lap 

Of Laying. 

/ Lexington, Ky. — Lady Walnut 
Hill, the famous White Leghorn 
hen owned by the State College of 
Agriculture started her fifth year 
of laying recently when she laid 
her 811th egg. The famous hen 
went into a moult Oct. 28th af- 
ter laying 154 eggs during 1920. 



She holdi one world's record in | »»-*• u *h^ i-*«p .-«» ^fK 
agg--iaiu^ J^lng_ jirflOaSfidOtJ ""'ff ot^ Tc ^htS SJSfe 
era* in 94 consecutive davs The T 11 !™*^ * 7% oldcn . <I *** k 



January 22nd was a galaday for 
the Rev. W. F. F, Smithy the" re- 
tired Methodist minister" living 
in our city of Rising Sun, Ind.lt 
was the occasion of his birthday 
and Mrs. Smith invited a few of 
his friends -, to celebrate wfth him 
and her, and to rejoice with 
them lover the Good Providence 
of Their Heavenly Father in spar- 
ing him to round out eighty well- 
spent years. "Under the guiding 
hand of that same Divine Parent 
those years have been fully en- 
joyed, {and notwithstanding the 
shadows that have fallen across 
the pathway he was able to de- 
clare to his company that he had 
been growing younger for eighty 
years,* and that he was now under 
the spell of Eternal Youth was 
evider.t to all. At the noon hour 
Mrs. Smith sat his visitors dowr 
to dine with him and break bread 
with him at a meal sumptuous in 
its extent, and aa savory as a 
feast set to the gods of ancient 
times. When the guests were 
reassembled in the living room, a 
chair which ftad been covertly 
placed in the house by Steel's 
Furniture Co., while all were at 
the table, was presented by H. 
B. Sparks to Rev. Smith in well 
chosen- ai.d eloquent words in be- 
half of all therein assembled. Oth 
er presents were showered upon 
him by friends from far and, near 
until he was in the midst of a 
veritable deluge of Friendship's 
tokens. The afternoon was spent 
in a social way with reminiscent 
stories, songs and speeches. The 
foremost address of all was the 
reply of Rev. Smith to the pre- 
sentation speech of Mr. Sparks. 
It was full of optimism" and ap- 
preciation; he paid to Rising Sun 
a very high compliment when he 
spoke of it as the one place af- 
ter all his travels that nave cov 
ered the entire world, where he 
hoped to live until his death and 
be nuried in its soiL "Another fea- 
ture that intensified the pleasure 
of the day was the song and 
music by Rev. Smith and ML L. 

the 



Don't go to the i big cities 
search of , fortune. The rent hogs 
wiU eat you up. Owners of large 
city houses and department build- 
ings have developed into the 
f reediest blood suckers the world 
as evex_known. Apartments that 
rented for $10 and $45 a month a 
year ago are now $75 and $100. By 
moving time, May 1, they will 
probably be given another boost. 
If you go from . the country to 
the city you must rent a room 
and take your meals at restaur- 
ants, or pay a small fortune for 
hotel accommodations. If you 
rent a room the rent will be 
in proportion to the amount the 
people pay for the apartment. 
Your meals will be equally high, 
and by the time oyu have cough 
ed up to these two tunes you 
will not have muchrleft regardless 
of the high wages offered! The 
rent hogs area ol patisfied with 
their pound of flesh. They want 
the whole carcass and at the rate 
they are going they will soon have 
it devoured. This is a good town 
in which to live, and there are 
no pounds of flesh or whole car- 
casses exacted. The same spplies 
to our farms. Stay at home and 
prosper. 



THIRD LYCEUM COURSE 

Attended by Good Siie Crowd 

and Was Highly Pleased 

With tho Program. 



eggs in M consecutive days, 
record was made in her 
year. 



The 
pullet 



There will be 



of 



a meeting 
Boone Post, American Legion, on 
Tuesday night, FebV 8th, at head- 
quarters in Burlington. All mem- 
bit* are requested to be present 
Lunch will be served after the 
masting 



The 19X0 rsglstratlon by the V. 

• utoaaohlles In use Iptha different 
•sates. New Ysrk «•**• with ft**, 
in in tho Stats of Kentucky 
are lit,!*. 



Twenty Five Harsas Burn 
$20,000 Fire. 

Twenty-five horses burned 
death and three barns and 
dw elling house were burned 
WHmere, Bar. The blast 
from an unknown m 
l» sbsut fco.ODO. The 
I .iMgtjd to 
ton, anil 
mors. A 
heavy sa«w 



In 



to 
t1 f 




STwIt 

> ana 
llt-mss, 



The Women's Auxiliary Unll of 
Boone Post No. 4, American Le- 
gion, will meet Tuesday, Feb. 8th, 
at 8 p. m., at Burlington. Mutters 
of vast importance to the organ- 
ization will be discussal at this 
meeting, 'neceesitattng therefore 
the presence' "of every member. 
Come all and bring a new member 
with you. All Legionalres are ear- 
nestly requested to see that tho 
members of their families attend 
this meeting 

RUTH M. KELLY, prea. 



At the regular meeting of the 
Fiscal Court last Monday T. J. 
Jump was elected Road Commis- 
sioner for the coming term. Mr. 
Jump will take his new position 
February 1st The position of roaa 
Commissioner carries with It a sal- 
ary of $1,200 per year. Mr. Jump 
Was road commissioner here a 
good manv years ago s:id was re- 
garded as an sf flclent man for th» 
Job For the past several yearn 
h* has bean snangsd In road work 
in Boons and Gallatin counties.— 
Grant County News. 



-Th*4-tron of 
Little Bound Jug, and other songs 
that helped in the round of 
merry-making and devotions of 
former years. Rev. and Mrs. Smith 
have now set out with an in- 
tense eagerness to cover a little 
| more than one year that they may 
i celebrate their Golden Wedding 
| Anniversary. It ia the fervent 
wish of their friends that they 
I may Inot only win out in their 
desire, but bve on till their Dia- 
mond Celebration and then some 
more. * 

Those present were Rev. an1 
Mrs. W F. F, Smith, Rev. and Mrs, 
Thos J. Hart, Mr. and Mrs M. L, 
Harris, Mrs John Hamilton and 
her mother Mra. North, Mrs. Lauri 
North, Mrs. D. T. Biggs and son 
George, Major snd Mrs. H H. 
Sparks, Mrs. Isadora Flak and Mrs 
Jane Barricklow. 



In presenting the third num- 
ber of the Lyceum CouTse, which 
is being provided for the folks of 
this community this winter thru 
the efforts of Principal B. A. 
Skillman, the Aeolian Company on 
last Wednesday night, Jan. 26th, 
was highly successful in uphold- 
ing the high standard which had 
been set by the preceding perform 
ances. The cast of the company 
was composed of three pretty and 
accomplished girls, each an artist 
in her line, and they rendered u 
program replete with musical num 
bers, both vocal and instrumental 
In the matter of singing^ tho 
work of the soloist was excep- 
tionally fino while the duet and 
trio renditions were exquisitely- 
harmonious and pleasing to the 
ear. Lovers of the instrumental 
were accorded full measure in the 
diversified program which includ- 
ed vietin, piano and Hawaiian gui 
tar solo selections with several 
beautiful concert numbers employ- 
ing those instruments. There were 
no duU moments in the evening's 
entertainment and an otherwise 
"enjoyable performance was 
brought to a picturesque and 
pleasing finish bv the prrsenta- 
"An Old-Fashioned -Gar-? 
den," a setection taken from the 
famous musical comedv success of 
1920, "Hitchy Koo" 

It would appear that Prinsipal 
Skillman is entitled to a great 
deal of commendation for the ear- 
nest efforts he has made since en- 
tering upon his duties here to 
promote the interests of the lo "il 
school and maintain them upon a 
high level. The matter of securing 
the Lyceum Course for the pupils 
and people of this vicinity inonly 
one of the several notable im- 
provements which he has effect- 
ed thru hie management, the suc- 
cessful results of which will lw? 
highly noticeable at the termina- 
tion of his first year of servirr 



visit f certain 

received. Bonuses, shares in tha 
profits of a business, Values of 
Guarters and board furnished, by 
an employer, and other items of 
compensation for services must be 
included. 

Returns must show both gross 
and net income. Gross income in- 
cludes practically every dollar re- 
ceived by the taxpayer duringthe 
year 1920. The net income is de- 
termined by subtracting from the 
gross income certain deductions 
specified by the revenue law, and 
fully explained in instructions on 
forms 10W-A and 10(0 for filing re-y 
turns. 

Business expenses are the prin- 
cipal allowable deductions in com 
puting net income. The law spec- 
ifically prohibits the "deduction of 
household and living expenses. 
Typical deductible business expen- 
ses are for salaries, labor, cost of 
merchandise, raw materials ana 
supplies, rent, repairs, light, pow- 
er, delivery, selling cost, advertis 
ing, and insurance. Doctors, law- 
yers, and like professional men 
may deduct from -their gross in- 
come dues paid to professional so- 
cieties ana subscriptions to pro- 
fessional journals, rent paid for 
offices, amounts paid for light, 
fuel, water and telephone useo? 
in such * of fices, and the wages 
paid to office assistants. 

This year, as last, the tax may 
be paid in full at the time of 
filling the return, on or before 
March 15, 1921, or in four install- 
ments, the first of which is due. 
on or before March 15, the second 
on or before June 15, the third 
"on or before September 15, and 
the fourth on or before December 
15. 

The return must he fUed__with 
the collector of internal revenue 
for the district in which the tax- 
payer lives. Heavy penalties are 
provided for failure or willful re- 
fusal to make a return and pay 
the tax when due. 

Bill HohenzoUern is saying noth 
ing and sawing wood. But he'd be 
yelling bis head off at the size 
of your 19*20 income tsx if he were 
doing the collecting. 

Receipt for an income tax en- 
titles a man to talk about "our 
part in the war.*> The coat in 
dollars is yet to be me*. ' 

If the war had not been won 
in 1918, what would have been 
your income tax for 1920? Pay it 
with thankfulness. 

Remember the war cost billions. 
Your income tax for 1920 helps to 
defray part of it. 

Not all of ua can be heroes, hut 
all of us can be patriots. Pay- 
ment of your income tax helps to 
make you one. 

Be thankful you are paying an 
income tax^ to Uncle Sam and not 
an indemnity to William Hohen- 
zoUern. 



Sixty nine applicants for Com- 
mon School diplomas were <><c- 
•ralned by tha County examiners 
last Friday and Saturday Scholars 
from all except eight schools m 
the county w©r« present The ex- 
amination was held in the nigh 
school building, two room* hsv- 
to dlnmtas to acoammodatn 
Applicant** 



tB 



Liqaor Penalties $104,072 lo 
Honth. It StHls Seized. 



Activities »f Federal prohibition 
officsrs la Ken took y during Ue- 
ccmber resulted in aesesaatosats 
and penalties amounting to lt#V 
67* being placed against liquor 
violators, according to n report 
hint made public By 8 R Brans, 
Prohibition Oonmiaalo ter of tha 
BouUern DlstrioL 



River Improving To Go On 

It was learned that the Ohio 
river improvement work will not 
be stopped during the next fiscal 
year, even though the House Re- 
publican leaders succeed in their 
plan to substitute for a regular 
river and harbor bill the proposr 
ed appropriation of a lump sum of 
$15,000,000 for all river and harbor 
work in the United States and its 
possessions, the allotments for 
specific projects to be made from 
this sum by the army engineera. 

On making inquiry of Gen. L&hs> 
ing H. Beach, chief of errjtneerer 
found that there is still on hand 
from last year's appropriation the 
sum of $4,527,269.40 which is avail- 
able for lock and dam construc- 
tion work on the Ohio river. Of 
this --amount- $2,555,097 iHrft- w o r k 
under contract, and the balance 
of $1,971,171.81 is not under eon- 
tract. 

If Congress provides no more 
than $15,000,000 for the Ohio river 
during the next fiscal year, that 
amount, together with the left- 
over balance of $4,a*7,a«9.40, will 
be sufficient to keen the work 
moving. Inasmuch tbe lump sum 
plan contemplates Ad allotment 
ment of at least $1,000,009. and 
perhaps $1,600,000 for the Ohio 
river. There is no reason why the 
friends of the Ohio river should 
worry, 

DM't Complain. 

Don't kick because yon have to 
button your wife's wui-j.. Be glao 
your wife has a waist and doub- 
ly glad 'you In vi' a wifeto but- 
ton a waist for. Some men's wh 
hays no waists to im'ton. 
mens wives' waists have no 
tpnf fen to button Some 
alyns who have waists with 
tons on to button dont eat* 
continental whether they are 
toned lor not. Some 
have any wlvss with w»iats 
butts* oa to button 
• rabbit. 



wlyoo 

Solas 



nan 



Miu. 



-— >■ V ■ » ■'»■»■- 



r^r- 



- — e 



■ POHB COUNTY 11COKD11 



rrr»i ■: ■ i ■ r 1 1 i i i* r f m 



This Store has gained the Confidence of the People by its Pair and Square Methods- 
Whatever is advertised Everyone can take at its Pull Pace Value 



Men's Elk Hide Work Shoes, strictly solid leather. 
Big values— now 



$3.50 



Men's $6.50 Dark Brown Cordovan Calf English Dress 
Shoes. See these at 



$4.90 



Boys' $4.00 Gun Metal English style shoes-strictly 
solid leather ; 



$2.98 



Ladie's see our fine of new spring Oxfords — we 
have the popular styles !n black or brown at. . . 



$3.49*. 



nd 

up 



Here is a Big Special for a few days on Men's High 
Grade Overalls and Coats. The same kind you have 
been paying $2.50 for, in a heavy full size & 4 QP 



blue denim Overall at 



Men's $2.50 Fine Percale Dress Shirts in a big selection 
of pretty patterns, fast colors and all sizes. 
Sek these at 



Low prices alone has never been 
the main reason why so many 

Boone county people buy here as 

Low Prices alone mean nothing 
unless backed by^tiality and serv- 
ice. That is exactly what you get 
when buying here, only high-grade 
merchanriiscLalways at the 
LOWEST PRICE8 



u 



Black Cotton Ridded Hose for Boys and Girles 
in all sizes; 35c values, pair 



15c 



Ladies' 35c Cotton Lisle Hose in black or white, 
double toe and heel; per pair- • 



17c 




ERLANGER, KY 



Men's 25c Cotton Hose in brown or black- 
fine for everyday wear; per pair 



12c 



Ladies' Ribbed Medium Weight Vests or pants- 
all sizes. Special at 



49c 



Mercerized Poplin in Navy Blue, black, green and white, 
fine for dresses, skirts, etc., 27 inched wide. •JQj, 



Special per yard. 



Wear well Sheeting 2 1-4 yards wide, extra fine quality. CJ n 
75c value. Special per yard U*rv 



Dresses for girls from 6 to 14 years in Ginghams and 

Percales in beautiful styles and colors; &■% *)Q 

$2 and $2,50 values. Special J I .Zu 



$5 and $6 Woolnap Blankets in plaid designs, full 
size. Special per pair .....' 



$3.98 



* 



M. O. Martin and wife and Mrs 
Emma Brown spent Sunday with 
C. C. Roberta and family at Wal- 
ton. 



Floyd Kelly, of Waterloo neigh- 
borhood, was the guest of his un- 
cle, Elmer Kelly and wife, a few 
days last week. 



Esq. E. J,. Aylor and son, James, 
of Hebron, were in Walton, Mon- 
day, making arrangements to 
market their tobacco. 

James Puey, of Union, sold a 
Barred Rock cockerel one day last 
week for $Zb. Mr. Huey has a tit.© 
flock of Barred Rocks. 



l^> 



Mr. and Mrs. . Lee McNeely are 
occupying part of James Kellys 
house. .Having .moved from Dr. 
Yelton's residence last week. 




P. H. Rouse and wife entertain- 
ed, last Sunday, H. W. Rouse and 
wife, of Limaourg, Elmer Kelly 
and wife, and Floyd Kelly, ol near 
Waterloo. 

A. B. Renaker was called to Dry 
Ridge, Grant county, lasc Monday 
on account of the serious illness 
of his brother-in-law, Kobert Cbu- 
rad. Mr. Conrad died on Tuesday 
morning. 

E. Y. Randall of near Idle wild, 
was a business visitor to Burling- 
ton last Tuesday. While in town 
he called at tins ofxice and had 
his subscription moved up another 
r.otcn. 



A Crises Confronts Us. 
Organization The Only Salvation. 

>LD YOUR CROPS 



Right 



Edward Huey, of Plymouth, III., 
accompanied tne remains ol has 
aunt, i^ucy Clore Huey to Bullitts- 
burg for burial. Mr. Huey wall 
epeud a few days with relatives 
and friends in toe county before 
he returns to Plymouth. 

Lizzie McCarty, wife of Dan Mc- 
carty, oi BeBeview, died Aionaay 
morring in Cincinnati Mrs Mc- 
Carty was operated upon last we n k 
and a tumor weighing 17 pounds 
was removed from her abuomen 
oho is survived by her imsbauu 
and a number of relatives. 

The official method for prevent- 
ing or stopping the hiccoughs has 
been announceu by the Medical 
Society of French Hospitals 

u , "» the simplest thing in the 

U° r H^ EVen a „ ChUd «» operate 
it. Here is all there is to it as 

put by the .famous French doc- 
tors : 

i J^k ^ he - index lm « er °n the 
left subclav 1 eular hollow several 

n,!L W j 0alb r a ith, Jr, National 
Commander oi the American Le- 
gion, has just returned from an 
inspection of Legion posts in a 
number of Illinois cities. The itin- 
erary included Chicago, Hurmi- 
lield Decatur, Aurorl ' RockfoS 
and Mooseheart. At Splin Jfieki 
the National Commaaui * was" 
greeted by Gov. Len Small A 
Pilgrimage was made to Lincoln?- 

a wreath The National Comman- 
der also inspected several ESS* 
hospitals which lodge nteS 
of the World Wai g H. w a as a cf 
companied on the trip by Will 
iam R. McCauley, Department Com 
mander, and WiUiam Q Sethffe 
Department Adjutant. oexu,It -« 



1 Continuance of Sales Means Financial Hnin ol Ky. 

Shall we be a party to the destroying of the tobacco inter- 
est of Kentucky or will you confront the situation by hold- 
ing the remainder of the crop and cutting out the 1921 crop 
thereby becoming Master of the Situation. 

Burley Tobacco Producers. Inc. 



virtS?^^ the Uw lowing con- 

I^v fSM tate Pri ^° n » ^nts 
* ^5L_i or the,r w <>rk has been 

the e«ect°«! y ^ three W "S 
lAe effect already has been to 

te<*ease the volume and Quality 

of work turned out, according & 

2*S- i?°/ er, „ Supt » of the Ken- 
tucky State Reformatory "Fore- 

SSL'SPW 1 ^ 1 * the tractors. 
kav* stated that the law already 
IS having a good effect on thl 

SSlJ 1 ^ Vl. payin «L ,,ettw **■ 

teotWD to their work and the 
quality and puantity of the out- 
put *u*ady has been greatly In- 
creased. 

JJ^msa isalisa thit on their 
beaavlor and the quality q± thoir 
law much 



Ambrose Easton, of near Flor- 
ence, was a business visitor to 
the county seat, Tuesday, -and 
made this office a pleasant call 
and renewed his subscription for 
another year. He said he had 
been losing his hogs with cholera 
—eleven having died the last few 
days. Mr. Easton is one of the 
countyni best farmers. 

♦♦eee«eeee**+*eeeee«e*e**e 

♦ WOOLPBR HEIGHTS. ♦ 

Benj. Hewett and wife, of Cleves, 
Ohio, visited friends and relatives in 
this neighborhood from Friday un- 
til Monday. 

Wilfred Sullivan spent last Sun- 
day with his aunt, Mrs. Ed. Easton. 

Henry Seikman and wife visited 
at E. J. Aylor'a Sunday. 

Mrs. Steve Gaines and son, Wal- 
ter, visited Mrs. Lucy Cloud and 
family, l»st Thursday. 

•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦eeeeeeeeeee 

♦ HUME. t 

♦ ♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Seveaal in this community have 
colds. 

Mrs. Eliza RobdrtB is quite sick. 

♦ J «? 8 Allphin made a business trip 
to Walton Thursday. 

Several from here attended the 
dance at Big Rone Saturday night 
and reported a fine time. 

Harry and Jeff Roberts made a 
business trip to Walton Saturday. 

Miss Katie Binder was the guest 
of her father John Binder, Jr., Sun- 
dag afternoon. 



CUT OUT THE MIDDLEMAN. 

I Webuy from producer, only. Ws hare no agents, cream station buyers I 
J or other middlemen. £sch cream producer sends his ereem DIRECT to I 
| oer creamery. WE PAY THE SHIPPING COST. Every cent Is yours. 
Your cream and cans are guaranteed against loss by 

IThe Tri-Stato Butter Co 

Cash Capital $250,000.00 CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



The right start counts for a lot with chickens. 
Often it spells the difference between profitable 
success and expensive failure. Professor Harry 
R. Lewis, head of the New Jersey Poultry Ex- 
periment Station, will tell you how to get the 
right start in coming issues of 

TRe COUNTRY 
GENTLEMAN 

In a remarkable series of fifteen penetrating 
articles he will characterize, one by one, the 
major poultry breeds and will point the way 
to bigger profits with each. 



><* 



Free Trial 
Cans gladly 

furnished 

for 30 days 

if yon have 

no cans 



We Pay the Freight and 

48c 

per pound for butter-fat 
Week Jan. 31st to Feb. 6th inch 



Successful poultxymen say that 
Thb' Country Gkntlkm an 
)• more helpful to them than 
the exclusive poultry journals. 
In a single year it prints the 
equivalent of more than 650 
book pages on poultry alone— 
top-notch material, all of it, by 
tuch authorities at Victor O. 
Aubry, James Dryden and Ral- 



ston R. Hennas. And that to 
only one department of an all- 
round farm service that offers 
concrete help with every prob- 
lem of your farm business. A 
whole year of this service— 52 
great issues— costs but $1. If 
you send me your check or a dol- 
lar bill today, m see that your 
subscription starts neat week. 



50,000 cream producers in Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky ship their 
cream DIRECT to The Tri- State, which has been established since 
1910 with assets over a million dollar* and now bandies MORE 
CANS OF CREAM PER DAY TfU, ANf I _ZRY IN 
THE WORLD. Your check for every shipment by return mail 



You need it in your business 

Robert Clore 

Burlington, Ky. 

An aothorlasd sobserlptiea repr«—Uau»a of 
1 1eeUaWHsu»Jeanal TsaSatari 

" ' ■■■■ n .w m 



IV 



NEWS FROM INDIANA. 



«„ wa * »? eloudy Tuesday that no 
one could see whether the ground- 
SSLfcSS* °!l fc or n ot-fcherefor the 

?„« m J° r the . next Bix week » •■ »n 
unsettled queation. 



la* itok thlta taslrnsy to cut 
t» aa tow as Tlv» oanfiT • day >" 



Bobbins made their appearance in 
Burlington last Sunday. 



The jury in the case of the Com- 
monwealth against Dr. Wlnues for 
the, murder of Lura Parsons, has 
nad the case under submission for 
24 hours. The Jury had failed to 
reach a verdict up to the time we 
went to press Wednesday morning. 

New Us* for Weed Pulp Waste. 

By carrying « step farther the proo 

•Si of recovering sulphite spirit from 

ths waste of wood palp factories, by 

•vaporatJea, It has bass discovered 

ttManew and valuable fuel may be 

J^hwed. isys Popglar aCechanks 

MWoe. The process nrsdpitatee tas 

yj*^°*»« •* <*• lya la the fans 
ai powdered coal. 



Lawrenceburg Press. 
Dr. G. M. Terrill left Wednesday 
night for Chicago to attend a 
dental association and take a post 
graduate course of three days. 

The Fox slaughter house in 
Greendale, built thirty-two years 
ago by Mr. Nick Pox, owned later 
by the sons and recently sold to 
Franks Ludlow, was burned to 
the ground on Thursday of last 
weeks 

Frank Collier, age sixty-three, a 
stationary engineer, who died in a 
Cincinnati hospital, was burled in 
Petersburg cemetery on Monday 
A widow and four children aur- 
vive. 

Arthur Watson died at hie home 
on Arch etreet last Friday. Mr 
Watson was born in Boone coun- 
ty*, Ky„ March 4, 1856, and came 
to Lawrenceburg 12 years ago. 

NOTICE 

A meeting of the farmers in Iho 
Florence precinct will be held In 
Florence, Feb. 4th, at 7:80 p. ra 
All farmers should be present as 
ere of importance will be be- 



FOR SALE ETC. 

Lost— Black auto glove at High 
School building in Burlington or 
on road from Burlington to Un- 
ion. Finder please call Smith's 
store, Union, Ky. 



Efficient, Service and Economy 



IS MY SLOGAN 



C. SCOTT CHAMBERS 

Embalmerand Funeral Director 



WALTON, KENTUCKY. 



It 



SALESMAN WANTED to solicit 
orders for lubricating oils, greas- 
es and paints. Salary or commis- 
sion. Address THE TODD OIL & 
PAINT CO., Cleveland, Ohio. 



For Sale— No. 1 fresh Jersey cow 
six years old, with four weeks old 
calf by • her side. Robert Clore, 
Burlington, Ky. 



For Sale— Shetland pony, bay— 
C years old. gentle, sound. Also 
harness and runabout in rood 
conditton. W. V. Moore, Beaver 
L-lck, Ky. Consolidated phone Bea- 
ver. 201. 5feb-2t 



For Sale — Four year old Jersey 
cow with calf by her aide. Bd- 
ward Brady, Petersburg «. D. 



matters of import, 

fore this meeting 

CLEIT 



KENDAL 



Ufl 



uomaaTttssT - 
in Burlington, Tuesday afternoon 



NOTICE TO CHESTER WHITK 
BRREDERS.-AU breeder* inter- 
ested are urged to be present at 
next meeting st Burlington, Sat- 
urday, Feb 6th, at 1 p. nv 
O ROBERT CLOBB, 

SjHcfetary. 



Rev 



. Totalis preaehed to a fair 
son was enjoyed hy all present 




t 

4 



Poland 



Closin out sale at farmers prices— 9 Big- Sows. Bred and 
open guilts, 2 300-lb. Boars ; 5 60-lb. Guilts. 

W. M. BALSLY, - Burlington, Ky 

Rural Routs 3 



Take Your bounty Paper, tl.50. 

Seas Osr Aevertiacmenfs m* Prt.ni b« mem. 



V 






BOOWB COWfTT R1CORDBB 



)k 1 th^aJ^ricanprIs s^SSociation I 



Boont Co. Urthtran Ptstorttt 

Wbv. Gbo. A. Roybb, ^astob. 
9unday, February 8th 1W1 
Hebron, 9:80 a. m.. Sunday School* 
flBbene*er, 10.80 a.m. Fifth annlveria 
ry sermon. 
All are cordially Invited to these 
servicoa. 



Consider the postage atamp-Jt 
■ticks 4 to one thing until it gets 
there. 



best 
in 



<*k 



January waa one of the 
•winter months we have had 
years. 

Women with email feet may be 
said to be thankful for the lit- 
tle things. _ 

Howard Aylor, of the East Bend 
bottoms, was the guest of his un- 
tie, Ed. Rice and wife, one night 
last week. 



Hufthes, who has been in 
Jewish * Hospital, Cincinnati, 

home 



C. C. 
' the, J<~ - 

lor several days, returned 
last Thursday. 



Do you 

know 

why 

it s toasted 

To ««al In the 
uoiioious Buriey 
tobaooo flavor. 

LUCKY 

STRI KE 

CIGARETTE 



& Week's News. 

♦ 

Few persons are aware of the fact 
that the automatic machine was 
first used more than 2,000 years ago. 
Tts inventor waa Has, of Alexandria 
who flourished from 117 to 81 B. C. 
It was actually a slot machine, 
which in return for a coin of five 
drachms offered a cup of wins and 
was worked on similar lines to the 
modern slot machine. 



John D. McNeety of loWer Gun- 
powder, waa transacting business 
irT Burlington laat Saturday, and 
made the Recorder a pleasant call. 



No tobacco sales will be held 
at Walton until Thursday, Febru- 
ary 3rd, two of the buyers can 
not be present. Prices were lower 
the latter part of last week. 

A Deputy Collector will be at 
the court house in Burlington, Ky., 
February 18th and 19th, to assist 
in making out your income re- 
ports. __^___ 

Rev R C. McNeely, of patriot, 
Indiana, was in BurUngton last 
Saturday, morning, and while in 
town called and ordered the Re- 
corder sent to him at his new 
Hoxav 

W ML Aylor, of Grant R. D, 
sends us $1.50 for more Recorder. 
Mr Aylor is one of the county a 
young and progressive farmers, 
and may he and his family enjoy 
reading the Recorder many more 
years. , 

E X Rouse of near Hebron, while 
in BurUngton last Saturday morn- 
ine «caUed on the Recorder and 
paid his dues for 1921. Mr. Rouse 
fo a roan who knows a good thing 
when he sees it, and has the Re- 
corder visit his family weekly. 

Localities well suited to the pro 
duction of cowpeas will find it 
highly profitable to grow seed on 
a large scale, especially if the best 
machinery- for handling the crop 
is uf»ed, say specialists of the U. 
S. Department of Agriculture. 

Quite a number of the farmers 
of BurUngton precinct sold their 
tobacco at the Walton loose leaf 
warehouses, last week, and con- 
sidering the sales at other ware- 
houses, are very well pleased with 
the prices received. 

The Recorder is in receipt of a 
series of pictures of the Florida 
East Coast Oversea Railroad from 
Geo. E. MicGlasson, of Bullittsville, 
who is spending a few weeks 
with Jay Stevens and wife __ on 
their yacht, Oasis, near Key Wesr, 
Florida. 

Wm. Sebree of Waterloo neigh- 
borhood, called on the Recorder 
last Saturday and Bhoved his sub- 
scription up another notch. Mt. 
Sebree is one of the county's best 
farmers and tobacco raisers, but 
says no more of the weed will be 
grown by him. 

Miss Hattie White from out on 
rural route two, was a pleasant 
caller at this office last Friday, 
and left $1.50 to renew her' fath- 
er, C. E. White's subscription for 
another year. This good family 
have been members of our read- 
ing circle many years. 

Cowpea seed more than two 
years old ordinarily has lost much 
of its viability, say specialists of 
the United States Department of 
Agriculture. Good viable seeds are 
uniformly bright colored, while 
seeds which have been exposed to 
moisture or are dead are duller 
and darker in color. 



D B Wallace, president of the 
Equitable Bank /aid Trust Com- 
pany, who has been, confined to 
his home for the past twoweeaa 
by illness, is improving. His phy- 
sician;. Dr. G. C. Rankins, has ad- 
vised him to take a much-needed 
rest and to relinquish aU business 
cares— Walton Advertiser. 

Howe Cleek, of the Beaver Lic« 
precinct, whose house was de- 
stroyed by fire a few weeks ago, 
has rented of W. C. Weaver his 
farm on Gunpowder creek, about 
two miles south of Burlington, 
and wm take possession about the 
first of Mhrch. Mr. Cleek is one 
of the county's young and pro- 
gressive farmers, and a great 
fancier of Jersey cattle, of which 
he has a fine. herd. We are glad 
to have Mr. Cleek and his most 
exceUent family as citizens of this 
community. 

Lloyd Weaver ami Bob Popham, 
who put theif crop of tobacco 
on the floor at the Covington 
loose leaf warehouse during the 
opening sales the first of last 
month, and on account of the 
low prices and the closing of the 
sales for a few days, Jbrought it 
back home. Last week they 
trucked it to Walton, where it 
was sold last Thursday, at an 
average of 16 cents. Why this dif- 
ference of nine cents on the 
pound with the same buyers at 
both places? This crop of the 
weed had been handled 8 times 
and only lost 50 pounds in shrink- 
age and waste. 

The third annual meeting of the 
Southern Section of the American 
Society of Agricultural Engineers 
will be held in Lexington Feb. 14, 
15 and IB, according to an an- 
nouncement which has just bee» 
made by J. B. Kelley of the Farm 
Engineering Section of the State 
College of Agriculture who is 
chairman of the committee on lo- 
cal arrangements. Joint meetings 
have been arranged^ for the morn* 
ings with the Association of South 
em Agricultural Colleges which 
meets at the same time while the 
afternoons and evenings will be 
taken up with lectures by at 
least twelve speakers of national 
reputation. The afternoon of the 
first day will be spent in visit- 
ing points of interest intheBlue 
Grass Section, according to Mr. 
Kelley. 



Discovery haa been made in the 
Holman iron mine near Taconite, 
Minn., not far from the source of 
the Mississippi River, of the trunk 
and branches of a prehistoric tree in 
an excellent state of preservation, 
with the cones on it. The tree is not 
petrified and the wood is perfectly 
sonnd. 

♦♦♦♦ 

Following the announcement re- 
cently that the 1921 session of the 
Press Congress of the World would 
be held in Honolulu October 4 to 14, 
Dean Wslter Williams, president of 
the Congress, has announced that 
the delegates will leave the United 
States about the middle of Septem- 
ber. 

♦♦♦♦ 

A man in Paris has a fountain pen 
which he has used since 1864. 



Connellsvllle, Pa.— Garden pro- 
ducts with a market value of 1322,- 
000 were raised in 1920 by employes 
of the Frick Coke Company under 
the very glare of the thousands of 
coke ovens which dot this section of 
Pennsylvania. Much of this wealth 
came from the garden which the 
company provides with every house, 
but some workers and their families 
were more ambitious than their 
neighbors and "farmed" 864 addi- 
tional plots which the company leas- 
ed for them. 



Seventh I Madison 




Covington, Ky. 



■ } Henry Clore, one of our good 
T friends from out on R.' D. two 
M sends us $1.50 to renew his sub- 
F scription for another year. Mr 

^lore is one of the RECORDER'S 

original friends. He is a good far- 
mer and substantial citizen, and 
may he and his good wife live 
to enjoy many more years of 
health and happiness. 



Lawrence Kii.ney, who runs a 
dairy, one of the largest in the 
county, on the Dixie Highway 
above Florence, was a vrsKor to 
Burlington, last Friday, He renew- 
ed his subscription to the Recor- 
der. He also bought of J. W. Good 
ridge, near town, a nice Jersey 
cow and calf Mr. Kinney is one 
of the county's industrious and 
progressive citiaena and knows 
how to make the "mare" go. 



i: 



That Kentucky school children 
waste almost half of their school 
life by failing to attend their 
classes 61.7 days out of the 150 
rovided in the school term, there 
y causing the state a loss of $3,- 
444,312 is shown by figures con- 
tained in an article written by H. 
R. Bronner, for School Life, an 
official publication of the Depart- 
ment of the Interior at Washing- 
ton. The statistics show that In- 
diana children waste less than 
those of any other State theHoos- 
iers failing to attend classes 7.1 
per cent, of the 155-day term. 

The general average for the U. 
S. showed a total of 25.4 per cent, 
of the term wasted at a loss of 
almost %00^ million dollars. The 
loss was attributed to the ex- 
pense of providing ht?at, teachers 
buildings and supplies for chil- 
dren that never came to take 
advantage 6*f the educational fa- 
ciUtiea, Kentucky's percentage of 
waste was shown to be higher 
than that of any other State in 
the union. 



"Wages of hired men on farms have 
been more than doubled in the last 
ten years, tripled in the last twenty 
years and were more than four times 
higher last year than they were in 
1879. These changes are shown by 
statistics of the Department of"Agrl- 
culture. 

♦♦♦♦ 
, Mt. Everest, the Himalayan peak 
called "the roof of the world" which 
Sir Francis Younghusband, the Brit- 
ish soldier-explorer, wiU attempt to 
climb next summer, has never yet 
been scaled by ami, 
♦♦♦♦ 

Another of the famous old Indian 
leaders who shaped the destiny of 
the red man in the early territorial 
days in Oklahoma has passed. In 
the death of David M. Hodge, 7£ 
years old, last "king", of the Broken 
Arrow tribe of the Creek Indian na- 
tion, Oklahoma lost a most interest- 
ing character. 



-*■ NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S GREATEST S TO RE — 

Silks, Woolens, Do- 
mestics and Wash 

» 

Goods New Low 

Prices 






/pea hay should be substit- 
uted in the Southern states for 
much of the hay which is now 
hel'ig purchased in th" North un.i 
West say specialists of .h • U:ilt- 
H Srt States Department of AgrlP U |. 
The greater use <>r rhii 
crop for hay and . paaturaga I" 

isei tjll? production of ,i^t» 

• k, mi essential factor in aecui 

Ing the maximum returns In any 

fcMi->m of agr-icult r* K also ulU» 

mi h In ksaping th- soil In goo i 

and maiatalning its produo- 



In order to prevent Jack from 
becoming a dull boy as a result of 
aU work and no play, many hours 
ean bo spent- pr u f Ita bly In VEe 
school room by forgetting books 
and lessons for a time and test- 
ing seeds. Seed testing is a di- 
version that is as practical as it 
is enjoyable. It is admirably adapt 
ed for exercise work in every 
school room whether or not a 
systematic course in agriculture is 
given. Little equipment is neces- 
sary. A study of samples of farm 
seed to be sown by the pupils' 
parents, to determine the percent- 
age of germination and the ex- 
tent of impurities In th»* seed, 
offers a means of connecting the 
school with the home with l**ne- 
(its to both. Imparity tests can be 
made by an examination with a 
magnifying flaas. The only appar- 
atus necessary for grrminution 
tests of small seed consists of two 
plates, and s piece of Hottlrnr 
paper Write to the V. S Depart 
ment of Agriculture <>r Parnu'ra 
Bulletin 4*8, "Ttisti.iK Farm Need* 
Oi tar 



Inscriptions in Egyption tombs 
often contain directions by which 
the soul is to finds its way to another 
world. 

♦♦♦♦ 

Fines aggregating $310,000 were 
collected in Windsor courts during 
1920 in 1,895 cases brought under the 
Ontario Temperance act, according 
to announcement by court officials. 
♦♦♦♦ 

With tonnage in good demand 
throughout the season for the ore 
movement of 58,527,226 tons and 
freight rates at about 30 par cent ov- 
er the previous season, the year just 
closed was a prosperous one for Great 
Lakes ore carriers. 
♦♦♦♦ 

Nineteen hundred and twenty was 
the greatest corn year in the history 
of the country, according to the re- 
cords of the Department of Agricul- 
ture. Besides growing*a record crop 
of 3,232,867,000 bushels, the farmers 
established a new record for average 
yield per acre with 80.9 bushels, the 
second time in history that the coun- 
try's average yield went past thifty 
bushels. 



HOPE MUSLIN. 

Genuine Hope Bleached Muslin, full yard 
wide ; formerly 39c the yard, new price 

15c 

OUTING FLANNEL 

Extra quality, good weight, formerly 59c 
the yard. Light and medium colorings. 
Yard 

25c 

APRON GINGHAM 

Lancaster Apron Gingham, the highest 
quality ; formerly 35c the yard. Now 

16Ic 

MOHAWK SHEETS 

81x90 genuine Mohawk full bleached sheets 
wide hems and hemstiched. Formerly 
$2.89 each. New price 

$1.69 

DRESS GINGHAMS 

Splendid quality, beautiful plaids in rich 
colorings, 27 inches wide. Formerly 45c 
the yard. Now 

20c 



SILK) CREPE de CHINE 

Full 40 inches wide, extra heavy quality 
the one formerly priced at $4.00 the yd. 
Now 

$1.98 

WOOL SniRTINGS 

Rich plaids and checks in medium and 
sombre colorings,. Extraordinary quali- 
ties. Formerly up to $5.95 the yard. 
Now 

$2.69 

$4.50 FRENCH SERGE 

A high-grade French Serge in navy blue 
and black ; $4.50 was the price of this 
two months ago. Now, the yard 

$2.45 

WOOL COATINGS 

Highest quality all wool coating in a won- 
derful selection. Some formerly pricee as 
high as $7.95 the yard. Now 

$2.69 

SILK SPECIAL 

One big lot of silks, mostly novelty stripes, 
etc., in medium and dark colorings. Val- 
ues up to $4.95, choice the yard 



$1.19 



feasy Jl ir. 



khoo 
lions. 



nn«i 



gives completi 



Rural 
rilrac 



Hilt Crest Mystery* 

A drama will »•• shown in Him mvta 

St Paul's Auditorium 
Mardl Or** sight, Tu»adar I'ah Hth. 



The manufacture of broken stam- 
ina and the building up of both phy- 
sics 1 aud moral power in men and 
wo men co mp rising a ll the t yp^a 
persons in the down-and-out cate 
gory, is the nature of work being ac- 
complished daily at the Municipal 
Farm, owned and operated by the 
city of Dallas, according to Conimis- 
siener L. E. McCiee, under whoso 
indirect supervision the rescue work 
is carried on. 

♦•♦♦ 

One silver medal and twenty -five 
bronxe medals vers awarded for acts 
of heroism by the Carnegie Hero 
Fund Commission at Its mid-winter 
meeting. Nino of the heroes lost 
their lives to save othsr persons, and 
to their dependents the commission 
gave adequata financial assistance. 
♦♦♦♦ 

The real dtttftf In kimtlug Is not 
SSioblDg gaiUl*, hut beillK caught 

kUnin/ ttio wrong imraou. 



It ha* l>ei n iNtliuatml Mini then 

ar«* mmhju ,ooo *er*a of past la Ida < 

M. AVHjIftlil.. for file) Kllil LtldUairlftl 

l>tn !><>«..• It f« nabttrtetl that with 
ths os« of up-tu dat" mm hi nary th* 
|»*al can pa nroparud foi u>> market 
at a oust <>f li a tun 



Sheriffs Ssle for Taxes 



Notice is hereby given that I, or 
one of my deputies will, on Monday, 
February 7th, 1921, it being Couuty 
Court day, between the hours of 10 
a. m. and 3p.m. at the Court House 
door in the town of Burlington, 
Boone county, Ky., expose to public 
sale for cash in hand, the following 
property, or so much thereof as may 
be necessary to pay State, County 
and School taxes due thereon and 
unpaid for the year IB20, and the 
penalty, interest and coats thereon. 

For a complete description of prop- 
erty Bee assessors book for 1019, at 
the Countv Tax Commissioners of- 
fice. 

L. A. CONNER. 
Sheriff of Boone Counts. 




||mt 6itU appreciate 
pifilip ®aliaferr0 




Beaver Precinct — 
Bolep, Cbas. S., town hit 209.82 

Bellevue Precinct— 
Rice heirs, town lot 8.69 

Constance Precinct- 
Anderson, Bruce. 8 acres 18.92 

Hood, John W., 40 acres 27.15 

Teeters, Vesta, town lot 10.88 

Hamilton Precinct- 
Black, Ben, town lot. . . . , 9.97 

Kendall, O. C, nr. 294 acres 126.80 

Petersburg Precinct- 
Rector, G. W., town lot 15.74 

Verona Precinct— 
Powers, John W.. 8 town lots 8.88 

Walton Precinct- 
Franks, Wm.. nr. 18 acres 8.66 

Hopperton, Joe, town lot 16.07 

Kelly, E. L., 1 town lot and all 

ersonal property belonging 
light plant .^--^-rrTrrrras.ffJ 



c 



"PUBLIC SALE. 

If you want to mmkm a 
food a«l« writ* 

A. L. LANCASTER, 
AUCTIONEER 

809 Madison Ave. , Covington, Ky. 

.Satisfaction* Qoarantea*. 

Phone S. 6048- x 60O7-X jsn 27 8t 



DR. T. B. CASTLEMAJM, 

•o^.DBINTiaT«o««» 

Will be at Burlington every Monday 
prepared to do all dental work- 
painless extraction, bridge and plate 
work a specialty. 

All Work Guaranteed 



8 



BEGIN NOW 

WITH A BANK ACCOUNT 

Your own prosperity depends on your ability to 
SAVE — not on what you can earn. 

Many men and women become rich by first putting 

certain portions of their earnings into a bank 

where it draws interest. 

A Tune Deposit at 4 per cent with this bank 
b a nest egg which steadly accumulates end 
leads its owner on toward independence. 

YOU ARE WELCOME AT THIS STRONG BANK 
THAT RENDERS SERVICE TO 
ITS CUSTOMERS- 
CAPITAL & SURPLUS 150,000.00. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 



W. L. B. ROUSE, Present. 
A. B. RENAKER, C«*hi«r. 




NELL H. MARTIN, Aut. Caohior. 
LEWIS C. BEEMON, Aut Caaai«r. 



Wanted— To rent 100aorenonnori\ 
will pay cash or ithare of cron. beat 
of raforsDOSa K. lleger, FiUujfnr, 
Ky., Route 4. SWJhii M 

WOOD k'Oll HALK-Tww tJolUi* 
per riiiik, hIx itolUra p«r cord Call 
or wrltu II H. Tanner, BlirllngUtD, 
Ky , It. 1» I Hebron plum. 

Wtjau O 

Th* iNnfi Plane**, 
front to KaiMafc Story— lo b«r iui» 
hi lam black trcaaoa o**(l*tl a large, r»S 



rSaVnMaVBawMOBVKBNBBKBM 
HEBRON THEATRE 

NEXT SATURDAY 

William Farnum in "Wolves of the Night" 

UConwdy "Tht Graat Niokls Robbery" 
First Show 7:30 P. M. 
lion 22 Cents, Children 1 1 Cent* 






lawtaMHag War la* 



"MXm 



» » » ,» 4 »»++»+♦»+»».«»»♦+ +*♦♦♦+ »+ »■♦♦»»♦+»■» ♦ ♦ + »> » > ♦ « » 4 *♦* ■» 

ARE YOU A READER OF THE RECORDER? 

> » ♦»♦»♦♦» HW»HH lM l HI»HIH t H 



wm 



m 



ouONE COUNT* 



BPSSSSS tt SSS M SSS S SSSSSa 



tDJEX 



i 



I 



Christ— The Subject 
Ci All Scripture 

By REV. B. B. SUTCLIFFE 

Kxtmialon Department, Moody 
Bible institute, Chicago. 



TEXT.— Search the Scriptures . . . 

they are they which testify of toe John 

6iS9. ' 

The only absolutely true history In 
.all the world Is found within the p 

of the /Bible. 



Wherever \Scrlp- 
ture toucbeahls 
tory, unlike the 
historians of the 
world, It touches 
It with a true 
hand. The bis 
torians of the 
world are natural- 
ly unable to look 
at history from 
any but preju- 
diced eyes. The 
very perfections 
of tbcir national 
heroes, as record- 
ed in* their writ- 
ings, leave us with 
the Impression that these were super- 
men and almost incapable of wrong- 
doing. But we know that they were 
men of like passions with us, however 
unlike ns they appear on the pages of 
the histories. But when the Holy 
Spirit wrote history, though It be the 
history of a David, He told us all the I 
truth, and the man David stands be- | 
fore us" as he really was. While the i 
Bible contains the only wholly reliable j 
history in all the world, its object is j 
not merely to record uislory, bu( to set I 
before the reader the person of Jesus [ 
Christ. 

The only true philosophy is found 
recanted on the pages of the Bible. All i 
the philosophies of the world, unable } 
to rise higher than their source, can 
have no fuller message than "Man, 
know thyself." But because of inher- 
ent inability, man alone can never 
know himself uor come to the knowl- 
edge which tells him whence he came ' 
or whltlu-r he goes; he continues on his 
way like a snip without rudder or pilot. | 
knowing neither the port from whence I 
he sailed uor the .harbor to which lie is • 
bound, and the reason for his being up- ! 
on the sea of life at all remains an un- 
solved enigma to him. 

But the philosophy which comes 
from the Bible begins by saying, "Man, 
ktiow God," and then graciously pro^ 
- ceeds to reveal God to man. In that 
revelation man may know both the 
God who speaks and himself beside*. 
But while the Bible contains the only 
true philosophy in the world Its object 
is not to give mau mere philosophy, 
but to bring to muu the knowledge of 
God as revealed fully in the supreme i 
subject of Scripture. Jesus Christ. 

Again, the only true moral code In ' 
the world is found within the Bible. 
Like the philosophies of the world the 
ruoral codes formed by man rise no 
higher than himself, and have in view 
man's relation to man only; they do 
not deal with man's relation to God 
But the moral code of the Bible begins 
with man's relation to God, followed by 
man's relation to num. The first and 
great commandment la, -Thou shall 
love the Lord thy God with all thy 
heart." ,, nd the 8Ccon(J |g 1Jke ^ - 

Thou shalt love thy neighbor ns thy- 
self (Mutt. 22:37-39). But while it con- 
tains the only complete moral code in 
the world, its subject is not that mere-' 
ly, but is Jesus Christ 

Without Christ the Bible would 
never have been written. U e is the 
Key which unlocks all Its mysteries; 
the Light that reveals all its hidden ex- 
cellencies. The Bible is like the fem- 
ple of which the Psalmist says, "Every 
whit speaks of Ui s glory" ( P8alni3 
29.9). Jesus said: "Ye search the 
Scriptures foe la them ye think ye 
have eternal life, and they are they 
Which testify „f rae « (Jbhn z m . 
Had ye believed Moses ye would have 

Sv V< l m0, f ° r he wrote of »*■' «ohn 
6:46). And beginning at Moses and all 

Tm ?*""* 1 ? expounued ««to them 
h> a I the Scriptures the things con- 
cerning IlJmself" (Luke 24:27) "All 
things must be fulfilled which were 
written ,l« the law of Moses and in 7hl 

■When "holy men of God wrote as 
they were moved upon „y the floh 

Jesus CbxUt Krom the beginning To 
he end of „,« Book, th rough Z^ 
tores and (he prophecies, the poetrv 
end the Psalms, the one radiant oJE 
•presented to our view In type „»£, 
, ? remony and prediction tVetrd 

iln?£w , , h " l !Scr, » )tur ««. «nd we read 
>our Bible* to little profit if we f.ir, 

f for our comforl and profit nml f„, 

16.14) we will com,. „ ", " " u " (Ju " u 
Increasing Mem. .ml £liJ"t T 
Lord irmis Christ „, „"*•''*' he 
Wend and Lord. A. I i,| N ... 1 f" vlor 

subject of the Bible, ,„ H,,* "'" 

should be the supreiu, 
Bible study 



,,1..],. 



linn 
f our 



Will you not join 

this 4 'Invisible'* Guest 
Club today? 



J 



Me« 



Do Not Understand. 

•e«ei nel.h.r , N||(| 

J Mr their atren^ih i ,, ... , 
(umer it,*, b»u#v. ^ ^ 

**•* ••*# efeeejM; ef tiu . 

^-Berwi 



Chinese Muugt. 

Medical gymiuiNticM «erc reduced te 
u acteatldd Wtmd uy Taeiet nookSi 
Hi- main petal <>f tba Ckteese »y«tera 

" r " '» ll>«« three principal at- 

iitudes. Maodlet, siitiiiu |od lying, 
mmt dtre«* modes nf hrenThlnij, through 
il'" hi.. nib, nsat nnd lns|.iniiioii and 
eiplretloe all ihreugk sett er- 

**"* Irea I rolled nwimu to 

""' fro " MH te iTinalaW «»»• 

u,Mi " "im»ait« t lve> •loutaih a 

m( .••iiHiating af thraa 
* i» aianllad 



Join 
the 
"Invis- 
ible" I 
Guest 
Club 



Have you a hospit- 
able home? Do you 
entertain your 
friends? What does 
it cost you for an 
evening's entertain- 
ment? Will you en- 
tertain an "Invisible" 
Guest at your table 
and become a mem- 
ber of the "I nvisible" 
Guest Club of Amer- 
ica? It will cost you 
only Ten Dollars. 

There are 3,500,000 
undernourished, de- 
bilitated waifs and 

orphaned children in 
Eastern and Central 
Europe, w*hose lives 
must be preserved by 
American generosity 
and hospitality. 

A C e'r t i f i c a t e of 
Membership in the 
"Invisible" Guest 
Club of America will 
be sent to you, signed 
by Herbert Hoover 
and Franklin K. 
Lane, National 
Chairman and Treas- 
urer; also signed by 
the State Chairman 
of Kentucky. 



If you will send your 
check for Ten Dol- 
lars, or more, to the 
European Relief 
Council, Richard 
Bean/ Treasurer, 
Board of Trade Build- 
ing, Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, or deposit this 
amount to his credit 
in any bank in Ken- 
tucky, you will re- 
ceive an "Invisible" 
Guest Certificate by 
return mail. 



Trade With 

D. R. Bly the 

Where you get the best quality merchandise 
at the lowest market prices. We handle nothing 
but the best. A few prices to show you that I 
am right: - , ~~j~ 

Telephone Flour in wood * $12 50 

Telephone Flour in sacks V. 12.00 

TRY A SACK OF 

Pacemaker Flour, 24 lb. Sack 1.40 

12 lb. Sack 7Q C 

Clean Easy Soap, 6 Bars for. : 25c 

Lenox Soap, 5 Bars for. 25c 

P. & G., Tag and Ivory Soap, 3 Bars for 20c 

Cupid Brand Corn, 3 cans 25c \ 

Wisconsin Early June Peas, 2 cans for 25c 

Recess Peas, per can 22c 

Happy Vale Peaches, per can 35 c 

Sorghum Molasses, per gallon. 90c 

Large Box Matches. A. 5 C 

OVERALLS, all sixes A 1.75 

JDJEfY C3-O.OIDS 

Of all kinds have-been reduced to 
Present Market Prices. 

IO R©r Cent 

Discount on all Shoos, 

Feed of all Kinds on hand at all times get my prices 
THEY ARE ROCK-BOTTOM. 

Bring me your Country Produce and get the good 
prices I am paying. My motto is 

Court esy and Square Dealing to All. 

D. R. MM? v^BBflSWr^i 

Consolidated and Farmers Phones. 



ForSale 

One acre, six-room house, cement 
cellar, furnace heat, electric light, 
and all kinds of fruit, at 4o8 Erlang- 
er Road, Erlanger, Ky. Jan. J* 



Notice. 



All who have not paid the 25 per 
cent of their subscriptions for the 
Burlington and Locub Grove turn- 

61k are requested to do so at once. 
>y order of the Board of Directors. 
_— JB. T. KBLLY, S ecretary^ 

For Sale, 

6-roojav house and one-half acre lot 
In MoVille, on the Ohio river. The 
buildings are all in good repair. Will 
be sold by Beileview Lodge No. 664. 
For particulars apply to J. D. Mc- 
Neely, W. R. Marshall, Jeff Willi 
atneon, Burlington, Ky. jan6 

Rural Route 2. 



F. W. Kassebaum & Sop, 

tumu 4 Hi KB LB >L 

MONUMENTS, 

H Large Stock tin Display 
to 8«ittt from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipment 

118 Main Street, 

AURORA, INI). 



JAMES L. ADAMS 

DENTIST 

Cohen Building 
Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 



Sweet Clover and Honey 

Sow sweet clover, cheaper and bet- 
ter than red clover. Buy direct from 
grower, special scarified seel for 
prompt germination. Prices and cir- 
culars free. Also prices on honey. 

JOHN A. 8HEEHAN, 
R. D. No. 4. Falmouth, Ky 



The Famous O. I. C. 

- I now have for sale registered 
O. I. C. Pigs, some of which are 8 
weeks old. '1 heir sire is the famous 
C C. Callaway Jumbo, and his aire 
is Callaway Edd, the world's Grand 
Champion Boar. All stock register- 
ed free. 

FRANK HAMMONS 

R. I). Florence, Ky. 



* 



Farm for Sale 

180 Acre, one mile south of 
Burlington, on the East Bend 
road, 15 acres in orchard, 25 
acres, in timber, 30 acres in 
corn in 1920, 15 acres in mea- 
dow, balance in pasture 

6 room house, large barn 
and all necessary out build- 
ings, Well watered. Price, 
$75,00 an acre on easy terms. 
Oscar Hanna, Bellevue Ky. 



D. E. Castlemcin, 
ATTORNEY AT LA W, 

— Office ove?— H 

. Erlanger Deposit Bank, 

Erlanger, - Kentucknt. 



List Vour Sales With Me Early la 
The Season. 

LUTE BRADFORD 

Lire Stock Auctioneer. 

Your Work Solicited. See' me 
' and get my terms. 
Phone , Florence, Ky. R. D. 
Farmers oct-14 



-^ 





iHmmimimiiHimmmiHumiiiiimiimiimiiiiinmmumiB 

"S PE-RU-NAI 

FOR CATARRH OF THE HEAD AND NOSEi 



5 

: lr. Fmk ran? 
= Ornl, In 16. 
Rifcnsti, 



** I began using 
PE-BTJ-NA Tablets 
three years ago for 
catarrh of the head 
and nose. Was un- 
able to do any things 
I saw a decided 
improvement after 
one box and after 



NO 
RETURN 

OF 

THE 
DISEASE 

IN 

TWO 
YEARS 



using five boxes bo- S 
lieve I am cured as £ 
there has been no £ 
return of the dis- £ 
ease in two years." £ 
Fifty years of use- E 
fulness Is the best £[ 
guarantee of Pe-ru- S 
na merit. 3 



■ Tablets or Liquid Sold E T ery where I 

auiumiiiiuiiiiiiiiuHiiiiimHiiiinnjiiiiHiiiHiiHHiniimiinmnnmmmnnE 



Kentucky News Collins j? a r ? m , SLr to t b h a e cc Bo y re SSityiSS 

is one man who is not registering 

A license returned to Mr. John- a kick, and he is so much of an 
son, Clerk, is accompanied bv a exception that he is really a cu- 
letter reading thus: "Dear "Mr. riosity. He took 2,290 pounds to 

the .People's warehouse at Dan- 
ville and gov a check for $803, 
which isn't bad for an off year. 
—Stanford Interior Journal. 

Seven empty cartons, contain- 
ers of lemon extract, bearing the 
inscriptions "85 per cent alcoholv 
were found in the men's toilet 



Johnson— I return the license. My 
plan did not work. She turned 
me down the same day. So I am 
sending them back to save time 
and trouble.''— Pikeville News. 

Stretched across a box in th-" 1 
city "watch house'' while their 
mothers iplied them with straps, 



FOR SALE 

I Have for Sale 
2 International Trucks. 
2 490 Chivrolets. 
1 Ford Truck Chasis, 20- 

model. 

CASH OR ON TIME. 

L. C. CHAMBERS, 

Petersburg^ Ky. 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 

TIME TABLE 

BurJington - Erfanger Bus. 

DaHy Except Sunday. 

Lv. Burlington 6:15 a. m. 4:00 p. m 

Lv. Erlanger 7:10a. m. 4-65 p. m 

SUNDAY. 

Lv. Burlington 7:10 a. m 

Lv. Erlanger 7:66 a. m 

Paaaenfer Fare— 50c one way. 

Round Trip 75c 

Express Packages handled at Rea- 
sonable Rates. 

L. R. McNEELY. 



IT'S A WISE IDEA. 

Do ss Many Others are doing- 
send your cream to the 

CLOVERLEAF CREAMERY 

i Burlington, Ky. 

I pav^cash for cream and insure '^kWL 
you a square deal. 

I RECEIVE EVERY 

FRIDAY 



J. O. HUEY, 



Manager. 



-AT HOME— 

DR. F. L, PEDDICORD 

1017 Madison Avenue, 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY. 



'Phone So. 1148. 



u»in»T» 'jMieu mem witn straps, "«<: iwujiu hi iik; men's loiiet 
three colored youths "bellowed'' ( room at the court house Tuesday 
and "yelled" until Chief of police l morning. Whether this is Indica- 
Salyers ordered the strap wielders ^ive of a shortage of homebrew 



to declare an armistic?. The pun 
ishment was given at the direction 
of County Judge Lancaster, who 
found them guilty of stealing $21 



or merely a stimulant before fac 

ing the Oraad Jury the Oazette 

does not presume to say. Neither 

found them guilty of stealing $21 do we know Whether seven bot- 

from the cash drawer of Penn cV j t,es o* lemon extract is mqfely 

Parker, coal and feed dealers. Sat- a "bracer'' or enough foi 



for an old 



Parker, coal and feed dealers, Sat- j a "bracer'' or enough for 

urday afternoon. — Georgetown I fashioned "Jag,'' but it is certain 

Tlma. i that th» "Viavonoa 



Time*. 

Forty shoats averaging sixty- 
seven pounds f>f*r head made S 
total gain of 2,030 pounds of pork 
valued at #357.60 in a sixty-day 



that the "beverage .habit'' has 
not entirely diea out hereabouts. 
— Lei ten field Gazette. 

"Old J?an,>' a mule owned by 
Mr. George W. Anderson, died Sun 



.it a sixiy-aay "*-•• **»-»"»*' »».■ ..»—»««.• >~.., »•»...-« .-.«»« 
corn and soybean derrmnstr.-itiftT) j day at the ripe old ajge of 4f 
which was conducted this fall I years. Mr. Anderson "Bought this 
by W. N. McCubbina, a Taylor-co., ' mule twenty-seven years ago and 
farmer, in <-o-o(»eratioii with Coun : ^as used her continuously since 
ty Agent J L. Miller The total j that time up until a couple of 
weight of the animal* when they ; year> ago. The mule was foaled 
were turned into the four-acre on tn,e 'arm of the late Cava- 

l..i «. -i ',.r . t.- • ■ . ' nnt.fvK T^**^.., mint* Z" 1 .. rv» .. w*w n 4-Ui« 



were rurneu into the four-acre uu lu,e 'arm w ma lat-v Lava- 
lot was 3.3*5 pounds Neighboro naugh Tipton, near Camargo, this 
of Mr. McCubbina estimated thaf county, and there is absolutely 
the corn yield of the plot was 180 »° doubt as to her age. Several 

n year* af 

r misfortn 



tne corn vicld of the plot was 180 »° «own«- *» io ner age. oeverai 
bushels and if no value is given yeara ago Mr. Anderson had the 
the soybeans he received $198 per misfortnue to have a barn on his 
bushel for the corn which the farra destroyed by fire and lost 
hogs consumed The value of the ** v *i"al bead of horse* and mules, 
pork produced was estimated at 12 but 0,d *' an ' wni,e singed up con 
cents a pound Kesults of the \ ;»lderably, managed to break out 
demonstration show that the ani- of tbe burning barn. The writer 
mals made an ■verare dallv gain MW tnls muie during the Thanka- 
of 1.24 ik>uihU while on the corn *' vin «" holidays and, considering 
and soybean*— Paris Ke-ntmckian- her ^t 1 *™* age, she looked re- 
Citizen *<mwicKian imarkab | y weU.-Mt. Sterling Ment- 

« .. ... „, I Inel-Democrat. 

O P. Wallwigford, Sunday, was , — 

showing a dandelion blossom, . , _.„ a . . , ,„ 

which V found in his yard Who ' Leslng ton-Sales of burl?y to- 
can equal this rocord for Jan. IS, , baCco ,°" ^e local loose leaf mar- 
Kiai?-Cynthiuna Democrat. I ket during the l»»*t *«••'■ »»•*- 

I aged more than luon.ooo pounds a 

Harry 8. Morgan, the famous dsy, figures compiled today by the 
pure bred iNmltry raiser of supervisor of sale* show A total 
White* BtsTloh. In UUing bU of S,iilJ,(rToTbi. was sold 
friends to quit raulag tobacco and ug» of $13 M per 100 1 1*., making 
go Into the White l/.ghorn pool- a season total of «.*»."> . at 

try business, lie ■ , «•«• a grand average of $U.2o par loo 

• f eggs of 30 the «•*»«« poumta. 

since January I, Mule his t 'w - 

,UI '"' *, The ©oet ot n marriage lleense 

»nd Heftattr lt i,r down and »*ver»l 

W H Vmihttok w^» raised « dollars essh wst'k thereaftsr. 



Canning PI am for Sale 

The Farmers Canning Plant at 
Grant, Ky., will be sold on the 
grounds of the Company at 1 o'clock 
p. in., on 

Saturday, feb. tt, 1921 

at public sale to the highest bidder. 
The plant oonslsts .of an engine, 
boiler, shafting, cookers, piping, 2- 
100 gallon copper kettles, platform 
scales, building and one-fourth acres 
of ground. 

The plant, grounds, building, ma- 
chinery will be sold atf-a whole. 

Terms— One-half cash, remainder 
on time with geod security. 
AL BODGE RS, 
JNO. SMITH. Com. 

W. B. ROGEBS, 



BETTER 
DEAD 

Life is a burden when the body 
19 racked with pain. Every thing 
worries and the victim becomes 
despondent and downhearted. To 
bring; back the sunshine take 

COLD MEDAL 

Th* national rsmsdy of Holland for onr 
200 ywrs; it Is an enemy of all pains re- 
sulting from kidney, liver and uric add 
troubles. All drugtfeu, three sixes. 
Leefc fee U>. n*m« Gold Medal o. •*«, fcsm 



4' 




NOTICE. 

All persons owing the estate of 
Laura Clore, deceased, please come 
forward and settle same at once. 
Also all persona having claim* 
against said estate present them 
to met at once for settlement. 
H M. CLORB, Agent 
V Laura Clore Fatate 



NOTICE. 

all persons who have claims 
Against the entsta of George ■. 
Houso dee**ft*d, wilt prassat them 
to diss proven si the lawr<S)u>rea 
All persons owing said estate 
will eon« forwsnl ami s*ttle 
W * DRADFOHt 

Atlmr. 



attention Into Owners! 

I am prepared to do first-class 

repairing- on all makes or cars. 

Smarter and generator work a 

specialty. All work guaranteed. 

Give me a trial. 

Earl M. Ay lor, 

HEBRON, KY. 
Phone Hebron 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 
Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by cAdver- 
tising. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



♦ 



IMPORTANT NOTICB. 



♦ 
e 
♦ 

♦ 
e 



Watch the date foltowlna 
your nam* on. the margin 
of your paper and if It la 
not correcl please notify 
this office at once. If your e 
paper has been dlsconUnu- * 
•a by mistake before your « 
*!»• expired do not delay * 
notifying this office All er- * 
rors sr<^ cheer lull* correct- ♦ 

♦ee es>eee» »eeece»eeeeeeeee? 



Take Your County Psper. 4 ** 4 * 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ »e»eee»eee»e»»eeee 



i ■■*■ aiia-neine. ■ 




BOCNE CwCJNTY RECORDED 



*1l 



V- 



it 



IE 



■* 



v 



SO 



r 



i^CALL ON 




And inspect their line of General Merchandise 
you will find their prices 



»♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

♦ • 

» FRANCESVILLB • 

♦ • 



J-U-S-T R-l-T-E. 



Blue Work Shirts $1,00 

240 Weight Blue Denim Overalls 2.00 

240 Weight Blue Denim Jackets 2.00 

Comfort Batting 3 1-4 lb roll 1.25 



V. 



Our Line of 'Groceries Is Complete. 



Table Meal, 12, lbs 35c 

Romeo Flour, highest grade patent, 24 ^ lb. bag. • ■ 1.50 

Town Talk Flour, as good as the best, 244b. bag 1 .60 

Pure Cane Bulk Sugar, per 1004b. bag 9.00 

Gold Bar Pine Apple, No. 3 can, 1 lb. 14 oz 40c 

Wisconsin Early Selected June Peas, per can . .... 15c 

Sorghum Molasses, per gallon 1.25 

Franklins Golden Syrup, made from cane sugar, 

1 lb. 9 oc. can 20c 

Franklins Golden Syrup, 1 lb. 2 oz. can . . . -«-. .... 15c 

New Orleans Molasses, per gallon A 90c 

Jiff- Jelly and Jell-O, all flavors lOc 

7 Bars Swift's Pride Soap 25c 

Blue Bird Bread---f re»h every day. 

Fresh Meats of all Kinds 



8 



Frank Aylor and wife spent last 
Sunday with Manliua Ooodrid^e 
and wife. 

W. C. Houze, wife and daughter, 
Marie,- spent Friday with J. 8. 
Eggleston and family. 

Misses Amanda Koona and Sadie 
Rieman spent Saturday with Miss 
Jessie Gordon, okfiebron. 

Chris Whitaker, Jr., and wife, 
spent Sunday with Chria Whita- 
ker, Sr., and daughter, .Maggie. 

Fred Reitmann and wife have 
been entertaining a little daught- 



er 811 

A n 



umber of frierds and rela- 



tej since the 25th-Dorotha Mae. 

n< 

Ml 
Jg L 
•pent the week-end with their 



tiyes surprised R L. Day Satur- 
day night, it being his Wrthdav 
Charles and EInora Egglesto'n 



\ 



We want all of your Eggs, Poultry and Cured Meats. 
Bring them to us and receive the Highest Price. 

GULLEY & PETTIT, 

Burlington, Kentucky. 

a: 




Merchants Creamery 

OF CINCINNATI 

Has opened a Cash Buying Cream Sta. at Petersburg, 

Ky. We test and pay for your cream while 

you wait. Start in and give us your next 

trial ^can. We are located in the 

Post Office Building. 

J. C. BOLEN, x Operator 

PETERSBURG, KY. 




cousin, Grant Houze and family, at 
Petersburg. 

Iva Ogden, AJjce Eggleston and 
Raymond Cave, from this school, 
took the examination at Burling- 
</n Friday and Saturday 

The little daughter of William 
McGuire, who lives on J. L Ril- 
eys farm, was badly burnt one 
day last week. The child was 
standing in front of the stove 
when her dress was drawn into 
the fire by a draft. 



►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

• ♦ 

• ODN POWDER. * 

• ♦ 

Harvey Utz went to Ludlow on 
i business last Saturday. 
] William Phillipps sold his to- 
bacco to J. S. Rouse Price pri- 
I vate. 

Quite a number of the children 
|who attend fechool at Florence 
jhave whooping cough. 

On account of the inclempnt 
weather there Was rather a small 
congregation at Hopeful last Sun 
day. 

Redmon Gossett and Jas. Will- 
iams sent their tobacco to Wal- 
ton the first of the week to be 
sold on the loose leaf market. 

There has been no preparations 
made for a tobacco erop up to 
this time, and the chancer are 
there will be a very small acre- 
age planted. 

After a sojourn in this neigh- 
borhood for about a year, Harvey 
Rouse and wife .left last Sunday 
for Dalton, Ga., where th?y will 
make their future home. 

Spencer Rouse has adopted horse 
tradingas E side line. He traded 
with Harmon Jones a few days 
sirce sightunseen. He says thev 
both got the x best of the"' bargain 
and are well pleased 



THE DEVIL AT WORK. 





'■ ■ • i 



Everythi 




THE DEVIL KNOWS 

Remember man as you pass by, 
as you are now, so once was I; 
as I am 'now, so must you be, 
prepare for death and follow me. 

The Devil made the following 
rejoinder: 

To follow you I'm not content, 
unless I know which way you 
went. * 



♦ ♦ 

♦ FLICKERTOWN. ♦ 

♦ • 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦*♦♦ 

Wm. White and Henry Jumo 
were on the sick fist last week." 

Blufe Wingate and family visit- 
ed Mrs. James Burns last Saturday 
and Sunday. 

Herbert Snyder solicited s this 
reighborhood to cut out the 192,1 
tobacco crop. 

George Shinkle and family call- 
ed, on J. W. White and family, 
one evening last week. 

Miss Alice White took the ex- 
amination for High school Friday 
aud Saturday at Burlington. 

Mrs. J. W, White visited Mrs. 
Lavina Kirkpatrick Friday and 
Mrs. Eliza Walton Saturday 

Ed. Maxwell, Podge Allowayand 
J. W. White helped Wm. Burns 
strip tobacco one day last week 

Anyone having 10 or 12 good 
cats to give away call on or ad- 
dress J. W. White, Burlington R. 

The old Woolper and Waterloo 
Telephone Co. will have a meet- 
ing at Petersburg. Feb 4th. AH 
members are requested to attend 



Get Our Prices 

WOOD AND ASPHALT SHINGLES, * 
PULP AND PLASTER WALL BOARD, 
ORNAMENTAL SLATE ROLL ROOFING-MIXED 

COLORS— DIAMOND SHAPE, * 

LIGHT. MEDIUM and HEAVY ASPHALT ROLL ROOF- 
ING, BARN SIDING, GARAGE DOORS, 
X iEAVY TOBACCO RACKING. 

The A. M. Lewin Lumber Company, 

COVINGTON, KY, 

Madison Ave. and 24th St. Phone South 465-466 



AMadi 




1886 



1921 



Thirty-five Years 

Of successful banking is our record. Start the 

NEW YEAR 

bv^ opening an account with us. 



♦ 



BIG DONE. 



- « 

♦ 



Establishing Tobacco Stancard Use Cavalry To Get Night Ridrse 

In order to as7i7t in placing the | ° OV a *£&£ ^ ™J£ 
marketing of tobacco upon a more ! nr $ Generali orderee f that the 
business-like basis, the U. S. Do- state , s caVa i ry forccH b „ at M ™ 

i^l™*?* ?' i£*S £"? I&J&2 read y 'or immediate service 



to begin investigations which will 
lead to the establishment of to- 
bacco grades applicable through- 
out the entire industry.' Though 
tobacco ranks fourth among the 
crops of the United States, re- 
turns more thartv $1,000,000,000 a 
year in agricultural wealth to th? 
Nation, and more than $300,000,000 
in annual revenue to the Govern- 
ment, it is marketed -in a manner 
which producers of less impor- 
tant crops would regard as a short 
cut to financial. ruin. 

For this condition, the special- 
ists of the Bureau of Markeca, De- 
partment of Agriculture, blame pri 
icti 



against night riders 

He also announced that a special 
court of inquiry into- the night 
riding operations in Bath county 
last Sunday will be hul 1 at Owlngs 
ville, Bath county, Friday. 

Gov. Morrow issued a smash- 
ing warning to night riders in a 
long statement. 

There are cavalry troops at 
Louisville, London, Louisa and 
Manchester. 

London and Louisville troops 
have horses, while the other 
two troops ure now receiving hor 
ses. 

Rewards of $600 each for cap- 



mariry the auction system of sales 
in certain sections and the pri- 
vate contract system in oth?r_ lo- 
calities. Under the former meth- 
od loose pilej of tobacco to be 
sold are placed on the floor of a 
warehouse 1 and. examined by the 
prospective buyers. The tobacco 
is not graded, nor does the owner 
have much opportunity to describe 
tMfe merits of his product. The 
auctioneer then offers the tobac- 
co for sale and the buyers are 
practically in a position to obtain 
the tobacco for any price they 
chooee to pay. In the latter case 
the tobacco is sold privately oy 
growers, who usually hava i/i in- 
defirite idea of market pricJs, to 
buyers who are fully ir.rormea. , 
The sales are frerLu^tjy r ,mag^Qnling_.Lthe: interest and ontL 

ine Ct sUr at tha r n onThe^bte? The ,U Com ^^y 
sale often is made before' the to 
bacco is harvested. At 



ture of the night riders were of 
fered by the Governor. 

1000 Members Their Goal. 

One thousand members is the 
goal that the Jefferson Oountv 
Farm Bureau has set for itself 
for accomplishment this spring. 
The membership now is a little 
over the seven hundred mark 
and new members are being en- 
rolled every week. Every mem- 
ber sign up a member is the motto 
the bureau is holding before its 
constituents. 

Almost five hundred members 
were present at the annual meet- 
i^K of the Jefferson County Bu- 
reau; the large attendance ahow«- 

aias m . 



Mrs. Robert Coles, of Rising Sun. 
Indiana, is visiting relatives here. 

Stewart Baker has returned to 
his home in New York to attend 
school. 

Victor Williams, of Ir.d., visited 
relatives here the latter part of 
last week. 

Conner Carroll wife and baby, 
are visiling relatives in Louisvlie 
this week. 

Arthur Pitcher, of Cincinnati, is 
the guest of his brother, George 
at Hamilton. 

G. L. Miller and wife are in 
Louisville with their daughter, 
Mrs. Will Smith. 

Miss Rose Krause was the guest 
of her parents in Indiana, the 
latter part of last weak. 

G. W. Baker trucked a load of 
tobacco from Walton to Lexing- 
ton the first of the week. 

Mrs. Harry Jones and daughter, 
Mrs. Geo. Wilkens, will start from 
Louisville to California soon 

Mrs. Bess Hoecraft, of Enter- 
prise, Indiana, is the guest of 
her daughter Mrs. Ben Black 

Miss Katie Krause of Indiana, is 
visiting Mrs. Mary Judge and at- 
tended the dance at the Hall. 

W. D. SniKh of near Verona, was 
the guest of his father, Daniel 
Smith, the latter part ef the week 

Mrs. Bea Smith and son, Orali 
of near Verona, visitedr elatives 
he re the latter part of- the week. 

Mrs. Lizzie Wood Miller ana 
daughter, Mrs. ,Mary Denham, of 
Chicago, were guests of this writ- 
er and family, Wednesday. 



IDLEWILD. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Master Barrett Grant is quite ill. 

Mrs. Ben S. Houston was shop- 
ping in Covington, Saturday. 

Robert Grant and Albert Hit2- 
field attended the tobacco sale at 
Walton, Saturday. 

Mrs. James S. Asbury enter- 
tained with a six o'clock dinner 
Saturday in honor of Mrs. William 
Terrell Berkshire's birthday an- 
uiversary. 

A. H. Norman spent Thursday in 
Union with his sister, Mrs. W. M 
Raeftal. Master John M". Rachal ac- 
companied him home for the 
week-end. 

Quite a bit of the tobacco in 
(his neighborhood is being put 
on the loose leaf market, altho 
90 per cen)t of the farmers have 
signed to cut out the 1921 crop. 

Mr% Pei^y Huey was buried at 
Bullittsburg Monday morning at 
10:30 o'clock. Mrs. Hney was a 
Bpone-co., woman but has made 
her home in Plymouth, III., for a 
number of years. 

. A hay stack belonging to Stev- 
ens Bros, was accidentally burned 
late Friday, causing quite an ex- 
citement in the neighborhood un- 
til it was found out what was 
burning." A telephone system is a 
great convenience at such times, 
although we kick at the ' poor 
service and high rates of said 
sv stem. 



Boone 60. Deposit Bank 

Established 1886. 

Burlington, Kentucky. 



N. E. RIDDELL, President 
W. D. CROPPER, Cashier. 



W. A. GAINER, Vice President. 
O. S. KELLY, Ass't Cashier. 



Ifl 



Let's Stop "Kidding" Ourselves 



\ 



ITS ALWAYS BEST TO FACE 
THE FUTURE SQUARELY. 

We are doing this and have greatly reduced 
prices on all 

Suits and Overcoats 

For Men, Young Men and Boys. 

Quality and service have build our business, and 
we will take care of your wants at a great sav- 
ing to you. 

We carry a complete line of Sweater Coats 
and Corduroy Coats and Pants. 



•<►♦♦< 



* 



FLORENCE. 



roused in 



Louis Houston was the guest of 
his father Monday. 

Mies Emma Scott speit Su.'.doy 
wi-h Miss Estella LohHne. 

Viva d rri Irene Piu-pont^- <? p/^t 



the time 
of the transaction the tobacco 
may be v.- far from being in a 
marketable condition that even 
the buyer is unable to determine 
its value, in which case the far- 
mer usually gets what tb« buyer 
estimates to be a safe price "or 
chooses to offer. 

In .a bulletin published by thc- 
Mjaaaaehuaetts Experiment Sta- 
tion it Is stited that "under thP 
contract method of sale th'» fur- 
mer has all to lose With "a eor- 
n spending gain; the huv^r, iitMe 
<>rn othing." The same rtntrmeflt 
would apply equally as wH| to 
y the "auction system, " 
ment Hpeeialists say. 

Because of lack of grades 
tohacco producer l«i u'T'rfeU. to <le- 
termlno If he Is receivings roas- 
prlce for his product. 
'"'uiuuiaou 
1 ' I in one 

1] I 



l1"[):u t- 



There Is n<. b 
rptWe-n I ho 
community n>i 1 I 
«h*re. Qu 

»Uy meji'i lltll 
kt't-s for t 

rocogniiea »U 



••I .0- 

111 I ' k. •' 



Acetylene Plant Went Wrong. 

Something went wrong with the 
acetylene lighting plant of Ber- 
nard Rogers, of Belleview, one 
day recently, when hia son, Hu- 
nlpha<; went into the cellar where 
the plant ia locked, ana after 
putting water in the generator He 
lighted a match for the purpose 
of nepecting the plant, and an 
explosion immediately followed 
Hualpha waa badly burned about 
the hands. and face, but not ser- 
iously The, force of the explos- 
ion shook the entir? dwelling. 

M.t. Sterling— An old negro wKh 
a very boor crop of tobacco 
brought a lond to a loenl ware- 
house last We-Pk. When his account 
una figured out, he had uothlnv 
for bin loud ami w.vh In debt to 

<i>.- warehouse r«r «j 00. which i« • 
did!, t nitre lie Wt Iho i|, 
promising to brl 13 a chicken I ' 
HfJlt for bit debt 



'n« it for bis di 
k Airight 1 1 I ■ 
ruing with (h r 



Tuesday with Bridget Carey 
Miss Oseie Cattleman is improv- 

in ? af ter an illness of bronchitis 
Mrs. J. G Rer.aker ar, i MissMin- 

ne Cahill spei.t VVediie-,.-iav in the 

city. 

Olad to report Batty Lor.g im- 
provir.g a(ter ar illness of three 
weeks. 

* Cliff Norman and wife were 
guests of J. O. Carpenter and wife, 
last Friday. 

W. C. Green, of Covington, was 
the guest of his Bister, Mrs. Eliza 
Arnold, Sunday. 

iy Chas. Souther and wife spent 
Sunday with A C. Souther aa.l 
wife. 

Hugh Carey and sister, Min-+ 
Bridget, ontprtaiaed-their nephew 
Carey ■ Fisher, of Chicago, last 
week, 

Mrs Li o Whltson cntertnine 1 
Thursday at dinner Kra. J. it 
Uhitson, Mrs. F.d Snyder and Mi.s» 
Anna Carlton 

Miss Ina Renaker rur 1 

hi Cy.ilb una , 

w it!i Mis • Kva 
['hilstluii K< 



►♦♦♦♦eeeeeeeeeeeeee* 

RABBIT HASH. t 

I 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦eeeeeeeeeee* 

Mrs. Alice Cloro who has beeu 
sick is getting better. 

Chas. Bachelor made a business 
trip to Covington, Friday 

Frank Scott lost a very valua- 
ble horse Friday night. 

M. E. Ladies Aid met at Lewis 
Mirrick's, Thursday evening 

Mrs. Wilber Kelly Bpent Tuesday 
with her father and mother. 

The river has been lower this 
winter than for several years 

Mrs. Claia McKay, of West Va 
visited Mrs. R. M Wilson, Jasi' 
week. v 

Jim Hager and daughter were 
Sunday guests of Wm. Aylor, of 
McVille 



605 MadisolT Avenue, 

Covington, Kentucky 



Some 01 the farmers have been 
shipping part of their tobacco to 
Madison, Indiana. 

Fred Birkle has bought of Chai 
Craig the blacksmith shop he has 
been operating for two years. 

D. M. Bondurant and wife have 
been spending a week with their 
daughter, Mrs. Elmer Rice, of 
Bellevisw. 

Jim West and wife, of Indian*, 
came over Saturday to see Mrs 
John StiephetiB, Who has been 
very poorly. 



Lumber Pr ices Hav e Come Down 

We have recently put in a stock of Flooring, Ceil- 
ing, and other dressed lumber on a low cost basis, and 
this, with our stock of framing and rough lumber, both 
pine and hardwood, enables us to make a very attrac- 
tive proposition to cash bu yers. 



1 



Mil 



una 



SSi I t 1 him, 



a Itr. (i 
Thursdn 1 



The clock tinker h loekU* 1 



•till I 

idj», of Hebron, 
"ill givs sr 

<urd.it right, st 
K Hall, Kvny U |y 



venerable old people who live ou 
Lick c^eek. have been very poor- 
ly this winter, he being 80 ami 
bbo 75 years old. 

Hubert Rylo took lira 1 T 
Stiphens to the hospital Mon- 
day to be operated upon Thevl 
wire accompanied by Dr Carlrlc 

and u. t Bteoaana, 

Curd of Thanks.— We dcaiw? '-> 
expriRH our appreeiatioM to <j ir 
id di'Mids fy. th ■ kind 
■ nd sMiiinihv shown In th 
1 of mir beloved I. 
ui.ele, Hubert L, Pal 

d> w.»h tft 
Swindler an 
uniing wonU «t 
ehulr f*ir thrli » 
the undertsksr M 
J Sttrr 



NOW IS THE TIME TO BUILD. 

If you are looking for a chance to save money on 
lumber, come and see ua. 

EDGETT & FULTON LUMBER CO., 

(Incorporated) 

219 Crescent Ave. - Erlanger, Ky. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ sieeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee^e 
««*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦*♦♦♦♦••♦«««*« ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦* 




11, .1 

ill's ul 



Subscribe for the Recorder, 
y It One Year - You'll Like It 
Only $1.60 the Year 

ft«r Uon't Pall (o M««U All The Asia In I rtla li 



♦♦♦ee asa e eae a eassee 
» » e ee e »at e ee » »e»e 



#%4 



assaiSMSiiii 



■aaaasi 



MMMMB-tMaHAM, 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



THE PRINTER'S DEVIL 



By Charles Sughit* 



Tfo? ftws Offg/ff to Know, 




U 



BOONE CO. RECORDER] 

PUBLISHED KVKRY THCRSDAV 

•N. E. RIDDELL, Publisher. 



^ntf iod at thf Pot-tofflce in Burling 
»n, Ky„ as Becoud-class Mail 

Many people who complain of 
high prices and other business 
difficulties, help exaggerate these 
. conditions for everyone by their 
•persistent buying on credit. The 
credit habit add* to cost of liv- 
ing, it ties up the country'B re- 
sources, and is a drag on all busi- 
ness. 
; j If every person in Boone eoun- 
' . ty would pay his debts for home 
and personal supplies, and here- 
t after pay c_ah, :t >ould release a 
4tot of local money now held up 
I in credits. The merchant who has 
; to borrow heavily to offset the 
* debts the public owes him, could 
B payl off these loans. This would 
; S„«ut out the charge for interest 
and bad debts which he now has 
'^to add to the price of his 
goods. 

But even more important, it 
would release many thousands of 
dollars to be used right around 
home for business enterprises, 
building houses, helping farmers 
finance their next crop. If more 
tooney were available for loans all 
over the country, interest rates 
would come down, which would 
reduce or.e important expense of 
production. Factories that had 
slowed up on account of high in- 
terest rates, could go ahead with 
full force. 

The business disturbances of the 
year 1920 were due principally to 
a shortage of capital. There was 
not enough money in the country 
to do its business on the inflated 
price level. Conditions are essen- 

aouod, since there is a 

good banging and currency sys- 
tem which protects solvent busi- 
■ Keas men and stocks of merchan- 
'- disc are not heavy. Business could 

;jo ahead with greater confidence 
f the people will provide the 
loanable capital needed for max- 
] imam, production. 

There are two ways for such cap 
viltal to be provided. First, ev- 
eryone to save money and deposit 
x it in good banks. That is always 
; necessary. Second, everyone to 
s quit buying on credit and to pay 
cash, so as to release unnecessary 
loans. Considering how thiswouU 
relieve difficulties and reduce 
j- business costs, it is a wonder 
people don't see it. 



fcfc 




M 




rJSS 



Men as well aa women can help 
reduce the high cost of clothing. 
A little care on the part of ths 
wearer will do much to preserve 
clothing already on hand, and thus 
eliminate the necessity of spend - 
;ipg large sums frequently to re- 
replenish the wardrobe. This is 
brought out in a recent pu 'Plica- 
tion of the United States Depart 
iment of Agriculture, Farmers' Bui 
letin 1089, Selection and Care of 
•Clothing. 

i Immediate attention to rips, 
'Sewing on loosened buttons and 
•hooks, reworking worn button- 
holes, and "preventive" darning 
are recommended as means of pro 
'longing the life of a garment 
The latter repair measure consists 
of reinforcing a worn place with 
rows of fine stitches or by lay- 
ing a piece of cloth under it ana 
■dan.ing it do.vn with ravelings 
taf the material The heel and toes 
I of stockings and socks especially 
4ftay he treated this way before a 
i-iiole' is entirely worn through. 
' Shortening sleeves or trousers a 
little to do away with a worn 
or putting new cuffs and 
or new trimmings on a 
Iress may often add months to t lie 
fe of a garment. 



GENUINE 

111 I 

L 

DURHAM 

tobacco makes 50 
good cigarettes for 

10c 

■ -i .. " " r i 

... , , . . , i 

Cow Peas For Hogs and Cows. 

At the Arkansas Agricultural Ex i 
periment Station, steers fattenea 
on cowpea pasture and cottonseed j 
meal made an average gain of two ! 
pounds a day for 90 days. As 
long as the cowpea vines were 
green and considerable seed was 
available, very little cottonseed 
meal was eaten. The cost per 
pound of gain was only two cents 
for the cottonseed meal, thuB 
showing the high value of the 
cowpea pasturage .The Oklahom.i 
Agricultural Experiment Station 
reports that cowpeas planted in 
July furnished two grazing per- 
iods for milk cows before frost, 
and that the flow of milk was 
noticeably increased. 

It a feeding trial at tlie Ala- 
bama Agricultural Experiment Sta 
tion it was found that pigs fed 
on corn alone gained 0.36 pounds 
daily, while hogs on cowpea pas- 
ture and corn gained 0.97 pounds 
daily, consuming 36 per cent less 
corn for each pouna gained. The 
same station conducted a feeding 
experiment with pastor age for 
dairy cows, using an upland corn- 
field from which the ears had 
been removed and in which cow- 
peas had been drilled between ths 
rows. The field was first pastured 
by three milk cows and later 
by three dry cows. The milk 
cows in the meantime received 3 
pounds of cottonseed meal daily. 
On this pasturage the yield of 
milk was 15.8 per cent greater and 
the yield of butter 9.5 per cent 
higher than when the cows with 
the same grain feed ran on a good 
pasture of Bermuda grass, caTpet 
grass, and lespedeza. In addition 
fo the increase in milk and but- 
ter, the milk cows gained a total 
of 85 pounds during the 19 days 
and the dry cows 53 pounds in 9 
days. 



-If yrm w ish to arise at a <i r- 
hour. make with your right 

>t as many marks on the floor 
.•a the hour on which you wish 
to Wake, then go to bed back- 
; ward. 
' To insure happy dreams burn 
some hazel nuts and do tb° asht k » 
•ap in a package which you must 
place beneath your pillow, you 
•ill then dream aweetly. 

If you wish to marry never look 
urder the bed. 

The Hirdoos say it Is bad 1-jck 
to sleep with your head to the 
forth, but sleeping with ycip- 
head to the south promote* Ion- 



•S*fc 



It \% oonsidere+i by *r>i;v i.:i- 
,#ons dangerous to sleep while 
thirsty, sf or they believe the soul 
leuvss the body in search of wat- 
er, and if the body should awake 
; too quickly the soul might not 
live time to return to it, so 
the body would die. 
In Oormany the nightmare is !>©- 

Ka to he * •pevtrit being 

which plaoes Itself upon the breust 
of the slsepsr depriving him of 
tfc* jnower «f utterance or mo- 

lH4<y<l. Of Newport, 
^■Hn U* weok via 
I Suttdlard 4«* *tf» 



Sweet Cream Butter Kotos 
Without Strong Flavor 

The Dairy Division U. 8. De- 
partment of Agriculture, advises a 
Larger use of sweet cream butter, 
because of its better keeping qual- 
ity. 

The United States Navy is a 
Large consumer of this kind of 
butter, made according to the Wa- 
vy specifications from unripeaaed 
or sweet cream, instead of from 
the cream ripened to sourness, of 
u hieh most creamery butter is 
made — 

The principal reason the Navy 
desires sweet cream butter is that 
it keeps r*etCer. As the larger 
part of the butter supply is made 
during the summer months, it is 
necessary to put some of it in 
cold storage in order to have 
enough for winter, and th the 
course of time it develops var- 
ious more or less undesirable flav- 
ors due to long storage. Butter 
made from swe.>t cream does not 
develop such flavors for x much 
Longer time, if at all. Many 
months after k has been made 
it is equal to fre*h butter pro- 
vided it has been kept under prop 
er conditions; hence sweet cream 
butter is especially suitable for 
shipping to distant countries, and 
for long voyages. 

Sweet cream butter Is gradually 
coming into wider favor in the 
domestic market It has not so pro 
nounced a flavor a* ordinary but- 
ter, but it Iuih a mild creamy fla- 
vor whish is pleasing 

Petor Sanders, aged father «f 
J. B Sanders, died at the home 
of his son in Covington, on the 
this place, but now at the Han 

I Years of ago and had heentn fall- 
ing health for several months. 




Here Is the Place Where Cash 

Buys the Most Goods 

For a Dollar. 

Telephone Flour, per bbl $12.00 

24 lb. Sack .$1.50 12 1b. Sack 75c 

Granulated Su^ar, lb. 9c, 100 lbs 8.50 

Fancy Grain Hominy, 3 lbs. for 10 

Fancy Navy Beans, per lb 06 

Special— 3 large cans Campbell's Beans * 35 

Fancy Dried. Peaches, peeled, 2 ' K *. ... Rlj 

Fency Red Clover, per bus 13.75 

Alfalfa Clover, per bus 1 1.75 

Timothy Seed, per bus 3.90 

Dry Goods. 

Percales, yard wide, per yard 23c 

Dress and Apron Ginghams, per yard 18c 

Heavy Outing Flannel, per yard 25c 

Corduroy Pants, $6.00 value 4*00 

Heavy Grade Cotton Pants, $5.00 value 2.25 

Overalls, $3.00 value 1.75 

Cotton Jackets. $3.00 value 1.75 

A great many other articles in Dry Goods and Notions 
REDUCED ACCORDINGLY. 

— — — — ■ ■■'! I I* I ■ I ■ | I — ■■ I. ■»■■-. ■! — ■ |l m — „ — III 

Shoes Reduced 15 to 30 iz 

BRING ME YOUR EGGS 

If they grade No. 1, — I will pay you within 3c of quota- 
tions ; if they grade No. 2, within 4c of quotation. 
40c per pound paid for good butter. 
A Large assortment of First Class Goods to select from 
—GIVE ME A CALL— 

W. L. KIRKPATRICK 

Burlington, Kentucky. 



The Right Start 



The right start counts for a lot with chickons. 
Often - ; * "pel^th- Hifferen^ between profitable 
success and expensive failure. Professor Harry 
R. Lewis, head of the New Jersey Poultry Ex- 
periment Station, will tell you how to get the 
right start in coming issues of 

<Z7fe COUNTRY 
GENTLEMAN 

In a remarkable series of fifteen penetrating 
articles He wilL characterize, one by one, the 
. major poultry ^breeds and will point the way 
to bigger profits with each. 




Dependable Seeds 

Hill's Seeds are all expertly tested and show the highest 
germination and purity percentage. GOOD, 
dean sound seed— the kind it pays to buy. " 

We buy seed in carload lots therefore- get it at lower 
prices — that is why. 

WE RETAIL TO THE FARMER AT 
WHOLESALE PRICES. 

Timothy, Alsike Clover, Red Clover, 

Sapling Clover, Alfalfa, Red Top, 

Blue Grass, Orchard Grass, Yellow 

and White Sweet Clover, Etc. 

GARDEN SEED— All varieties, new, good sound seed- 
Special prices to truck gardeners- and farmers who buy 
in large amounts. 

HILL'S SEEDS DO GROW. 

Write to Department B for price list on seeds. 



Successful pouhrymen say that 
The Country Gentleman 
h more helpful to them than 
the exclusive poultry journals. 
In a single year it prints the 
equivalent of more than 650 
book pages on poultry alone — 
top-notch material, all of it, by 
such authorities as Victor O. 
Aubry , James Dryden and Ral- 



ston R. Hannas. And that is 
only one department of an all- 
round farm service that offers 
concrete help with every prob- 
lem of your farm business. A 
whole year of this service— 52 
great issues— costs but $1. If 
you send me your check or a dol- 
lar bill today. 111 see that your 
subscription starts next week. 



You need it in your business 

Eva May Rises 



Phone Erl. 50- Y 



Erlanger, Ky 



Aa authorised subscription representative of 

TksCeaatry Ceadeasu TksLasW Hssss Jsaraal TbsSattrosy Erasta* 
SZImm-UM i2i««-».ss r 



The Best Coffee Money can Buy 



NOBETTER COFFEE 
Pound 35c. 

Four pounds delivered by Parcel Post, postpaid. 

On sale in Burlington by W. L. Kirkpatrick. 

" " " Grant by *...B. D. Rice 

" Union by Rachel C& Norman 

Hebron by M. L. Crutchsr 



Northern Kentucky's! Ba^SESE 



Pre-lnventory 

Shoe Sale 

Prices Cut to The Quick 

Far two weeks you can 
• get Shoes at Pre- 
war Prices. 

Profits Forgotten 

DAVIS 






<** 



v- 



f 

<4 



The Shoe Man 



Rising Sun, 



Indiana. 



;WflT.Xl 



nhlHl 



H 



Long Distance Phone 8. 1855 and S. 1856. 

letafellahad 1063. 



This Rapid Aoa. 
Man's business requires bait*. Th* 
at era*, buslossa and professional man 
eats la a harry and gats dyspap.la. B* 
walks In a hurry and gets apoplaxy. 
•U talks la a hurra and gala tha Us\ 
He doaa business to a hurry and be- 
comaa a bankrupt Ha merries la a 
hairy and forgtts It In a hurry. Be 
ooakew his will in a hurry end leaves) a 
legal contest II V diss la ■ hurry sad 
t» the d**li— «ad his trlba ha* 



Kejbeeribr io# tae aU 



iabeaHbe foe th* MCORDB» 



iper Flower Arrangement 
Tha tossenttal point In all flower ar> 
rangaraWnt Is that there shall b. form 
and balance. y , t thai th. composition 
•hall net be perfectly symmetrical, as 
perfecr.iyniuntry la not found In na- 
ture. In order to attain the desired 
affect the flower stalks and branches 
•aad are carefully bant and twisted, 
aad mis work Is don. with such dell- 
ascy sad dnterity aa to conceal the 
fact that their forms nav. bos* a> 
*? unit -tat 




■ OOM« COPNTY RlCOtnn 







I will sell at public Auction at my farm, 41-2 
miles south of Burlington, Ky., on the 
Burlington and Big Bone Road, on 

WM *• 4 





5 th, 1921 



The Following Property: 



BUck Mare 12 yeors old, bay mare 4 years old, both first-class farm mares lady broke 
Thornhill Road Wagon, good as new; Iron wheel truck wagon, Hayframc. Rockbed' 
new 2 .*rse Sled, Rubber Tun ~<fcgy, Oliver Riding Cultivator, 2-horse Cornonll 1-h 
CorndriU, Disc Harrow, 'A' Harrow, E. Breaking Plow, No. 20 Breaking Plow' Hill- 
ad* "ow, 2-horse Jumping Shovel Plow, 1-h. Jumping Shovel Plow, Double Shovel 
McCormick Mowing Machine, Hayrake, Fairbank Platform Scries, Sorghum Mill and 

Z*** T ? ^ dth « Tug Harncss ' 4 Lather Horse Collars, 2 Work Bridles, Riding 
Bridle, 4 Leather Halters, 2 sets Buggy Harness, set Breast Chains, Man's Saddle Hay- 
fork and rope, Blocks and Ropes, 3 Pitchforks, Single and Doubletrees, set Stretchers 
Log Cham, Log Bolsters, and other articles too numerous to mention. 

TERMS OF SALE. ~ 

All sums of $10 and under, cash ; on sums over $10, a cred- 
it of 12f months without interest, will be given purchasers to 
give notes with good security payable at the Peoples Deposit 
Bank, Burlington, Ky., before removing property. ~ — 

W. L. Stephens. 

LUTE BRADFOBD, Auct. Sale to begin at 12:80 




"Trade Where They All Trade." 



CoringtoD's Largest Seed and Grocery House 

Offers high grade tested seed at the very lowest possible prices consistent with 
quality. We do not carry any second or third grades as we figure the best is 
none too good tor a good farmer and our experience has been that 99 out of every 
100 want the best seed obtainable. 

When we quote you on seed you may rest assured we are quoting the best 
grade. Our TIMOTHY, CLOVER and ALSIKE tests 99.50 per cent puTe 

or better. ~ 

Our Alfalfa is American, northern grown, and we will mrnish, tree, euough 
inoculating bacteria for what you buy. 

Blue Gn*. Orchard <*«•* Red Top, Abike, Sweet Clover, Lawn Grass. 
AU nigh grade. Send yonr order or write for prices. * 



^ 



GOLDEN BLEND COFFEE, pound 

5-gal. Can New Orleans Molasses . $4.00 

100 Lb. Half Bbl. Lake Herring ... 8.00 

50 Lb. Half Bbl. Lakr Herring. . . . 5.00 

20 Lb. Pail Lake Herring 240 

25 Lb. Bag Blatchford's Calf Meal 1.50 
KANSAS CREAM or ARCADE FLOUR 

Barrel in wood, $12.00; Barrel in 98-Ib. Cotton Bags 



35c 



100 Lb. Bag Blatchford's Calf Meal 5.50 

100 Lb. Bag Nary Bean*..... 5.00 

150 Lb. Bag Potatoes 3.00 

100 Lb. Bag H. & E. or Jack Frost 

Granulated Sugar 8.75 



$11.50 



f ccde 



WFuGes 



2* GROCER fES. FLOUR SEEDS. MEDIC /NFS 
19-2 / P/KF ST AS 20W.7Z" ST 



Averts Diphtheria Epidemic. 

Striking evidence of the value 
of a full-time county health de- 
partment is furnished by the ex- 
perieneee two neighboring Blue 

?i r ^i2 Un ^f have ^d w «h 
diphtheria this winter 

JtL Scott ,°?, u 5 t y. w here there is 
SS, * *pll-ttme County Health 
Department, a ease of the dis- 

r£H W ,^ dis ? >vered in a «*ool. 
The child who was suffering was 
removed immediately to hiAom" 
his family was quarantined, and 
ri^i r< ^2 where the disease had 
£22°£?iii W E ^^ted. Swabs, 
"f^t ° f *" the eWWren* throats 
t-u i * ame room ' wer ® »ent to 

T&S^^Z ° f the State Board of 
Health for examination, and when 
it was found that none of the chil- 
dren had the disease, they all 

ZfiX ^I 6 ". J 1 Schick test to see 
which would develop diphtheria 
if exposed to it. Those /ho .were 
not found to be immune immed- 

Sf^LrSf**^? an insulation 
to prevent their acquiring it As 
a result of these energetic mew! 
urea only one case of the di^an* 
developed in Scott county an^ 
there wer- - ^jfe^s. ' 

also developed diphtheria in a 
school in tte county seat/There 
the similarity ends. This county 
has no fuU-time health depart - 
merit, only a physician Veceiving 
•200 a year, and the absence of 
someone whose sole business ii 
was to stamp out diphtheria im- 
mediately already has led to ih.- 
closing of the school in thecoun- 
ftl* « oun , t y-»e«t 'or sixty days, to 
the development of 138 cases of 

li«.J d48ea8e i J n the county, and to 
eleven deaths. 

i;ft P !^ fr01 ?, $ e savin JP oL hu »an 
Ufe and suffering in Scott coun- 
ty, and its woeful waste in the 
neighboring county, the effective 
preventive measures in Scott dia 
not cost tne taxpayers of that 
county a cent outside of its regu 
Jar expenditure for health work 

ftS.^? 1 ^ 0r i, ng «> un ty. hy actual 
figures, already has spent sU.000 
in combating diphtheriarand there 
£ no, way of calculating how much 
has been spent by private fam 
Oies for physicians, nurses, under 
ctw and . the other expenses in- 
cident to sickness and death. 

Heavy Trucks ara Ruin- 
ing Roads of Connty. 

We saw something the other 
day that well illustrates just whv 
«t is that the roads of our coun- 
ty have so short Ufe. A truck 
loaded with tobacco presumably 
from Owen county, on its wav to 
Carrollton market, passed throueh 
town and the weight of the to- 
bacco must have been at least 4- 
000 pounds. What this did t'o 
the roads, which were m a yield- 
ing condition, can welt be imagin- 
ed. Yet people wonder why it is 
that roads do not last indefinite- 
ly- 

There is no desire to close the 
lu ?>*?, tru <*s, for these form 
the highly favored way of trans- 
portation at this time. The truck 
i!LJL . «»nunfr«ial and industrial 
necessity and has come to stay, 

2™? an increasing number in use 
each year. 

rtS&i t i here ^ U a deaire and there 
should be the enforcement of leg 

St? 00 , *£ d watchfulness on the 
part of the public to see that 
trucks are not so heavily loadea 
^uZ*% ^r one We noticed the 
° t |ELi d *J r - *1? truck should be per 
mitted on the roads, at teastat 

?h« ta i n ^ Beafl ° n8 of tbe y«»r, when 
i h ^ latter *"> mort **««y dam- 
? g ^U Carry 2 n S OVer « ton of 
hSFii, wW ^ u would be about 
SSL^T weight of the load of 
tobacco referred to. The roads are 
Ft 1Ven *°° Ji* 1 * Protection, S 
w IfW tbe PnbUc sentiment 

terested to see that this very nec- 
essary ,ad unct to our civilization 
would be better cared foi The 
people who wantonly disregard 
should^ re » ula «"g road faSrfie 
should be made to' respect them- 
Warsaw Independent 

You can see the same condition* 
on Boon e county road s any day 

Monday's Tobacco Market. 



^ 



WHOLESALE-"C«iii«loii'. Lar««.t W and Giwwy Home"- RETAIL 

Covington, Kentucky. 

Phones South 338 and 336. 
United State* Wheat Director license No. 030057- Y. 
U. S. Food Administration License No. G-1770. 




LOGAN FOSTER. 



B. B. ALLPHIN. 



Foster & Allphin 

Real Estate and Auction Sales Co. 

I am associated with the above flrm and srllolt your busi- 
Stock and other Personal property. 

We do the advertising, auction your sale, clerk and col- 
lect. All you have to do Is give us property list. 



Srttta, H.n,» write. Mrs. H^S 
N. J. 

■Ji 1?%?.} T*"'. lnto i owr J»» »«« taaai my best 

Gwlky A P.«tt, BurBnston, Ky. 



Covington 

Carrouton 

Cynthiana 

Flemingsburg 

Frankfort 

Lexington 

Maysvill© 

Paris 

Walton 



Per 100 lbs. 
$21.41 
15.40 
9.60 
13.15 
16.00 
15.00 
19.20 
14.78 
No Sale 



Wesleys Tungate's crop of to- 
*£% of Taylorsport, averageJ 
IJ3.77 at Covington, Monday 

General Market. 



FOSTER & ALLPHIN 

Corington, Ky. Walton, Ky. Phone 37 Con. £ 

B. B. ALLPHIN, Local Agent, Walton, Ky. <*£ 

ennn^n iiMswn^ns^nnennnnnnwnaMsnsseansa'"' '"■» r ■ — s»— ssssi— i^— es^asis—i a^^^^^^— ^»— — ^-^^-^- ^ ^ 

♦eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee ittiiiiiMM t 

DO YOU TAKE THK RECORDER? 

If Not Try It One year. 



For Sale. 

^*R aI V MiI ^ Can8 ' one with f »"c«t 
80-lb. Cap Butter Worker 

15-gal. Stone Jar 

6-gal. Bucket, with lid 

Hsavy 10-qt. Milk Pail 

Strainer 

All on sale now but dairy supplies, 
which can be had on Feby. 86th. 
' Leather Halters (horse or cow) 

Tie Chains ' 

lie-out Chains. 80 ft. long 

Plow, J ton Straw 

Harrow, Sewing Machine 

1 1-4 Gasoline Engine ( Vim 1 

Writing Desk, Lamp 

Dresser, oir walnut 

Xxtenslou Table— oak 

Oil Air Oil Stovs—8 burners 
-OH Air Oil Stove Oven 
Several dos. Fruit Jars- i gallons, 



Potatoes 80 and 95c 100 lb sack 
Apples, Baldwin $4.00 barrel 
Tomatoes bo4 $4.00 
Onion 75c and $1.25 per loo lbs 
Calves $10.00 to $13 25 
Hogs $9.00 to $10.01 
Lambs 8.00 to $1025 
Sheep 3.26 to $8 26," 
Medium Steers 7.S8 to $9 la. 
Feeding Steers 6.00 to $8 50- 
^an* 24 - 60 Per ton. 
Middlings $22.00 per ton 
Wheat 11.90 buaneL 
Wheat-May $i.<g pe r busheL 
Com 60 cento per busheL 
Corn-May 64 cents per bushel. 

H^f Y^ 6 *"»*«* *» th * Cin- 
cinnati Southern Rellroad shops 

^.h^rto*, Ky., announcing there 

jetioa in 



-»e+e*e*4>e«+«e**e*e*eo+«*« »♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»#»»♦♦< 




\Successors to 

C. W. Myers 

Florence. Kg. 

We had two Wg days last Friday and Saturtlay. 
Many people from miles surrounding have taken 
advantage of our low prices. 

We are basing our success on quality and the low- 
est possible prices of our merchandise, and are re- 
joicing over the satisfaction expressed by the people. 



GROCERIES ^0 ^^ Swr 



83c 



TELEPHONE FLOUR 

1 2| lb. Sack ... 75c 24i lb. Sack .... $1.50 

Diamond Brand, lb. 24c 
Diamond Brand B, lb. 29c 
Diamond Brand C A., 34c 



COFFEE 



FINE TABLE MEAL 3c a Pound 

10 Pound. 28c 



Jersey Corn Flak es, 10c pkg 

Delicious S^eseTlflSc 

(kept in cold storage) 
TRY IT AND SEE THE DIFFERENCE 



Rice 8c lb 

Grapefruit 10c 

Oranges, per doz 35c 

P. & G. Soap, a bar 7c 



WE BUY YOUR EGGS AND BUTTER.' 



DRY GOODS 

We have just received a fine selection of 
Calicoes and Dress Ginghams 

O. N. T. Thread, a •pool. 7 C 

Calico, 24 inches wide, a yard 12k 

Drew G in g h ann, 27 in. wide, a yard. 19c 

Fine Linen Finish Toweling, a yd 12*c 

Men's Chambray Shirts 98c 

Men's Warm Socks, a pair 18c 



WE BUY YOUR EGGS AND BUTTER 



Shoes 



Men's "Lion Brand" Shoes $3.45 and up 

Men's "Bald Band" Rubbers and Felts ..... 6.00 
We handle Boys' Lion Brand and Buster Brown Shoes. 

Rubbers for 

Misses' Boys' Ladies and Men 
Prices Reduced 10 per cent 



WE BUY YOUR EGGS AND BUTTER 



We handle all kinds of feed for cattle and poultry 
We handle the best Seeds at Right Prices. 
We have what you want, if not-wewill get it. 

Watch Us Grow. Thank You 



Brown & Dunson, 



Successors to C, W. MYERS 

Florence, , - - Kentucky 






Notice. 




rea 



and pints 

. Qseollas Can. 

miomXbl 



-KAflR. 

Ludlow, Ky . M. F. D. 



would be a general redueu 
the working lorce at the .ho P i 

?£? . 8atuf ? ay l Xt w " •""muted 
thut approximately 100 men will 
be throwa out of employment. 
?Jfi Wv ^"a***" o* mon were 

month Reduction lu the foroe oi 
•hop employees te eaid to have 
hl %Z ? ad f !t* 8«nw^t 
cent of their employee, "^ 



uSTCmS 



Uuolsimed Depoaita in Erlanger 
Deposit Bank, Erlanger, Ky., over 
five years : 

Names. Credit 

D.C. Clark t 60 00 

C. H. Garvey 310 00 

Mary Crisler Borders 6 00 

J. Q. KUton 5 00 

John OUaer, Ir 50 00 

J. W. Nead, Chairman 34 60 

I, W. P. Gardner, oaahier, uf the 
above bank, do certify that the above 
list Is correct to the beat of my 
knowledge and belief. 

W. P. GARDNER. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me 
this JJUh day of Jauy, ltntl. 

L. A. HENTLKR 
Notary PubUe KenUm Co. 
My nommieaiun expires Jan. 14, lSxi 



Four Generation. OMttt 71 



[One roof abetters four gecera- 
tiona of the Gaiaee-Cropper-Car- 
roll family, residents of Louisville 
for the past twenty-five years. 

Mae, L. V Gaines, the great- 
X ***** to Tl t years old; Mow. p. 

,u. Cropper, the grandmcther, 51; 
If 1 *" ^ m «Sl? War(r c ««-oll, mother, 
2ft, and William Edward Carroll 
Jij *% yoare old. 

n/«?^ *S? e onel, <* n bo**. •* 
William Edward Jr, can, of hav- 
ing two great -grandmothers, for 
P»..tT*»t-f wndmothor Cropper, 78 
Je Uvinir In Boone eounty. 

Mrs. Carroll's mother and greed- 
mother ware uativee oi Boeee 
county, but cam» to Loolevllie ft* 

c srvr 



." 



lt«e difflenlt to soevteese lesi- 
er that he lent smarter, than nee 
who work. 



ter of years. 
the pres i d e nt 

_The family Uvea at 



*S 



the 



Ceart. 






■saftansi 



sasaai 



BiBvamBvsvsiBftBsMMMMI 



mm 



BuoNE 



•& 



It 



MMKMMM 



[NCOLN TrtE MAN 





*%t aoi Aim who 
tameless j*ll down the 

house otaao16er,kt& 
himself." U 

v 
A recent writer on Lincoln as a 
"lover of mankind" has likened him 
to two other great men who have be- 
come a common possession of our 
V^nglo-Saxon race. Although they 
seem almost as far separated from 
each other as from Lincoln himself, 
both Chaucer and Sir Walter Scott 



qualities that provoked a comparison 
apparently so remote. These are the 
qualities of a lover of mankind. 

Chaucer displayed them In depict- 
ing, with sympathy for all, the group 
of widely various characters who made 
their hnmort'nl Canterbury Tilgrlmage 
together. Scott displayed them not 
only through the creatures of his Im- 
agination, but also In his recorded re- 
lations with all his fellow .beings. In 
.that respect Chaucer Is at a disad- 
vantage, because he lived long before 
biography had attained anything"like 
Its modern abundance. Lincoln, later 
thai: Scott, and more tempting to bi- 



ographers because of his high place,^ 
Is the most fully reoo«w« « . <-«*« 
—although there Is no single book 
about him that seems so sure to per- 
sist as the "Life of Scott," by Scott's 
son-in-law, Lockbtrt 

It is In the very variety and extent 
of the studies of Lincoln's character 
that the strength of his bold on the 
imagination of the world is shown. 
Flftv-six years have passed since 
he met his tragic death. Through all 
that period the Interpretations of his 
character— historical, analytical, po- 
etical— have steadily Increased In num- 
ber. The bare facts of his unique, 
yet straWly typical and significant 
career, arrange themselves in per- 
spective like the acts of a great up- 
lifting t...„- V- M he *** Uved to ™ e 
days when myths were made, It Is 
easy to Imagine that In the process 
of time he would have grown Into a 
great mvthlcal figure, a King Arthur 
of the New World, a half-divine hero 
like those that we associate with the 
•most distant antiquity. 

But he belonged to no such period. 
His age is one of the most amply re- 



reveal to the careful observer the^corded In all history, and the records 

of his life are so Intertwined witn 
those of men and events quite with- 
out poetic or heroic suggestion, that 
his feet can never he wholly removed, 
from the earth. Indeed, It Is much 
better that no such possibility exists. 
We need to know that out of our com- 
mon life can spring so extraordinary 
an example of the development of 
which our human nature Is capable. 
When all is said and done, when his 
wisdom, his patience, his sacrifice are 
fully remembered, we shall delight 
pre-eminently to recall him as the 
friendly, huniorous, accessible lover of 
mankind.— Youth's Companion. 



e*****e*e*****«+e«>**«***** 

* ♦• 

* HEBfcON. * 

* ♦ 
»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Mrs. Myrtle Stephenson la sick 
at the (home of h'er aunt, Miaa 
Ottie Rouse. v 

William Jfcrnum in "Wolves of 
the NiehtV at Hebron Theater 
next Saturday niglK. 

Rev. Shepherd, of Independence, 
was the guest of Rev. Omer anu 
family, Saturday and Sunday. 

Leslie Baker and family, of Lud- 
low, were calling on Edward Ba- 
ker and family, Sunday afternoon. 

Lewie HsM&ng awl wife expect 
to leave -ft*r St: Petersburg, r\a., 
this week, and wiU be gone about 
two months. i 

Barl Aylor and family and ML. 
Aylor and wife, spent Sunday at 
Ludlow, guests or Lewis Riddell P 
and family. 

Frank Aylor and wife spent las 
Sunday with, her father and moth- 
er Harry Kilgour and wife, of 
Franeesviue. 

Mrs. Brenda Garnett, of Bullitta- 
viUe, spent from Thursday until 
Sunday of last week with Elmer 
Miller and family.- , 

Several from here attended tho 
surprise party at Mr. Robt. Day's, 
at Francesviile, Saturday night, "it 
being his birthday. 




♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦ 

♦ VERONA ♦ 



AID FOR CHINESE 

WHson Calls On Kentuckians 

to Save 40,000,000 From 

Starvation 



E. Y. MULLINS~I8 CHAIRMAN 



Forty million Chinese face starva- 

tbough relief be seaymme- 

mUllous fit A* Dafore 

This Is taV.sumnury of 

to help^Ue C'tfnes* and 
the BA^^Swfci&JJI 
lias, president of the Southern Baptist II 
Theological Seminary, Louisville, Ky- 
snswered by accepting the chairman- 
ship for Kentucky of the Chlna/Fsm- 
Ine Fund. r 

Dr. Mullius la making public the ^ 
President's prodamtlon, said no cam- 
paign, in the ^.>e of a personally so- 
licited canvass, would be held, but be- 
ginning early In February the people 
of Kentucky would be asked to seal 
voluntary contributions to the State 



Henry . Aylor and family and 
Mrs. Oaines will keep house for 
Mr. and Mrs. L, C. Harding whilo>Headqnarters in Louisville, 
they are in the sunny south. President Wilson's proclamation fol- 

Quite a number of the young 
folks from this school took the 
common school examination last 
Friday and Saturday at Burling- 
ton. ' x 

Boys take my advice, keep off 
of Lover's Lane with your ma- 
chines. There will be plenty of 
time when that road^can be trav- 
eled. 



lows: 

"A famiue, alarming In its propor- 
tions, today holds In its grip several 
Important provlnoes In China. , The 
crop failure Is complete, and the pres- 
ent distress, which is great, is likely, 
befoce winter has run its course, 
come appalling. In fact, our 
marie and consular agencies ii 
^_r5m *W?*£i *"r»loss resulting from 
death In distressing form may run into 
millions of souls. It Is certalnttmt the 
b*6al Government and e«T^ttshetf 
* agencies of relief arc unaOIe to cope 
g+e*eeee**e*ee*eeee**eeee* with the magnitude of the disaster 



IS llfcOlJ, 

se, to be- 
ar dlpio- 
in China, 



Lincoln and Sumner. 
Lincoln was modestly proud of his 
stature amHJf the effect of the physical 

. man, especially when actuated by 
noble sentiments. He used to speak 
of his height to every tall man he 
met, and to propose measuring — an- 
other guileless habit of self -gratifica- 
tion. The only refusal he is known 
to have received was from Charles 

"Sumner, Who was also tall and proud 
of his height. Sumner was worrying 

-the President, as he often did, about 
some perplexing matter, when Lincoln 
abruptly challenged him to measure. 

. /'Sumner declined," said Lincoln, "mak- 

1 tag a fine speech about this being the 

. time for uniting our fronts against 
the enemy, and not our backs. But P 
guess he was afraid, though he is a 
good piece of a man. I. have never 

- had much to do with bishops where I 
live, but, do yon know, Sumner Is my 
idea of a bishop." — Harper's Weekly. 



As Lincoln Is Remembered. 
j The work he did, the sum of his 
deeds and their great fruitage, may 
Inspire the chronicler of our national 
life and the recorder of God's hand- 
writing In the annals of His world; 
but to the rank and file, whp know 
but vaguely the details of his heroic 
achievements, the memory of Lincoln 
takes the form of a warming, loving, 
saddening personal presence, a latter- 
day reflection of the everlasting Man 
of Sorrows. 



Why Lincoln Helped a Bug. 

President Lincoln was walking with 
a friend about Washington and turned 
back for some distance to assist a 
beetle that had got on Its back and 
lay on the walk, legs sprawling In air, 
vainly trying to turn Itself over. The 
friend expressed surprise that the 
President, burdened with the pares of 
a warring nation, should find time to 
spore in assisting a bug. 

"Well," said Lincoln, with that 
homely sincerity that touched the 
hearts of millions of bis countrymen, 
"do you know that If I had left that 
bug struggltag/'fbere on his back I 
wouldn't have felt Just right? I wanted 
to put him on his feet and give him 
an equal chance with all the other 
bugs of his class." 



The Verona bank will install 
burglar alarm. 

J. Newton Powers W. B Cot- 
ton and Hugh Vest, spent a few 
days in Louisville last week on 
business. 

. We learn that ths Equitable 
Bank and Trust Co., has been ap- 
pointed administrator of the es- 
tate of James Anderson. 

Quite a number of farmers are 
hauling their tobacco to Walton 
loose leaf - warehouses, and are 
well pleafcd with prices. 

The young" folks were tender- 
ed a dance at the home of Sam 
Hicks, last Saturday night, which 
was well attended and enjoyed 
by all., 

Rev. Charley Hind, formerly of 
21st »ult. Mr. Sanders was past 81 
tist Seminary, at Louisville, Ky„ 
delivered a very interesting ser- 
mon >at New Beth?l church last 
Sunday. Bro. Hind is the son of 
James Hind. 

J. M Powers and wife were 
called to St. Elizabeth hospital, 
Covington, last Monday, where 
Miss Corjne Powers, had under- 
went an operation for append- 
icitis. She is the youngest daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Pow- 
ers, of Rising Sun, Indiana. 



Cut Lincoln Off His List 
General Huldekoper In 1862 detailed 
two companies of his regiment to 
guard President Lincoln's summer resi- 
dence. He saw the President constant- i 
ly and they became real friends. 

The first time the general met the 
President, Lincoln, iWho had heard that 
the Huidekopers came from Holland, 
Inquired : "What Is the difference be- 
tween an Amsterdam Dutchman and 
any other damn Dutchman?" 

And the general, who admired Lin- 
coln above all other Americans, adds: 
"If I had had any awe of the Presi- 
dent It was then and there forever 
gone."— G Ira rd, in Philadelphia Ledger. 



With a Nation's Tribute 










•■•••jsnsgisnsjseay fff*Pf*f'f t • WW WW m 

♦ . ♦ 

• ONION. ' ♦ 

eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee* 

Mrs. B. L Sleek Sundayed with 
Mrs. Anderson 

Pat Norman was an 
caller here Thursday 

Mrs. Fannie Sleet Is nursing Mrs 
Anderson and Mrs. Lame. 

Miss Eunle Adams has sufficient 
ly recovered to resume her school 
work. . * 

The firm of Smith & Pope have 
dissolved /partnership, and Mrs. 
Smith is the sole owner now. 

Mrs. Geo. Barlow and Mrs Rich- 
ard Feldhaus spent last Wednes- 
day with Mrs. Owen TJlankeubek- 
er. 

Mrs. 8. C, Hicks entertained the 
W M U last Friday afternoon. 
Mrs. /W. A M. Wood and Mra, 
Maxfield, of Erlar.ger, were pres- 
eit. Mrs. Maxfield spoke oji wo- 
men's Work in the Central Dis- 
trict. Mrs. Wood, who has Just 
returned from the Women's Con- 
vention at Louisville, had for her 
subject "Pergonal Service* sad 
those who failed to heir her 
missed something worth while. 

Owen Presser and wife ^enter- 
tained the young folks with a 
Rook party Friday night, Jan. 28. 
Those present were Virginia ana 
Cathryn Utz, Shelly Senour, Annie 
Mae Bristow, Myrtie Stephens, 
Ruth Stephenson, Cora and Clara 
Clegg, Mabel Rouse, Ray Con ley, 
Arnold Conley, Lloyd Weaver, Al- 

srin fla rrinnn HnmnH H^gg, Will- 
iam P?ixon, A Inert Wilson and 
Nick Jones. 



which faces them. 

"Under the circumstances, relief to» 
be effective should be granted quickly. 
Once more an opportunity U offered 
te-the American people to show that 
prompt and generous response with 
which they have Invariably met the 
call of their brother nations in dis- 
tress. 

The case of China, I regard as es- 
pecially worthy of tho earnest atten- 
tion of our citlxens. To an unusual de- 
gree the Chinese people look to us for 
counsel and for effective friendship. 
Our churches, through their religious 
and medical missionaries, their 
schools and colleges and our phi- 
lanthropic foundations have rendered 
China au Incalculable benefit, which 
her people recognize with gratlture and 
devoUon to the United States. There- 
fore not only In the name of humanity 
but in that of friendliness Which we 
feel for a great people In distress, I 
venture to ask our citizens shall, even 
though the task of giving is not today 
a light one, respond as they can to this 
distant but appealing cry for help." 

President Wilson In sending his proc- 
lamation to Dr. Mullins and through 
lam to be made public, called on thv 
seminary president to take charge of 
the campaign in Kentucky. 

Norman H,. Davis, Under Secretary 
of State, Is honorary treasurer, and 
Vernon Munroe is treasurer for the 
national campaign. Joseph Burge, of 
the Peaslee Gaulbert Company, is 
treasurer for Kentucky. 



r MMa*MA ' MMSL8& L JU K XMJ9nX* BG 



L. T. CLONE, fVealdent. HUBftNT CONNtW. Sse'ty. 

J. L. KITE, Agent. 

Breeders Mutual Fire and Lightning 



%^v^lN8URANCE COMPANY^.* 

Of Beene Connty, Ky. 
Jnauren Wve Stock against Loss by Fire or Lightning. 
\ WRIT! US *0* RATI*. 



IJ5IHG. 



isV 



Ajitbsiobile tube* 'vaA tires rep«ifW : Sy the. Uteut 
process. Bring- me your old tirss and I may be 
able to get several milea'W>re service for you out 

of them. N 

Auto Accessories kept in stock. 
Qoodridge, Portage and Cupplet Tires and Tubes on hand. 

GEORGE PORfER, 

BURLINGTON, KV. 



I 

i 




i 

s 

s 

it* 



place your order lor a car now, 
so you won't be disappointed in the spring. 

PhMtan Hudson $2538.00. Seren Passenger Hudson $2538.00 
Ceupe Hudson - - $3445. Sedan Hudson - ■ - $3874 
Essex Touring $1688. 

Eimx Roadster $1698. 
x Dodge Touring $1390. 

Dodge Coupe $$038. 

Podge Sedan $2298. 

Cleveland Tractor $1395. 

The shore prices are delivered at year door. 

It you want to place an order for any of these cars,— J 

call >£ 

B. B. HUME, Burlinston, Ky. * 



5 




Best Quality— Fair Prices 

Our constantly increasing business 
proves conclusively that "Best Quality 
at Fair PriceB" will win. We test each 
carefully by the latest and most accu- 
rate methods and grind lenses to ex- 
actly suit yod. 

Phone Sooth 1748 

DR. N. F. PENN,6i 3 JU^nS^^Smiiton. Ky 




Why Worry? 



State News. 



We note that many farmers are 
coming to the- tobacco market in 
thousand dollar automobiles and 
burning 30-cent gasoline, to sell 
tobacco at 25 cents to $1 per hun- 
dred pounds. 

+++ 

A numbeT of local citizens are 
buying the low grades ot tobac- 
co on the local loose 'leaf mar- 
ket. The appearance of thoso 
uew buyers has stimulated the 
price of the low grades, which 
the "Big Four" have not. been 
bidding oo at any price. These 
speculators are buying the IfOba**- 
co with a view to redrylng it. . 



We know the price of Tires has gone sky high. But wby wor- 
ry? You can have your old Tires half soled and they will be bet ] 
ter than new ones because they are guarpteed puncture proof fo 
1 8,600 miles and tbey only cost; one-half as much. 

This tiie bargain oan only be bad at 

The Conry Rubber Co. 

34 Pike Street, -:- Covington, Ky 



— 



A Kenton county farmer pur- 
chased 3,000 pounds of fairly good 
tobacco on the Covington loose 
leaf market last week for $19 50 
This farmer said he intended rais- 
ing a crop of tobacco on his 
farm next year, but he could buy 
a crop and bold it for lees money 
than he would have to pay for 
canvas to go on a plant bed. 



Funeral Train of the Martyred Prestdsnt Leaving Washington Under Escort. 

[From aa Old Print.) 

The splendor of the ceremonials 
ttggraodlsa ttvlng royalty as 
j^^HNr scarify dead heroism 
log la rue obsequies 
wis u ken 
the provi 
All 
BO0VS- 




ujost continuous procession of mourn- 
ers attended the remains of the be- 
loved President There was no pag- 
eantry save their presence. There 
was no tribute but their tears. They 
bowed before the bier of bun who had 
been prepbet, prigs* and king te his 
people, who had struck the shackles 
from Ike sieve, whs tea taught a hlgtv 
er sense «f dnty to the f*ee sbsu, who 
bad rsssad tan nsMie te a lefties eesv 
eentjea »# teak and hope sod ebsrity. 



If President-elect Harding ap- 
pointed all the men' who are 
earnestly recommended by high 
authority for his cabinet, it would 
take a good sized hall to hold 
them. They might have to hold 
meetings out of doors. 

The old time politician's idea 
was to use the cabinet appoint- 
ments to flatter the pride of 
states and sections, and to take 
care of rivals who might make 
trouble if omitted. But the coun- 
try in these times demand* that 
government be run more Uka a 
business concern. 

Many presidents have bean clev- 
er la naming candidate* thai 
would secure men with |ilt* for 
executive msnsgemant. 



Jaa. S. Newkirk, of Greenwood, 
delivered his crop of -Judy's Pride 
t o hs^ ff* nT> tVift V> Clit r-'PP Qg Q ^ <ta f. 
market last Thursday. The' crop 
consisted of 601 cut slicks, weigh- 
ing 90S pounds. The weed averag- 
ed t»7 bringing him 1833.10. itr. 
Newkirk dropped into our office 
and gave us three or four hands 
for more Outlook. 



i^ 



Vault That Gan Not Be Robbed. 

If you live within 125 miles of 
Cincinnati you are interested in 
the wonderful Safety Deposit 
Vault at Fourth and Vine Sts., 
built by The Central Trust Co. 
and guaranteed to be burglar, 
firs, mob and storm ."proof. It 
"sets in a hole in the ground, 50 
feet deep and/is lined with steel 
rails set in glass slag. It is 
guarded night and day. It con- 
tains securities worth millions 
of dollars in the Safest Place in 
the country. 

Don't Keep your Valuables Where They Can be Stolen. 

Out of town persons en* afford to patronise ear vault. A box, with 
complete privacy, as low as $3 s yenr. Write us for particulars. Farm- 
ers, Dairymen, Tobacco Growers, Market Gardeners, etc, this should in- 
terest you. 

The Central Trust Compary 

Fourth end Viae Sts* CINCINNATI, OHIO. 




The biggest problem that Prest 
dent-eleot Harding ha* te 



meet 



of hie depart meats, 

S enough practical ' 
ruetrv* genius 
'•ultlea of this 

(roe* the tt»t> 
they < y*np i*ia. 



with 



' Arthur Cox, hustling young fari 
mer of Grassy Creek, delivered his 
crop of 1170 pound* of tobacco on 
the Falmouth loose leaf market 
Monday. Be received an average 
of SO cents per pound. This was 
a crop lot, from the f round, up. 
The highest basket brought 45 
cent* a pound. Mr. Cox was w*H- 
prsased with the average and went 
honse 



= 



i — 



2E 




.One-half of the world dbe* 

not know howjtheotkej half Uvea, 

Hut what I* the «*• £*.**** fell 

that rive* gf^j^&t^Sj 

Jurlsi, hi* fan* year*, ****** > dwv^Utir ttr*» . •» 'sUHef to- 

* right now It U to get as heads baaeo at fifty eawtt a too pounds 



Erlanger Garage 

WALTON DEMP8EY, Prop. 

Repair Work Absolatsly Guaranteed. 

EXPERT MECHANICS. 

Full Uno of Ford parts, Urea, Tube* 
and Accessories. 

F. W. DEMPSEY, ,s».tf Eriangcr, Ky. 



3E 




#tnmp •prttfng to- 

a toadw *y* awo 
soeo (o, 

• iiliei^n 



Virginia 

T* many pseple the Virglals creee- 

IstesjSlfa* raihet a lowly sad bmsV 

a giant and y*t it bss reoslred a 

la Ma**. wM*i tt 

m pews 



*%£% 




'^Mitsa^leaj WwSg v ^*s*ss w ssaj ^^sfWa^n^V w^g 
■mjfc^a-^eAeS) ^^jen e*s*t*i alsnensi' en^sen 

•PVWlPg mm* WVP tlwt/V pajl 

»NJijMii*l far m & 

'S9. Wm M*1*# ftajM^ pay wNWWsMl 

4 they gfst mpHJ s» itls- 



-'I 

4 

■ 



\ ■ 



a ssgg^We M r gy Weewn^pwe^W^^^wi 

U*t * m *TVrr th* man wh* 



% 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



Vol. xxxxvi 



Established 1875 



BgRLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY FEBRUARY 10, 1921 



$1.50 Per Year 



No 19 



fi«x2<sf happenings. 

Next Saturday being a Legal 
holiday, all banks will be closed. 
\ ^ '- 

Saturday ia Lincoln's birthday, 
and t he Tuesday 'following is St. 
Valentine* day. 

In the (Cities* they, complain 
about the noise, and in the coun- 
try they kick about the silence. 

The diaarmani...... movement has 

not yet struck those* girls that 
are distributing their killing looks. 



• 



►* 



9 



# i 






A people who kick about their 
income tax, can always, avoid the 
same, by giving away their mon- 
ey. 



TbA> women who wear the back- 
less gowns might explain why 
htey oother to wear any cloihea 
at aU. 



Congress is asked to tax bache 
lors. It might be more appropri- J/j^" thy 
ate -to prosecute them for dodg- 
ing the draft. 

A lot of people are 'Willing to 
go in for community work, pro- 
vided they are paid $2.00 an hour 
for their time. 



The movement to do away 
with capital punishment has not 
made much progress since the 
crime wave got started. 



If you visit the big cities, you 
can gev. 'some spienuiu bargains, 
consisting of $40. 0u suits markeu 
down irom *75.00 to $45.00 



The president elect is consult- 
ing witn the "best minds,'' ou: 
the political Dosses think the b.-si. 
minus are those that mind best. 

Most people, if they really want 
to know who causea the hign 
prices can locate at least of tne 
guilty parties by looking in .t 
mirror. 



Price reductions have not yot 
led to any big drop in building, 
except that some of these poorly 



cox strutted 
fallen down 



modern houses- have 



Unfortunately ,no girl has yet 
been able to make up for the lack 
of stuff inside her head, by put- 
ting two inches of sole loaihcr 
ii to her high heols. 



You may save some motor car 
speeders by separating the rail- 
road grade crossings, but the last 
drivers feel . that tliere are many 
telegraph poles and trees along 
the road that need to be knocked 
over. 



If some merchants worried about 
the big city and mail order com- 
petition a little less, and would 
use a little more the advertising 
methods that boom the big city 
and 'mail orUer store business, 
they would come out better. 



C. L. Renaker, of Dry Ridge, 
Grant county, sends us $3.00 tor 
past and future subscription to 
the Recorder. Mr. Renaker is one 
of Grant county's young' and hust 
ling farmers, and knows a good 
thing when he sees it. This ex- 
plains why he came to Boone-co., 
to get the good wife he has. 



We$ are indebted to Judge B. N". 
Tanner for .a copy of the Boone 
County Recorder, published in Bur 
lmgton, Kentucky. The editorials 
are snappy and interesting ana 
the news notes are quite readable 
even at a distance- of so many 
miles. A number of short articles 
are being copied in this week's 
Advertiser from the edition hand- 
ed us.— Fayette Advertiser. 



HOLDINGS JJF TOBACCO 

Art Largest Reported at Any 
Time In Last Five Years- 
Cantrill Urpes Cur- ' 
tail of Production. 



The Quarterly tobacco census, 
giving stocks of leaf tobacco held 
by manufacturers on Jan. 1 last 
made public by the Beureau at 
Washington, ehows an enormous 
supply, and is of particular inter- 
est in view 'of the present depres- 
sion that recently has been of 
great disturbance to * the tobacco 
market. 

This report shows the aggregate 
of all stocks on hand Jan. 1, 1921, 
io he l,44b,9H,460- lbs>, ac- against 
1,318,131,291 pounds on hand a 
year ago and 1,271.521,630 on hand 
October 1, 1920. » 

Using this report as an inspira- 
tion, Representative J. Campbell 
Cantrill, of Kentucky, himself a 
la/ge tobacco grower, - issued a 
statement in which he 
advocates a complete cut-ou; of 
tile 1922 burley crop, a?:d, if pot 
too late, a cut-out of the 1921 
crop. Following is hjs statement in 
part : 

"The statement issued by \ he 
Bureau of Census of the United 
States Government, under the Can 
trill ItobaCco census law, shows 
that the manufacturers, and deal- 
ers have on hand and in stock, 
238,000,000 pounds of burley to- 
bacco. This is by far the largest 
amount of burley tobacco. held by 
the manufacturers during th? past 
.five years on January 1. On Janu- 
ary 1, 1918, the manufactuers had 
117,000,000 pounds of burley; on 
January 1, 1919, 1,39,000,000; on Jan- 
uary 1, 1920, "^27,000,000. 

"It should be carefully borne in 
mind that practically none of the 
1920 crop had gone into the hands 
of the manufacturers on Jan. 1> 
1921. It is estimated from relia- 
ble sources v»,that the 1920 crop 
which is just beginning to move, 
to market, .amounts to 325,000.000 
pounds. Addition of 325,000,000 lbs., 
to 238,000,000 pounds in the hawers 
of, the dealers on January 1, 1921, 
gives us a total of 563,000,000 lbs. 
of tourlev tobacco on hand Jan. 
1, 1921. 

"Why, in the name of common 
sense, " does the hurley tobacco 
grower persist in raising big crops 
to break hrs own neck in the fu- 
ture, when he is already confront- 
ed on the present basis of con- 
sumption, with a three years' 
supply of burley tobacco in the 
hands of the manufacturers and 
growers? To continue, year after 
year, to produce burley tobacco 
with this tremendous surplus, 
will inevitably lead to the old 
condition which existed in Ken~ 
tucky 12 yea,rs ago, when practi- 
cally every tobacco tenant was an 
absolute "slave of the tobacco trust,, 
and when the land owners them- 
selves could barely secure enough 
from their lands to * feed and 
clothe their families. 

"The facts given above, in my 
opinion^are indisputable, and as a 
tobacco grower I am willing \ to 
join in any organization which the 
majority of the tobacco growers 
are willing to enter for the bet- 
terment of our condition for the 
planting, handling- «nd marketing 
of our burley tobacco crop. What- 
ever plan is suggested, to be ef- 
fective, must have the support of 
a majority of the growers in the 
burley district. As^ one of the 
fundanymcal steps in bringing 
about relief, my opinion is that 
there will— be-no permanent- relief 
until there is a practically com- 
plete cut-out of one crop of hur- 
ley," which I hope will be made 
possible in the year 1922.'' 



RECONSTRUCTION 

"Reconstruction'' is not the ter- 
ribly difficult problem in this 
country that it is in Europe. 
In those war torn lands millions 
of crippled men must be taught 
to support themselves. Debts 
amounting to almost the entire 
capital wealth of some of these 
countries must somehow be fi- 
nanced. Markets have been de- 
stroyed, and many business men 
have to create a wholly new trade. 
' America's problems are relative- 
ly small. Our country is just as 
rich ae it waB before the war, 
and we have no great body ofj 
crippled men. Our man power l is 
r early intact. Pessimists will re- 
tire to the rear, while mer of 
confidence and hopeful spirit see 
the wonderful opportunities of a 
r.ew c.^and wilf carve out new 
fortunes for themselves. 

The first step after a period of 
upheaval when the ordinary hab- 
its of business are upset, i* to get 
everybedy working. The relief 
from the emotional strain of the 
war, created during 1919 and thV 
first half of 1920, produced a wave 
bf extraordinarily good business, 
but on an artificial basis. 

When people began to recover 
their senses, they rebelled at th^ 
inflated price level, and stopped 
buyirg commodities. This pricked 
the, bubble. But as wher a bal- 
loor bursts in mid air, the de- 
scent was too rapid for safety. 
The business community needed 
a parachute, and for lack of some 
have come to grief. 

The so-called Consumer's strike 
has gone as far at present as is 
consistent with safety, While the 
price level ought eventually to 
descend still further, if the peo- 
ple attempt to force it further 
down now, it will increase em- 
ployment, and lead to many dis- 
asters. Good merchandise bargains 
are -being offered now, probably 
as low as they will be at any 
time" during 1921 It is a good 
time to buy, and public welfare 
demands a greater rhbvement bf 
commodities. 



LIBERTY BONDS - 

Found hi Man's Shot-Identifi- 
ed at Property Stolon From 
Walton Rank 



The .following is from last 
Thursday's Enquirer : 

An arrest made last night in 
Covington will clear up the rob- 
bery of the -Walton Bank & Tr *. 
Company at Walton, Ky., Decem- 
ber 14, according to police. 

Detectives Grees, Higgins and 
Parker arrested • Camilus Terleau, 
26 years old, 1123 Russell street, 
Covington, who is charged with 
vagrancy, and Al N[orthcutt, 31 
years old, 514 Johnston ■tre?t, 
Covin^tjB, who is charged with 
disorderly conduct. 

The officers say they fou id 
three Liberty bonds secreted f;i 
Terleau's shoes which were in 
denominations of $500, $<100 ana 
$50. 

Detectiyo Higgins, who went to 
Walton following the arrests, 
said the bonds were identified by 
A. R. Johnson, cashier ofthe Wal- 
ton Banlf^aa those stolen from 
safety deposit boxes December It. 
Cashier Johnson said, according to 
the detectjve, that the $500 bond 
is the property of Ben). Bedin- 
ger, Walton, who is in Florida, 
and the $100 bond the property of 
Mrs. Pearl Johnson, wife of th'» 
cashier of the bank. The $50 
bond was not registered, 5ut Mr. 
T ~hnson positively identified it, 
the detective said, as one of the 
bonds stolen. 

Terleau told police he found the 
bonds in a house on Banklick 
street, Covington, where he had a 
room a few weeks ago. 

The safety deposit vault at ihv 
bank was opened and 30 boxes 
ransacked. The er.tire contents of 
18 boxes wer? stole Jt. Besides the 
bonds $130 in postage stamps, $280 
in revenue stamps and" a quan- 
tity of war savings and thrift 
stamps were stolen 



Wm. Finn, of Plattsburg, who is 
attending the State College at 
Lexington, came home last Thurs- 
day to spend a few days. He had 
completed his examination for the 
last session and as he would have 
nothing to do at the college for 
several days he came home to 
spend the time. It will take 
young Finn two years after this 
to complete his course and he in- 
tends to go' the whole distance. 



The Farmers Warehouse, at Wal- 
ton sold 117,770 pounds of tobac- 
co last Thursday, at an average, 
of $49.&tt. This Hoof- juf -tobaoee 
contained a quantity of low grades. 
There was very little dissatisfac- 
tion at prices, low grades were 
lower and no change in the prices 
of good grades. Seikman & Win- 
gate, who live about three miles 
north of Burlington, sold their 
crop containing 2,175 pounds at 
an average of $44.50. Mr. Seikman's 
age of $40.00. 



Groundhog came out on 



iast. t he 



vi cai 
failed to see his 



in 



If Mr 
the 2nd 

(thadow, for 'overhead conditions, 
while bright to a certain extent, 
wire minus sunshine. (This is cheer 
ful news to thom' who long for 
the warmer months, and others 
who are firm believers in the 
"groundhog.* 1 Some of Hie ftuper- 

sfltloui contend Mutt th»' ground- 
hag must see his shadow in 1 1- i 
forenoon, while others argue thai 
it lie uvv* his s h ad ow »mv Hm*-- 
dwing the day, in- w hi return to 

his bungalyw to remai.i six WOOkl 
longer, mid during that time * 
arp to huve bad wrattn-i \u 
1/ eprlng Is (hi firm I < 
niie of our local i'luherii 
are- getting then puioj iml 
lit ahape 



i- ii 
of 

a h i 
Hues 



Thanks His Neighbors 

Last Wednesday a number of 
kind neighbors and friends met at 
Colin Kelly's woods and cut and 
hauled , ime a big lot of wood, 
thus furnishing me enough fuel 
to last all winter, which I need- 
ed badly, and was unable to buy. 
Those who so kindly assisted mo 
were : 

Marion Scott, with team. \ 

R. Ml Wilson. I 

Sam Wilson. v 

Q. H. Wilson 

Geo. Walton, Jr. 

B. W. Clore. 
L. C. Craig. 
Punk Stephens. 
Will J. Stephens. 
Fill Ryle. 

C. G. Riddell by Raymond Acra. 
Ray Williamson. 

—Z-JL. Kelly ' 

Wilbur D. Kelly. 

J. Colin Kelly. 

I wish to thank each and ev- 
ery one of them for /heir kind- 
ness and for the sympathy thus 
expressed for ray wile and I in 
our time of trouble. Such acts as 
this makes life worth living 

R. T. STEPHENS. 

Five hundred; pennies, each coin 
representing a deprivation, were 
received last weak from poor chil- 
dren of Louisville as* a gift to 
the starving children of EurojH', 
through the - European Rrliei 
Council. The little' givers took 
from their meagre store u penny, 
here and there, to show the heart 
felt interest of the poor for 
Other*, even more unfortunate. 

TheVhildron who made up the 
fund live jiear the Union Gospel 
Mission of Louisville 

'I ht- fund of $S3,fwtt,fMW with 
wlinh to feed MOO.OtQ children, 
one warm njeul a day, until t Ii ■• 
ii -\t KurOpe.in hnrveitt m nut two 

thirds oompiettd 

riu rks of roi,u ihut^um may be 
tel I to Rii-hnrd ttauii, Trail' 

lu- Kenliukv Kuro|*'an K»lii»f 
oil, st any bank In Kent neat 



How Much It Meant 

When Mother Prayed. 

la a meeting of ministers : 
whose intent was the deepenin-f 
of the spiritual life, one of the I 
members, a verba'.. le modern saint J 
arose and related this incident of | 
his early life. One night, he sail, j 
when he was a hoy on the obi . 
farm,' he went to bed as usual i 
in Jhe open garret, and just as 
he was dozing of I Into Bleep | 
he heard a familiar footfall on th% 
uncovered stairway. H* knew 
quite well Who it was, but he 
thought he would fall sleep ana 
see what she might do. Slowly, 
on tip-toe, lest she might wake 
him, she went to the end of the 
long chamber, put her candle down 
upon the old-fashioned bureau, 
took a hard-bottomed chair that 
stood near by and, bringing it to 
his bedside, knelt down and bur- 
ied her face in her hands. Never 
had his heart beat so fast or so 
loud, ^e declared, as it did that 
right. It seemed as if he must un- 
deceive her by raising up in boa, 
reaching his arms around her neck 
and giving her a kiss that haa 
more love in it • than any he had 
ever planted on her fond face. But 
he restrained the impulse, and, in- 
stead, she arose after the lapseof 
many minutes and kissed him; and 
then carried the chair back to its 
place, took the candle and went 
down stairs. But he d|d not go 
to sleep. It was long after mid- 
night ere his. drowsiness returned, 
ard all through these long hours, 
he told us, two great thoughts 
kept coursirg through his mind 
ard heart. The first was, with 
such a mother, prayirg for me, 
what marner of man I ouerht to 
become, ard the second, I c jat, 
see to it that rothing that 1 
am responsible for comes between 
those prayers and their answer. 
He concluded the incident by say- 
ing that the memory of that 
evening had chastened his whole 
life, and often since entering - the 
ministry the thought of his moth- 
er's prayer had proved a source o£ 
irapiration and strength —John 
Balcom Shaw. 

Agent Sutton Is A Husrtler. 

Earl Robinson, of Richweort, 
fame dver last Thursday in search 
of Barred Hocks from ' which to 
increase the efficiency at his 
stock of poultry. The hustling 
county farm agent, W. D. Sutton, 
[earning of Mr Robinson's desire 
soon had him supplied with the 
chickens, getting two .hens from 
Dr. Yelton and -a cock and two 
hens from Mrs. B. C. Graddy, of 
Bullittsville, and Mr. Robinson was 
on his return home proud of his 
purchase. The poultry business in 
Boone- county 4thould be one of 
the county's leading industries in 
view of the excellent market for 
poultry products right at its door 

Emmetl S Weglaed, aged 55 
years, died at his home in Brian- 
er, on Thursday of last We U 
antral services were held at his 
residence .Friday evening hy Rev. 
Kilihle Hi» remains Wirt foi -ward- 
ed to Ghent, Ky, Saturday morn- 
ing by undertaker. Philip Talla* 

Ji'rro Mr. Wewlund »s survived by 
nis Widow, Mrs Mimii- Criglor 
W inland and one urotOOr, -'ml 
WlVt ami. Of l.nulsvllte 'l^ir. Orht- 
Pelfowa '' "' 'huigi' *'f the 
vlOM .it iiu- fravf 



the arrest of Ter 
by, J. C. Bedinger, 



A warrant for 
leau was issued 

Esq., for breaking' into the vault 
of the Walton Bank and Trust 
Co., and he will be turned over 
to the Boone county authorities 
after his trial in the Kenton 
circuit court for stealing the au- 
tomobile of A. W. Corn, 
lander. 



American Legion Notes. 

Scores of letters have been re- 
ceived by the editor of the Amer- 
ican Legion Weekly urging that 
the American Legion request the 
state department to obtain the 
release of the two Americans who 
were captured in Germany during 
an attempt to arrest Grover Cleve 
land Bergdoll, America's most ho- 
torious~draft dodger. 
n>++ 

Ninety new units of the Wo- 
mfeWBriAuxiliary of the American 
Legion were chartered in the last 
two_weeks, raising the total -otim- 
ber to 1,823. Iowa led with thir- 
teen, followed by Indiana, eleven, 

New York, tea, and Minnesota, 
r.ine. The latest scheduled con- 
vention of the Auxiliary will be 
held in the Department of Wash- 
ington at Tacoma, February 17, 18 
a<:d 19. This will be the tenth 
stifte convention of th • womrn'3 
organisation. 

The people of the U. S. are in 
sympathy with efforts of veterans 
to obtain passage of the Fordney 
lionus bill, according to^ Lemuel 
Holies, National Adjutant of the 
American Legion, who bases lus 
opinion on reports from North 
Dakota, QregO.1, Minnesota. Illi- 
nois, and other states. The legis r 
latures nf the first three states 
have passed resolutions urging the 
United States Senate to pass the 
bill and plebiscite of Legion mem 
bers in Illinois showed an over- 
whelming sentiment in favor of 
the national bonus. Ninetv-nine 
per cent of the Illinois Legion- 
naires also expressed themselves 
in favor of a state bonus. 

In {spite of the unemployment 
situation, which tends to increase 
the need of veterans for ready 
money, forty-six per cent of the 
Illinois Legion members preferred 
some form of compensation other 
than cash. 



REFERED TO GRAND JURY 

Was Case of Boys Who Fought 

With Knife, Bricks and 

Cocoa Cola Bottle. 



Ray Scroggms was before Judge 
N. E. Ridded last Thursday, charg 
ed with striking Morton Perry 
on the head with a Cocoa Cola 
bottle. The evidence developed 
the facts that Perry had cultivat- 
ed a crop of tobacco on the lands 
of Geo., Gray, that the good to- 
bacco had been sold. Gray & 
Scroggins had agreed that the low 
grades would not be put on the 
market at present prices, Imt if 
Perry wanted to sell they would 
divide the tobacco in the barn. 
January 21, while Gray was not 
at home Perry loaded the tobacco 
over the objection of Mts. Gray r 
who had .Scroggins, her grandson, 
and her son lock the front gate. 
Perry broke the lock and started 
out tb'e gate when Scroggins 
grabbed one of the horses by the 
bridle. Perry, jumped off of the 
wagon and struck Scroggins on 
the breast who then h*t Perry on 
the head with the bottle, Virgil 
Perry then grabbed Scroggins and 
him in the back with his 
making six ugly wounds, 
this time Robert Perry 
a half brick striking Scrog- 
gins on the hack of the head, 
cutting to the bone and render- 
ing him unconscious. Ray Scrog- 
gins iB 16, Virgil Perry 14 and Robt. 
Perry 16 The ease was referred 
to ttie April grand jury. 



struck 
knife. 
About 
threw 



of Er- 



You Are 



The trou ole with most of the 
schemes that are being suggest- 
ed to meet the prese T u farming 
situation is that they would 
doctor the effect and leave the 
cause untouched. Loaning money 
to a farmer at favorable rates is 
a good thing, of course, ai.d so 
are some of the ideas advanced. 
But they would bring only temp- 
orary relief. What the farmer 
wants is legislation that will put 
his business on as safe and soUhd 
a basis as any other business. He 
boards of trade abol- 
wants stabilized mar- 
wants some assurance 
millions he is called 
feed will not rise up, as 
now doing, and under- 



the 
He 
He 
the 
to 
are 



wants 
ished. 
kets. 
that 
upon 
they 

take to send him to the poor- 
house. He wants the public to quit 
passing imposte like the tariff 
and high freight rates, from back 
to back ur til they land upon his 
own. He wants to have the same 
assurance of profits before he pro 
duces that the manufacturer has. 
He wants to have something to 
say about what his grain and stock 
will bring These are economic con 
ditions that must be anawered. 
And when* they are answered 
right we will see agriculture on 
such a sound basis that quack rem 
edies and charity loans would 
never again be mentioned in con- 
nection with the man who farms. 
Congress could help a lot if it 
would. Why can't it get just as 
interested in agriculture this win 
ter as it did in the railroads last 
winter?— Paris, Mo., Appeal. 



European Relief Council. 

* 

John D. Rockefeller, Jr., has con 
tributed $1,000,000 to the funa of 
$33,000,000 being raised by the Eur- 
I opean Relief Council for the sal- 
! vage of t-hild life in the war- 
j wasted/ countries of Central and 
I Eastern Europe. 

When Herlrt'rt Hoover was pre- 
sented with this great gift, he 
made it clear that the contribu- 
tion came from Mr. Rockefeller as 
a personal donation and that it 
was in no part that of his father 
or a benefaction from the Rocke- 
feller Foundation. 

Mr. Hoover, said he simply was 
not getting the money needed to 
save the lives of the starving 
children. He said the people of 
the United States had more than 
they need, with an 18 months food 
supply in hand and a mounting 
surplus that is causing unemploy- 
ment, and yet were not respond- 
ing rbadily to the call of the 
suffering. 

"Something must be wrong if 
such a situation is allowed to con- 
tinue,*' he said. u lf we w r ould 
preserve the foundations of civil- 
ization we cannot allow it to go 
on. The people of suffering Eur- 
ope must be given the knowledge 
that America stands behind ev- 
ery project to promote the wel- 
fare ana happiness of humanity. 

"Peace itself is predicted upon 
good will among men rather than 
upon documents. There is noth- 
ing that so maddens men as to 
see their children perishing about 
them, so I say that if peace is to 
endure the suffering of these in- 
nocent little victims of war must- 
be relieved.'' 

A check to Richard Bean, Ken- 
tucky Treasurer, addressed to any 
bank in the State will help com- 
plete this fund. 



Reroute Dixie riigeway. 



No Smoking Allowed. 

The Kentucky W. C. T, U.,ha\ - 
ing completed its mission of mak- 
ing the Bluegrass State as dry 
as a marsh, now announces its be- 
lief tliat tobacco is more dan- 
gerous to. the human race thai. 
lid\iors have ever been. The pres- 
ident of the urdon pledges her- 
"Setf "trr work—fo-r" n: 
amendment which would absolute- 
ly forbid the growing of tobacco 
on American soil or its importa- 
tion from any other country. 
And this just at a time when t lie 
raising of tobacco was about to 
undertaken in a large way* in 



Meetings 
auspices 
in the 
along 



will 

of 

near 

that 



be 



T*,i hiuuli i I 
of Wesley Tung 
uouniia average 
hi* crop, «» 
urnna last vm- w 



*lxl\ 

crop 



pounds 

of ifiUO 

id ...d 
».• i..| 



California. Do not the Kentucky 
ladies know that leaf tobacco fa 
being extensively used in other 
avenues than those lined by 
smokers? If man insists on using 
it for his suicide it is also valu- 
able as a commercial insect ri I 
While our men are poisor.ing them 
selves with ifcs noxious vapors, 
why not kill off the bugs tin 
bother our prune bushes si d Coeo- 
anut plants? It is only for lab- 
oratory purposes that 'California 
leaf is wanted Why this Ins: 
to banish its growth' from Amer- 
h un soil? Los Vngtdea Times 

Hid \ .hi t\ ».| miiji to think t h i. 
I obled up miken M? Km- 

m>nie u Is an unlueky number, but 
for otbara it is th« iu«ki •■». of 
them all What If.M will brini to 
(lie ChUmI States mid 
world will aava> U» )>• blamed up- 
on poor, mistreated ii 



The Dixie Highway Commission 
and the Cincinnati Auto Club are 
attempting to have the Dixie 
Highway routed fo-om Covington 
to Lexington via Independence, 
Falmouth and Paris 
be held under the 
those organizations, 
future at all points 
route ir. order to get the citizens ! 
residing along the route ^o en- i 
thusiastic that they will dig dowr, 
ir. their jeans and produce tlu> I 
coii. to construct a boulevard in 
order that the members of the 
Dixie Highway Commission and 
the Cincinnati Automobile Club 
may ride over the highway it. their 
Packards and Pierce Arrows just 
the same as if riding in a Pull- 
man. The Automobile Club will 

Tf-f ur t.iB h - ail thu hoL air and enjov 
constitutional ridit> , oVer the road a[tp| . it - s 

completed and all that \nu wilt 
have to do Mr. Citizen and Tax- 
payer is to furnish the money to 
build and keep in repair this 
road so t hat Mr. Auto member can 
ride over it in comfort and luxu.y. 
The 19:20 session of the Legislature 
by an act passed by that body, 
r nited all of the State and Fed- 
eral aid roads, but their action 
does not seem to have met with 
the approval of 
dent automobile 
trying to dictate 
for the state of 
gardless of what 
may have enacted 



Tobacco Growers Organize. 

The Burley Producers of Boone 
County are organizing to cut out 
the 1921 crop, all for the purpose 
of securing better conditions for 
this great cash crop of youc coun- 
ty and state. It stands fourth in 
commercial importance, returning 
in agricultural wealth more than 
$1,000,^00,900 a year. We are work- 
ing for a better understanding 
among producers, for improve- 
ments in our marketing systems, 
to wock out more definite ideas 
as to acreage, that i;here may be 
at all times an adequate and a 
more staple market for your pro- 
duct, and this we cannot do by 
going ahead, , as individuals, by 
merely trying to see how much 
you can produce, with the ir vert- 
able result, a demoralized market, 
with ruin, destruction and starva- 
tion in . its wake- as your reward 
for a year of toil. To attain 
tfiis end we must have unity of 
purpose, and for that reason we 
are asking you to get into your 
orgar.ization— the dues are only 
$1.50, see your local committeemar. . 
Ary of the following gentlemen 
will be pleased to have you sigr : 

Burlington— Robt. Huey. 

Bullittsville— E. J. Aylor, Robert 
MicGlasson. 

Petersburg— Wm. Stephens. , 

Belleview — AJ Rogers, Leomer 
Louden. 

Carlton— Don Williamson. 

Big Bone— Joe Cleek. 

Beaver— C C. Sleet, Joe Huey. 

Union— Len Barlow, • 

Verona— M. Whitson. 

Florence— Clem Kendall, Hubert 
Beemon. i 

Constance— Emmit Riddell, Se- 
mour Wilson. 

Walton— Scott Chambers, Wal- 
ter Robinson. 

Any of these gertlemen (are in- 
tensely interested in the welfare 
of — tho- t o b acc o in t e re s t s ai d the 
interests of their county. Have 
community meetings at your 
school houses, talk matters over. 
They will do vou good. 

C. O.' HEMpHLINO, 
Chairman 
Taylorsport, Kv. 

LACY CROPPER, 
Secty-Treasurer, 
Petersburg, Ky. 



Consider Your Hours. 

Let this and every dawn of 
niorning be to you as the begin- 
ning of Ufe. and let every set- 
ting sunv be to you as its close; 
let every one of these short lives 
leave its sure record of some kind- 
ly thing done for others— some 
i goodly strength * or knowledge 
for yourselves; so, from 
day and strength to 
strength, you shall build up, 
by art, by thought, and by iust 
will, an Ecclesia of which it shall 
not be said : "See what manner 
of stones are here!>' but "See 
what manner of men!''— John Rus- 
kin. 

Chesterwhite Association. 



gained ; 

day to 



some non-resi- 
cluha who :ir> 

the road policy 
Kentucky, re- 
the Legislature 



An Interesting Heirloom. 



I V 

■ >v 



An interesting heirloom " 
brought to our office, last week 
I ishdait. ul near Buthoi 
i» « pair oi copper spoon moulds, 
which were brought from Kn^l'inu 

Mr Vslx-tuft's K^st-IP 
grandfather, who wua one of tlv 
early »o«tl»i!i that came ove* h 
England Mi Wh>i,»(< -„. \ -i |ur all 
he known, thu .. might 

have be*a WouirM ova* on The 
Mayflower ~Oran< r«mnty News 



The Boone county Chesterwhite 
Association held its annual meet- 
ing at the court house, last Sat- 
iii iiy. The same officers were re- 
tained for the coming year. The 
Pig Club for the following vear 
was discussed. It was agreed 
upon for all members to sell 
pigs at the same price. The pigs 
in the club are to be farrowed 
during the month of March and 
must be purchased between May 
1st and 15th. Mr Chester Tanner, 
8 H. Ryle and- the County Agent 
we appointed to purchase the pigs 
for the boys. All pigh must he 
registered Chesterwhiles 

The Association is |*otng to caje* 
iv on ap axtenaiv? advertising 
campaign In th spring This to be 

11 -done thru the Secretary \!t hoys; 



"in. signed 
be regiHt 
intioii The t 
March Mb. lo 
tag; oampaign 

the 



duly fur 
Chaete 



hi < u>n salea must 

• I m The c w Ahimic- 

- to meet 

to phn then advortie- 

ul arrange mora 

I*'* ('lulk. 

KOUKHT 



r 



CLOaJL 

fSaCiii 









..... . ! 



■"^■n 



tabNl COUHtt KlCOlDll 



Ths fnc:mo Tax Lew 

Applied to Farmers. 

By Mauriee L. Lyons. 

T)w Uim "farmer"' as applied to 
ir ditiduals und er the- Income Tax 
Law embraces all peraora oper*£- 
iig stock, dairy, p oultry, fruit or 
truck farms, pttJ tations, rnncht s, 
or ai.y land used for fruit rail- 
ing or agricultural purposes. 

if the total net income of the 
farmer for the taxable year was 
$1000 or over, he is required to 
make a personal income tax re- 
turn, unless he was married ana 
living with his wife on the last 
day of the year, in which ease 
a return is required \o be filed 
in the event that his total net 
ii.come equaled or exceeded $2,000. 

But all that is required is the 
filing of the return. As to wheth- 
er any tax is due the Govern- 
ment is another question. 

The single farmer has an ex- 
emption under the law of $1000 
and therefore if his net income 
was $1000, his exemption would 
render him tax exempt. 

The married farmer has an ex- 
emption -under the law of $2000 
ana 200 additional for each child 
under 18 years of age. Further 
than this t he has $200 for each 
person other than his wife, de- 
pendent upon and receiving chief 
support from him, regardless of 
age, if such dependent person is 
incapable of self support because 
mentally or physically defective. 
It thcr^/orp fo'l°ws that is the 
married farmer has a net income 
of say $3,000 and an exemption of 
$2,000 .plus $600 for three minor 
children and $400 for his father 
and mother or the parents of his 
wife who are old and incapable of 
self support that these exemp- 
tions would render him tax ex- 
empt. 

Now let us take the farmer 
who has a net income of, say, 
$10,000, and by net income I mean 
the income that is left after all 
allowable deductions are taken, 
and he then has an exemption of, 
say, $2100, being a married man 
and having two minor children. 
He would have left the amount of 
$7600, the first $4000 of which is 
to tax at 4 per cemt, or 1$60, 
and the balance of $3600 at 8 per 
cent, or $288. He would further 
have to pay surtax or in plain 
words an additional tax on everv- 
thing over $5000 of his net in'- 
come of $10,000, as follows: From 
$5000 to $6000, or $1000 at 1 per 
cent, being $10; from $8000 to $000, 
or $2000 at 2 per cent, being $40 ; 
and from $8000 to $10,000, or $2,000 
at 3 per cent, being $60. There- 
fore the entire tax would be $558. 

Well, then, what is the first 
step to be taken by the farmer? 
It is to ascertain the gross in- 
come for the taxable year, which 
includes gains, profits, and income 
derived from every source what- 
ever, unless wholly exempt from 
income tax. To be more specific, 
the farmer must include all gains 
or profits and income derived 
from the sale or exchange of prop 
erty of any description, includ- 
ing farm products and live stock. 

The gain or profit from sale or 
animals purchased and used sole- 
ly for draft or work purposes or 
solely for breeding purposes, 
should be reported as income. 

There must also be included in 
gross income amounts received 
for board of persons- board and 
pasturage of animals, labor of 
men and teams, and hire and use 
of machinery. 

Having determined the income, 
the items wholly exempt from tax 
are: 

1. The proceeds of life insurance 
policies paid upon the death of 
the insured .to individual benefic- 
iaries or to the estate of the 
ii.sured. 

2. The amount received by the 
insured as a return or premium 
or premiums paid by him under 

• life insurance, endowment, or an- 
nuity contracts^ eitherLdjiring the 
term or att he maturity of the 
term mentioned in the contract 
0r o U £? r ' surrend er of the contract 
J iv rhe .Y u alue of property acquir- 
ed by gift, # bequest, devise, or de- 
scent. 

*• Interest upon the bonds or 
other obligations of any State, 
.r ty, Cou T n ty> Town, or Village of 
of the United States or of any 
territory or any part thereof, or 

* * D,stric t of Columbia 
xt 1 A ll Libe riy bonds, Victory 
Notes, U. S Certificates of Indebt- 
edness, and War Savings Certifi- 

efnf? aT % ?*? mpt both * s to Prin- 
cipal and interest from all Fed- 
eral State, and lofal taxation, ex- 
cept (a) Estate or Inheritance Tax 
es and (b) Federal Income surtax- 
es, excess profits, and war pro- 
"18 taxes. ' 

6. Amounts received through ac- 
cident or health insurance or un- 
der workmen's Compensation Acts, 
as compensation for personal in- 

S"™ ° r i sicknoss . Plus the amount 
of. any damages received, whether 
fy suit or agreement on account 
°L2H£ t l, >.njuii*»-t>r sick n e ss 

Therefore, if any of the above 
items from Numbers 1 to 6 have 
°!*" . 'n^ded in the farmer's 
gross income he should take them 
out and disregard them 

(To be continued in next issue.) 

As is perhaps true of all men 
in public business, the editor is 
sometimes criticised for r.ot print- 
ing such an item as the grumbler 
thinks should have appeared in 
the paper Well, if you stop to 
consider, the editor and printers 
have about all the work to do 
that is required to U> done :o 
issue a paper. It is true many 
items of news escapes notice tha: 
otherwise could be given to the 
public. We are told things as be- 
nlg "news items'' that |*'rhaps 
are interesting only to the infor- 
mant, and only of minor import- 
ance. The pro|>er way to )udg»* 
n ■mrwapnper is by what Is lert 
•out. Be considerate, by ill means 

Lot Of people Who don>t dare 
trost their money in a good lank, 
will invest It with a fak. •took 
promoter wfco ha* no atari* 
bit emly tongue 




Successors to 

C. W. Myers 

Florence, Ky. 

We are making an earnest effort to keep up, or rather 
keep down with the present prices of merchandise. 

We are changing our prices as fast as we gel them 
from the market, you may find a difference in price of 
same article in the same day. 

There is no reason why prices h* r *> in the cpuniry 
should be any higher than in the city. Our own truck 
reduces our transportation on cost to a minimum. 

We are one of the largest stores in the county, buy- 
ing in laige quantities and discouirting our bills, enab- 
ling us to sell on a small margin and keep the prices 
down as low as possible. 

The more goods we sell the cheaper we can sell "them 
to you. Your dealing with this store is not only ap- 
preciated, but enables us to keep on reducing the pri- 
ces, resulting in a great saving to you. 

Watch Us Grow. Thank You 



GROCERI ES - p "o P G Zr. , "• ,, s "*" 



80c 



FINE TABLE MEAL 3c a Pound 



10 Pounds 27c 



COFFEE 



Diamond Brand, lb. 24c 
Diamond Brand B, lb. 29c 
Diamond Brand C A., 34c 



TELEPHONE FLOUR 

121 lb. Sack... 75c 24* lb. Sack. . ..$1.50 



BLUE ROSE RICE. 
7AcIb. 3 lbs 



21c 



NEPTUNE SARDINES 
Laarge Size 



12c 



Delicious June Cheese, lb. 39c 



(kept in cold storage) 



Websters Cove Oys- 
ter* 18c- 2 cans 



35c U 3 k fba Hering '. Ib :. 10c ..29c 
10c ca p^ ge 3c 



KX y E x. ,u 1flf> CABBAGE 

fresh, lb | Ub pound 

Werk's Tag Soap AQ A Palmolrve Soap . ft- 

bar 7c, lObars UOU bar dC 

P. & G. Soap, 3 bars 20c 



WE BUY YOUR EGGS AND BUTTER. 



DRV GOODS 

We have just received a fine selection" of 

Caljcoes, Shirting and Dress Ginghams 

at very reasonable prices. 

Men's White canvass Gloves 19 C 

Men's Ghambray Shirts 98c 

Men's Warm Socks, a pair 18c 

O. N. T. Thread, a spool 7 C 

Muslin, unbleached, yard » . . . .^ 13* C 

Muslin, bleached, yard /. \q c 

Fine Linen Finish Toweling, yard I2ic 



WE BUY YOUR EGGS AND BUTTER 



Shoes 



Men's "Lion Brand" Shoes . . : $3.45 and up 

Men's "Ball Band" Rubbers 
and Felts- 



$4.75 



Rubbers 

We have a full line of rubbers for Misses', Boys' 
Ladies and Men. Prices reduced 

10 Per Cent 



WE BUY YOUR EGGS AND BUTTER 



We handle reliable 8KKD8 at right prices. 
We have what you want, if not— we will get it, 




Public Sale! 



I will offer at public sale, on 





23d, 1921 



J iuoiuuij i-uu, 

Oil the^Dixie Highway, next to, the five-mile 
House, known as the old Shelly Hudson place, 

the following property: 

29 milk Cows mostly Jerseys, some fresh, 10 to be fresh in 
March, team mules 9 yrs. old, bay maie 8 yrs. old, sorrel 
mare 6 yrs. old, 10-mos. old colt, 5 tons sheaf oats and timo- 
thy hay, two 1-h. corndrills, 1-h. cultivator, potato plow, 
mowing machine, hay rake, disc harrow, cultopacker, hay- 
wagon, wheatdrili; boxbed, 2-h. sled, 2-h. harrow, cream sep- 
arator, 3-h. power gasoline engine, 2-h. cultivator, breaking 
plow, laying-off plow, power churn, skimmer butter worker 
200 bus. corn, i hogsneads, 4 whisky barrels, grindstone, 
25 milk crocks, 50 milk cans, 2-h. Hoosier corndrill, 2-h. Rid- 
ing breaking plow, and many other articles. 



TERMS OF SALE. 

All sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on sums over $10.00 a credit of 
six months without interest, will be given purchaser to give note with good 
security payable at the Erlanger Deposit Bank, Erlanger, Ky. 

Frank Michels. 

Sale to begin at 10:30 a. m. LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer. 

FREE LUNCH SERVED. 



Notice. 



Successors to C, W. MYERS 

Florence, - - Kentucky 




Unclaimed deposits remaining in 
the Union Deposit Bank, Union, Ky. 
for Ave years or more: 

N. D. Moore, 1-1-13 $ 1.25 

Marietta Love. 1-1-18 3.40 

G.M.Allen, 1-1-16 

John O. White, 1-1 15 Big Bono 

8. 8 
C. E." Wilson, 1- 1- 15.' .'.' .' .'.'.' .' .' .* 
Pratt McKee, Tr. U. I.C 1-1-16 
Sallie Hicks, Tr. U. I. C. 1-1-15 
Chas. K. Denady, Tr-Prea So- 
ciety. 1-1-16.. 1.98 

B. L. Norman, Treas. Farmers 

Tele. Co., 1-1-16 1.00 

Geo. M. Sparks, 1-1-16 

Gladys Rogers, 1-1-16 

B. B. Allphin, 8. B. C, 1-1-16 

B.C.Allen, 1-1-15 

MattieL. Rice, 1-1-16 

J. C. Powers, 1-1-16 

I, J. L. Frazier, cashier, of the 
above named bank do certify that 
the above list is correct to the bent 
of my knowledge. 

Suhscribed.and sworn to before me 
by J. L. Frazier, cashier, this 31st 
clay of Jany,, 1921. 

W.M. RACHAL, N. P, 
My commission expires Jan. 20, 1922 



34.02 

5.18 

.88 

3.60 

8.48 



60 
.50 
2.38 
70.80 
.70 
.88 



Efficient, Service and Economy 

IS MY SLOGAN 

C. SCOTT CHAMBERS 

Embalmer and Funeral Director 



WALTON, KENTUCKY. 



"1 Cot Real Mad when I Lo.t My 
Setting Hen," write. Mra. Hanna, 
N.J. 

"When I went into our barn and found my best 
tetter dead I got real mad. One package of Rat- 
Snap killed six kig rat*. Poultry raisers should use 
Rat-Snap." Comes in cakes, no mixing. No smell 
from dead rats. Three sixes. Prices. 35c. 65c. * 1.25. 
Sold and guaranteed by 

Gulley & Pettit, Burlington, Ky. 



For Sale. 



2 10-gal. Milk Cans, oue with faucet 

1 80-lb. Cap Butter Worker 

1 16 gal. Stone Jar 

1 6-gal. Bucket, with lid 

1 Heavy 10-qt. Milk Pail 

1 Strainer 

All on sale now but dairy supplies, 
which- ea n b e h a d -en F eby* 9 6th. " — 

2 Leather HalterB (horse or cow) 
2 Tie Chains * 

2 Tie-out ChairiB. 30 ft. long 

1 Plow, i ton Straw 

1 Harrow, Sewing Machine 

1 1 1-4 Gasoline Engine (Vim) 

1 Writing Desk, Lamp 

1 Dresser, cir walnut 

1 Extension Table— oak 

1 Oil Air Oil Stove— 3 burners 

1 Oil Air Oil Stove Oven 

Several doz. Fruit Jars—) gallons, 

quarts and pints 

1 1-gal. Gasoline Can. 

MICHAEL KAHR, 
Ludlow, Ky., R. F. D. 



PUBLIC SALE. 

If you want to make a 
good sale writ* 

A. L. LANCASTER, 
AUCTIONEER 

•*• MsjMf+a Avl, Covington, Ky. 

• atl.f action Otiarantaed. 

Pho»a 8. 604ft- x HOOT-x Jan 27 8t 



The fact that tha general coat 
<>( living baa y«n» down should 
not be poaeiaUred a .ufffcieUt rea- 
son for Mking for another ad- 
vance in 



III 
CUT OUT THE MIDDLEMAN. 

We buy from producer, only. We have no agents, cream station buyer. 
or other middlemen. Each cream producer .ends hi. cream DIRECT to I 
our creamery. WE PAY THE SHIPPING COST. Every cent i. your*. 
Your cream and can. are guaranteed against loss by 

The Tri-State Butter Co, 

Cash Capital $250,000.00 CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



Free Trial 
Cans gladly 

furnished 

for 30 days 

if you have 

no cans 



We Pay the Freight and 

46c 

per pound for butter-fat 
Week Feb. 7th to Feb. 13th incl. 



50,000 cream producers in Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky .hip their 
cream DIRECT to The Tri-State, which ha. been established since 
1910 with assets over a million dollar, and now handle. MORE 
CANS OF CREAM PER DAY THAN ANY CREAMERY IN 
THE" WORLD." Y o u r ch eck- fo r eve ry .hip ui wit by i ntuni mar k— 



^fTr^mTr i r J V Mmx t J r XMMMMMM ' MXMA. : 



ATTENTION-, FEEDERS! 

We carry a complete line of the following feeds and 
for a short tfme will make a special price on same: 

Bran Cotton Seed Meal Scratch Grain 

Shorts . Little Chick Feed Corn 

Mixed Feed Tankage Hog Feed 

- , also Oats suitable for seed. 

We have feeds for every purpose. Come in and let us 
figure with you on your requirements. 



B. J. CRISLER, 

PETERSBURG, KY. 



Take Your OouDty PaDer, $1.60, 

Our Advertisements ond Profit ftv Them. 



ttj&^fi-fe; =:!i*V*C 



Jv 



>*Y 




ssssn 



BOONB COONTY RECORDBR 



i 



PI 



I 



I 



^ 



Foreign Advertising R«pr«tertt««»« | 
THE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 



Mrs F. A. Hall spent Monday 
and Tuesday visiting her daugh- 
ters in Newport. 

Dr G. C, Rankina, of Walton, 
was a business visitor to Bur- 
lington last Thursday. 

Atty. Edward Pfleuger, pt Cov- 
ington, was transacting business 
in Burlington, last Thursday. 

Robert Youell, who is attending 
State* College at Lexington, spent 
a tew days at home last week. 

H W, Shearer, wjfe and little 
daughter of Newport, spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. P. A. 
Hall. m • 

W D Sutton attended the con- j 
Vention of County Farm **«*? 
at Lexington, several . days last 

Week. f 

Chas. Stewart and wife, of Day- 
ton, Ohio, spent a few days with 
Everrtt Hickman and wife, last 
week. • ^_ 

They usrd to say Mount) Ev- 
erest was the highest mountain 
top, but the peak of high prfOM 
beats it. , 

Do you remember the good oW 
davs when vou went to the ma 
' ple y sugar camps? Well, maple su- 
gar time is hero. 



LUCI 
STRIKE 

/ItHtoastibJ, 
CIGARETTE 

No cigarette has 
the same delicious 
flavor as Lucky 
Strike. Because 
Lucky Strike Is the 
toasted cigarette. 



A- Week's News. 

Madison, Wis.— Co-ftperetlve mid- 
dlemen employed by the farmers are 
suggested by the WiscotWfn Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station 1 as a 
feasible means of solving the mar- 
keting problem and of stabilizing 
prices. 




WISE k OTHERWISE 

A Combination of Sense, Non- 
sense, News, Etc. 



Miss Maude Hume, of Covington, 
was the gue*t of her parents Mr. 
arid Mrs. B. B. Hume, last Satur- 
day night and Sunday 



Beauty i» said to be skin deep 
•and now it appears to be knee 
high with a good many of thp 
girls.'— Stillwater Minn., Gazette, 
+*+ 
Chicago is instituting an era of 
.reform and soon a man will be 
' able to make it from the depot 
to the hotel without lieing roo- 
Atty John L Vest, of Walton, bed.-Waxabachte Tex. Enterprise, 
*eWed B-J gjoffli £> *JjJJJ Tho porf ♦*+„ 0ctoher tun 

?nf batterv last^Thursday. ed out 9»,%T cars Now, hunt up 

and hatieiy p»^ the knocker who brags about all 

Fd Maurer 61 Pitts- the toys being madr in Germany 
•! I 'few "davs at 'and show him this.-McAlester Ok 
lahoma Guardian. 



Captain 
bure,Penn., spent 
Belleview, last week, Bo was Calf-, 
ed here on account of the sick- 
ness and death of his tether, J<>* 
Maurer. 



Mr and Mrs. Samuel Wright 
and Mr. Godfrey Kotzing, of Cov- 
ington, were guests of Mr., ana 
Mrs B. B. Hume last Sunday even- 
ing. Mr. Wright is a wholesale 
merchant in Cincinnati. 



A E Poster, of the firm of Fos- 
ter & Co., real estate* dealers, of 
Covington, was a business * 
in our town last F 
ter is one of the , 
real estate business and a fine 
Kentucky gentleman. 



own last Friday Mr. Fos- 
pioneers in 



Seven-cent hogs, 45-eent pork 
BO-cent hams. $2 coal cost fn the 
car, $11 to $14 to the consumer. 
The ghosts of old Jesse James, 
Jim Dalton and Billy the Kid will 
please lekd the choir in sinking 
"Onward Christian Soldi<jrs.>'— Mon 
te Vista Colorado, Graphie-Bcpor- 
ter. 

**+ 

We'd hate to be as mean as 

some people. A hateful old para- 

grapher up in Milwaukee or some- 

, where put this in his "collyunv 

ST I the other day. ! l Where the geuce 

* does a girl get vaccinated now 

so that it won't show?"— Clarks- 

ville Texas Times. 



Maurice F. Lvons, First National 
Bank building, Covington, Ky, in- 
come tax export, has prepared a 
series of articles dealing with the 
ir.come tax laws as effects far- 
mers of which the first article ap- 
ticle appears in this issue. 

Mavor T. W. Balsly, of Ludlow, 
attended fiscal court here }ast 
Tuesday. Mayor Balsly and others 
were seekinz to have the county 
construct a* road from Taylors- 
port down the river to the He- 
bron and North Ben4 pike. 



The arrival of good weather 
will be welcomed by residents 
along the main thoroughfares of 
town as the streets will then in 
all, Iprobability be cleaned. They 
are' certainly in a filthy condi- 
tion. 



Last week's prices show a a de- 
cline in all feeds, fruits and veg- 
etables. - — j-r 

Cattle slight advance, Hogs 5 to 
45c lower, lambs ,25 to 75e lower. 

Butter 5 to 6c lower than last 
week March wheat declined 6c 
per bushel, white corn advanced 
1 cent. 



The Tobacco Markot. 



Cynthiana 
Carrollton 
Maysville 
Lexington 

y Shclbyvill" 

r Walton 



$15.00 
$16.73 
$14.90 
$14.08 

moo 

$16.88 



Robt. Popham from over on Gun 
powder creek, was a business vis- 
itor (to the "hub'' one day thp 
latter part of last week, and call- 
ed in to see the printers. He 
had the date on his paper mov- 
ed up another- year, and also left 
$1 50 to have the Recorder sent to 
his sister, Mrs. Wm. Weathered, 
.Aurora, Ind., R. D, 1. 



The American people have vot- 
ed for a complete change of bus- 
iness and political policy, in the 
hope that a new administration 
can remove many of the economic 
difficulties that now impede bus- 
ii.ess progress. The people are 
anxious to see whether the new 
management is going to accom- 
plish the results it has promisen. 

A (drop of 1 cent a gallon on 

gasoline is announced in many 

parts of the country and a still 

further drop is predicted. One 

authority says it will drop to 20 

cents a" gallon within 5 months. 

(Anyway, let us hope so. Gasoline 

and coal oil have been twoneo- 

T ■ essaries which have not come 

• dmnrnny- f r om war-- prices, Rivd 

with everything else falling there 

is no good reason why it ahou'.O, 

not drop. • 

B J Crisler, of Petersburg, nna 
son, Wm. Crisler, Supt, of the Nu- 
tritia Co., Lawrenceburg, Indiana, 
were hi Burlington a few hours 
last Sunday. Mr. Crisler has open- 
ed a fc?d store at Petersburg, 
where he will handle Ml kinds of 
fivil and will be glad tohttveyou 
call on him when in need of any- 
thing in his line. See ad. in anoth- 
er eolunuY They each left $1.50 to 
1x>ost their subscript ion up anoth- 
er year. 

Judge S. Gaines left last Mon- 
day n.ornini for Wiiliumstown, 
where he will convene court. The 
Gra'it County News says : 

• The mid-winter term of th 1 
(Irani Circuit Court will convent 
here next Monday. Thi i in ft full 
thrive weikn' term, and whiln the 
civil docket WIS prrMv well 

cleaned up ul * »* • In! < 
i« i nough new buuncl 'i-> ' • 
court i, r|i "'li ;,< * for iht' full 

ihr i> week* Tun homicide OMM 

will nome before : I" ■ eoirt If iho 

| id jury Indict* Several imi»" 

I . niullty (•«*'» II >1 th8 

Wet and w Urge nuiuNi <>( 

I- »<• 



The directors of the Farm Bu- 
reau held their regular meeting 
uRt Saturday, which was attend- 
ed by the following directors: L. 
R Barlow, Robert McGlasson, C. 
O Hempfling, E. Y. Randall, Clem 
Kendall and Geo. Penn. 

AU regular business was trans- 
acted and the necessary steps tak- 
en to handle the increasing busi- 
ness. Clem Kendall was employea 
to check out car load of feed 
bought by the Bureau. 

We had a ..meeting at Florence 
last Friday night and about thir- 
ty-five or. more were in attend- 
ance. This was the best farmers 
meeting the writer has ever at- 
tended in Boone county. Every- 
body enthusiastic. A regular bus- 
iress meeting of farmers talked 
ar.d transacted business.. Lei us 
have more of them. 

G GEO. W. RENN, President. 



La*t Saturday was a lively day 
in Burlington— tobacco growers 
meeting, Chesterwhite breeders 
meeting and Farmers Bureau meet 
ing, besides there was a general 
meeting of prospective candidates . 
for eounty offices with the voters 
from the' different precincts. 



This is the tune of year to trim 
fruit trees and grape vines. 



•**•«♦.♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦• 

* PETERSBURG. ♦ 



•Blind horses are never known to 
makes mistake in their diet when 
grazing. Like all other horses, they 
are guided by the nostrils in the se- 
lection of proper food. 
♦♦♦♦ 
Ostriches yield a crop of feathers 
every eight months, the number of 
feathers being from 20 to 40, worth 
from $25 to $100, according to size 
of growth. 

♦ ♦♦♦ 
The lemon tree of California blos- 
soms throughout the year, so that 
buds, blossoms and fruit in all stag- 
es of ripening are to be seen gn the 
tree. 

♦eee 

New York City has an area of 320 
square miles, which indicates that 
her average distribution of popula- 
tion is 17,566 men, women and chil- 
dren to the spuare mile. 

♦♦♦♦ 

The Bible has been ticflslated in- 
to the national language of the Chi- 
nese in a form said to be the most 
nearly perfect literary production in 
the Chinese republic. 
♦♦♦♦ 

There are still 148 veterans of the 
Mexican war. 

♦♦♦♦ 

The wives of Si»'j ,,> **" 410 hlemen 
cut their hair so that it stands 
straight up on their heads. It Amer- 
ica the barbers cut oar hair so that 
it will not stand twice in the same 
place. 

♦♦♦♦ 

Mexico has a new holiday to add 
to the many already observed. The 
Mexican Congress has decreed that 
November 20 shall be a legal holi- 
day, commemorating the revolt of 
Francisco V. Madero agaiust the 
Huerta regime. 

♦♦♦♦ 

One of the most distinguished wo- 
men physicians in South America, 
Dr. Ernestine Parez of Chile, was 
the daughter of a poor washerwo- 
man. 

♦eee 

Cleanliness and sanitary methods 
of treating foodstuffs are unknown 
to the dealers of Constantinople. 
Huge pieceB of meat are carried 
through the dusty streets on pony 
back without the least effort to pro- 
tect it. 

eeee 

Machaquite Spain's most famous 
bull lighter, has made $500,000 in a 
year. 'He took part in about fifty 
performances, each, so far as his 
part went, lasting perhaps 15 minu- 
tes. So his pay averaged more than 
$650 a minute. 

♦♦♦♦ 

Fxperts have estimated that there 
are enough peat deposits in sight in 
Minnesota to supply that State's de- 
mands for fuel at the present rate of 
consumption for hundreds of years. 

♦eee 

The Panama Canal Commission 
reports that there were 467 earth- 
quakes- in the canal zone between 
MHitt and 1U20. All of the disturb- 
ances were slight and harmless. 
♦♦♦♦ 

Nearly half the t rattle between the 
French provinces is carried on by 
water instead of by rail. The cost 
of water trathc is less than half that 
by rail. 

♦♦♦♦ 

There are about 40,000 square 
miles of virgin forest and about 20,- 
000 square miles of second growth 
timber in the Philippines. 

♦♦♦♦ 

t — a 

One hundred and fifty-five women 
are now sitting in State Parliaments 
in Germany^ nineteen of them be- 
ing members of the Prussian As- 
sembly. 

♦eee 

The Arabs have a proverb that 
after whistling, the mouth in- not 



Seventh ft Madison 




Covington, Ky. 



NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S GREATEST STORE 



Do You Receive One 

Hundred Per Cent 

Worth for Every 

Dollar you Spend? 

Genuine economy consists, not so much in saving, as in the wise spending 
of your money. The art of receiving the greatest value for each expendi- 
ture is one that may be acquired if it is not natural with the individual. In 
this day. the matter of receiving one hundred cents worth for every dol- 
lar spent is one that is uppermost in most everyone's mind.- 

FOR SPRING, are you going to exercise the utmost thrift in your 
purchases ? Are you going to SHOP or merely buy. We urge you to 
* shop. I rni* great growing store, .^-one store in the entire Cincinnati dis- 
trict that has taken the stand for NORMAL PRICES will receive your 
patronage if you really shop. Our values are" greater. Our selections wot 
to be excelled. And truly, COPPIN'S is the best place to do your entire 
spring buvjng, tor 

This Store Leads The Drive For 
Lower Prices, As It Now LEADS 
the LOWEST PRICES. 



: 



Think It Over. 



- l 



DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

In my new office 

Cloyola Place, Florence, IW. 

Te«-tli extracted painless. Bridge 
and Plate Work a Specialty. 

All Work Guaranteed 



L. N. Early is still improving. 

Bud Moreland has mups and la- 
grippe. 

Geo. BatQhelor is quite ill with 
pneumonia. 

Circuit Clerk Chas. Maurev was 
in town Friday. 

Burton Yates aiul wild wore vis- 
itora here last Friday. 

Mrs. Yerkes who h:id pneu- 
monia, died Sunday night. 

Mrs. J. M Botts was shopping 
in the city last Friday 

Mnist of the farmers rife thru 
atripping tobacco and n-ady fo* 
Hale. 

Frank Ocisler who in working 
AVer the rivrr. was ut home Inst 
Suvjiy 

gfJM I A Soft uni the jjliest 

<>( her brother In Lawrenceuur 

o u- day lust ^ e 'K 
Mr Prrktrm nnd 
nun, were gnc-.tt of hit 1'iotll 

in Ihw * i.rwi* Rootoi it n< i (anally, 

Su i div 

Youi wii. it Hat two occasion* 
, lol>r a • <ifi ths llth i iv Km 
coin'* lir'.hdsy und tin- wiili'i'i 
«5.h urddtng anniversary 



purified for forty days; they regard 
it as the most unlucky sign that can 
emanate from human lips. 

♦♦♦> 

French statistics estimate that a 
man of 50 lias slept ft.000 days, work- 
mi H,oOO, walked 800, amused him- 
self 4,000, spent 1500 in fining and 
b"<-n rfiek for 500. 

♦♦♦♦- 

A vocation is something you do 
for a livings an uvocation sonndhing 
you do for a while, a vacation some- 
thing you wouldn't) stick at vi ry 
loon without heing th-ad Itrokt- and 
ilciui til'fd. 

♦♦♦♦ 

Ati < diuahii declare* that .schools 

fuki t<> r<Mirh i hi- majority. Auothel 
deplorable feel le Ut*l In "o»ny r»«- 

gloiiM mads irt M had tint tin- ma- 
tamtlv. of .Atr- jurlty ntton tail t* ifttHi t !••• ««du»«*U. 
of hie brother- 



g, 



Pu blic S ale. 

I will sell at public auction on 
my farm 2 miles north of Union. 

Saturday, Feb 26, 1921 

The following property. 
„ 1 Black horse, 7 years old good 

worker weighs 1400 pounds. 

3 Jersey cows 

H Ton Ford truck. 

1 Road wagon, 1 Hay bed- . 

1 McCortnac mowing machine, 

1 Hay rake, 1 Surrey, 

8 Barrels assorted corn, 

1 Oliver plow, 

Lot household and kitchen fur- 
niture and other articles. 




^o\x fatU appreciate 
tlje jlerfrtce 3Rettberri> bu 
tp (Ealtaferra* 



Terms-All sums of $10 and un | 
der cash, over $10 a credit of six j 
months will be gi\4n, purchaser j 
to execute not^ with approved se- 
. curity payajble_a.t Union Pepoalt| 
Bank. No property to te remov- 
ed until terms of sale have been 
complied with. 

Sale will begin at 1 p. m. 

j. w. waters. 

Notice 



BEGIN NOW 

WITH A BANK ACCOUNT 

Your own prosperity depends on your polity to 
SAVE — not on what you can earn. 

Many men and women become rich by first putting 

certain portions of their earnings into a bank 

where it draws interest. 

A Time Deposit at 4 per cent with this bank 
is a nest egg which steadly accumulates and 
leads its owner on toward independence. 

YOU ARE WELCOME AT THIS STRONG BANK 

THAT RENDERS SERVICE TO 

ITS CUSTOMERS- 

CAPITAL & SURPLUS 150.000 00. 



Peoples Deposit Bank 



W. L. B. ROUSE, Pretident 
A. B. RENAKER, Cashier. 



Burlington, Ky. 

NELL H. MARTIN, Ai.t. Cathier. 
LEWIS C. BEEMON, A»it. Cathier 



There li i<>»i enough In lbs United 

Stat*-* bo- In** ttmiiMKiid* "I >"arh, 
hot w* !»«»»)• in* peeeeai prtee* will 
a** I*m tu«t l«*«**e- 



The Stockholder of The Mutu- 
al Telephone Company of Union 
Ky. are hereby notified that the 
election of directors and officers 
of the company will be held in 
Union Ky. March Sth 1 ( >21 from 
') a. m. to 4 p* m. 
3tpd N. C. Tanner, President 

Scent* In Wood. 

With (he woody of tha world te 

cboQst* from, one ran en^ly ttmmse 

u whole acnle of arvotM from (ha 

■weeteet and mosi iipiicnu of peri 

fumes ut our axtreutf le r:uiW unci 
cHferpow*«rFul oiliira at thv oilier, iuye 
the Ainertmn Forestry Mnmilna. The 
atorvi of the i>vifumer'n line will not 

yrSJd a greater \arlety ilmn one cae 
find Itf wtMtdl 



K 

8 



sx^gg^^grs^a«K^aKxa&g 



. HEBRON THEATRE 

NEXT SATURDAY 

Buck Jones in "The Square Shooter" 

Standard Comedy 

Firat Show 7:30 P. M. 

Admission 22 Cents, Children 1 1 Cents 

Including War lax 




Hxibecrlbr for the HaKOiDB^ 



ARE YOU A READEK OF THE KECOHDER? 



'^'^^^s^s'ffc^^^i^^-jfi.'^i'^tf^^^M.^ 



gi^iiiiMJailMrii«TfiiWifl(i^ 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ ♦ 

♦ HATHAWAY. ♦ 

Health of this community good. 

Road« are bad in this neighbor- 
hood. 

" r ost Of thc_ farmers n'rt 
: tripping tobacco. 

Mrs. N II Clements returnoj 
last Sa t urday from Dai.ville, after 
spending several days visiting her 
son Edward, who is attending col- 
lege there, David Clements ac- 
companied her from Lexington to 
Danville 






LIMA* BURG. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Susie I'tz has chicken pox. 

i hneva Tanner has mumps. 

Sterling J^onae is making maple i 
molasses. WL 

Mrs. Will GrOas visited friends > 
In Cincinnati tho first of ' the I 
■week 

Frank Aylor writes from Tampa 
Florida, that lie is enjoying his 
visit 

Milton Frederic look a load of i 
very fine tobacco to Walton Tues- j 
day of List week 

Miss Kitlie Brown and Mrs. Tda ' 
Hay Buckler w*er? vlsitir.g Mits, 
Belle Baker, one day last week. 

Leonard Rouse and daughter, 
Mi-s Isabel, Mr. afid Mrs. Cheater j 
Tanner and daughter Elizabeth, 
were ahopping in Cincinnati last i 
Tm -.iiv 




fligh School Notes. 

In another column the Boono 
County High School a. inuur.ee .; the 

appearance of Robert 11 H Tre- 

p main & Co., the fourth number of 
the Burlington Lyceum Course, 
thru This company will appear at the 
! court house, Thursday night, Feb. 
■ IT, 19'jl. This is an organisation oi 
unisna: meriv and p o pulari ty; Mr. 
Tremai.n thru years of study, ob-" 
aeryatton and . experience, has 
come to be recognized as o^e of 
the foremost exponents of thel 
art of character portrayals. Soj 
completely do?s he Impersonate 
these characters that you forget 
Tremain and live only fn th;> 
characters he portrays His assist* 
ant, Miss Van Dyke, i» an ac- 
complished musician with a charm 
tag personalis. All this combin- 
ed with her dramatic powers, 
makes her a versatile enteri lin- 
er When you have heard these 
I two people you have had a pleas- 
! ant and enjoyable evening It is 
■ the hope of'- the Hi School that 
I the entertainment will he liberal- 
I ly patronised. 

•HONOR STUDENTS. 

It means iomethii.g to be an 
honor student in the Burlington 
sch-jois. A student must have 1,01 
only an exceptional ability to 
master knowledge tut also the 
will power and petermittation to 
do bo. Honor studci.ts this seasion 
are chor.e i on the basts of the 
ternrs work Any pupil who 
made 90 per cent or better i.. <&v* 
ery subject ;ach month for ih<* 
past school term qualities as an 
Honor Student ' 

The following stude.lts rpeeiV- 
ed this honor for the first term 



flUONB COUNTY RKCQRDJK 



*4**m*m***** 



Mrs Lawrence Pope 
with a sprained knee. 
Roy Beemon-is suffer!] 

an attack of appei 



is suffering 
with 



J 



yii 



ileitis 

i.i much 
yd h.", 



improv- 
school 



Wl! 



;i! 



led at 



.1 little son. 
Mat Ryle's 



Miss I. u lie 
ed and has ■ 
work. 

Wra. Presser 
AVm. Ryle, vis 
Sunday. 

Hartley Kyle 
more Kyle am 
of Gk A Ryle 

Harry Hamilton and wife wer 
guests of Mr Hamilton's relatives 
at " 
w ( 



iiivj January l ( 
First tirade— " 
Vir^ii Kelly. 
Corri ie Nichols. 
Martha Blythe, 
James Jones, 
Second Gfade- 
Alma Birkle, 
Harold Arnold. - 
Lottie Slavback. 



Trade With 

D. R. Blythe 

Where you get the best quality merchandise 
at the lowest market prices. We handle nothing 
but the best. A few prices to show you that I 
am right: 

Telephone Flour in wood. J , e^ QO 

Telephone Flour in sacks | j g 

TRY A SACK OF 

Pacemaker Flour, 24 lb. Sack j 40 

12 lb. Sack 7Q C 

Clean Easy Soap, 6 Bars for 25c 

Lenox Soap, 3 Bars for ' £5c 

P. & G., Tag and Ivory Soap, *3 Bars for 20c 

Cupid Brand Corn, 3 cans 25c 

Wisconsin Early June Peas, 2 cans for 25c 

Recess Peas, per can £2c 

Happy Vale Peaches, per can . 35 c 

Sorghum Molasaes, per gallon 90c 

Large Box Matches. 6 forj. . . . 25c 

OVERALLS, all sizes 175 

IR~¥- GOODS 

Of all kinds have been reduced to 
Present Market Prices. 



y. 



For Sale 



One acre, six-room house, cement 
cellar, fiirlmce heat, electric light, 
anrl all kinds tit fruit, at 4S3 Erlang- 
er Road, Erlanger, Ky. jan. 15 



Notice. 



All who have net, paid the 25 per 
cent of their stfbsoriptions for the 
Burlington and Locus Gtfove turn- 
nlk are requested to do so at, once. 
By order of the Board of Directors. 
» B.T.KELLY, Secretary. 

For Sale. 

S-room bouse and one-half acre lot 
in MeVllle, on the^Ohio river. The 
buildiriKsarealllngoodr&palr. Will 
be sold by Bellevlew Lodge No. 554. 
For particulars apply to J. D. Mo- 
Neely, W. R. Marshall, rtfeff Wllii- 
aineon. Burlington, Ky. janfl 

Rural Route 2. 



f. W. Kassebaum & Sen, 

KiHITE 4 aURBLE 

MONUMENTS, 

B Large Stock on Display 
to detect from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

118 Main Str«et, 

AURORA, IND. 



k 



and family and El 

I Wife, \v: re gCUSti 

and wife Sundav. 



Big 1'one, several davs last 



linj 



u 



■ll. Wl t 
lianwon a->.l 
Mrs Gen 
returned t 

ville. Itlsl 
davs Vjslt 
W Kvle 



llftnrtiaon, fl-rnrtt 
Ons, David au'l 
• gucs '. ■>' IV. V j I 
wife. Sunday 



Wi;- 
,Ias 
Vfi'- 



Smi.li 
their 

Pm sda . 

with !SL 



a 



i 



littb 



d Mrs. 



■i.il 



•♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ »»♦♦ ♦ #♦♦ »♦»»# ♦♦♦^ 

♦ HEBRON. a 

♦ « 
•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦as 

Mrs. Myrtle Stephenson is im- 
proviny 

Elmer Miller butchered bis hogs 
last Mpnduv. 

Hallam Clore left Inst Saturday 
for Los Angeles California 

Mrs. Mao Anderson spent Satur- 
day with Mrs. Naomi England 

Mra, Robert L Aylor has been 
on the sick liat the past week. 

Buck Jore.i in "The Sharpshoot- 
er'' at Hebron Theat r Saturdav 
night, 

Artlas Plook and wife were vis-' 
iting Cullum Garnett and' family I 
Sunday 



Fra^tk Edgiest 
Harry BeekelhPimer, 
Earl Eaaton. 

Thir I v' t ra Ie — 

Lucille Rice. 

Jami s Bteph! . 

Ber dee \rn .1 I, 

Boy I .hi I I 
. Fourth Grade — * 
1 Rohfiri R.^m 

Rt>v Fr : !; -. 
R ibert M •:■•■ 
i [th rradt*-< 

'' ■' r n i 9i i h • i . 

Wiv- i. lulse Rennker 

Lee Fr I ks, 

Al. i Ma«. Rouse. / 
Sixth &rader— 

Wflto l Sti-nhens 

Elizabeth Hen*l*>y. 
Seventh t'n'ade— 

Ora Keih, 

Kathry.'t Cl^re. 
Eighth (r'rade— 

Aim i Runes, 

Bessie Bald n 

IH.IH SCHOOL DEPARTJCBKT. 
t-it-hm i l Class.— 

Julia CiDk. 

Mary McMul l en, . 
Sophomore Class-* 

none 
Junior Class — 

.Voile 

Senior Class.— 
Mary Bess Cropper. 

To Hold Open Session 

The Cicero-dan Litorarv Society 



Discount on all Shoes, 



Feed of all Kinds on hand at all times get my prices 
THEY ARE ROCK-BOTTOM. , 



Bring me your Country Produce and get the good 
prices I am paying. My motto is 

Jouriesy and Square Dealing to All. 



Sweef Clover and Honey 

Sow sweVt clover, cheaper and bet- 
ter than red clover. Buy direct from 
prower, special scarified seed for 
prompt germination. Prices and cir- 
culars free. Al»o prices on honey. 

JOHN A. SHEEHAN. 
H- P. No- 4, . Falmouth, Ky 

Farm for Sale 



180 Acre, one mile sopth of 
Burlington, on the East Bend 
road, 15 acres in orchard, 25 
acres, in timber, 30 acres in 
corn in 1920, 15 acres in mea- 
dow, tctfanoe in pasture 

6 room house, large barn 
and all necessary out build- 
ings, Well watered. Price, 
$75,00 an acre on easy terms. 
Oscar Hanna, Bellevue Ky. 



JAMES L. ADAMS 

PENTIST 

Cohen Building 

Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 

The Famous O. I. C. 

I now have for sale registered 
0. I. C. Pigs, some of which are' 8 
weeks old. 1 heir sire is the famous 
C. C. Callaway Jumbo, and his Bire 
is Callaway Edd, the world's Grand 
Champion *3oar. All Btock register- 
ed free. 

•FRANK HAMMONS 
-- R. D. Florence, Ky. 

-D. E. Castleman, 
ATTORNEY AT LA W % 

— Office over— 
fErlanger Deposit Bank, 

Ertan^ar, - Kentucky, 



% 

<* 



List Vour Sales With Me Early In 
The Season. 

LUTE BRADFORD 

Live Stock Auctioneer. 

Your Work Solicited. See me 
and get my terms. 
Phone Florence, Ky. R. D. 



Farmers 



oct-14 



R. BLYTHE, ' - Burlington, 

Consolidated and Farmer* Phone*. 



Mrs. Naomi England is the first ■ of "».e Boone County High School 
neighborhood to report ' 



was th 
and tum 



little chickens. 

Miss Myrtle Anderson 
guest of Arthur GofHon 
ilv. last Siuulny 

Lowell <;. Tanner eathe home last 
Friday from ilock Hill Sanitarium 
where be bad been taking treat- 
ment 

Mrs. Jane Conner went to Lu I- 
low last Kri-lny to B pw -a n m „nli : 
with her daughter, Mrs pcrrv 
Aylor. 

Mrs Mae \yh.r, Mr, Etta Cri '- 
ler and Mr» y ; /M . Qravca « t 
a very pleasant day last Thura- 
day With Mrs. J^Rsie Aylor 

Chester Utz ytttRled home Inst 
Thursday f.W , Livin^ton coun- 
1 >. r.-in where he had been 
ti'ig h,s father for several 



months. 

• DEVON. t 

James W Bristow and mother 
Were i . the city Friday. 

•' H. ('oomhs wife and children 
were guests Bunday afternoon o! 
Ben] Bristow and family 

W * Woodward wife and son 
Rolusrt, Snndayed with Rob?rl 
1 ainer and wife near Union 

Misses Clara Uuiae an J Willie 
^ H lfH ' k m i d -Mr-. H Mnrv Y.\\ A JT.un 
ilion, were gueats of Istelh Eliz- 
abeth Miller, Sunday 

Raymond Rogers and family ex- 
peet to move to Dayton, oTaoon 
Dr S.vni,^,,. a , K l family wj „ mo . 
to Mr Roger's place 

Messrs r ttttk McCoy, \v. NV . 
C. D. Carpenter and 
•vis sol 1 tobacco on 
et. Saturday. 

and wife, Mrs. 

altond- 

• Sunday. 



which metts once a ir.ont'h, 
j planning to hold its next regular 
meeting in the court house This 
('•Open Session 7 ' will be given on 
Friday night, Februa/v 25 1921 
at 8 o-cloc^ A chargifof 25 cents 
i w !'' V p asked in order to obtain 
additional funds for the Hi School 
'Library. TJie teaeh-rs are workin-r 
! hard ;o train the jnipils and the 
society is expecting a lih<ral pat-^ 
ronago from the well-wishers <>i 
the local tschool The program ! 
will be as follows. - 

Opening Song Girls' Chorus' 

Current Events of th« month- 

Qeorgia Klrkpatrieh 
Readi i| Mnry Hecskey 

Piano Solo (atherite Clorc ; 

Hist uy of Poone County— Oiira 

IP ii -.ie.- 
Reading 
Oration 
Saxaphon; 

,rltS-,()H 

Reading Marion Rogers 

\ h "- >l \ '"> Franklin Huev 

!)<•( ate -Ow-n .\e r a. Robt Clore. 

f l.iyt > i lii i.vr. and Howard Mc- 

Gla i-^o i 
Piaho Solo Marjorie Tanner 

; Skeich-1 sal. rile Duncan, ALirv 

Less Cropper, Oa"„ Af,a ami 

Clayton Brown 



Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Feb. I. D)J1 
Editor of the Recorder : 

Burii/igton, Kv, 
Dear ^ir p 

I real in this week's Re c order 
of Wm Edward Carrell, Jr.. of 
Louisville, 'having two great-grand 
mothers Irving 

My cousin's baby, little Dorothy 
Haree Northcutt, of Newport. Kv, 
can heat that. She not only his 
both grand mother-, and both 
grandfathers but also four great - 
grand mothers and one gioa grand 
I lather. 

She is ihc daughter of Mr. and 
, Mrs. Charles Wallace Nortbeu.t 
■ Mrs. NorthjCntfH mother and fat h- 
| er. Mr. aid Mrs. Hergert, live in 
I the same house as does Mr Her- 
fgft's mother^ makii:g tour gjener-j 
Btions under one roof Mrs Her-' 
get's mother. Mrs. Harli ig, lives' 
in M i.lisonville. Ohio. 

Mr Nnrtheutt*s mother and fath 
er, Mr. ar, 1 Mrs Charles N, North- 
cutt. and Mrs Charles NorthcutCsi 
mother and father. Mr. and Mrs.' 
Mike Rouse, live in Covington. Ky 
They are formerly from ' Boone- 
county^ ''' | 

Mrs C N Morthcutt'a mother. 
Mrs Sarah Northcutt. 73, is the 
oldest great grandmother and Uveal 
i.'i Cincinnati* aud*"ia' also from' 
15 «i,»- emm'.y \, k \\ \ 



I 



So! 



Julia Cook 

Charley Maxwell 

— Howard Stc- 



During the past f-ur years when 

biljions of dollars were dumpil 
into circulatioa in this country, 
wages, farm products, and manu- 
factured articles advanced bv If-aps 
an I bounds, therein- creating a 
false structure under th ■ solid 
normal business standards of the 
eou 'try Some men believe these 

high levels would always b? main- 
tained, and I'nci extravagantly. 
rarmers argued that th"v Would! 
never return to five-cent tobacco 
sixty-cent corn: the laboring 



Tablets 

k.^ or 

Liquid 

PE-RU-NA 

A Great Medicine 

t*. 1 h S r * ntei ^ e-rn-M »k.^ Jnmr It te rmd 
rcr rtirt«, fouirfit »nd caUrrh. It cored mj 
ft'»rrlj »n.l I d^not Ukr cold whan I mac 
le-ru-aa. llUagreatmedlGloa.': 

, I '," r l? B " ,elutnrtT r<-«r*,Pe-ninabMba« 
lookivr owm a* the rellabla m«<ttetne for 
eai« rr li <.( every deacrtption, whetkMT It a* of 
■JWI uid Uiroat, »tomich, Jwwaa or otter 

Hr keeping Pe-rn-n* la the hooat for cater- 
Itenele*. aerkoai •lekDeaa mar frenaentlr be 
prevented. C»«ltiftertbegrlporeoanlahriu. 

Sold Everywhere 



•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

FOR SALE- 

I Have for Sale 
2 International Trucks. 
2 490 Chivrolets. 
1 Ford Truck Chasis, 20- v 

model. 

XASH OR ON. TIME. 

I L. C. CHAMBERS, 

Petersburg, Ky. 
| ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦>♦♦♦>♦>♦>♦ 
TIME TABLE 

Burlington-Erlanger Bus. 

Dally Lxcept Sunday. 

Lv. Hurlington 6:15 a. in. 4:00 p. m 

|Lv. Errauger 7:10a.m. 4-55 p. in 

SUNDAY. 

Lv. Burlington 7:f0a.V 

Lv. ErlanK«n* 7:66 a. m 

Passenger Fare- 50c one way. ~~m 

Round TripafSc 

Kxpress Packages handled at Rea- 
sonable Rates. * 

L. R. McNEELY. • 



IT'S A WISE IDEA. 

Do as Many Others are doing 
send vour cream*to ihe 

CLOVERLEAF CREAMERY 

Burlington, Ky. 

I pay cash for cream arid insure 
you a square deal. 

I RECEIVE EVERY 

FRIDAY 



«• 



J. Q. HUEY, 



Manager. 



-AT HOME— 

DR. F. L. PEDDICORD 

-1017 Mad i. on Avenue, 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY. 
'Phone So. 1146. 



riSS 1 * 8 *" 1 "" ,,oyw and OW»'le>" •*# it'uoii'ld never 

_ ____ [••tie to Bo Melt to the oil !f.,|- 

Tbe siaty-nioe cemmon ^hool ffttTj ^J^U^Sl *&£ 

^l^ y, ........ .. H -^^ ^ , p ,. rin . a a ..) i L , H tjn| v t n,, -^-^, ; , t ,.i„,,,,; 

' papers|omical man who is a^wtherins th- 



^o examlna a 
1 een detvios 
most of the 
amination. It 



id grade a 

into th- 

i inn- |nc 

would i 



h 
oasa the 

U, • ex- 
it ;'Hil 



ba» sf)rrn Th. 
a I itter 
one fhat 



! hehool 
'»■ c, but 
fools ui 



i exporlenee is 

i' i^ ■ h > only 

ever learn in 



; As a rule cowpcas should not 
he cut for hay before the pods 
[begin to turn yellow. Th'» best 
(quality U produced and the hav 
cures mont readily if th«- vine* 
are cut when most of the pods 
are full grown an d a considerable 

jthat stage of growth no.ie of the 



Canning Plant f or Sale 

The Farmers Canning Plant at 
Grant, Ky., will be sold *on the 
grounds of the Company at 1 o'clock 
p. in., on 

Saturday. Feb. it 1921 

M public sale to the highest bidder. 
The plant consist** of an engine, 
boiler, shafting, cookers, piping, 2- 
100 gallon copper kettles, platform 
scales, building and one-fourth aeres 
of ground. 

The plant, grounds, building* ma- 
chinery will be sold a* a whole. 
'Terms— One-half casfe, remainder 
on time withgootfaecurity. 
AL RODO-ERS, 
— r J NO. SMITH. Com. i 

W. R. ROGERS, ^ 



MAN'S 
BEST AGE 

A man is as old as Ins organs ; he 
can be as vigorous and healthy at 
70 as at 35 if he aids his organs in 
performing their functions. Keep 
your vital organs healthy With 

COLD MEDAL . 




Tha world's standard remedy for kidney, 
liver, bladder and uric acid troubles 
since 1696; corrects disorders; stimulates x 
vital organs. All druggists, throe sizes. 
I>ek for tt>* name Gold Medal oa evory box . 
Sad accept aw imitation 



Woodward, 

Raymond R< 
Walton mar 

T. J. HuLst 
Sympeo'i and Mrs 

ed servie.-s ; ,t Finn. 



i\ 



d 



a 



> and 
biauk 

> wife 
Mary 

'ollins, 
am) 



vin - 

HOil 

M.- 

anu 

Ella 
were 

fain- 



Bro. Runyan do 

( sermon 

W. W Wood« n 

Robert, M'- and Mrs 
Coy, Raymond Rogei 
son Deione, and M"1hh 
Hamiltoi and <; uy ( 
Kueats of Benj. Bristow 
ily. Saturday evening, 
, Albert Underbill Wjfe ;l ,. ( | ,, IU ,, 
ter. Miaai lirma, enterlaii.ed ' H 
lightfully SaturdAv evening 
number of friend* In. honor o'l 
their sons Taylor, who wtw tl „ nu . 
from Praiiklinlon, Ohio, and |> un - 
oan, who |» with Uncle H.on m , 
*»p»f4 In Ohio. Everybody enjov 

1st **!..*&? ^ h<jMMtitty J of 
My. and Mr* Uadarhlll and Mi«« 



pleasure to the buperiliiendei 
graduate every one of tl.-,. p«. 
plls, i. ui according t<i his l>elief 
at prese it there ui|| i„. ., ]ar; , ( , 
number of failures, but v Iik«- ti u 
young Americans the pu^iu who 

their studi.s and <a|,tu.- the much 
Paired diploma w ,me time 

BAl t IJ IX' 



Four Eclipses This Year. 

There will I 
the suo an i tw 



best hay varieties will have drop 

ped their leaves and the planes 

j will have practically attainexftluMr 

full growth. 

Mai.y of the tobacco growers 

A ir. this seel ion who have a go >.i 

two eclipses of rpjality of the weed aro realising 

' themoon^his top prica« for it, while others who 



are 



not 



i. 



ri 



Through the efforts 
jrreasrnan Rouse, j: \, 
"t Burlington, has \» ,.„ 
from Bullittsvdle, Qftrth 



• ,f 



year On April »th the sun will have Inferior tobacco 
be partially blotted OUi and on. getting enough out of 
April a-Jnd, it will be almost com- crop to pay 
pletely hid from vlsw, BachlTne raising of 

• clips*- may M- sc, -., with the r .ak-,a gam Me and it is only the few 
11 l \ i -i ', s W: """' d that; crops that come thru the many 

be used That critical stages and on to the mar- 



the jvhole 
lor the atrippinsr. 
tobacco in "almost 



Coriiei 
part ' 

ii sjiecto 



i on 



ner s corner, «-f ri<.t i ^ 

ThU 

over 

lap an 

mended Th** i 

uoua ui.). i t , t,, ! 

roads on this route 
reco mmen ded ihn 1 1 
ttn i . .nt, ovei u 

li ■' 'til linn d 



I-". I 



Con- 1 two LefUpaea of the moon will bejket dear of damage ] he 

; '.n m October, one on the | ir s t and that you c„t a file In™ in the 

t, C ,.'^'J V", h ° "' , ,UAU w ' i "," p ' d a »d " gets damag'd there, 

i Hny- ba almost total and if it is put in the barn In 

good condition, it may be too 



.h 



•' b 






r li in 
'I .1 

' • ,in 

I II, 



W. all ) I || 
* in in Itui I. 
in I ubib- ,,< 
(lis 






'i I 



) Herbert K irk pa, r : . k, local d'-ihr 

i.i ftirs, bought three very largt 

in I handsome lux petti on< 

last week >,t Ralph < aaofl who re 

i l"-i do Wi| on Mi |, ||, ereek The 

I'Mts I i.,ii r|,i M, Caaon 

■ii twrnt) bill us when*as,last 

• Oii| I Ii ii e brought 

doll ir* Beaidea The 

•lump in live i riCM ,f n, . , 

m foaes cauaasl Mr l iikjii an 
»»«hJ |o*M by dcvour.ivf »iOlt 
'•Ilv young turkeys fur him tha 
I i'*»t seaaon 



be 

hot, too cod or too Wet and then 
vour whole year's work is ppae- 
tlnyptically lost -Weal her conditio. is 
have to be Just right to >ur •»* a 
crop of tobareo in good »y;iiii- 
lion 



5. .KANSAS 



FLOUR 



Attention Jato Owners! 

I am prepared to do first-class 

repairing- on all makes or cars. 

Starter and generator work a 

specialty: All,work g-uaranteed. 

Give me a trial. 

Earl M. Aylor, 

HEBRON, KY. 
Phone Hebron 



NOTICtv 

All persons owing the estate of 
Laura Clore, deceased, please come 
forward and settle same at onco. 
Also all persons having claim* 
against said estate present them 
to met at once for settlement 
H, M CLORB, Agent 
Laura (lore Fstute. 



Pcatry and Praaa. 

"Dnnclng Is the poetry uf motion." 
"Maybe It Is," answered Senator Nor- 
ghuni. "Hut give a, a ,(,, ..juj proM 

af a ins rob upon (lie Avenue \n an old- 
rsshlwned pot riot n tuna 



NOTICfi. 
all persons who have Maimi 
sgalnat the estate of Oeorge E, 
House dceei«H"d, will praaant them 
to me, provsn as the law i- .|ulres. 
All persons owing said estate 
will come forward snd settle. 

W W BftADFOMM 
Admr 



Xqu Can Tra de 
the Article You 
Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by c4dver- 
tising. 



- t 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦a 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 



♦ 
♦ 

Watch the date following a 
your nam* on the margin a 
of your papwr and If It UI a 
not correct please notify a 
this office at once. If your 
pa[»er has been discontinu- 
ed by mistake before your 
time expired do not delay 
notifying this offfre All er- 
rors are cheerfully i-orrett • 
ed Iter*. 



••—•—ft— 4— aeeeeeea 



a 
a 
a 
a ^ 

a 
a 
a 



♦trees'*"* » » • M • » M » »+ »♦♦♦+ 

Take Y«tir Ceaaty Paper. ^^ 



V 






** 



I 




gOQWg CtfPNTY RECORPinr 




Pettit 



And Inspect their line of General Merchandise 
you will find their prices 

J-U-S-T R-l-T-E. 

Blue Work Shirts • j^jO 

240 Weight Blue Denim Overalls 1.60 

j 2?" Weight Blue Denim 0«rr-«la # £hildrens 75c 

Comfort Batting 3 1 -4 lb roll 1.25 

Our Line of Groceries Is Complete. 



I 



MM 



THE DEVIL AT WORK. 



TREES NEEDED ON ROADWAYS 



Table Meal, 12 lbs 35c 

« Romeo Flour, highest grade patent, 24^ lb. bag. . . 1.50 

Liberty Bell Flour, as good as the best, 24-lb. bag . 1 .50 O 

Ohio Corn, 10c can, r. 3 for 25c O 

Pure Cane Bulk Sugar, per 1 00-lb. bag fe 7.90 

Gold Bar, Pine Apple, No. 3 can, 1 lb. 14 oz 40c 

Wisconsin Early Selected June Peas, per can, 10c 

Franklins Golden Syrup, made from cane sugar, 

1 lb. 9 oz. can" ,. . . . f 20c 

Franklins Golden Syrup, 1 lb. 2 oz. can . -. 1 5 C 

New Orleans Molasses, per gallon 90c 

, Jiff -Jelly and Jell-O, all flavors 10c 

7 Bars Swift's Pride Soap . « 25c 

Blue Bird Bread -fresh every day. 

Fresh Meats of all Kinds 



No Reason Why the United 8tatea 

Should Be Behind Europe in 

Matter 61 Beautlflcatiorv 

One of the pleasant Impressions 
which our soldiers brought back with 
them from oversells wns of miles of 
country roadways beautified with 
magnificent trees. In this country a 
shade tree by the roadside Is so rare 
as to cause comment. Once in a while 
during a trip of many miles one will 
come to a place whore some wise man 
of the post has set out in a row along 
the side of the road maples or oaks 
or elms. Bnl an eren commoner sight 
are tile stretches where somebody has 
cut down Uio trees and left the road- 
way bare tmil unsightly. Not Infre- 
quently telegraph or telephone com- 
panies have gone hacking their way 
through a stretch of fine old trees. 





A 

one 



THE DEVIL KNOWS 

:ronch called at the office 

ay last week, and asked the 

uevir to tell him, "WHAT IS A 

KNOCKER?.' In reply the devU 

said : 

"After God finished the rattle- 
snake, the toad and the vampire 
He had some awful sui stance left 
with which he made a knocker 
A knocker ia a two-legged animal 
with, a corkscrew soul, a water- 
sagged hrah. a,td a combination 
backbone made of jelly aud^lue 

It appears* that a land owuer resld- Li^J. 81 ! u other People have their 
r on »i,v ,.»,„.»..„ _m.* » J _.__'T TParts He ear.-.. ., „- iMfnor^nf rot- 
ten principles. When the knocker 



Everything in Wood 

Get Our Prices 

WOOD AND ASPHALT SHINGLES, 

| PULP AND PLASTER WALL BOARD, 

ORNAMENTAL SLATE ROLL ROOFING-MIXED 

COLORS— DIAMOND SHAPE, 

LIGHT. MEDIOM and HEAVY ASPHALT ROLL^ROOF-' 

INC, BARN SIDING, GARAGE DOORS," 

.1EAVY TOBACCO RACKING. 

The A. M. Lewin Lumber Company, 

COVINGTON, KY, 

• Madison Ave. and 24th St. Phone South 465-466 f 




We want all of your Eggs, Poultry and Cured Meats. 
% Bring them to us and receive the Highest Price. 

GULLEY & PETTIT, 

■fl • Burlington, Kentucky. - 

"■^- " ■ !— irn n-l. 




Merchants Creamery 

OF CINCINNATI 

Has opened d^Cash Buying Cream Sta. at Petersburg, 

Ky. We test and pay for your crearn while 

you wait. Start in and give us your next 

trial can. We are„ located in the 

Post Office Building. - 



■ 




J. C. BOLEN, x 

PETERSBURG, KY 



tug on any country road may citf down 
trees along the highway for cord wood 
and plow the hind to the very edge 
of the road without interference, and 
that the law has permitted him to set 
out saplings In the spring and get 25 
cents each in reduction of taxes. Pub* 
He service corporations, it is stated, 
also have certain rights under the law 
which Beera to -work to the disadvan- 
tage of private • citizens seeking to 
beautify the highway adjoining their 
property hy planting valuable trees. 

The State Forestry association will 
submit a proposition to its ' entire 
membership this fall by letter ballot, 
with a view to determining whether 
codification and revision of the slate's 
shade tree laws shall lie one #f >he 
objectives in the campaign for neces- 
sary forestry legislation. The associa- 
tion is appealing for the support of 
all citizens Interested, 

This is something which may well 
command our favorable attention. The 
movement should provide* not only for 
the protection bf such roadside trees 
ns still exist, i„,t should also make 
provision for the replacing of those al- 
ready des troy e d. - — Iluffalu Express 



• - -m • -- «•■•-•• fruw ajoa hfi 

comes down the street honest men 
turn their backs, the angels weep 
iears in heaven and the devil 
shuts the gate-H of hell to keep 
him out. No man has a right to 
knock so long as there *Ls a .pool 
of water 'deep enough to drown 
his body in, or a rope to haiw 
his carcass with P 



STA1I TREASURER OF. 

CHINA FAMINE FUND 



<£ LOGAN FOSTER. B. B. ALLPHIN. $ 

I Foster & Allphin | 

Real Estate and Auction Sales Co. ^ 



7R I am associated with the above firm and srlieit your busi- 

^ 'SZ2 ness. List, your farms with as. Give us yoiu sales of Live 
&} ..^IStoek and other Personal property. 

«&» ~^** ^° t ' lfi a( * vort ' 8 '"g- auction your sale, clerk and col- 
[lecfc. All you have to do is give us property list, .^^j 



FOSTER & ALLPHIN 



^ %& Covington, Ky 



Walton, Ky. Phone 37 Con. 



B."B.~ALLPHIN .""Local Agent. Walton, Ky" 



* 






O^^^^^^^JK^¥^^^^W^^^¥^*^*^6 






n 



V 



way war? 



All 0. 0, F, Ball, Hebron, 



/ . . 



u. 



.BACKYARD ORCHARD AN ASSET 

— ^— — I 

Can Be. Depended LVaon to Pay Divi- 
dends of Pleasure and Health 
for Many Year3. ' 



The orchard behind the village home 
has alwnys been an asset of great 
value. ' We knew one once that had 
cherries, pears, plums and apples for 
the entire fruit season— early and late 
—and It yielded enormous dividends of 
pleasure and health for a full quarter 
of a century. 

A few fruit trees may be grown with 
profit in the bade yards of cities not 
too closely built. One exists in a near- 
by ejty, where ten years ago a wise 
h n n Kan d tnan planted fruit trees in his 
back yard, and for ornament set ortt 
Japanese apricots and dwarf quinces in 
his front yard. From his trees he now 
has two crops, one of surpassing beau- 
ty ."-during blossom t.'me and an- 
other of palatable and healthful fruit 
illter. Theif are also .berries on his 
lot in abundance, and a wild goose 
plum tree that carries prodigious 
crops. I — f ~ 

It may be stated as n fact that no 
man ever planted fruit trees who did 
not thereby become a benefactor. 
There is room for thousands of them 
In the rear of Omaha hornet."— Omaha 
Bee. 




Time Deposits 

Money Savers may now take advantage of the 
facilitius offered by many of the country banks 
to secure INTEREST ON DEPOSITS without 
undergoing the many inconveniences that are 
incident to deposits in Saving Banks. The fact 
that we* pay 3 per cent, interest on deposits 
ni«ne"ior a term of less than \2 months, and 

4 per cent 

on deposits made for a term of one year may » 

interest you in this matter. 

Boone 60. Deposit Bank 

Established 1886. 

Burlington, Kentucky. 



5 




IN President Wflson : s appeal for 
aid for the 40.(00.000 Chinese fac- 
ing starvation, he points out that 
$1 will feed one Chinese for a month. 
Through the appointment by the Presi- 
dent, Joseph 1). Kuive. president of the 
Louisville Hoard of Trade, is state 
treasurer and rhe Kev.,Dr. K. f. Mul- 
lms, president of the Southern Han- 
tist 'Theological Seminary, is chairman. 
Funds for the China Famine Fund 
should be .;ent to Mr. lUirge, 9 Board 
of Trade building, Louisville. 



^/ 



* 



OLD FASHUND 



DANCE 

• » i 

. Music 'ird Everything 

Come One. ■ Come All 

Odd-Fellows Committee. N 



Roads of Remembrance. 
The trees planted nt the technical 
hijrh school were in honor of former 
pupils In tfie service and not for, the 
dead. Women's clubs, highway asso- 
ciations, state forestry associations 
and the American Forestry association 
are taking an active interest In the 
movement. No more beautiful way of 
paying tribute to the boys who went 
to war could be devised than the 
planting of trees, and it is an under- 
taking to be encouraged, Memory 
trees, singly or In groups, or along 
"roads of remembrance" will be known 
for what they are quite as well as a 
Carved monument and may be far 
more beautiful.— Indianapolis Star. 



URGES FRIENDSHIP BE 

CEMENTED WITH CHINA 





Vacant-Lot Gardens. 
according to C. O. Davis of the Mil- 
waukee garden commission, more than 
1,000 vacant lots are ndw under culti- 
vation. One of the benefits of the 
plnntln? of gardens Is that it Stops 
people from using the vacant lots as 
dumping grounds for their garbage 

and rubbish. The heaps of refuse 
often form breeding places for tiles 
and mosipiltoea. 

Yet greater benefits are realized In 
the prollts derived from ihe garden 
produce, and the healthful exercise 

gained in caring for the tracts. 

Now for Tree Planting. 
Trees for ch.v street planting may 

be of the same kind for .1 do, en bluets 
and must be evenljf" apuceil -..i\s the 

American Icin strj 1 1 ol 

VViisbliikton. u hii li win Bend r free 

tree |ii.iiiiihi: :uide t.i mi) one When 

I lee, 111 e phillleil along n I -oiliil 1 > 1 .. nl 

Hide II l-i tulH-i 111 lime > In in l| 

of 11 l< u SlllUS i III in ills In 

tilled 




Let's Stop "Kidding" Ourselves 

IT'S ALWAYS BEST TO FACE 
THE FUTURE SQUARELY. 

We are doing this and have greatly reduced 
prices on all 

Suits and Overcoats \ 

For Men, Young Men and Boys. 

Quality and service have build our business, and 
ttre will take care of your wants at a great sav- 
ing to you. 

We carry a complete line of Sweater Coats 
and Corduroy Coats and Pants, 




605 Madison Avenue, 



Covington, Kentucky 




Wall U Rimimblr. 
Well -kepi In. 
HleiiUt Utui 



— Photo l.y OAl'HKXD £ SHOOK 
DR. HENRY E. DOSKER. 

NOT only from a humanitarian 
sUiiid|«<ent but lu view of. the 
serinus situaiion faced by 
America in the Orient, it would be wise 
to eement the friendship between the 
United States and Chiun, in the opinion 
of the Rev. Dr. Henry K. Do.-kor. u 
member of tin- faculty of the l*re«b) 
ter'an Thoologicftl Seminary, I.n.r< 
VI lie* l>iv Uosker. who nerved M a 
ml.ssionao In .Japan ami also in I'ttViu, 
make an urgent SBUSSJ for fumls- for 
H10 40.00O.000 sUirvln K Chinese in the 
faiil'ue MiieUeu praVinCSS north nf the 
•'(•itoa riser. 

lie ha* been in this lerr lor., in.. I j 
)■&} s 4ie I . lull in | t | „,.,| „[ liH . .-, 
Of the \liiei , .ui MiUler n| | •. -i 
« lii. Il i^iuie^ I hat I.VOOO.tKH) o| 11 1 
li.ilnt.niis are ninststlBl ita ill 
«ild pi nits . mi 
diaih 1 

i . INN) . 

■1 en 
.1. 

bun 



We have recently put in a stock of Flooring 1 , Ceil- 
ing, and other dressed lumber on a low cost basis, and 
this, with our stock of framing and rough lumber, both 
pine and hardwood, enables us to make a very attrac- 
tive proposition to cash buyers. 



NOW IS THE TIME TCf BUILD. 

If you are looking Tor a chance to-tave money on 

lumber, come and see us. 

EDGETT & PULTON LUMBER Cp., 

(Incorporated) 

219 Crescent Ave. - j Erianger, Ky. 



>*«♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦««.«.««««< 



II will 

L'Vllllll 



U t > ( 






atuiitS I uut| 



Subscribe for the Recorder. - 
Try It One Year - You'll Like It. 
Only $1.50 the Year 

\ 
Stv Don't t'nli 1«» I4«i>il All Ihe Atlm In 1 hla l«au«.^Hl 



•*•♦••••♦♦•••••*••••♦••••««♦♦♦»♦••♦♦ 




BOONE COUNTY RBCORDM 



k wckie; the printer's devil 



Ry Charles Sughroe 




SN GOUN, TWW'% R\<3WT 
I U£\>Efc TUM4K "TU£ GOOD 
PEU.OYUS >WMO VA&.V4E A. UhSXV 

OF PACHmGr^-fUfcX* 
PAVER >¥»VTUOvyr fc£\V\<a 
UOTVFXEO 




Tfe Boy Must Like Pork Chops 



\UWO v S AttfUfrMfc <SCTC , 

FER OS , M£ NR£ 
ALLANS fcOOGXXtt 



W 



td» 



AVM> TttfcV S0*£ 00/ V *U0 U*\)fc W>*VC <S*G?& 
rAAUfc KM «H«0 J^-^S-^1 o!SS^ 



A 



D*N* 



r\ "'13-Y 



■»,'•'■' 



•rt^ 






i!»»-* 



Km 



irwj 






:^r 



■fr -»■ 



000/V£ G0. RECORDER \ 

HCBU3IIEU KVfiRV TUl'RSKAV 
N. E. RIDDELL. Publisher. 



•Wirt^ii-il at the PtodofRee in Burling 
ion. Ky.. as Sti-oiid-class Mail 



LOVERS L15AP 



Mr*. Hubert White ai.d Mrs. Joo 
"Walton spent tho week-end With 
their parent*, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. 
Eddins. 

Mrs. "Hud'' Stamper is very ill 
of bronchitis. 

John Riley has moved to Mr-* 
Ijewis Clore's place. 

Hubert White o.nt- a tra^k "... 
of nice bog* to the city one da J 
last week 

Mrs. Ray Cropdrtdge has about 
recovered from a serious illness 



Do you know 
you can roll 

cigarettes tor 
lOcts from 
one bag of 



A CHILD CAN RUN A SILENT ALAMO FARM 
ELECTRIC POWER AND LIGHT PLANT. 
THIS PLANT TAKES CARE OF ITSELF 
AT A COST OF 3c PER DAY. 











♦ 






• 


*> 




PETERSBURG. 


• 


♦ 






4 


Hubert 


MeMiille/i is tseo\ 


Ting 


from 


a 


cas& of appendicitis. 




Mrs 


Ba 


rah E. White, an elderly j 


and 


most worthy christian 


WO- 1 


na an. 


is 


seriously ill at her 


io no 


i b*re% 










GENUINE 



BullDurham 




TOBACCO 



>\/ mLf Jhtn±~i£a**~ <&Ba£ £^*^ 



Rev. B. F, Swindler haa r 
ed the car? of Petersburg Rj 

church, to tak^ effect in 
spring, wlien he will remove from 
the community. 



M is. 

ths 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ ♦ 

♦ WOOLPER HEIGHTS. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 

Miss Helen Aylor who haa been 
employed at the John Shillito Co 
for several "years, has returned to 
her home, having resigned her 
position. 

Mrs. Henry Seikman visitod her 
parents. Mr. and Mrs B E. Aylor, 
last Thursday.. 

Mabel Williams spent Tuesday 
night with Zelma Beemon. 

Zelma Beemon and Earl Mudman 
spent Sunday with her sister Mrs 
Elmer Goodrrdge. 

Mt. and Mrs. Newton Sullivan, 
Sr., and Mrs. Sara Henaley and lit- 
tle daughter, visited at Ed. Eas- 
ton's, Thursday. 

Henry Siekman eojd liis email 
crop of tobacco including all the 
grades, at an average of $3825 per 
100 j)Ounds, at Walton Loose Leaf 
market last Thursday. 

Mrs. R. H. Walker is entertain- 
ing her mother, Mrs. M. Rouse, of 
Covington, this week. 

Mrs. Casiua Sullivan and two 
sons Wilfred and Caaius, viaited 
B J. Akin and family, Sunday. 



<*000000+< 



FLOBENCB. 



♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦* 

Mrs. iGeo. Bradford spent last 
Thursday with Mrs Owen Bracl- 
Bradfor.l. 

I. Dunson and wife entertainea 
several of their friends from the 
•eity Sunday 

• F. C. Sc'nram and wife, of Ivory- 
dale, were guests of G. F Sehrana 
arid family, Sunday. 

Russell Bradford and wife en- 
tertained Rev Tomlin and Miss 
Renaker at dinner, Sunday. 

-O W MnTksberr> and family 
Sundav %vith Mrs. Marksberrys 
ui.cle.I'ete Wolford, of Verona. 

Tht supper given by the Bap- 
tist church Sut irdajr night, was 
well attended and ,i nice sun 
realized 
L. T I'tz who has a position in 
— pifce nuiuity, .was the week-end 
guest of his parents. W. P. Utz 
and wife. 

Clyde Clements and family, of 
BigBone. were guests <»f S II 
Tarshall and wife, last Wednesday 
and Thursday. 
J. R. Whitson, Jr., haa mumps. 
Mi-s. Bruce Thornton died Mon- 
day at her home after a lew days|i 
illness of heart trouble 

TjHt. Carl Suim itnd «n» 
Skinner were married at the home 
of Rev Geo W Atn.nerman, of 
■ Cynthiana, Peb .'.id, at •> M i 
Tie, groom is the son of Mr 
Mr*. John Swim ol Florence, 
th«? brid' »» th ■ •' • , l.i.n ol 
Skinner, of Hani 
Her the ceremony ll 
ule left for the ho 
Swim, brother or 
where n bountiful suppei u 
ed them, which urn* enjoyed h 
all prewent. ,Tlw y«»ung p«o|»l 
liave th* b**t 
many friend*. 



The Army Preparii 

Previous to th? Wilson Admin- 
istration, the army was regarded [ 
merely as a fighting machine. Hit] 
tie attention was paid to the ef- 
fect of the service on the men 
who enlisted Men who were 
given no useful ways of occupy- 
ing spare time, except such or-j 
dinary tasks as cutting grass at 
the army posts, frequently devel-: 
oped bad habits and layvloss ways. 

Under the pr?sent administra- 
tion, the theory has been not) 
merely - 1# mak? the army an ef- 1 
ficient fighting machine, which 
has not been overlooked by any 
means, but to make the exper-| 
ience in the service a useful one. 
for the soldiers. There has now| 
been in operation for about a 
year, an educational and vocation- 
al system which trains them in 
such useful callings os agricul- 
ture, printing, tractor work, etc. 

Thus "not merely are the men 
saved from formation of the vic- 
ious- habits which the idle army 
life often encouraged, but they 
are helped on to efficient produc- 
tion and business success after 
their te_rm of enlistment is fin- 
ished. 

Before this system was introduc- 
ed, it was difficult to get re- 
cruits for the army. Big posters 
were put up all over the country, 
and recruiting officers were Bent 
around everywhere, but the young 
n»en would not enlist. Wow with 
this training, the army has be- 
come popular and there is no 
trouble about getting recruits. 
The expense of recruiting has 
been cut down from $flO to ff2ppr 
man. 

This is one of the most states- 
manlike (changes that has been 
made by any administration for 
many years. The WiLson regime 
will be * remembered for *a long 
time as the one thai put the 
army on a new basis and made 
it a successful training school 
for life as well as the country 1 * 
means of defense. 



W. 



Ss^ 



:~i-\ 



Home is the place for comfort. Electrify your Home- 
Give the family the bright lights and keep Jhem happy 
Electrify your home for sa-fety keep the dangerous open- 
flame lights from your buildings. Electric Lights are- 
clean and dependable, and' safe anywhere. 

In selecting a Farm Lighting Plant be aware of the* 
size you are buying. Thererare some three-quarter kw 
units for practically the same price as a four ftw plant. 
Investigate this matter carefuJly before- placing your or- 
der. 

Take into consideration that the SILENT o*LAMO 
does not have to have any extra expense to install it. You 
can set this little motor downaoywhere you wish, hook 
the wires on and the plant is installed. 

The SILENT ALAMO is the cheapest hand you can 
employ on your plack. The plaert will light every build- 
ing around your home, and do> much other hard' work 
for the family. , t 

Don't neglect the pleasure and; convenience that you. 
ewe yourself and family by placing your order for the 
SILENT ALAMO. 

W. L. KIRKPATRICK 

Burlington, Kentucky. 



Labor income is not the limiting- 
factor in determining how much 
the farmer shall have to eat, 
hut it is the determining factor 
for the wage earner in the city. 
Food, fuel, and shelter are pri- 
mary requisitie8 of life, and the 
farm furnishes its proprietor a 
good proportion of these neces- 
saries in addition to the income 
he derives from the sale of farm, 
products. These things that the 
larm furnishes directly towarrtthe- 
living expenses of the farmers 
[amity enable him to live even 
though his crops are poor. ThiB 
indirect income from the farm, is 
often underestimated, often . un- 
recognized, unless provision is 
| made for accurately recording li 
the farm accounting system, 
i sav specialists of the t T S. D*>- 
e |paVtment of Agriculture. 



PUBLIC SALE. 

We will sell at auction at th» 
. the. late residence of Susan Uta,. 
deceased, Z% miles, west of Un- 
iott. Ky., on 

Saturday, Feb. flth, 1921 

The following household 



NOTICE. 

I do not tatpect to handle the 
International line tkia- year. I 
have a few bargains, to- ofler for 
sale. 

1 Fajrm road wagon* 
Llate motfel manure- spreader, 
1 Ohio 2 aorse riding plow, 

1 Oliver hillside breaking 1 plow;, 

2 Oliver chilled breaking plows, 

LJDisk-rMing-c alt t y a t o r . k_ vvavcr ^ J , ^-Folding bed*a Bed- 

L Oliver 2-row 14 tooth bottom 



i nun . \ 

s otinir 



. m 
and 

and 

■\ ill 
V- 

ou- 



Hides.Durmg tht Day. 

B I'.h the larvae and adult wee- 
l*. feed during the night, 



ground. Usually 



V ihlies >if I hell 



Can turrtmltr Charter 

Tna Court of Apuaals handed down 

.n M4n i>Uy. "<»'•"«»« ""' 

ludMUaftt »f 'h* tteiMifOlrcHll « "tirl 
»>#rniUtlun !»»• •«*»» •' Vonm* <«• 
Mmidir iticnaH 



and 
eeal lhem-vl\es in the day un- 
der rubbish or in cracks iri'tbs 

I hey Work on UlC 

if the lenVLHi whore 

Ihej aat small holes and are not 

ii i n exeejil by the careful obnuf* 

1 he mOSl ImpOl t ;• in eh «ek Oil 

tie- pest Ii i ii • fungous Ii *•**■ 

« lie h Kills Hie Ian o u> » «^l 

i imtlii i t diiiii; tb« iiiunthH of 

\inii .i ii< i Mn 'Hid .i^.uii iii Onto* 
vi mbei 



(leorge | ur, lersidi 
,m oo m 

,l« :lll 



I l>< g.ll 

Ihem 



th it 
Vk llh 



iu»|Hiri 

well a-i 



ga.ug plow, 
1500 rod different farm fenceimg, 
10 Dit'Ierent lengths wire gates, 

Some lawn fence, 
1 191* Ford truck with stock rack 

in first class condion, 
1 Ford touring car in good con- 
dition well equipped. 
250 Bushels corn in crib, 
3 tons good No 1 sheaf oats, 
3 Tons of No 1 mixed hay. 

These goods will be sold at a 

bargain. „ 

W. L. KIRKPATRICK. 
Burlington, Ky. 

X Ray OtttcU 8wall*VM4 Coin*. 
In (he government mint In Japan ao 
X-rny u>u«hln» la used to etamlue ■ua- 
pected •Banlejrtai aa th«j laava tha 
•alubllahmaul dally, and It haa r»- 
T»ol»il tht pr«a»iteM or culna that had 

b««n fiirtnUi H ii** luiiif oaa'a 
atajnjarh 



stead, 2 Springs, 3 Feather beds 
Pillows, Comforts, Quilts, Car- 
pets Chairs, Safe, Dishes,. Two 
Wash stands, 2 Tables, 2 Large 
Heating stoves. Kitchen range 
in good condition, also 2 Stacks- 
Hay, about 2.G Ions each. 
, Terms made known on day of 
sale. Sale begins at 1 P. M. 
E. E. UT2. 
M. L. UTZ,. 



8ev«nteen Pound TroutT 
Trout vary ureatly within tho 
•pecles. according to the nature of tho 
waters they ' Inhabit, tho variation* 
being iiiunli'esied In their color, elza, 
form an<J tin development, aoya tho 
American Korea! rr Mngaslna. Aa to 
their weight. Mr. Ilnllock, a famous 
Amertcun fhheriHnn clalnia to have 
Inown of one tlmt H*.«hw4 aevooteoa 
pound*. Midi* aa a rule the/ do a«» 
fun over three M fOOf pOtMOa 

TAhK Vt)H»< < Ot Nl\ I'APHK 



Pre-lnventory 

Shoe Sale 

i 

Prices Cat to The Quick 

For two wee!;cyou can 
get Shoes at Pre- 
war Prices. 

Profits Forgotten 

DAVIS 



i 



The Shoe Man 



Rising Sun, 



■a 



Indiana. 



You, Mr. Farmer, You 

Take that middleman's profit 

And Put It In Tour Own Pocket ! 

buy direct from hill's at 
wholesale prices 

We specialize on high-grade tested seeds 
for the Field and Garden 

Red Clover, Alsike Clover, Timothy, 

Blue Grass, Red Top, Sweet Clover, Etc. 

Write to Department B for prices 

Did You Get Our 1921 Seed Catalog? 

Hill's Prices Always Lower. 

Best White Table Meal, per 100 lbs $2.00 

Farmers Salt, 60-lb. bag 1.25 

Ohio River Salt 230 lb. Bag - 3.65 

Scratch Feed, clean, free from grit, 1 00 lb ■ bag • 2.25 

Egg Mtaah, (Chicken Chowder) 50-lb. bag 3.75 

Poultry Charcoal, 100-lba 2.00 

Oyster Shell, 100-lba 1.35 

Ryde's Calf Meal, 100 lb bag 5.50 

Lake Herring, 1001b. ', bbl ., r i_7.50 

Fancy Mackerel, per kit 2.50 

RARUS FLOUR **M??!liW 

The highest grade soft winter wheat flour on Wiis market 
and guaranteed to give satisfaction. We buy right and 
sell right— you pocket the difference. 

Mail your Order* to> Dept B for prompt attention. 

Northern Kentucky 's I gggjjg 

Long Distance Phone S. 1855 and S. 1856. 
. letaMlsbe* 1863. 

tti 



I 



t 



f'.MiM;Tl 



PH"2::.H.r3 



► ooooo-eeo-e ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



DO YOU TAKE THE RECORDER? 

If Nc* Try It One year. 



««»•««••••••«»•♦«•»«»•««•« «♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦#♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



**ssai!«i&.'ifs-ft ,, 3*i 



i'Hlb^tt , h'#'# ; 



■OONI COUNTY RECORDER 



**> 



** 



i 




Every Day Is Bargain Day at Schanker'sl 



It is the same today as it Is tomorrow or the next day— high grade merchandise selling at 
the lowest prices. We do not have to sacrifice our profits on certain classes of Mdse. to 
attract the trade, and then "Mark Up" other goods in order to make up for it. People 
who have been trading here for a number of years know they can ALWAYS buy here the 
best class of merchandise at the mo st reasonable prices for which they can be sold. 

New Low Prices on all 

Men's and Boys' Furnish's 



Men'8 $1.50 Blue Chambray Work 
Shirts, now 



98c 



Men's $2.50 Work Pants in hard 
faced worsteds. Big values at . . . 



$1.79 



Boys Knee Pants in Heavy Cassimerers, 
$2.50 values, in all 



sizes at 



$1.39 



Boys' Stockings in Heavy Ribbed 
35c value's in alls sizes at 



19c 



Men's Dress Pants in the finest Wool Wors 
ted and Cassimereres, beautiful patterns, 
$5 and $6 values), 

See these n6w at 



$3.90 



Men's 25 Cotton Socks, 
now selling at ... . 



12c, s 



SHOES THAT WILI NQX WEAR ARE NOT CHEAP AT ANY PRICE— DO NOT 
JUDGE SHOES BY THE PRICE— QUALITY IS THE BIG THING 

Schanker's Shoes Have a Known Reputation for 
both, high quality and Low Prices. 



Ladie's New Spring Oxfords 
in dark brown and black new- 
est styles; formerly 
sold at $5. Now. 



$3.49 



Ladle's Dark Brown or black 
Shoes in dressy styles^ 
$6 values. Now. 



$4.49 



Children.g Gun Metal Calf Shoe 
$3.60 value. Special at $2.49 

Boys' 50c Lisle Web Suspend- 
ers 39c 

Men's $2 Dress Shirts in finest 
Percales, beautiful pat- QQ. 
terns. Sdecial at. «70U 



Men's Work Gloves with leather palms and 
heavy canvass back 



Window Shades in good 
heavy cloth, dreen or white 
36 inches by fl feet. TEZg% 

Each IDG 




Men's High Grade Work Shoes made like illustra- 
tion with wing tip; heavy tan Elk Hide, two full 
soles, guaranteed solid; $7.00 value &E CA 

now selling at ^D.DU 



Men's Heavy Elk Hide Shoes fine for every 



day wear; $5 values. Special. 



Men's Dark Brown or Black Shoes made 
over dressy lasts; $6 values. Now 

Men's $5 Gun Metal Calf button or lace 
Shoes. Special 



$190 
$4.90 



$3.50 



You Get the New Low 
Prices on Dry Goods 

In Buying Here 



Bleached Muslin, yard wide in fine quali- 

19c 



ty formerly sold at 39c 
the yard. Now 



Dress Gingham in pretty plaids and 4 Q^ 
checks; formerly 29c yd. Now | JO 



Shirting Ginghams and Chiviets in big se- 
lection of stripes and small checks 
formerly 40c the yd. Now 



23c 




ERLANGER, KY 



Heaviest Outing and Canton Flannel 
in plain white or colors; formerly 
40c yard. Now 



23c 



Finest Percales made in big selection of 
dark or light patterns, yard wide; 
formerly sold at 39c yd. Now. . . 



23c 



"Trade Where They AH Trade. 



Attention, Mr. FARMER! 

Do you want to save money these times when your crops are not bringing as 
much as they should ? We anticipate every decline in price. We do not wait 
to be driven to it. If prices decline at the source of supply, we immediately put 
our prices down, whether we have large stock or small. Read these : 



H. & E. or Jack Frost pure cane 
granulated sugar, per cwt 

150 lb. Bag Fancy White Michi 
gan Potatoes, 

100 lb. Bag Fancy Hand Picked 

Navy Beans 

100 lb. Half Bbl. 

Lake Herring 

Clean Easy Soap 

(60 to box,) per box 

6-Gal. Can Fancy Sorghum 

or New Orleans Molasses 



$7.90 
2.65 
4.90 
7.50 
2.60 
4.00 
6.00 



G. & D. Special Coffee, 

Per pound 

Gee Whiz Coffee, 

Per pound , 

Golden Blend Coffee, 

Per pound 

G. & D. Special Tea, 

Per pound 

Icy Hot Teat 

Per pound 

Bulk Cocoa, 

Per pound 



100 lb. Bag Fansy 
Head Rice 

KANSAS CREAM or ARCADE FLOUR 

buy cheaper flour but .quality tells. 

Barrel in wood, $12.00; Barrel in 98-lb. Cotton Bags 



20c 
30c 
35c 
49c 
75c 
20c 



4 DbB. Coffee or Cocoa sent postpaid, 2 lbs of 
Tea sent postpaid at these prices. 

guaranteed the best on the market— you can 

$11.50 



If you have not joined our Pure Bred Poultry Register you should do so at once. 

This includes turkeys, duoks, geese and chickens. 

Send in your list today. 



Clever Seed, Alfalfa, Timothy, Alsike, Blue Grass. Red Top. All high grade tested. 

Agents for Jareckiz Fertilizer. 



f C0dfr€mcjtunKi& 



GROCERIES. FLOUR SEEDS. MEDICINES. 
I9r2/PIKEST. /& 20 W. JIh 'ST. 



%» 



WHOLESALE-"C*Hn«ton , t Lugot Seed and Grocery Home"-RETAIL 

CovIngton, Kentucky. 

Phones South 338 and 336. 

United States Wheat Director License No. 030057-"¥U 

U. S. Food Administration License No. G-1770. 



GUNPOWDER. 



Airs. E. K. Tanner spent Monday 
with Mrs. Nell Blankentx'ker. 

P. J. Allen and wife spent last 
Sunday with this serine and wife. 

Miss Beatrice Aylor entertained 
with a social on Tuesday night 
of last week. 

H. W. Ltz is the first, in this 
reighborhood to report young 
lamus in his flock. 

The tobacco crop is being mov 
ed pretty rapidly, several large 
truct loads passed thru our burg 
last week. 

The ground hog failed to see 
his shaoow, it being cloudy ail 
day. Therefore he will have no 
control of the weather. 

L. H. Busby sold his crop of 
tobacco 'on the Lexington loose 
ieaf market last week at an aver- 
age of 10 cents per pound. 

Mrs. Alice Daughters and daugh-. 
ter, Miss Effie, of Cincinnati, were 
guests of Mrs. H. F. UtzandMrs. 
Utz, Saturday night and Sunday. 

Linnie Busby has completed his 
equipment. He purchased a trac- 
tor some time and he has a hay 
press and circle saw and added a 
new crush mill last week and wiU 
crush each Tuesday. 

Walter Huey and sister of Bur- 
lington, while on their way to 
White Haven last Friday night, 
their machine went out of com- 
mission when within three milee 
of Union, and after working ana 
coaxing for about an hour it fail- 
ed to go, and he called for as- 
sistance at Union, and in a few 
minutes they were on their way 
rejoicing. 



The Boose County Higb School 

Will present as the 4th number of the 

Burlington Lyceum Course 

■i 

Robert H. B. Tremain & Co. 

Character Entertainers 

Court House Thursday, Feb. 17, 1921 

Burlington, Ky., 8 O'clock. 

An evening of character impersonations, humorous sketch- 
es, song and story. zA programme filled with tragedy, 
pathos and humor. Come out and enjoy an evening full o* 
laughter and delight. 



ical to subscribe for ner home pa 
per sent her little son to borrow 
the copy taken by their neigh- 
bor. . In his haste the boy ran 
over a four-dollar stand- of bees 
and in ten minutes looked like a 
warty Summer squash. RiB cries 
reached his father, who ran to 
his assistance, and failing to no- 
tice a barbed wire fence ran irfto 
t, breaking it down, cutting 



Henry Horace Grant 

£r. Henry Horace Grant, 67, who 
1 in Louisville, was professor 
surgery in the medical depart- 
ment of the University of Louis- 
ville and professor of the princi- 
ple* of surgery and oral -surgery 
in the dental department of the 
university. He was a feUow of the 
American Mtedical Association and 
of the Southern Surgical & Gynec- 
ological Society, ana a member of 

<!,.. \r; ti . ;.,.: ....; \*..n »t„,i:„. 1 « L 



A woman who was too econom-, the Mississippi Valley Medical As- 



!f 



* 




Warren O. Harding's first year as 
President will cost the country $189' 
000. 

He will receive f75iKK) salary, $25,- 
'000 for traveling expenses, $80,600 
for furnishing and upkeep of White 
House and grounds. 

The new First Lady of the Land 
will have $60,000 to refurnish the 
house, pay servants and bay autos 
and horses, gasoline aod oats. 
j Congress allows $8,000 to heat the 
''executive mansion and the green- 
houses, $18,000 for greenhouse ex- 
tensions and upkeep, $9,000 for gar- 
dener's services, and $9,000 for re- 
pairing and reconstructing green- 
houses. 

White House grounds closed since 
war began In 1917, are to be opened 
to the public again. It will cost $10,- 
000 to improve them. 

The new administration in expect- 
ed to be a brilliant for $8,«oo 

will be spent to light the mansion 
grounds and greenhouses. 

Hut the President will have some 
hi I Is ko pay out of his own pocket. j 
There are food and clothing Hint the 
state i iitertaliiiiianta. 

They'll cut a hole in his f7f.,»HM) i 
ualary. 

Mr J W. Russell Bradford, of 
Florence, aaya any one in IUmmi«* 
county ptiszlcd about th.ir income 
tux report he will give there the 
tlxftliud Information, if thry will 
• all at his home 



FOR SALE ETC.!:' 



j • FRANCESVILLB. • 

For Sale— Shetland pony, bay— | • ♦ 

* years-otdi- gen tl e r -seiHwh- A l so j ••• » ♦♦♦»• ♦»♦♦♦♦»»♦»♦♦♦♦»»« 

harness and runabout in good Mrs. Frank Avlor spent Sunday 



condition. W. V. Moore, Beaver 
Lick, Ky. Consolidated phone Bea- 
ver, 201. 5feb-2t 



with her parents Harry Kilgour 
and wife. 
R. L. Day and wife spent Sun- 

WOOD FOR SALE-Two dollars fly* W " h **" WhUaker « nd fM1 

£J?L r J}! lk V? i V , °!, larKper J? ord - CftU ... A J °« den entertained Leon 

or write H. 8. Tanner. Burlington "Aylor and family, Sunday 

Ky., K. D. 8. Hebron phone. » Mrs. R. S. Wilson, two children 

, 28Jan-tf. , Bernard and Myrtle and Alice Eg- 

For Sale— Two tor. timothy hay ' &^?, ton "Pe^t »ast Sunday at \V. 
Cheap if aold at once. Kenneth VV. L ■J& >w £5 tnt . „ 

Aylor, Walton R D 2 nd ' . W,1 l Reitmann and wife enter- 

Z_' talned a number of friends Sun- 



sociation ana the Jefferson Coun- 
ty and State Medical Societies. 

He was the author of "Principles 
of Surgery and Diseases of the 
Mouth and Jaw,'' published in 1902 
and until recently was one of the 
editors and business manager of 
the Louisville Monthly Journal of 
Medicine and Surgery. He had 
been a frequent contributor to 
a surgical journals and was widely 
known among physicians and sur- 
geons of the country for his pa- 
pers read at various medical gath- 
erings. 

BORN IX BOONE COUNTY. 
Besides his widow, Mrs. Leila 
Owsley Grant, to whom he was 
married in lbSG, Dr. Grant is sur- 
vived by a son, Dr. E. Owsley 
Grant, a Louisville practioner. He 
was a bother to the late Dr. W 
Ed. Grant, former City Health Of- 
ficer. 

Dr. Grant was born in Peters- 
burg, Boone county, Dec. 12, 1853, 
the sou of Dr. EUjah Lane Grant 



For Sale - Three Rhode Island • da y 
Red Roosters, one Plymouth Rock | W. 
yearling Rooster. Pure breed. Mrs. na guests 



W. H. Eggleston and family had 

..j guests Sunday S. W. Aylor, Mr 

Everett ijekman, Burlington Ky j Frank Estes and Chn». Eggleston 



For Sule— Fresh Jemev e«w wUh „ J , 8 E 8r8i°«ton entertained last 
calf by her side Ea rTKnSh £S l u ? d * y ' *F' j?' * Sandier Jerry 
lliurtoii Kv | Estes and daughter, Katherii.e, 



S. W. Aylor, Mr. 

Chas. Eggleston. 

J. S. Eggleston entertained last 

■ A 



llngton, Ky 

L If Husby, Jr, will grind aim 
crush corn at his place on the 
Hi Ion pike- evci \ Tuesday 
lofeh-vt 

for Hale— Two good milch rows 
due. to frtMdMtn in April, ul«> one 
H gallon cream can Mi i» Josie 
RUsy, Oram, Kn lofel 

••barilla tut the lir 'KDtfN th fi u 



Seymour Wilson, Dalflta Richie, 
Jassie and Gladys Wilsot. und 
Florence Eggleston 

The little daughter of Robert 
MWJuIre, who wss burned some 
time ago, U much improved 

Charles llesll, Jr , sjHMit a <>oii 
j»le of days last VMl with J \\ 
Ctttnger and family, ne.tr |..,u 

rsneeburf, Irdlana n. <.|«.ite t | 
Mr Utsingvr't fsmlly nil *l< K with 



handful pT flesh from his anat 
omy and ruining a five dollar pai) 
of pants. The old cow took ad- 
vantage of the gap in the fence 
and killed herself eating corn 
Hearing the racket, the mother 
ran, upset a four-gallon churn ot 
rich cream into a basket of kit- 
tens, drowning the whole Utter 
In her hurry she dropped and 
broke, past all hope of mending 
a twenty-five dollar set of false- 
teeth The baby, left alone, crawl- 
ed through the spilled. cream 
and into fhe parlow, ruining a 
twer.ty-dollar carpet. During the 
excitement, the eldest daughter 

ii awav with thr* v,;w,.i 
do 

eT "est EJ °;; ; gygr i ot Boo°»^r hrwaa centre 

; College, Danville. He received the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts there 
in 1675, and entered the Jefferson 
College of Medicine, Philadelphia, 
from which he was graduated with] 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in 1«78. In 1834 the de*groet of 
Master of Arts was awarded to 
him by Centre College 
When he left the Philadelphia 
; medical school, Dr Grant began 
a general practice of medicine at 
I Newcastle, Ky. He remained there 
. "bout two years, coming to Louis- 
! vtlle u a general practitioner 
In 1900 he began the special prac- 
tice of surgery there 



able of these instruments is one 
which aids in the healing of frac- 
tured bones. Dr. Grant was known 
much more widely among the 
members of his profession than 
to the public. He was averse to 
a conspicuous position of any 
kind. 



ran away with the hired man the T i ^° U °i P r ELi J ah Lane Grant 
dog- Wke^up- Jeven £?ti J£ "iJZl^^^^i^H^J^ts.^ ' Grant M. 
T3 the calves go^out arXhTw^! *f "^"^ J5e public schools 
d the tails off of ' uf Boone - p °- he entp 

shirts. All to save $1.50. 

Plowing in January. 



We are indebted to Judge B \ 
Tanner for a copy of the Adver- 
tiser, published at Fayette Mo 
from which we take the following 
item : " 

"This is the first time it. veain 
the farmers have ueen able to 
io any plowing in January, but 
tins is just what they ha\ a been 
doing for several weeks, at o,l I 
times It ir aaid *hc ffroun I 
works up in good shape and .he 
weather has been Just cool enouth 
erongh, so they have been iblo 
to get much of the plowing done 
'Those who have taken advantage S 
of the opportunity to r ,. t ;lie'a 
gr.ound lit ahape will be the first ' 



FISCAL COURT 

The Fiscal Court was in session 
Tuesday, witfc all the. magistrates 
present except 'Squire Wilson. The 
road engineer was ordered to. com- 
plete the opening and change In the 
road from Taylorsportto Whitaker'a 
gate. 

Culvert pipe was bought foa the 
Alt. Zion road, the citizens In 'that 
neighborhood are to install the cul- 
verts without- sost. 

Citizens living- along the Woolper 
pike from Ashby Fork to the Pet- 
ersburg pike offered to put a quan- 
tity of rock in a crusher pile If the 
county would crush same and pat 
on Pik*. The offer was accepted. 

Thel-oad engineer was directed to 
pay $2 00 per day 1 for labor, and for 
team and man WOO per day. 

The claim of S. M. Bilite'r for work 
done on the Lexington pike, was re- 
jected. 

NOTHINGv 

There's nothing in tobacco. 
Xothing in your stock, 
Nothing in your harvest,. 
Nothing In your flock, 
^.Hogs^hnve gone to nothing. — 
Corn ain't worth a darn-^ 
Trusts have got the nation, 
Debts have got the farm 
Harding telle you nothing- 
Wall Street is now king, 
Money magnates whistle, 
Swift and Armour sing 
There's nothing in tnis' story, 
But as your homestead rocka 
Just whtstle like you whistleo" 
Cox e -Ex y ° U 8and - b *re ed J it»my 

Lodotd in Jail 

• ■ —i Wm 

Earl McNulty, who assaulted Miss 
."*"!!* Pe * no » few weeks since" 



to plant in the sany spring 

BIG DANCE. 

,h " <* K»ry Club W ||| KiVH H 

daooa at rlortnoo, Nwiurday ni K bt 
tary ISHh. Prl»., wait, < 
onia all. 



"tile 



Soon after" eomlnf to UlO,v|||.|S5^^fti^S27jB 
Dr. Grant became a leachci ni , nii H 8ed Heb.u.i -. i . *° dlt * 

anatomy ,., „,.- old K, .fi ! SSTofTlKl,!, KrTSS. *ES 49 

Mumed the prof^orahlt, of H„r -' *l,. M c N T.l v Z f», il""^ 
|erv in the HetnlftaJ r ; .He K e uf | fer llleT KJ Z a»?J "iffiowlbtS 

Sledici,,,., uhie f,e held until PHjawina limn,. MeNullv lliri, It^Sl 

tliat he would be back hi a few dav 

., 'CI.... ... mm J* 



when (his Institution was merg- 
ed with the Medical Department 
of ih,. i Rlveraity of LouievlUe 

He I hell l^<ullie |i|>if 1-v.in ii| ^m 

|erj oi the unlvera 

nventrd t niunbai n| hui • 
which an 

.•f l 



• a« Mill IMI i| il 

(fical Instrument! 

in wide ttir (inl- 



and get her The I ounly Juda 
iH'ttflMl who at u.u-e , H l| r|| fc. 
< enner when h» mm\ DepuU Hft 
went in tearoh of M- 
tied htiu behind tiiu harali 
ten |ai| \ u uaaiiiluli.a t 
new in * few ,u>rf 






boon! county recorder 



Hard coal Is falling, hut nobody Is 
being hurt by It* deBWit. 



France's new President l» 
Tcrv little fulling off ili<- "' :lil1 



dulses, in 




"Americans Buying Few Diamonds" 

-beudllnc. A few is nil that's left. 



The man who married his mother- 
in-law deserved u decoration, not ar- 
rest. 



Notwithstanding nil the price drops, 
the good old dull, sickening thud is not 
yet audible. 



A salt' Held has been' found in Can- 
ada, which naturally means a fresh 
development. 

Labor that will not produce when It 
can may find that It cannot produce 
when it will. 



Some of the price reductions seem to 
have taken the elevator 1ind others are 

using the stairs. , 

If epidemics follow the styles, you 
mny look for an outbreak of kne-e- 
monln this winter. 



The modern woman searching for a 
pood complexion might try soap and 
water for a change. / 



The only trouble with ntfrr 5SCS> 
tails is after one Is all lit up therejs 
apt to he an explosion. 



French search for another Kussinn 
patriot of the hour to succeed Wrangel 
has not been successful. 



Without the 'booze accompaniment 
the cabarets may find It difficult to 
have jazz received as music. 

England is compelled to handle nil 
kinds of foreign and domestic prob- 
lems at one and the some time. 



i The Elder Brother 

I 



i | By REV. LEW W. GOSNELL { 

■+ ...... ; 



Assistant Dean, Moody Bible 
Institute, Chicago. 



feggggggggS^Sg^g^W^gg^^^^^^' 




CUPID'S OWN DAY OLD LOVE TOKENS 



Fourteenth o f February Belongs- 
to Him Alone. i 



Years Ago All Valentines Had a 
Personal Touch. 



Anniversary Brightens the Drab Month 

With Memories of the Past and 

Joy of the Present. 



There is no chance of nsing oil to 
calm troubled waters so long as it is 
underground awaiting exploitation. 

Turkish women are now showing 
their faces, which Is more than the 
Turkish men have the nerve to do. 



Woman caterer advertises lfcper cent 
mince pie, Instantly arresting attention 
by omitting to say 15 per cent of what. 



TEXT.-And he was angry and would 
not go In: therefore came his father out 
and entreated him.-L.uke 15:28. 

D. L. Moody frequently preached on 

"The Elder Brother." He gald he did 

so because there 

are so many of 

him! 

In the first In- 
stance the elder 
brother repre- 
sented the Phari- 
sees. The open- 
ing verses of 
Luke 15 read 
thus t "Then drew 
near unto Him all 
the publicans and 
sinners for to I 
hear Him. And 
the Pharisees and Scribes murmured, 
saying, This man recolvcth sinners 
and eateth with them." It was to re- 
bm\<« nrls 'murmuring, by seL*&i tforlh, 
In contrast, the seeking love of God, 
which goes forth to publicans nnd shi- 
ners, that Jesns spake the parables of 
the lost sheep, the lost coin, and the 
lost man, or the prodigal son. In fact, 
he draws a, portrait of ,the murmuring 
Pharisees In the story ' of the elder 
brother. As Mr. Moody said, there 
are still maijy of him; for he finds suc- 
cessors in all formal religionists, who 
have no sympathy with God's Joy over 
the recovery of the lost. 

First of all, such men find no joy In 
the service they themselves offer God. 
When the prodigal came home, the fa- 
ther ■called on those about him to 
make merry. The »arable goes on to 
say : "Now his elder son was In the 
field; and as he came and drew nigh 
to the house, he lieard music and 
dancing. And he called one of the 
servants, and asked what these things 
meant" (w. 25, 26). Such merriment 
was foreign to his spirit. And so It fs 
always with formal religionists, for 



It will take more than a mere courl- 
to make the American woman admit 
that man is still the head of the fam- 
Mly. 

Fires thnt destroyed 15 warehouses 
In Liverpool were started with gasoline^ 
Just think of what the loss will be, aH 
^old. 



\ 



There Is at least enough reduction 
in the cost of living to provide a few 
additional pennies for little Johnny's 
bank. 

'The fuel crisis Is regarded as hav- 
' tog passed, but the consumer doesn't 
-find much change in the bin— or the 
price. 

Canada hopes to pay off its war debt 
i In 37 years. If Eurbpe could see day- 
light even that far away it would re- 
joice. 

Amateur brewers who used to sing 
"We won't go home till morning" are 
now singing "There's no place like 
home." 



It Is intimated that the ex-kal»er 

has to Interrupt his wood-ehopplng 

..now and then to do a little coupon 
cutting. 



Another way to reduce, the number 
of hunting accidents Is to do away 
with all the wire fences — or enjoin the 

hunters. _,.*,'; 



Hers 
L tel 



A telegraph company has Increased 
its rates 20 per cent. Thls< will re- 
mind somebody thaj^he is a man of 
few words. 



Philadelphia makes 100,000,000 bed 
sheets a year, beating the world at 
producing Philadelphia's own* best 
loved article. / 



Nobody suspected Enver Pasha of 
being a j c fcesmith until he began to 
show Turkey's parallel to Ireland. 
That betrayed him. 



A Paris doctor says men could get 
along very well without <heir stom- 
achs. Wonder if lie's willing to try 
getting along without his. 



It Is shid that Turkey bars diction- 
aries. And a casual glance at the 
Turkish names and language makes 
this bar entirely reasonable. 



A warning has been souridpd that 
nitre cocktails contain sulphuric acid, 
or are there instances where that 
won't make any difference? 
* ^_ 

*The people demand the best meat" 
may excuse jhc high price In some in- 
stances, but Just where Ones It leave 
the* customer who doesn't get It? 



The fellow who collects commis- 
sions from the Jobless through false 
promises to get ' them Jobs makes 
grave robbing look fairly respertabta 



Constantlne of Greece Is said to he 
■ poor politician but an exeelleni K en 
•ral. What Greece needs In an abll 
politician, who rill keep It from 
peed log, good generals. 

Doubtless all the world would be 
-wlllleg te let Russia work out Its own 
econasalc end political salvation If 
evinced the slightest dispoei 
et auytsia* 



Brightening the dull, drab month of 
February and doing their very best 
to cheer up and bring love into our 
hearts, the valentines — the valentines 
smile at us with their lnee-and-forget- 
me-not daintiness from the .shop win- 
dows. , 

There are eluborate "mllllonab^* 
valentines of celluloid and blue ribbons 
that come In big lace boxes, like 
French dolls; there are valentines that 
when pulled out like an accordion be- 
come Cinderella coaches of cardboard, 
laden with Loves and Venuses and 
Cupids. Others resolve themselves in- 
to airy pink-and-biue palaces — you 
never know — peopled with delightful 
goddesses and doves. 

But the best and most sincere, per- 
haps, are the old-fashioned valentines 
— vistas of foamy paper Ince. through 
which you look upon hearts redder 
than lovers' lips, In a prospect of vio- 
lets c^.i forget-:.... oo.ts. And hidden 
nwny, like u billet ddux In a Iwuquet, 
a little verse: 

This heart, sweet love, I send to you," 
Together with these violets blue: 
•And It you like this heart bt mine, 
I pray you be my valentine. 
_ < 

Could anything be more simple or 
direct to the point? As unerringly ns 
Cupid's darts or a beau's rapier, the 
verse carries Its message home. It 
..-rty be that the Elizabethan? lyrics, 
the love songs of Herrlck and Love- 
lace nnd Suckling, survive today only 
In the valentine. 

And, ah, what memories these har- 
bingers of love bring with them ! They 
lend us back along the columbine- 
bordered road to yesterday, over the 
asphodel meadows of Youth and First 
Love and Childhood Fancies, nnd we 
meet and kiss our first sweethearts 
again — nl%s, they have gone out of 
our llves^hese many years. 

And so, dear little Valentine, accept 
these violets and forget-me-nots, nnd 



the Joy of the Lord Is not theirs. John" hug tills message close to your heart- 



for surely a sweetheart Is the sweeter 
for a valentine, nnd, ns all wise men 
know, 'tis love that makes the world 
go round. 



Wesjey was such an one evct after 
being ordained to preach. When on 
his way to Amerlcn as a missionary to 
the Indians, his ship ran into a dread- 
ful storm. He was disturbed at the 
outlook-, and was amazed to hear a 
company of simple-hearted Moravian 
Christians singing calmly and Joyous- L Embarrassed by Shower of Hearts, 



ly In the midst „of the storm. Even 
their children Joined In the songs. 
Wesley was forced to contrast their 
conduct with his own feelings. The 
Incident was an Important factbr In 
lending him out of a life of religious 
bondage into the liberty of the glory 
of the children of God. 

Notice, too, the restraint between 
this son and his father. When he 
would inquire as to the sounds of 
merriment in the house, he did not 
ask his father, but went to a servant 
A life of true prayer Is Impossible to 
the formal religionist. He says pray- 
ers, but this Is not the same as pray- 
ing. The prayers of the Pharisees 
were full of vain repetitions, for like 
the heathen they thought they would 
be heard for their much speaking. To 
refer to John Wesley again, he never 
prayed without a prayer book until 
after he had come. Into the experience 
of a true child of God. How different 
Is such restraint from "the boldness 
and access with confidence" to which 
God Invites us. e_ 

How beautiful to rend: "Therefore 
came bis father out; and entreated 
bfm" (v. 28). It has been well re- 
marked that ,thls verse shows there 
Is a gospel for the Pharisees! God 
loves the formal religionist quite as 
much ns the prodigal. And ff he only 
knew It, the formal religionist needs 
the compassion and grace of God quite 
as much as does «the prodigal. 

For, see the spirit exhibited In the 
son's complaint thnt the 'father had 
never given him a kid that he might 
make merry with his "friends." Evi- 
dently his springs of Joy were not in 
his father, but In his friends. And, 
verily, the successors of the, elder 
brother would not be happy even IP 
heaven. They would not find their 
Joy there with the Father -ond would 
not respond when the Great Shepherd 
said: "Rejoice with me; for I have 
found the sheep which was lost" 

But did not the father say. "Son, 
thou art ever with me, and all that I 
have Is thine?" Yes, but he refers onjy 
to earthly things; the "living", he had 
divided. True, It is better not to 
squander our "substance," of body and 
mind nnd possessions, in riotous liv- 
ing, as did the prodigal. But it Is frue, 
also, that while a correct life Is better 
than an irregular one, It will not of 
Itself secure heaven. 

The best robe wets graciously laid 
on the repentant prodigal's shoulders. 
The elder brother never wore It, and 
never will, until he recognizes the 
flltbiness of his ragsl 



GOOD OLD SAINT IN TROUBLE 



Though It Would Seem He 
Should Be Used to It 




Much of the Romance' of the Day Has 

Passed, Though Sentiment le 

the Same as Ever. 

Thbree hundred years ago young men 
and women wrote their own valen- 
tines, which consisted then only of 
love mottoes, or declarations of affec- 
tion, written In Verse from a very full 
heart and on plain paper. Many of 
our great-grandmothers saved these 
old missive ... . i « 

Perhaps our • parents came across 
such valentines, old and yellow and 
decaying, packed away In lavender in 
the bottom of a dusty trunk up lu the 
attic. Yet when these valentines were 
first penned nnd put in her hand how 
grandma's heart did palpitate and the 
blushes rise to her cheeks I No mat- 
ter how halting the sonnet, or ana- 
gram or triolet. It was the music of 
love to her. "Heart," "dart" and "art" 
did rhyme sweetly I 

The machine-made valentines that 
we buy nowadays have lost this per- 
sonal touch, though perhaps some of 
■HP'iii have gained from an artistic 
point of view. Today it is only the 
school children nnfl a few open-hearted 
interested grown-ups who find the cus- 
tom of valentine making and valen- 
tine giving the fascination that it used 
to bo. Why, even Charles Lamb wrote 
valentines, and' loved to. 

Now the modern young man drops 
In a confectioner's or florist's shop and 
orders candy or flowers sent to Her. 
He scorns the vnlentlne sonnet — 
whereby the girls of today are missing 
a heap of romance. 

This was the day when a young man 
might accuse some youag woman he 
admired of being a coquette without 
insulting hor. In those days "co- 
quette" had Just such a naughty 
meaning ns "vamp" has today. It 
meant a heartless trifler. 

If she thereupon sent him a hand- 
made valentine on which were two 
bleeding lieurts made as one, it was 
her answer to his accusation. It meant 
that conquejdng the hearts of other 
men Hum lie, mennt nothing to her; 
that only J*is heart and hers In all 
the world counted, that her heart was 
bleeding for him just ns much as his 
was suffering for her. 

The comic vnlentlne is an outgrowth 
or burlesque of the super-sentimental 
valentine nnd has almost dle'd.out In- 
stead of pointing out the recipient's 
perfections nnd charms It dwells vivid- 
ly and uncomplimentnrily on his man- 
nerisms, clothes and appearance. In 
colored caricature. Red hair, large 
noses, blotched complexions, remark- 
able skinnlness or avoirdupois are us- 
ually the Jocular themes. Because 
valentines arc sent anouymously, it is 
possible with Impunity to remark 
scathingly op the physical character- 
istics or disposition of one's friends or 
foes. 



| Breeders Mutual Eire and Lightning | 

•*O^IN8URANCE COMPANY^^ 

Of Boone County, Ky. 

Insures Live Stock against Loss by Fire or Lightning, 
WRITE US FOR RATES. « 



gpsanrjer-srs •xKtCKXXWxacmxx. 



L. T. CLORE, President. 



HUBERT CONNER, Sec'ty. 



J L. KITE. Agent. 



£ 





m 
to 
to 
ft 
* 
ft 

ft 
* 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 



VtTLCANIZING. 



% 



Automobile tubes and tires repaired h* *h«" latent, 
process. Bring me your old tires and I may be 
able to get several miles more service for you out 

of them. 

Auto Accessories kept in stock. 

Good ridge and Goodyear Tires. 

GEORGE PORTER, 

BURLINGTON, KY. 



m 
m 

to 

to 
m 
to 

to 

i 

to 
to 







ft 

ft 
ft 
to 
to 
to 
ft 
ft 
to 
to 
to 
ft 
ft 
ft 



l 



$3574 



\ 



T'S a wise idea to place your order for a car now, ^ 



ft 
ft 
ft 

ft 
ft 
ft 

ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 



so you won't be disappointed in the»6pring. 

Phaeton Hudson $2538.00. Seven Pa.tenger Hudaob $2538.00 
Coupe Hudson • - $3445. Sedan Hudson 
Essex Touring $1698. 

Essex Roadster $1698. 

Dodge Touring $1390. 
, Dodge Coupe $2035. 

Dodge Sedan $2295. 

Cleveland Tractor $1395. 

The above prices are delivered at your door. 

It you want to place an order for any <Jf these cars, 

call 

B. B. HUME, BurUngftoii, Ky. 



Best duality— Fair Prices 



8um Total of a Life. 
The sum total of a llfo lived in union 
with Ood is realized when tlie hlgbest 
aspiration of the soul takes form in 
corporate and objective worship, and 
prnjrr becomes but the volcj u f une 
win. luts pi need at tho feet of (he Lord 
Jew tin r\ houI roas>(»sUJ lo the service 
of the dear Master, nnd tho greater 
glory or Ilia holy Nume.-Hev, ll,.,,ry 
Lowndes Drei 



Firm Persuasion. 
A s Wi ea under Ibe Ins i>< rsttaaloo 

that in' i'un iMiiiiuiiiid 

tllBllj tUt* | |vy 



resources vlr> 



St. Valentin* slyly • 

Put up his umbrella. 
"This 'Shower of hearts 

Would embarrass a fellow. 

"I'm glad that f manage It 

Once In a year. 
Exercise Is the thing 

Hearts are needing, I fear. 

"While many are beating. 
They're all out of tune, 

And cold as December 
Inatead of warm June. 

"Bo I'll mix 'em and change 'em 
And warm 'em up. too." 

I wonder If he'll fix 
Your heart up for you? 



Valentine Challenge. 
One form which the observance of 
Valentine's day took in England was 
that of a person's valentine being the 
first young man or woman that person 
saw on Valentine's day. This devel- 
oped Into" the custom of* challenging 
one's valentine by saying, "Good mor- 
row, 'tis St. Valentine's day." The 
one who said it first upon meeting a 
person of the opposite sex received 
a gift. 



Interesting Valentine Reading. 
Interesting reading for Valentine's 
day Is Dickens' account of Samivel 
Weller's laborious writing of a valen- 
tine to his housemaid' love, signed 
"Tour lovesick Pickwick." 



TEDDY'S VALENTINE 




NOT AS IN DAYS OF OLD 



Valentine Day Missives Somehow Dif- 
fer From Those of One's Qay 
and Festive Youth. 



When we were 
yet a young- 
ster sihall. 
And sweet- 
hearts true 
swapped 
valentines, 

What Joy waa 
ours! How 
we recall 
Their mushy 
lines! 





Our constantly increasing business 
proves conclusively that "Best Quality 
at Fair Prices'* will win. We test each 
carefully by the latest and most accu- 
rate methods and grind lenses to ex- 
actly suit you. 

Phone. South 1746 - 



DR. N. F. PENN,6i3 Madison Ave. - Covington. Ky 



Why Worry? 

We know the price of Tires.has gone sky high. But why wor- 
ry? You can have your old Tires half soled and they will be bet 
ter than new ones because they are guamteed puncture proof fo 
8,600 miles and they only cost one-half as much. 

This tiie bargain can only be had at 

M The Conry Rubber Go. 

J(J 34 Pike Street, -:- Covington, Ky 



i 



Then when to 
man's lm- 
po r t ance 
grown. 
Those dread- 
ful comics 
were our 
bane; 

Their hits at 
faults w e 
though t 
unknown 

. Gave us a 
pain. 





But February 14 

moves, us no 

more 
Alt houg h the ^ 

day brings 

missivea 

still; • 
We get a dun- 
ning letter, 

or, 
Perchance a 

bill. 



No old time 
token greets 
our eye, 
To make us 
either gay 
or niadi 

Both love and 
malice paaa 
us by — 
Ife very 




Make Sure of Valentin. Klee. 
If you have no sweetheart tS coma 
to klaa you early on Ht. Valentine's 
morning, go out and aweep the nearest 
well wllli a broom (hue (he cuhwebs 
are gone he will cuts* Hjlog, 



A Vault That Can Not Be Robbed. I * 




i 

i 
i 

ii 

I 
ii 

i 

j ) Don't Keep Your Valuables Where They Can be Stolen. 

) Out of town persons can afford to patronixe our vault. A box, with 

j | complete privacy, as low as $3 a year. Write us for particulars. Farm- j | 
| | ers„ Dairymen, Tobacco Growers, Market Gardeners, etc., this should in- 



If you live within 125 miles of 
Cincinnati you are interested in 
the wonderful Safety Deposit 
Vault at Fourth and Vine Sts., 
built by The Central Trust Co. 
and guaranteed to be burglar, 
fire, mob and storm proof. It 
sets in a hole in the ground, 50 
feet deep and is lined with steel 
rails set in glass , slag. It is 
guarded night and day. It con- 
tains securities worth millions 
of dollars in the Safest Place in 
the country. 



, terest you 

II 



(! 

I The Central Trust Compary f 

| Fourth and Vine Sts., CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



»a » ^ £^^e^^-9 S ^f jr r 3 -rf 3 r ^ S5N C iHijH 




1 



Erlanger Garage 

# WALTON DEMPSEY, Prop. 

Repair Work Absolutely Guaranteed. 

EXPERT MECHANICS. 

Full Line of Ford parts, Tires, Tubes 
and Accessories. , 

F. W. DEMPSEY, J|H1() <, Erlanger, Ky. 






Tempered Cleanllneea. 
In the Lola de la Oalaoterle. written 
for bsaaa and dan Us* In 1040, It Is 
urged that "Kvert day one should 
take (mlns to wash one's hands, and 
one ahould alse wash one's face el- 
most as often." Perhaps as often as 
twice a week r Youth's Companion. 



Take Your 



1'apwr. 



London Dog Market 
The well-known "dog market" la 
the Bast end of London la situated 
In the vicinity of Club row, where 
hundreds of venders can he-seen every 
Sunday morning with doge of all 
ah a pea, aiiee sad breeds, which they 
eater for eat* 



• TRaDM AT UOMI I 



kiinef S^i^b^ 



*Jv£ u aBfl££fc-4r»*££g- Jf" -i^agi ■ 



ggnfjoraflwa 



wiitiairtssa 



• 



■»» 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



Vol. XXXXVI 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY FEBRUARY 17, 192 1 



$1.50 Per \ ear 



No 20 



fio«<sf happenings. 



A SWEEP OF P. M'S. 



The following is from the Crit- The idea noemi to prevail In 
tenden correspondent in Grant , Republican circle*, that there 
County NewB-: I will be a general sweep of Dem- 

Crittenden gets fo entertain the j oeratic office holders, in bo 
Tournament this year. The execu- 
tive board met last Friday at Wal 



ton to discuss the tournament 



as these are not protected by the 
classified service. If so, the |ew 
president is going to make a 



plans, which is to be held May | great mistake. The people are sick 



25, ;26 and -27. There an- many 
reasons for having is here. Kea- 
son one, Crittenden haB a central 
location. It can be reached by 
rail, motor or airplane. Reason 
two. It is not a great distance 
from' the (nrthest school. Rea- 
son three. AU the schools like to 
come to Crittenden. Reason four. 
Crittenden has one of the best 
auditoriums in this district and al- 
so the required seating capacity. 
Rehrson five. We have a real 
high school orchestra which will 
add much attraction to the oe- 
caaion. Reason six. Wc have a 
cherished, royal hosts. We can all 
t»,uaran.tee to entertain and pro- 
vide for our guests. In other 
"words Crittenden has everything 
to make this an ideal place for 
the tournament. Are these suffi- 
cient number of reasons? Good 
reasons? So come on", come all, 
you Crittendonians and lets give 
one big booBt for the Northern 
Kentucky Tournament at Critten- 
den. 



Why is it that no preparation 

is being made for work in 1921 
no fields being cleaned off for the 
plow, no barns cleaned out and 
manures spread, no hum of indus- 
try that brings contentment and 
prosperity. Does it pay to make 
matters worse by shirking on the 
job and dodging the issue. This 
is the time to curry aid feed 
old Dobbin, get him ready for the 
plow, Fix the hot beds, clean the 
barns und ben houses, prune and 
spray the fruit trees and ' bring 
the work Up for a good start 
when the season opt>ns. Wo hav<» 
had a fine winter and the promise 
of an early spring ho lets us c * our 
brains a little more and prepare 
for a successful year. 



of this constant rotation in of- 
fice. 

If a new manager on taking 
charge of a business, asked wheth- 
er his subordinates agreed with 
him politically, and . if he dis- 
charged (.hose belonging to the 
opposite party from his own, he 
would be considered wholly i n- 
competeoit. He could never suc- 
ceed in organizing production un- 
til he forgot about political con- 
siderations. 

Mr. Harding's new administra- 
tion would be stronger if it let 
all faithful office holders retain 
their jobs regardless of politics. 
It may be admitted that execu- 
tives in charge of departments 
need to be In sympathy with 
the new management. Bui in ol'..- 
er cases, political consideration 
should be ignored, aa they would 
be in private business. 

It may be said that both parties 
have Heretofore followed this prac 
ticc of making political removals, 
when an administration changed. 
That is t .no doubt true, and both 
parties are to blame. But the ad- 
ministration thai should have the 
wisdom to discontinue this unbus 
iness Like course, would go a long 
way to please the people, who 
are sick of the squabbles over of- 
fice and the pulli.ig and hauling 
of politicians. 

Considering the tremendous ar- 
my of hungry office seekers who 
are r.ow taking up the time of 
i he Republican chiefs, it is too 
much to expect this to be done. 
Perhaps when the Democrats get 
back to power they will be able 
to see far enough into the fu- 
ture to resolve on such a popu- 
lar course. 



Formally Declared Elected. 



Warren G. Harding of Ohio, ana 
Calvin Coolidge, of Massachusetts, 
were formally declared today by 
Congress to be elected President 
and Vice President of the United 
States for four years beginning 
March 4th. 

Thus was written t he final chap- 
ter in the history of the 1920 
presidential elections. The scene 
was laid in the chamber of the 
House of Representatives with the 
Democratic Vice President Mar- 
shall presiding. The' occasion was 
the canvassing of 
votes cast by the electors 



GAVE "COLD" CHECK. 



Wall Satisfied. 

W. T Davis in renewing hi 



Saturday morning Sheriff Con- 
ner was called by 'phone to Pet- 
ersburg to investigate the con- 
duct of a man, in a soldier uni- 
form, who was accompanied by a 
young lady. The man answered 
the description of the soldier who 
passed a worthless check on the 
Ludlow, Ky., Savings Bunk, last 
Wednesday. 

Upon his arrival in Petersburg 

and after talking to the soldier. 

Sheriff Conner was certain h" was 

th«~ electoral I the party who had passed th- 

ectors chosen check at the Ludlow bank H" at- 



suosfription, 



writes as follows: 
Gadsden, Ala . 
Feb. 8, 1WI, 
i Dear Mr Riddell: 

We are all well and satisfie.t 
' here where we are located in Al:i- 
1 Kama on a good farm of 76 acres. 
I Th<- Weather has been very pleas- 
i ant here this winter, the ground 
jbeir.g frozen only a few timesand 
! very thin ice, % of an inch. 



The Hare and Rabbit. 



on Noveml>or 2—404 for the Rcpub 
licati candidates and 127 for the 
Democratic candidate*, former 
Gov. James M Cox, of Ohio, and 
Franklin D. Roosevelt, of Hyde 
Park, N. Y. 

REDUCTION NEEDED. 

Every year for the past five or 
six farm property in this SSQ 
other counties in ihis section of 
sh^-Sftaie. and 'V'^presuie.e ii. oth- 
er sections as welk has beer, 
uoosted. If the bo*ost was rot 
made by the assessor or taxcom- 
missioi er it was made by the va- 
rious county, boards of equalizers, 
and if the county boards PI 
equalizers refused to raise the 



rested him and brought him, with 
the young lady, before the fount. \ 



Although hares and rabbits look 
very much alike, they have wide 
.differences of which manv per- 
Judge. The man said his name was gooa' are, however, ignorant Apari 
Herbert Stone, and admitted that f,.„ m the obvious fact that the 
he passed the check and also iffi- | f( „ meI . nave | OII g PI . | e £S and ears, 
plicated another ma.i. Francis | yoang j^res are born covered 
Grady. The lady who was with w ith fur and with eves ope. i, thus 
Stone proved ta be Birdie May | being able to run in a few min- 



property, it was 



Suitable plantings are necessary 
to unite the parts of a farmstead 
into a pleasing, homclik" whole. 
Trees are used for windbreaks, as 
frames for the buildings or a 
background for them, and to give 
shade. Shrubs are needed inabund 
ance to hide partially the found- 
ation lines of buildings, support 



/Enthusiastic Campaign. 

nt; — — 

Hir.dman, capital of Knott 
county nestled among the foot 
hills of the mountain of Eastern 
Kentucky has furnished the most 
interesting story and experience 
In money raising during the re- 
cent Campaign in this State for 
She Suffering children in Eastern 



their corners, give reasons for ' and Central Europe. 



taken up by 
the state board at Frankfort. Dur- 
ing the past two yearB r?al es- 
tate values soared, and land whicn 
normally would have sold for $35 
ard $50 an acre jumped to $75 and 
$100 ar acre. Quite a considerable 
amour t of land changed hands at 
the ircreas?d prices, and under 
our assessmert law such land hai 
to be given in at 90 per cent, of 
the price paid for it. 

The assessment list which ten 
years ago WaB between $3,000,000 
and $4,000,000 was increased to be- 
tween $9,000,000 and $10,000,ooo. 
Landowners who had been paying 
on a valuation of $50 an icre 
were raised to $100,- $125, or even 
$150 |an acre, and lower priced 
land was increased accordingly. 

This year has sen a slump in 
land values even greater than 
the increase of one and two years 
ago. Land which was valu e d at 
$100 an acre last year would hard- 
ly bring half that now. There 
are realiy so few transactions in 
real estat" that a fair basis of 
depreciation can hardly be found 
depreciation is- apparent 



The 



to 



turns in drives or walks and to 
screen unsightly Objects. Native 
trees arid shin's and those known 
by trial to thrive in the locality 
are Uie h"st to use. 

B. C. Kirtley, prominent young 
farmer of East Bend bottoms, was 
a business visitor to the county 
«e:it, last Saturday. He called on 
the printers and left $1.50 to re- 
tain a front seat in the Recor- 
der's joy-wagon for another year. 
Mr. Kirtley is one of the busiest 
men in the county but he finds 
a little spare tim" to auctioneer 
a public sale when called upon to 
do so. He has had quite a lot 
of this kind of work to perform 
over in Indians), the past few 
months. 



Campaign 
European Children through read- 
ing the stories in the Literary Di- 



Measured by the time required 
for the work of this office in 
the year, the office of County 
Tax Commissioner, is* the best pay 
ir.g office in the county. The 
prospects of an examination may 
keep down the size of the field, 
but at that there will probably 
be several candidates. This office 
in Boone DOW being worth about 
$4,000 per year, while it was for- 
merly worth from $1,200 to $1,500. 
The salaries of th" deputies must 
be paid by the commissioner. 



Fifty Boys and Girls members of 
the Bible Class of th" Hindman 
Settlement School, found their in- 
spiration for the Camuaijrn tor 

>pt'L 

the 
gest. 

These yoting mountain people 
organized themselvos into small 
bands after having thoroughly 
equipped themselves with infor- 
mation concerning the conditions 
in Europe, sallied forth to solicit 
from the villagers of Hindman and 
walked for miles and miles to the 
i eighboring towns around Hind- 
mar, collecting their funds in 
small sums totallirg $287.22. which 
was received at the State Head- 
quarters of the Europear Relief 
C'ourcil. 

Perry Davidson, who sent in the 
collection from Hindman, writes, 



any one familiar with conditions, 
however. 

This being the case it . seems 
or|y fair there should be a re- 
duction in land values by the Tax 
Commissioner. Of course this can 
not be done for the year 1921 
for which the assessment has 
already been made, but it is only 
right and fair to demand that it 
should be done at the next as- 
sessment. As it stands now there 
is lots pf land assessed at a 
higher figure than it can be sold 
for, and it is doubtful if all 



the 



IS uouuuiii ii iiii i lie I 

land in the county if sold at pub- ***te sla xe law 
lie outcry would being its asses- j 
sed valuation.— Grant Co. News, j 



Clark, of Cincinnati, not quite Iti 
years of age. Stone and the Clark 
girl had been at Aurora and oth- 
er places in Indiana selling post 
cards and pictures Sheriff Conner 
and Deputy Hume went with the 
Clark girl to Ludlow where sir- 
pointed out to them the residence 
of Grady, whom Stone had impli- 
cated in* the check deal. The (lark 
girl was delivered to her father 
and grand mother in Cincinnati. 
Sheriff Conner and Deputy Hume j 
together with the Ludlow police, | 
arrested Grady and also took into i 
custody Anna Dirch, a girl justov-| 
er 15 years of agp, who had been I 
with them and turned her over 
to the Kenton county auth- 
orities. The Government author- 
ities will prefer charges against 
Stone and Grady for violating 
the white slave act. Deputy Hume 
took Stone to Covington Monday 
morning. Herbert Stone claims to 
be a soldier of the late war and 
that he was wounded in the 
Argonne and also gassed. Stone 
has a number of wounds on his 
I ody, his right limb was so badly 
injured that he has no feeling be- 
low the knee Ston-- shows the 
effect of having been gassed, as 
he is at times short of breath, 
and also seems to be mentally 
deficient. He says he left the 
Great Lakes hospital Chicago, or. 
March 5th. 1920. without leave and 
is a deserter. It is to be regret- 
ted that one who hau served his 
country ftnd received the punish- 
ment that has been inflicted up- 
on Stone, he should violate the 
laws of our country. 
• Stone and Grady wer° tri<*d in 
the Ludlow police court Monday 
morning and the bank had bBSB 
paid the amount they los. >.i th • 
check, and that charge was dis- 
missed! 

Sheriff Conner and Deputy 
Hume held their man for the Fed- 
eral officer who reached Ludlow 
shortly after they had bee-: dis- 
missed on the cold ch"ek charge. 
These nv: i will be given a pre- 
limi r.iry hearing next Thursday 
before United States Commission- 
er Mrs. Bell, for violating the 



born nak"d, blind 



utes, rabbits ar 
and helpless 

This perfect Ly suits each cre- 
ature's way of life. Bares live sol- 
itary in the open, having only 
"forms' - or slight shelters in the 
grass, for homes. Rabbits live un- 
der ground, and in community 
They have warm burrows, and 
their young are kept for 
weeks in snug, comfortable 
series, lined with leaves. 
ard fur. Yet rabbits have 
shorter jvouth They pair 
five to eight morths old 



INCREASED ASSESSMENT. 

The State Tax Commission has 
filed wiih Governor Morrow, their 
third annual report, being for 
the year 1920. This report shows 
that the assessed value of lands 
has increased 156,193,530 Town 
lots have Increased 819,381,313. 
Tangible property other than live 
stock has increased 138,754,236 Live 
stock has decreased 110,964.815. 
Bank, shares hav • increased $2,638,- 

741, while Intangible property has 
decreased 888,608,270 The great 
loss in the assessment of intangi- 
ble property is «w plained by the 
fact that the asaessme i< in ion 
included the intangible property 
of the Bingham estat", amounting 
to over $100000.1)00 This estat" was 
r.ot assessed in 1920 and suit has 
beer, approved by the commission 
seeking to asses* this property 
for 1920. Excluding the Bingham 
estate there was an increase in 
tangible property of 811,726,977. 

On each $100 of tax collected 
for state purposes, is borne by 
the different classes of property 
as follows: Lands $40 90, Town 
lots $!0 9(i, Intatig/Me propc. ";" 
$15.40, Tangi! le property, 81f.se, 
Bank deposits $3.60, Live stock .90. 
In 1915 the amount was as fol- 
lows: Lands $41.75, town lots $31.97 
Irtangille $8 15, Tangible $13.89, 
Bai k Deposits 81,24. Live stock 
rothii.g. The taxpayers in Boone, 
courty pail lata ihe state treas- 
ury from all ki; ds of property 
160,919.97. Ii 1415 bank deposits 
were sul ject to a tax rate of 55 
cei ts and produced a revenue 
amour ting to 880,741.85 while in 
1920 a tax rate of Id rents, bank 
deposits produced 1260,919.3$ 



some 
nur- 

grasa j 
the ' 

wher j 
You ne: 
hares wait a year before matit.g. ! 
Their families make no effort to 
rival in size those of the notor- j 
iously prolific rabbit. 

A marked physical difference be 
tween the two types of animal 
is found in their^ feet The hare 
has five toes to his forlegs and | 
oily four to his hind legs. The 
soles of his feet are marvelous- 
like soft brushes. Women know 
there is nothing better for ap- 
plying rouge than a hare's foot. 

By dav hares remain xuiet in 
their "forms/ feeding and travel- i ate equipment she will 
ing through the sight. To foil I her experience 
any would-be pursuers, as they | House,' (hey feel 
come in at dawn, they run in a 
maze, crossing and recrossing th->ir 
trail, finally taking several long 
leaps to the lonely tusso'eks of 
grass which they call home. 



THE JOYS OF SHOPPING. 



Club Enrollment To 

Have Big Increase. 

Lexington — More than 12,000 
Kentucky boys and girls ranging 
in age from 10 to 18 years have 
already been enrolled and 10,000 
more are expected to be enrolled 
in junior agricultural clubs during 
lM-.il as a result of ar ecent proc- 
lamation made by Gov. Edwin P. 
Morrow, signifying a club enroll- 
ment week, according to results 
of the campaign which are being 
compiled i:i the office of C. V\ 
Buckler, state leader of junior 
club work in Kentucky. 

With indications pointing towar J 
an enrollment of approximately 



The Rat-A World Menace. 



In Line of Duty. 



John J. Sch warts, of Tacoma, 
Washington, died of heart trouble, 
February 3, 1921. He was born in 
this, Boone county, Oct. 12, 1866, 
and moved to Washington in 1904 
to make hia home.. He is survived 
by two sisters— Mrs. D. Trippear 
and Mrs. H. J. Tepe, both of Ta- 
coma, Washington. He had be°n a 
regular subscriber to the Recor- 
der ever since he located in 
Washington, and never forgot his 
'Old Kentucky Friends. 



"I have never seen a more tho. 

ough or enthusiastic campaign. It States navy who stepped 
was real crusading. There is no ward u. another man's place 
wealth in all this neighborhood 
or I am sure Ithat the splendid 
example set by the workers at. a 
ai.d the villagers, all i>eople of 
limited meur.s, would have pro- 
duced more contributions. Hind- 
man was stirred up to the warmth 
of sympathy and self denial.' 

The Kentucky fund is still short 
of theg oal by several thousand 
dollars, check should be sent to 
Richard Bean, Treasurer Board of 
Trade Bldg., Louisville, Ky., or 
deposited with anv bank in tho 
State. 



The necessity of a campaign ol 
unvarying efficiency against the 

: common brown rat is an outstand- 

A dramatic appeal to the House ■ O1|0 Xo olner animal or in- 
to reward the heroic war exploit I S( . ct is su dangerous and persist- 
Edward Isaacs, United | (>nt .,„ cn n my a nd no other en- 



When the women read how Mrs. 
Harding is busying herself with 
shopping, in search of the elabor- 

need for 
in the White 
a thrill of sym- 
pathetic interest. Most women 
would enjoy this chance to buy 
beautiful things freely, about as 
much as any other pleasure that 
the first lady of the land will 
have in her varied life. 

No man quite realizes the pleas- 
ure that the normal woman gets 
out of shopping She has an in- 
herited love of fine fabrics, and 
is trained from girlhood to a 
discriminating sense of excellence 
in this kind of products. She feels 
the same elation in securing a nice 
piece of merchandise, that a hun- 
ter does in capturing a deer or a 
fisherman in landing a big trout. 
The modern producers of tex- 
tiles and clothing each year in^ 
their sense of harmony in color 
and design. Women who have any 
artistic idea can't help being fas- 
cirated by the beauty* of all these 
works of humar skill. 

The satisfaction of shopping Is 
r.ot all in the acquirement of 
costly fabrics. There is also a 



of Lieut. 



for- 






Altho there has been very lit- 
tle good sugar weather this sea- 
son, Sterling Rouse, of Pt. Pleas- 
any 'neighborhood, has had his 
camp in operation and has made 
si \ eral gallons of the very fin- 
est of molaB8e3_Jfchic4t-- nf^arlTR'aT 
-88.50"" a"" gallon. There are none 
better and if ynu want one or 
more gallons you had better be m 
a hurry about ordering them. 

.Ransom Ryle, substantial farmer 
and good citizen of Locust Grove 
neighborhood, was a visitor to 
Burlington ; lwst Saturday, transact- 
ing n little urgent business: — He 
took time to M\\ at the Recorder 
Atinctum and ipformed us that if 
he had the time he would like 
to make several speeches to th" 
farmers on the tobacco question 

I)r Kenneth Ryl", the veterinar- 
ian, has been k"pt on the jump 
for the past month or so, hut he 

look time enough one day the post 

"aeek to call at this offie" and 
pay for another year's subscrip- 
tion to the Recorder for his 

brother, l)r C U. Ryle, who is 
located tit (Georgetown. 



Mrs (leu pi'iin, left 
day for ■ visit of *e\ 
vend her mother, at 

it ni nt h«N i ei.it Ives In 



hint Hatur- 
i'iiiI W"ks 
* leorgetow n 
Si'ott i oiin- 



The oi (gin itOI 



Ouvllght 
.»» undoubted* 



Showing the Right Spirit. 

At the last meeting of the Fis- 
cal Court a number of citizetiB re- 
siding along the Woolper pike 
from Ashby Fork to the Peters- 
burg pike, submitted to the court 
the proposition that they would 
put along the pike in crusher 
piles a quantity of rock to re- 
pair that pike, if the court 
would haul thi rock crush, and 
but on the pike. The rock are 
to be put where they can i»e 
crushed and haujed on the._piko.- 
-NoThfhg is IcTbe paid by the coun- 
ty for the rock o»- hauling to 
the crusher pile. The court ac- 
cepted the proposition The more 
propositions of this kind flint are 
male and accepted by the court 
the better will be the condition ol 
our loads. 

"Lizzie" Penned Up. 

A prominent farmer who lives 
about three miles from Burlington 
has made a Tirm New Year re- 
solve. He sat down one day re- 
cently and too!; an inventory of 
conditions, and then he walked 
firmly to the garage and drain- 
ed his machine Coming back to 
the house he said to lis goo l 
wife: "The automobile license is 
due <ias is high and farm pro- 
ducts are low Lizzie is out there 

in (be garage penned op, and it 

you want to spend your butti 
:u I egg money feeding and run 
i.iig iter, I haven't a wont t > 
*«y Hot h* Un>~ iwe— «4d HobltlM 

and the buggy are good enough 
I am KOillg to tide in ni\ inn- 

horse i hay until timoa gel more 

pi 'iih|MToiin '' 

me volilll' Hit PS id- i «d [\jfi 

to ,t Rttp toward business suc ce s a 

i« to equip thsOfWlVMM ttllU .» 

di ens suit und plug bat 



become a prisoner aboard a Oer 
mar. submarine after his ship, the 
President Lincoln, had been tor- 
pedoed, was made by Representa- 
\e Joseph H Eagle, of Texas, 
Democrat. 

The speaker said Isaac's record 
would stand out as one of the 
daring feats of the World War. 

"When the submarine Captain 
demanded an officer prisoner'' said 
Mr. Eagle, "Isaac's came forth aim 
announced that his commander, 
Percy W. Foote, now aide to the 
Secretary of th" Navy, probably 
had perished and that he was 
ready t<r go 

"For 11 days, while a captive of 
the U-boat, he learned facts about 
the German navy's plan of opera- 
tions that were of utmost im- 
portance to the allied fleet.'' 

With this in mind he escape.1, 
at the risk of his life, Mr. Eagle 
Continued, and was wounded so 
seriously and beaten so severely 
(hat although 2 l » years old he 
was physically unable to remain 
i i the haw 

"Cm igrea*. *h««ld_* 
the rank of Captain, not that oi 
Lieule si int.'' Mr. Eagle added, "so 
that when he go'»s out of service 
it will . be on sufficient pay to 
buy bread and meat for his wile 
and children.' 



emy succeeds in inflisting the 
to | damage that the rat annually im> 



23,000 youngsters an increase of I pleasure in making moderate re- 
adout 500 per cent over the 4,000 J sources go to their utmost limit. 
in 1920 will be realiz°d, according The woman who, after careful 
to Mr. Buckler. The campaign I study of advertising and of the 
was conducted during the week of j material offered, returns with an 
Dec. 6 to 11 excellent piece of goods at a mod- 

The largest enrollment in a i crate price, feels a sense of ela- 
single county was reported from j tion She has beaten the game 
Whitlev countv where Countv ! of n .UJ h prices, and she shows her 



i poses upon humanity. The rat 
population of the United States 
is at least equal to the human 
, population, and the same ratio 
j holds irue for practically every 
j country under the sun. Tho Bu- 
t reau of Biological Survey, Uriiteo 
! States Department of Agriculture, 
I places the value of the food 
j and property destroyed annually 
by each individual rat at $2. Keep- 
w'ell within the boundaries of con 
I servatjtsm this means that each 
! vear, in this country alone, we 
produce $200,000,000 worth of food 
i io no other purpose than to feed 
j our rats In another way 200,000 
j men in the United States are de- 
I voting all their labor to the main- 
tenance of 100,000,000 rats. 



Death to Insects. 



$1,000 Reward. 



One 

alis e"' 



thousand dollars "dead or ' 
for the capture of a bank 
rOhber will probably soon be I h ! ' 
reward given by banks of Ken- i 
tueky in an effort to protect I lie 
ii stiitilions from loaned caused by i 
liai lits The plan was formed at I 
a nieetirg of the executive conn-; 
oi] of the State Bankora> Associa- i 
lion held at the Selbach, Louis- | 
villi-. 

A number of other precaution- 1 
a'i> measures were also plan.iei | 

The Legislature will be requested 

to provide severer punishment for 

bank poblera it was suggeste i 
thai batiks In small towns equip 

lieu ' l.iulduiK* uilb inn kIii 

alarms und provide uifhl u.it'i^ 

men 

ii r, ward ..f f (.not 

I i plan 

Hurry < i Hm.it h 

• i . bj hav ■ 
in thi Stair make 
of 9*i irnrli upon the 
a bank Uindil. 



To the sorrow of some of the 
Ir.sect pests which feed on the 
under sied of plant leaves and so 
t scape the effect of poison sprays, 
the Bureau of Entomology, United 
States Department of Agriculture, 
itl ucti n g c.ipuiniint. i 
With nicotine sulphate appli°d in 
dust form Mixed with kaolin to 
give the poison bulk, forty per 
cent strength nicotine sulphite til I 
remarkable work in controlling '< t 
melon, cabbage, and pea aphis, on- 
ion thrips, and western cucumber 
beetles. All these insect pests 
are hard to rc^flch with ordin iry 
sprays, but the floating dust 
settles upon the under side pf the 
leaves as w*dl as oi the surface 
The experiments show that mu>'h 
larger areas can be treated in less 
time than is required by spray- 
ing Moreover, th 1 '' equipment neC 
essarj to apply the dist is mu<'h 
expensive, than a spray out- 
and its cost of application is 
ess than by the Older method U 
weighs less thai spraj utd 



Agent E. F Davis already has 1,- 
200 boys and girls signed up for 
the work. He expects to enroll 
at least 150 more. Other counties 
which have enrollments of more 
than 500 youngsters include Jack- 
son. Barren. Daviess and Laurel. 

Christian County Heifer 

Establishes State Record. 

Pembroke, Ky — What is said oy 
dairy authorities at the State Col- 
lege of Agriculture to be the 
highest milk and butter fat rp- 
eord ever made by a yearbng heif- 
er in Kentucky has been report- 
ed from a Jersey, Blue Bell's Sarah 
Ann. in the herd of Mrs. H. H. 
Felcher. of this city. Tho cow- 
started her official test when she 
freshened at the age of one 
> ear and five months and during 
the >ear she produced 8,219 lbs., 
of milk and 429 pounds oi butter 
fat equivalent to 505 poun Is of 
butter. Mrs. Felclvu was assisted 
in the tenting by H. O. Cress, 
assistant county agent of Christian 
county. 



trophy to her friends 
certain pride. 



with 



jhed Lips Are In 



The Unemployed. 

In view of the continued large 
number of people who remain out 
of employment in many places, the 
question of finding jo us on public 
works ought to be taken up by 
states and municipalities. It is not 
an easy matter to arrange, as the 
business situation may change in a 
a short time. Four "months from, 
r.ow may see the factories very 
busy. Yet in view of the harm 
done by having large numbers of 
men idle, plans should be formed 
for actioi. in case this revival is 
delayed. 

It would seemii.gly be good pol- 
icy to hurry up pfai.s for the be- 
gii.ning of a large amount of 
highway construction ^taies 

i where there are manv idle men, 
ought to put through a lot of 
mad jobs, that need doing and 
must be attended to soon. 

The federal government ant 
j many M the states are planning 
R lot of road construction for 
this season. The work should be 
pushed ahead with all possible 
speedy so as to relieve ui 



I. w 
tit 



For Good Washing. 

Birmingham Ala., girls with hec- 

c eomplexior.s artificially pro- 

j tlueed are ii. for a face washing 

w hei.ever they appear On the- 

streets ili the future, according to 

Mrs Hulda Xewsome, police- 

I w omaii. % 

Mrs. NeWsome declared today 
tint W'hel.eVi-r she sees a yOUUg 
| girl With i "chalky white com ■ 
I ple\ion. cheeks of brilliant red, 
Vermillion, pigment oh Ir-r lips 
'and her nose powdered to the 
I'lith degree,* 1 she feels like esooft- 
i i(.» her to the nearest bathroom 



ment as*"qutckly as posd* le Cut 
out the red tape When men nee J 
work. 



Farm Flock Makes 

$98 For December. 



The Ir.CI l i M 
Will III 

iii nounced l>v 
i elm y of tha 

M hunks 
« itoltiH i Ipt en 
uoi.\h-Uuu ol 



nior 

can 



an 



co"veniontly hnndl I 
i '■ mi\ed with arsenate ol b 

n'pbiir for use agams; i;ii' 



It 

el 
ts 



»rd "administering to her f.e 
liberal dose of soap and uati 

"I am going to do it. ton,' 
asserted. 



a 



Corydo i, Ky.— What e in 
I eompiishi I t y the propor car 

land I le. die.g of th- farm puultr 

fl"i'k IS show . by .he i,s ii 

taii.e I from the Hock 

T \\ llson, of . ihis eit\ 

profit oi % Ifi ih was r ■"■ 
: Ititi White Wyandotte 
' ing Dee, ml <M . y hs \ Vi: , 

ducting a demonstratl 

' eratio.i wiih the St 

Vgricuituee and ii i ,\i 

and nianagt nu-nt ace : le 

■ ecommendatioiiH 



i n 



li 



d Mrs 

where 

M I ito 
i- din 

I is lOll- 

i'i COOT- 
dlegH of 

ft sling 
',' to its 



r» 



diseari 



I s. 



.1 W Howe, of Himilt 
newlnir hts subscription t 
eorder as follow 

•Vim, the former 
t In' man) ro iders 

ins best <t ihIu-h tin 
and hi i 



pu 
lb 



Kb 



I M< I 

b i \ e 



I i 
at 

Mom! i) e\ cnlng 
IS ^ ■ 1 1 • i monl 

Mrs K i|h 

III I I I C I 



\\ 



I Pel. , 

lull 



lot 



nils 



hi u • reading 



ml 
ni 


t 

1 Ii.- 


Inn 
lid 


Ill l*S 


Ith 


lllll». 



ll B OS'l,, 

ii ! I 
.« in .1.1. 
In in 



-is in 
nu ml) i 



■I i iii eoiigreen 



I- 1 
old 
litgton 



M etliV 
■ o VV 1 1 , 



imli 

l>IM 



Mrs. Walter Kelly. 

Mrs Jessie W il'lii Kelh |MIMOfl 

n the mortal to .in immortal !' t , t f u lar I' 1 "' h - "• 

,e. hY.mi ,n ". nm "' i nw i m 

lock us <i 



I, 



ed.. 



Willi uu i ut u ut in ni.- 
street, l)i\i ill 

a tde mil |, i\ , ,| u ith 
are its u i.i i 

iinilU i 



eir- 

I I i Mil C'OV" 

High A |j , it 

He Well 

Mam 



Hun 






■■■■■■MHttHHBJHHWBHBBBBBBBBBBBBH 



ffiMtBHfftlll ! tf fa ' aft ™ ^tffiM?iia^iWtfMi^ ^ 






■OONl COUNTY K1COKD11 






We Have the Prices You £x Waiting For 

If you want to see the Newest in Merchandise, then come as we 
; are receiving New Goods nearly ^ very day. 



Men.s $1.50 Blue Chambray Work Shirts. 
SpeciaT 



98c 



Men's $3. 50 Elk Hide Scout 
Shoes. Special at 



Men's Fine Blue Denim Union made Over- 
alls or Coats. Special at 



$1.25 



Men's $2,50 Work Pants. 
Special values at.... 



$1.79 



Men's 25c Cotton Work Socks. 
Special at 



15c 



Men's $1.50 Leather Work Gloves. 
Special at 



98c 



Boy's $2.00 Knee Ponts, very 
serviceable, all sizes. 
Special 



$1.39 



I 



Boys' Blouse Waists, all 
sizes, in dark patterns. 
Special 



59c 



$2.85 



Men's $5 Elk Work Shoes, fine 
for everyday wear 



$3.75 



Men's $6.00 High Grade Dress Shoes in 

brown or black, all toes. &> M rr\ 

Special Vr.OU 



Boys' $4,00 Gun Metal Shoes strictly solid 

leather, in all style toes. ^n QQ 

Special 1Z. UO 



Ladies' High Shoes or Oxfords in beauti- 
ful styles in brown or black. 
Special . ^...w 



Children's Black Ribbed Stockings 

all sizes. 1 C« 

Special |3C 



Ladies' Lisle Hose in 
black or white. 

Special at .» 



17c 



in ucauii" 

$4,48 



> 



OUR PRICES ON DRY GOODS ARE THE LOWEST. 



59c Black Sateen, fine for petti- 
coats, linings and bloomers, 
30 in. wide. ' QQ« 
Special per yd wwv 



39c Linen Crash Toweling fine 

quality. O'Qn 

Special per yd ZOv 



59c Pajamas Cinth and p^mi ty 
in small check, fine qual-f) 7- 
ity. Special pet yd A / C 



^ancy Outings in heavy doub- 
le fleeced either light OQ« 
or dark. Special per yd.£uC 




ERLANGER; kY 



v Living Conditions/ 

The distressing living conditions 
of the European people was tola 
by Prettice Terry of Louisville, 
formerly at officer on (Jeneral 
pershir.g'B Staff and now an Amer- 
ican Relief Worker in Herbert 
Hoover's Administration. The fol- 
lowing story of conditions in Bud- 
apest, being only one of a num- 
ber of places he has visited in the 
lust three months: "Even the 
Mood that is used,'' said Mr. Ter- 
ry, "in the American Relief Ad- 
ministration Kitchen for cooking 
soup rations, which is given to 
50,01)0 Starving children of Buda- 
pest, is imi>orte(d from another 
country. 

"The schools have been closed 
since October 1, due to Jack of 
fuel, The bread lines start form- 
ing at midnight, in spite of cold, 
wet rains, snow and sluch. The 
bread offices open at nine in t he 
morning, soon the supply is ex- 
hausted, hundreds are turned 
away empty handed. 

"There are 7,000 refugees living 
in box cars scattered throughout 
the railroad yards in Budapest. 
These people are total Hungar- 
ians who have come to Budapest 
from occupied territories because 
they would not swear allegiance 
to their-' victorious enemies, the 
Jugo Slavs, the Roumanians, an* 
the Czecho-Slovaks. They live 
wretchedly, a family of four to 
ten in each box car — and these 
box cars are not more than half 
the size of our American freight 
cars. I went into several of them, 
and was made sick by the sight 
and odor and the literal horror, 
of the poverty of these people. 
"Scarlet fever has now broken* out 
among them. You may be able 
to visualize t the rottenness of it 
all. Sometimes when a child re- 
turns from the bread line with a 
loaf, or empty-handed, as the 
case may be, he will r.ot know 
Where to fir.d his home, for it 
has beer, shunted over to another 
track or yard. 

"I went into some of the tene- 
ment houses; there I found an 
average of five people to on© 
room ten feet square, in which 
all the members of the family, 
cook, eat and sleep— no windows 
are opened during the winter 
tgime. These people pay a rental 
of about a half cent a week. 1 
found a widow with nine chil- 
dren in one of these rooms, not 
one of them had shoes, and the 
mother was almost crazy with de 
spair.'' 

Funds cortinue to come to Rich- 
ard Bean, Treasurer of the Eur- 
opean Relief Courcil of Kentucky 
but not sufficiert yet to reach 
the desired goal. 




$1.50 Table Damask, fine mer- 
cerized linen finish, 58 in. wide 

Special 

per yard , 



35c Dress Gingeams in plaids 

or checks, 27 in. wide. 4j #) A 

Special | gQ 



89c 



39c Standard Percales, yd wide 

in light or dard patterns*)*}^ 

Special per yd ZvC 



29c Brown Muslin, 
yard wide at . . . 



17ic 



Children's $2i00 Fine Gingham 
Dresses in pretty plaids or 
checks, beautiful styles for 
girls from 6 to 14 yrs. 4*4 4 A 
Special at . 1 | . | Jj 



35c Shirting Gingham in big 

selection of patterns. OOn 

Special £UU 



Printed Cretones and Silkolines 

in beautiful desigaes, yd- rtP« 

wide. Special ZUv 



25c Best Apron Gingham in 

small checks, 26 in. wide 4 "| A 

Special per yd | #C 



25c Toweling. 
Special.... 



15c 



NEW LOW PRICES IN ALL RIB- 
BONS, LACES and EMBROIDERYS 



Mercerized Poplin in all colors 

27 in. wide, fine quality. QQ. 

Special per yd OuU 



hi 



The Ciceronian Literary Society 



—OF THE— 



BOONE County High School 

WILL GIVE AN OPEN SESSION 

Court House, Friday light Feb. 28. 

Burlington, Ky., at 8 o'clock. 



i. 

iL 

in. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

XII. 

XIII 
XIV 



XV 



PROGRAMME. 

President's Address. 

Pageant-"Contest of the Nation". Girls' Chorus 

Current Events of the Month Georgia Klrknarripk 

Reading-"Mintv's Christmas". . . . . g M arv len lev 

Piano Solo— "The Fairy Barque" Kathrvn Clnre 

Essay-History of Boone County. . . . Oleva Hens ev 

Readinp-"Uncle Noah's Ghost" Julia Cook 

R rt ad?^ ati T^'T he T Ne,, :. SoUth, ' ••••••'•••■ franklin H 

Reading— -'Langby Lane" Marian Rodtrers 

r^ Ph0 r4?f°rp' E ' 1C H bant l nenr Howard McmaS 

I>W>ate- Capital Punishment Afflrmanate, Robert Clore 

r»!- a i ^ , . ' " Negative, Owen Acra 

Piano<8*>lo-"Edelwei88 Glide Marlorie Tanner 

Sketcli-"Second Childhood." ^arjorie i anner 

CAST OF CHARACTERS: 

a™,i» « dW rf U1 -n l Clayton Brown 

tiffin' 11 Isabella. Duncan 

*n™% §£2r£! I* W Maf y B « B * Cropper 

'Good-Night Song" Boys' Chorus 



General Admission :x Adults 25c; Children 

Benefit of High School Fund. 



15c 



§-' ^ " w^esssuuua^eawguJBPW 

s Beginning Feb. 19 to Feb. 26 1 

WE WILL SELL O 

Felts, Shoes, Robber Boots and Robbers 

at 15 c.« discount 

These goods are all No. 1, and standered made. 

MAURER&RYLE, - - Grant, Ky 
>Ommmmmmommmmmm\%m 



Public Sale! 



I will offer at public "sale, on 







, iuuiuuij uuu, 

On the Dixie Highway, next to the five-mile 
House, known as the old Shelly Hudson place, 

the following property: 

29 milk Cows mostly Jerseys, some fresh, 10 to be fresh in 
March, team mules 9 yrs. old, bay mare 8 yrs. old, sorrel 
mare 6 yrs. old, lO-mos. old colt, 5 tons sheaf oats and timo- 
thy hay, two 1-h. corndrills, 1-h. cultivator, potato plow, 
mowing machine, hayrake, disc harrow, cultopacker, hay- 
wagon, wheatdrill, boxbed, 2-h. sled, 2-h. harrow, cream sep- 
arator, 3-h. power gasoline engine, 2-h. cultivator, breaking 
plow, laying-off plow, power churn, skimmer butter worker 
200 bus. corn, 2 hogsheads, 4 .whisky barrels, grindstone, 
25 milk crocks, 50 milk cans, 2-h. Hoosier corndrill, 2*h. Rid- 
ing breaking plow, and many other articles. . 



PUBLIC SALE. 




The Tobacco Market. 

Tobacco markets for week end- 
ing Feb. 12, 1921. 

Covington $12.79. 

Augusta $17.65. 

Cynthiana \ $12.62. 

Flemingsburg $17.30. 

Frankfort $15.00. 

Lexington $14.03. 

Maysville $13.11. 

Walton, old house $15.49. 

Walton, new house $16.88. 

During the month of J anuary, at 

rallkfort, there - Was sold "X309,- 
149 pounds or tobacco at an 
average of $13 40 per 100 pounds. 

At Covington there has been 
sold 1,566,225 pounds of the 1921 
crop at an average of $13.64 per 
100 pounds. Farmers rejected 190,- 
310 pounds, making an offering of 
1,756,535 pound*, flie actual sales 
produced $213,636.95. 

Camp Taylor to be Sold. 

Camp Zachory Tavlor probably 
will be auctioned b. parcels in 
ApriLit was aru.ouneed when the 
War Department out of thirty-two 
proposals, accepted the $1,000,000 

guarantee bid of the Louisville 
eal Estate and Development Co 
Last-mkiute efforts to have the 
base hospital property at the 
camp excluded from the sale were 
abandoned when It was asserted 
in Washington that the camp 
hospital* would not bo suitable for 
public health services 

It had been suggested that the 
hospital be retained nnrt Improv- 
ed in preference to Improvement 
of the United States Marine Hon 
ital here, for which Congr^** has 
asked to appropriate %U\- 



We will sell at„ auction at the 
the late residence of Susan Utz, 
deceased, 3% miles west of Un- 
ion. Ky., on 

Saturday, Feb. 19tb, 1921 

The following household 
pr oparty-*-- 2-Fo lding b ed s 3 ~fied- 
stead, 2 Springs, 3 Feather beds 
Pillows, Comforts, Quilts, Car- 
pets, Chairs, Safe, Dishes, Two 
Wash stands, 2 Tables, 2 Large 
Heating stoves, Kitchen range, 
in good condition, also 2 Stacks I 
Hay, about 2.6 tons each. 

Terms made known on day of 
sale. Sale beeins at 1 P. M. 
E. E. UTZ. 
M. L. UTZ, 



NOTICE. 

I do not expect to handle the 
International line this year. I 
have a few bargains to ofler for 
sale. 

1 Farm road wagon, 
1 late model manure spreader , 
1 Ohio 2 horse riding plow, 

1 Oliver hillside breaking plow, 

2 Oliver chilled breaking plows, 
1 Disk ridi 



TERMS OF SALE. 

All sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on sums over $10.00 a credit of 
six months without interest, will be given purchaser to give note with good 
security payable at the Erlanger Deposit Bank, Erlanger, Ky. 

Frank Michels. 

Sale to begin at 10:30 a. m. LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer. 

FREE LUNCH SERVED. 



Community Supper At Union Ky 

Tuesday February 22nd begin- 
ning at 3 p.m. for the benefit of 
the Near East Relef Fund. A 
short progrm will be given dnr- 
in K the afternoon by the primary 
school children. Kemember the 
date, come and and help save the 

starving children. 

— — — - __^_^^^^^ 

YODll COUNT V PAPmT 



1 Oliver 2-row 14 tooth bottom 
gang plow, 

1500 rod different farm fenceing, 

10 Different lengths wire gates, 

Some lawn fence, . 

1 1919 Ford truck with stock rack 

in first class condion, 

1 Ford touriag car in good con« 

dition well equipped. 

250 Bushels corn in crib, 

3 tons good No 1 sheaf oats, 

3 Tons of No 1 mixed hay. 

These goods will be sold at a 

bargain. 

W. L. KIRKPATRICK. 
Burlington, Ky. 



Notice. 



A D.I lea te Compliment 
It was teacher's birthday and ths 
* Mm brought bar many bonqnsts, 
which made a tin* showing on her 
Mk. Om little girl voiced bar ad- 
miration of ths sight by saying i "Oh, 
Miss Blank, your dask looks just ilk* 
s gram."— Boston Transcript 



Unclaimed deposits remaining in 
the Unioa Deposit Bank, Union, Ky. 
for five years or more : 

Ni D. Moor e , 1 - 1 - 10 $ i.2 g 

Marietta Love, 1-1-18 . . . 3,40 

G.M.Allen, 1-1-18 ' :i4 02 

John C. White, 1-1 16 Big Bone 

8. S 

C. E.WiJBonV i-"i-'i'«i.' .'.'.'. 

Pratt McKee, Tr. U. I.e. 1-1-16 
Sallie Hicks, Tf. U. I. C. 1-1-16 
Chas. E. Denady, Tr-Pres So- 
ciety. 1-1-15 

B. L. Norman, Treas. Farmers 
Tele. Co., 1-1-16 . . 

Geo. M. Sparks, 1-1-18 

Gladys Rogers, 1-1-15 

B. B. Allphin, S. B. C, 1-1-16. 

B.C.Allen, 1-1-16 

Mattie L. Rice, 1-1-lfl. ~ 70 

J. C Powers, 1-1-18 88 

I, J. L. Frazier, cashier, of the 
above named bank do certify that 
the above list. Is correct to the best 
of my knowledge. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me 
by J. L. Frnsier, cashier, this 81st 
day of Jany., 1921. 

W. M. KACUAL, N. I\ 
My commission expires Jan. 20, 1922 



5.88 

.88 

3.40 

138. 

1.98 

1.00 
.50 
.50 

2.38 

70.80 



ESKXSK2K2XM 



CUT OUT THE MIDDLEMAN. 

W. buy from producer, only. W. hare no sgonf, cream .ution buyr. 
I or other middlemen. Each cream produce .« n .U k;. mmm |>, R FrT tn 



1 our cr.em.ry. WE PAY THE SHIPPING COST. E*.ry cent i. your.. 
Yqur cream and can. are, guaranteed ag.m.t | OM by 

TheTri-State Butter Co. 

Cash Capital $250,000.00 CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



« jjr 



Free Trial 
Cans gladly 

furnished 

foe. 30 days 

if you have 

no cans 



Ian. 8 Kir 
Inn. 1IU ISK 
Jnn. 17-flOc 



Ian. i4 — IMc 
Jnn. m— 4K<- 



Our Price 
This Week 



46c 



Week Feb. 14th to Feb. 21tn incl. 



flsd Ink Stain.. 
Ho remove red Ink stains from tsbls 
linen spread freshly mad. mustard ov- 
er them sod leave on about half aa 
■our. When sponged off all traces of 
tke Ink will bavs dlisppearsd. 



WE PAY YOUR SHIPPING COST 
50,000 cream producer, in Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky akip their 
cream DIRECT to The Tri-St.te. which ha. been Mtablbfted .inc. 
1910 with aa.et. over a million dollar, and now handle. MORE 
CANS OF CREAM PER DAY THAN ANY CREAMERY IN 
THE WORLD. Your check for every .hipeaent by return mail. 



— 



Taifc Youjr County pawr. 81.BO. 

*c#4 Our A4vr rtiscments on4 Profit Bv Tticm. 



4k 



kf« 



, 




V . 



* 



* 



11 



(Foreign Advertising Representative 
TH E AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION I 



Boone Co. Lutheran Pastorate 

Kkv. Oko. A'. Roykk. Pastor. 
Sunday, February 20 tli 1921 
Hebron, 9:80 a. m.. Sunday School. 
10.80a.m. Regular service. 
All are cordially inv|ted to these 
services. 



BOOrTB COUNTY BKCORPBB 



Boone Co. Christian Pastorate 

' C. G. Omer, Pastor 

SUNDAY, FEB. 20th, 1921. 
Pt. Pleasant, Sunday School 10 a. in. 
Preaching 11 a. m. by 
Constauce, ■ Preaching 7 b. in. 
You •-" '"-vised to wotT* '- with us. 



Mrs J. H.i Jockey has been quite 
poorly~for several days. 



Sunday 
like day. 



was a beautiful spring- 



the first Sun- 



Last Sunday was 
day in Lent. 

Next Tuesday is Washington's 
birthday. It being a holiday the 
banks will be closed. 

Denied that "43,000000 batUfi- 
V ships "are useless, as their decks 
make fine dancing floors. 

Miss Lizzie Rogers spont the 
latter part of last we* w h rela- 
tives and friends at Walton. 

Charles Kelly and wife were In 
Carrollton last week, attending the 
funeral of Mrs. Walter Kelly. 

♦After payirg their bills for 
fuel, m4y stockholders have ..no 
<Joubt that February is a snort 
month. 

The popular conception of a 
bank is a place whose businrs* " 
is to lend money to anyone who 
aeks for it. , . 





Mr R B. Huey asks the Recor- 
der to say that he is not solic- 
iting pledges for a cut out of the 
1921 tobacco crop. 



The workmen who went out on 
strikes a year ago, are now kick- 
ir.g at the high prices caused by 
their failure to produce. 



The CongreeBrof* n who , are holrt- 
ing up work by their 'long speech- 
es, will probably be complaining 
soon because no businesa is being 
done 

Rev Tomlin filled his regular 
appointment at the XL E church 
Sunday morning and evening. Rey. 
Tomlin is one of our best pulpit 
orators. . ~ 

Tn> people who won't adver- 
tise beornse tb^y -'•ant afford It, 
ought to go one step farther 
and save money by discharging 
their store clerks. 



So much wirm weather through 
February is causing much uneasi- 
ness among fruit growers. They 
fear the buds will swell and be 
killed by late freezes. . 



Rev. Beagle occupied the pul-. 
pit at the Baptist church Sunday 
morning and evening. Rev. Beagle 
iK#an interesting speaker and de- 
livered two excellent sermons. 



So much publicity matter Is dis- 
tributed nowadays, that it is not 
so easy as formerly to got it print- 
ed. Editors are tired of the con- 
stant appeals for their space. 

The rever.ue collectors should 
rot be so touched by the losses 
reported by the ireome tax pay- 
ers, that they feel it recessary ±0 
supply them with poor relief. 

Ed. Brady of Petersburg, whil' 
transacting, business at the "hub' 
last Saturday called at this office 
and left the sbondulics to pay 
for the Recorder another twelve 
months. 



The people who refused to sub- 
scribe to liberty bonds to help 
fight the war, are now indignant 
at the idea of restoring these 
obligations of the government to 
100 per cent value. 



Holmes & Smith, of near Rab- 
• bit Hash, were in Burlington, last 
Friday. They will have a sale of 
a quantity of live sto^k on Feb 
$2na. See their advertisement 
another column of this issue.* 



' L C. Campbell, a 
dent of Boone, who 



former real- 
is now em 



plo y ed by the Globe Coap Co., 
Cincinnati, is one of their star 
salesmen, being ninth in a staff 
of more than two hundred men. 



LUCKY STRIKE 

• cigarette. Flavor is 
5§ft!edmbytoastirg 



&/ •J"" M ^* e f2i-j£z? e *Z~-^ 



INCOME TAX LAW. 



Having progressed thus far, the 
farmer may now deduct : 

All ordinary and necessary ex- 
penses paid during the year in 
arrying on the farm. 

All interest charges paid to 
banks, etc. 

All taxes paid to~State, City, 
Town or Village, excepting Fed- 
eral Income taxes and taxes 
which increased the value of the 
property. 

Losses during the year and not 
compensated for by insurance or 
otherwise if incurred in the- busi- 
ness of farming. 

Losses during the year and not 
compensated lor by insurance . or 
otherwise, if incurred in. any 
transaction entered into for pro- 
fit, though not I connected with 
the business of farming. 

Losses during tfie year on prop- 
erty connected or not connected 
with the business of farming if 
arising fromMire, storms, -or other 
casualty, or from theft, and if 
not compensated for by insurance 
or otherwise. 

Debts that are worthless and 
have been charged off during the 
year. 

A reasonable allowance for ex- 
haustion, wear and tear of prop- 
erty used in the business of farm- 
ing, including"*!!- reasonable allow- 
ance for obsolescence, this latter 
terra' applying to property which 
has become worthless and from 
which a small amount might be 
received for it as scrap or sal- 
vage. • 

Contributions or gifts made 
within the year to corporations 
organized and operated exclus- 
ively 101 religious, charitable, 
scientific, or etb.ioatiop.al purpos- 
es or for the prevention of cruel- 
ty to children or animals, but no 
net earnings of such corporations 
must insure to the benefit of any- 
private stockholder. This deduc- 
tion the farmer may have up 15 
per cent of his net income. 

And then the farm has the ex- 
emptions of $1000 for the single 
man, and $2000 for the married 
man, plus $200 for each minor 
child or dependent person incap- 
able of self support because men- 
tally or physically defective. 

Please bear in mind that the 
personal living or family expenses 
of the farmer are not deductible, 
nor are any amounts paid out for 
new buildings or for permanent 
improvements or betterments 
made to increase the valueofthe 
farm property. 

Neither are any amounts deduct- 
ible which were expended in re- 
storing property or in making 
good the exhaustion thereof, for 
which an allowance is or has 
been made for its depreciation. 

I stated that ordinary and nec- 
essary expenses are deductible, 
but what does such statement 
cover? 

All amounts paid for labor in 
preparing land for a crop, and the 
cultivation, harvesting, and "mar- 
keting of the crop; the cost of 
seed and fertilizer used; the 
amounts expended for labor used 
in caring for live stock and the 
cost of the feed purchased; the 
amounts paid in making repairs 
to farm buildings, but NOT TI1K 
DWELLING ROUSE; repairs t> 
feices, farm machin'^, etc., the 
cost of material and farm tools 
which are used u;> in tin* Course 
in *** of a year or so, such as piin'i- 
forks, spades, and similar tools, 
but not farm Implements, machin- 
ery,' .wagons a ,,.j other vehicles 
whjch are classed as I-ivr-.stmi'nti 



A Week's News. 



The New Testament was first di- 
vided into verses by Robert Steven 
a French printer in 1651. 



In New Ouinea many of the wom- 
en wear nose rings, the nose having 
been piereed in the same manner 
that is adopted to pierce the ears of 
civilized women. 



Harold Gaines and wife enter- 
tained last Sunday, his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Gaines, and his 
grand-father Mr. Legrand Gain -s. 
Mr. Gaines is past 87 years of age 
and looks to be in the b''Bt of 
health. ________ 

Miost of the people who art- 
opposed' to hcti ding money out 
of the country to relieve tae 
starving children of Europe, ha V«* 
not yet put down their nam's on 
any subscriptions for 
people at home. 



of Capital. The amount <>f rent 
paid for a farm is deductible, 

If the farmer purchases an au- 
tomobile to be usni 10 a ("*lvat 
extent in th? business of farming, 
the amount paid for it in classed 
as an Inventment of Capital una 
is not deductible as an expense, 
though each year a depreciation 
allowance may be claim.'' I. 

The cost of insurance of crops 
and of all farm buildings, except? 
ing the house in which the own- 
er lives, is .deductible 

The following article will ex- 
plain Partnerships. 



Men" who used to boast that they 
could cither drink or let it alone 
didn't want to be told to let k alone. 
» » »» 

Tbe bootlegger who once held hiui- 

Belf aloof In some mountain resort is 

no.. LI.o cWlffer of an admiring and 

clamorous throng in the -hotel lobby. 

I ♦♦♦♦ 

The record of a cow in Spartan- 
burg county, S. C, of having borne 
two sets of twin calves in 1920 has 
-been equaled if not beaten by a reg- 
istered Jersey owned by Marion 
Richardson, of Davis county, N. C, 
which in eleven months and three 
days gave birth to two sets of twin 
calves. 

♦♦♦♦ 

Potash in Germany occurs in the 
form of a rock salt and runs in seams' 
of thirty feet or more in thickness. 
As mined it has about the same con- 
sistency as the common rock Bait of 
commerce, and its grinding is easy. 
The depths at which the true potash 
deposits are situated make it neces- 
sary to sink shafts leading to levels 
of .as much as 6,000 feet below the 
surface. 

♦♦♦♦ 

It is «aid that some of the Vene- 
tians—these who have never been to 
the mainland— have never seen a 
borne in all their lives. 
♦♦♦♦ 

A prominent geologist estimates 
that the Dead sea will be a mass of 
solid salt within less than 500 years. 
♦♦♦♦ 

German experimenters have per- 
fected a eombined mechanical and 
chemical process for opening plum, 
cherry and other fruit stones and ex- 
tracting the oil contained in their 
kernels. 

♦♦♦♦ 

The pipe lines in America used to 
carry petroleum from the wells to 
central points for storage or to re- 
fineries, are sufficient in length to 
girdle tbe earth at the equator. 
♦♦♦♦ 

To harness up the chained water 
power of America would result in a 
saving of coal of more than 126,000,- 
000 tons a year. 

♦♦♦♦ 

A great industrial plant in one of 
the Chioago suburbs employs 5,000 
women, 1.000 in the offices and 4,000 
in the shops. 

♦♦♦♦ 

Tips amountiug to $50 a day are 
said to have been received by a boy 
employed to open motor car doors 
outside a big Paris restaurant. 
♦♦♦♦* 

Oxford— Oxford University is or- 
ganizing an expedition to Spitzber- 
gen for the purpose of making geo- 
graphical discoveries on several of 
the highest peaks which have not 
yet been climbed. 

*♦♦♦ 

"The trouble with inqst politicians 
is that they promise more than they 
can perform. 

"I avoid that," replied Senator 
Sorghum. "I keep a man hired to 
do all my promising, aud if he prom- 
ises don't come true I administer a 
shocking report to him, with Mie dis- 
appointed constituents as a highly 
approving audience." 
♦♦♦♦ 

London.— An English girl has just 
set an example of patriotism to her 
sisters of this or other countries by 
cutting off and selling her hair and 
giving the proceeds to the govern- 
ment to help relieve its financial 
situation. The girl's name has not 
'been made public. 

♦♦♦♦ 

TherV is only oin- Democrat in tile 
lower branch of the N w Jersey leg- 
islature, but We gather he la having 
a very good time. The Jaw requires 
mat tutli partit 



I 



Seventh t Madison 




Covington, Ky. 



NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S GREATEST STORE 



JSow in progress 



The<ireatest Sale 



Homefurnishings 

We've Ever Held 

Thousand of Dollar's Worth of Rugs, Draperies, Linoleums, 
, ? ,< K>r Covering::, Houscfurnishing*, Kitchen ami 'Laundry * 
Helps and Appliances Sensationally* Reduced. 

zA great combined sale---our February Rug Sale with the February Sale of 
Housefurnishings*— -making a tremendous event in which you may BUY THE " 
VERY THINGS YOU HAVE BEEN DOING WITHOUT SINCE THE~ 
REIGN OF HIGH PRICES and BUY THEM AT PRICES YOU HAVE 
BEEN WAITING FOR, THE LOWEST IN YEARS. Hundreds of rugs" 
at old time prices. Curtains and draperies at surprisingly low prices, c_>tnoi k 
housefurnishings including kitchen ware, tinware, enameled ware, aluminum 
ware, chinaware, and laundry helps o* most every kind at extraordinary re- 
duced prices. Buy now* and reap the harvest of these greatest savings. 

Now On Sale. 



DR. T. B. CASTLEM^*, 

•^^DBNTIST^^ 

In my new office 

Cloy old Place, Florence, KV 

Teeth extracted painleBS. Bridge 
and Plate Work a Specialty. 

All Work Guaranteed 



A M 



Mr. T. K. Wallace, of near* Flo- - 
<-<r*e, l'ft his order with the Re- 
corder hunt Saturday for a sate t>» 
be held Feb. M, at I p m. Hen < 
hi* advorll-mment In Onotoor <<>!- 
urn ' Mr Wall icp. sh>o eulacrirwd 
ior tbe Remril'T. 

While lierin mv un loubti'dly 

< ii 'hi to pay an liiilcnii \ of ut 
I. ..11 *" 00ft 000 000 

to begin to uuU> 'or h:jr crtaitA 
it lh» allie/t atiep^**-<t In * 1 urp«4Ait 
• unit *IMN> uctual rush out of h«*r 
%t><"v » ill to prtttrv well 



Underbill, of near Devon 
in employed I Station, will have » stale ut hi* 
farm on' March 1st Mr. Underbill 
expveti to move ro Krlanger and 
il is ReOMMPy for him to dis- 
of his atock, larmi ig toots 
&c. Real hie advertisement la 
this issue. 



Mario 1 County Farm Bureau hui 
rea'hel a m-mls- **(. p of ulnoM 
300, all hue forty «rf whom wort 
< 111 o|l©d in their r a Osn t drive ThU 
county bureau (a not I >»k-4ii{ .if- 
ter the ptftrOfcftM of m>t»U for 
•ori'14 aowl.ig 

"We aittfect tn have a M-Miber- 
•htp ol m hjr March fitat-' riya 
It » H«-ewn»e, HeeriM.iry, 



be represented on 
certain logislativc committee*, and 
fliis lone Democrat has mi many 
committee assignments that he does 
imt know what to do with then,. 
♦♦♦♦ 

In China all the Uud belongs to 
1 he state, an 1 a trilling sum for each 
acre, seare.oly altered through lon^ 
cnturiert, in paid as rent. 
♦♦♦♦ 

Women are being used in increas- 
ing numbers for jury aervice in Eng- 
land, and an examination of the 
casi h so far tried shows that, insttbd 
of harki -uiug t'> sentimental appeals, 
they have proven ratherMtern judnes 

y ♦♦♦♦ 

Andrew Jackson, seventh Pres- 
ident of the United StateH, served an 
apiireiit,li'islii;> with a saddler. 

♦♦♦♦ 

Women ma) uol laWs tnuull inter 
eat in the diStiUSaioO of open vs elon- 
«d simp, hut w at oh '• in sit u^i and 
take Botloe when Hie > .iqyersAtton 
Mint* around U His t loU-«a, shop. 

tiki "yoor nddlirrv V *ta i 



Public Sale. 



I will sell at public auction on 
my farm 2 miles north of Union. 

Saturday, Feb 26, 1921 

The following property. 
1 Black horse, 7 years olrj g*ood 
worker weighs 1400 pounds. 
3 Jersey cows 
U Ton Ford truck. 
1 Road wagon, 1 Hay bed- 
1 McCormac mowing machine, 
1 Hay rake, 1 Surrey, 
8 Barrels assorted com, 
1 Oliver plow, , 

Lot household and kitchen fur- 
niture and other articles. 

Terms-All sums of $10 and un 
dercash, over $10 a credit of six 
months will be given, purchaser 
to execute note with approved se- 
curity payable at Union Deposit 




'•.ir««*: 



ATTENTION, FEEDERS! 



N 

We carry a complete line of the following feeds and 

for a short time will make a special price on same: 

Bran Cotton Seed Meal Scratch Grain 

Shorts Little Chick Feed Corn 

Mixed Feed Tankage Hog Feed 

also Oats suitable for seed. , 

We have feeds for every purpose. Come in and let us 
. figure with you on your requirements. 

B. J. CR1SLER, 

PETERSBURG, KY. 



iJLUJ^W^ 



Efficient, Service and Economy 

IS MY SLOGAN 

0. SCOTT CHAMBERS 

EmMpr andFuneral Director 

WALTON, KENTUCKY. 



Bank. No property to be remov- 
ed until terms oj.sale have been 
complied with. 

Sale will begin at 1 p. m. 

J. W. WATERS. 



ForSale 

Having sold my farm and will 
more by the first of Mnreh, I will 
sell at private sale the following pie- 
o*s) of furniture and other articles 
to-wit; 

1 Doubl*- Bodstead with box spring 
matrt'ss. 

I Double Child's Bedstead, walnut, 

with railing. 
I JrUiigU< Bfdst„ad with eotlon mat-! 

tress. 
1 Walnut Drop l>af Table. 
I Kitchen Table. 

I Kanoy :Smt»ll Walnut Table, also 
• 1 Si hi id 
1 .Chiffonier and l Fanej Rttchtn] 

Oupoard, glass doors. ' 
U or more Chairs and 1 Couoh 
1 I'antiy Hlo'lve stand for divem 
14 Knife Kiaut-eiitt..r 
I No, It) Antnrprise Sausage out tar 

i No. h Largo Cooking move a pips 
i doa. Mason Fruit Jars more or lee* 
Atniut NO galltaia of H yeaf-idd Vine- 
gar llrlngyour JiysA.ahoig 
M»r.»4 - J({ifR KAilH 



^ . ca: . cg , CT: . y j e . g . g-yr'yrr-' , y,i*-yTa^ 

1 HEBRON THEATRE 1 

£ tfEXT SATURDAY 

| Tom Mix in "Rough Riding Romance'* j 

Sun.h-«e "ShfillM riiimmioc W *A 0»» \ 



-omedy 



Should Dummies Wed?' 

First Show 7:30 P. M. 
Admission 22 Cents, :-: Children 11 Cento 



Including War lax 

sgKapataBaagMjBBPi ^ 



*JUi 



Whilo Kirb Tanner an I Charl*\s 
W ootbay ' were prowling nrouni in 
the tormer's barn, lH«t SunJ.iv 
tliev discovered a hull's pf-st con- 



Must Sell at Once. 



The Wood Riggs I arm 88 l-;i acres, 
. wltb good 6 room house, hank biirn. 
*•'"•* | arranged fur M oowa, 4 horses, poul- 
try house, inn blue grass, plenty good 
Iruok laud, one mile from the Ferry, 
ueartwo pike a -|4rsH». $lo»M>down 
haUnoe ternir. PfflimiOB this 
■priog. Mr i'.-o living «.i» the f»rui. 
Se« it and you will huv It. 

FRANK It! CHOWK. 
WI Juluiato i HI lg . 
is Maiu InTaV ctiuiituatl, o. 

.sub*«»u (oi the fmcoRi>a» 



much ifn the order of u o<> nun un- 
ity ne«tt and noi m:in> Wsoksal 
it >*<>old have- »m-o» it vnhi«!»|i- 
llaOOVery It H ;ihout lime \> 
bi he.ii ing frt>m Mr Tana"r .en 



his i'».'l si.ake 



For HbIb— T»o goo«l nnU'h eoaa 
due to IreaiM'U ia April; mI«> ihm 
« gsUoti cream cun Mr* J«ai« 
KUey, Orant, K lof. 



U : lM&i&ji&C±&&'£&^&^- t i&k?*~£%&^ ^.. utiw^si *&&*&%.£ 



ffl^'lWWffrtfllliMiMIIJiMlMfWlMfifillll 



JJWBffiMi^nMitiM 








BOONE COUNTY RfcCORDE* 



HP 



♦ 
♦ 



BEAVER LICK. 



c n \ii«l« rsiui moved to Justice 
Hu I • ■■ i"m farm mar Walton, last 

;• < s?< i : and v ifr sprirt Sun- 

, mini h id W C. John- 



♦ 
• 



LIMA BURG. 



Mrs. Ross Russ is Improving: 
Mrs. Mary Tarhier is very si k 
J. C. Brown "killed hogs Thnrs- 
lay of last week. 

Mrs. M I. Bakrr spout last Wed- 
nesday with her mothm- in Ev- 



•-4 '.mli y 



;iint 



wife 



anenl ! linger. 



re lu- 



ll, SI I 

.1 
S.i. 

M 



Ed. Riggs and wife wore visiting 
Ins mother. Mrs Well Ki^gs, lust 
Sunday. 

Mrs Nellie Gavjioit is visiting 
her sister. Mrs Koso Quick, of 
Walnul Mills, Ohio. 
Harry Gross and wife* and Miss 
With Mr W (. .Johnson. I Mildred Swnrti, spent tru< week- 
(i Griffith and Wife spent] end With Will Gross and wife 
!;t\ evening with Mr. ancf 



u'nu fiii, wis and 

. , i W iluin 
i Di Uha'inly, on?' of out 
successful ship-*?p raisera, has 

■ •. \Ul ll I' 1 I'WOH 

\ HlavliRCk and wife and] 
Maiv No, -11 Soe-nt hist Writ 



M 

RFI 

M 



John l)t h hnuntv and wife 
tit Green sold 1850 pounds 
i ■■' 'CO OJD the Walton ntar- 
iht wi -'k for an average of 
) i luindred 

v> ( U- >k and Cr, A.Slayt.aek 

1 pounds of t'H -ifvii til I h ' 

- house last Monday atari 

•v of- $l,s-:i e|-<:ir 

VV Clepk and Benj Hodges 

pounds of . i ■■ h'pii it the 

house for a'i n t va ye 

$23 on per 'iii-l' •■) 

' <>. Gi iffil h an I slater, 

m v Oiiihim. of Cbienjjo, 

i Fund i v u ;' . Ii Mrs \\ K. 



• ♦ 

» CONSTANCE • 

• ♦ 

• ♦<•♦}♦«• »♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 

Charles Garnett is aide to be 
out*. 

OHie Kottmyer's children ha\^ 
whooping cough. 

Frank Doluick and wife are the 
happjrp areius of a little 6oy, 

Mrs. Kate DolWick is the ,'U"8t 
of her daughter, Carrie, at George 
town, Ohio 

Su id iy week II M. Kenyon, wife 
and daughter Elisabeth, were the 



nvuh r. -I.Mr Big Bene, guests of his parents here. 
1 . young rolks >• the B?aver Miss Norma Wemt/. surprisen 
n.. ilv o.-ho.id \irr entertained by j | u . r fo u- s Sntiirdav l«v marrvirtg 
Misses Molue and Bertha and Mr. H av nea Bruee, of Ludlow. We wish 
Leon Wilson, las! Saturday night. I them much Joy 

Mrs <• \\. O-sm-i i spent last j Charlie Sparks, of Ohio, fame 
* * '" th " nlv inspecting the over and look his hrother-in-law. 

'■t-|Dr. Muratt, who is i-i had health, 
home with him last Mo iday. 
William Reeves and family .it- 



the 
Ml} 


hrgesl 

hai si- 
1 nughl 

llll S|ll 


stocks of new stvles 

•>\ in years, of which 
very liberally to sup- 
\'f trade. 






• 

• 
♦ 




♦ 



Miss Kay Cross is nursing Mrs. 
Anderson and Mrs. Lane. 

Mrs Courtney Pope and chil- 
dren spin; Sunday :it Ludlow. 

John Ciiswi-il and wife spent 
Sunday with Clarence Tannerano 
wifi>. 

<, Fr.Jik Feldhanss pent the week- 
end with his ;iun;, Mrs itfeorstc 
Bradford. 

R v' Parber will preach 
Baptist chin <h •..••■;t Sinr ) i 
ing and evening. 

Mrs. John Dicker otl e 
ed J R. Williuns wife 
and Mi Jami - 7 '.' i I. -m 

The ladies of ih • Bapti a 
Pres.-viori.i i gocjptk 'S vvl.l 
an oyster supper at the O'cTd-1 i- 
lows il ill, I- 1 h >2% for Hi '■••i.'. ft 
of the Starving Sufferers in th 1 
Near Easl Everybody com-' out 



Public 




I will offer at public **ale on the Mat Riley 
farm by Narrow Grove school house on Rich- 
ardson pike, 3 miles east of Devon Sta., 11-2 
miles west of Madison pike, on 

Tuesday, Men. 1 , '2 1 

The Following Property: 



8 Milk Cows-hne of them registered 
Ayrshire, will be fresh by day sale, 1 
due March 10. rest giving milk. 
Team of bays— horse and mare, coming 

8 years old, weigh about 2400 lbs. 
Black driving mare coming 8 years old. 
2 Colt coming 2 years old. 
20 bus. Oats. 100 bus. bus. sorted Cor». 
Some Fodder. 2h. Farm Wagon, 
Haybed, 2-h. Platform Wagon, 
1-h. Spring Wagon, 2-h. Carriage, 
Rubber Tire Buggy good as new, 



tended the wedding super giveti 
by Mrs. John Beekel, of \V»st- 
uood. in honor of the marriage of Steel Tire Buggy. McCormic Mower, 

her uieee. Marie Priee, to 'Kenton 

John Deere Hayrake, Hay-tedder, 



Hiho, of Harrison, Ohio 



^♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦»»»*» ♦♦*♦♦♦♦ 

• ♦ 

• VERONA « 

• ♦ 



Disc Harrow, Laying-oF p W\y^, 

2 year old Bull, and 4 or 5 tons of Hay in the barn. 



Left-hand Oliver Turning Plow, 

Left-hand Steel Turning Plow, 

2-h. Jumper, 5-shovel Cultivator, 

2 Double Shovel Plow, 50-tooth harrow 

2 sets double Work Harness, 

2 Mens Saddles, 2 sets Buggy Harness > 

Set double Carriage Harness, Collars, 

Bridles, and Check Lines, 

60 gal. Coail Oil Tank, Scalding Pan, 

Doz. Plymouth Rock Hens & 2 Roosters 

22-lb. Sledge Hammer, Double-trees, 

Spring Wagon Pole and double-trees, 

New Syracuse Hillside Plow, 

100 ft. Hay-rope, fork and pulleys and 

various other articles. 



t th 

iiioi !: 

it iir 



J. M Powers an 1 A. C, Roberts 
were transacting business at Wal- 
ton? last S aturda y 

W- learn lh:>; ih < wif • of jpr- 
rv Sturgeon has diphtheria, hut is 
i ported ppeovpfi/ig 

Saturday the Verona lank d>m-! 
oistratfd the new burglar alarm! 
w hich " "■ red it] s' insfe: II ■ I 

Rev. T homp o •. ii i'r dctoi l, ' 
Kv., delivered profit-ill .< and in- 
. resti !■; sei'moiia Sunday ari l Sun; 
day iiighi 

Vye lear.i that n n"\v firm iff 
toJaacea business ha- b?en 
sized luM-" i>y the name oil 
t'hapma i Vest tt Dow nard, 

.1 M. powers ree 'iyed the s. ".«' 
news of i he serious illness 
Mrs.. Eni'ra Fli -v». wife of Geor 

Ky . Mond 

Th" death anj|pl visited our 

midst a iid removed from this I'll" 

Wolford ,who died Turs- 

ly ''i^ht of old age. Hi- was Tj 

years old. The fu vial took place 

rnrce . [ j rom \ v w H ( .;h"l ehureh Thu r sday 



and imp this great work Supper j Funs, of Fli: 
30 Dents, 

Miss l.ouisu Frklhaus entertain- 
ed the V. W A. last Thursdav I g e? 
with a quilting, A delightful j ^ 
lunch was Berverl at thenoonbou 
Twe"tv-six w it ' present 

new muabcrs were recr-iv r,. rne „■• tasl Wlth al () - o! . 1( ^ ReV i 

next meeting wdl be held all dr. lh;lrU . v IU ,. ,. ul - Lolli>V! ,u, Kv.. 
..,.;', Lu '- 11 0:u ' : ^°"- F ^'- preached th- funeral Inthe p^ei-1 
lu .,'r " ■ . . , _ ence of a larg? e-atberintt of 

The many inen Is. f Everett f rien ds x who met to pay the last! 
Will! r,.,* ,,:„;, -.1 tU ..Mr o: Mhut ^ () , ,,. { „»,,,„ ,,,.„.,,.,. j 

his death wlrfch occurred at Ha ,. d The deceaietl leaves n d wot- 
home near Mlevild, Su.iilay. I! • ,.,) wil> , ,, . s „ :! . Rdward, and! 
was n patie'it sufter-r for many , u .„ daughters/ Mollis and Belle 

> l ", '' ' MOCe ' h - l«rth '' His wolford. 

mother two years ago, lias oft^n j 

e\ ji''.':.s''(l a n' siri i ■ ■--, av i r . 

., ,., ,,.. . l( .... i,. V|S , t nol) ! *♦♦♦♦♦♦#♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦•♦♦♦ 

christiin, and #hen £he Bummons] * pr .\Mrw«4vn r n 

camd was re.a ly to f&n ' Ws l^ord. UKANCfcSViLLB ♦ 

His remains were laid to rest in ■ * * 

the Bice e-meterv j ••♦♦^^** ♦..♦.-*♦♦•♦♦♦*♦•• 

„ H S, iV'ilson and wife ?fn'iit 

» •♦»♦ #» •»» • »»•»♦» »» »»» »<> » » {Sunday al Jerry Bates, « 

0, ^ i >i • i* ■ on the llth hJ i hi- month 

♦ HEBRON • ♦'■') John Muntz and v.i'e, a girl. 

e «j M.-s Will KriiSe n?«i ohildren 

»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦ h,,. -t oiie day last \* • ,-k with rel- 

Johj- Dye and ramilv entertain- a*ive* i« raylorspott: 

ed several relatives Sunday. , Jobn ( a , vo r Jr ■• , W ','V : !''' tu,>c ' hl 

In i, and Jacob Phelps, spent 



TERMS OF SALE. 

All sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on sums over $10.00 
a credit of six months without interest will be given, purchas- 
er to give note with good security, payable at Florence De- 
posit Bank, Florence, Ky., before removing pfoperty. 

Albert M. Underhill. 

:;;;jSale will begin at 10:30 a m. Lute Bradford, Auctioneer 



TABLETS OH LIQUID 
SOLD EVERYWHERE 



"IT SAVED MY LIFE" 

The Feeling Tribute of t Woman to 

PE-RU-NA 

HEAD HER LETTER— IT WILL DO T0U O00D 

"Pe-ru-na hu benn • Godsend to me. I feel safe In saying 
that It Rovi'itmy Ufa. 1 was all run down and miserable when 
1 commenced taking Pe-ru-na, hut am on U>o road to recovery 
now. I oannot thank you too much." 

Mas. ( 1UK1.T8 AxKPArnn, 

II. F. D. No. 7, Lagrange, Indiana. 

A letter like this brings hope and the promise of health 
to every sick and suffering woman. Tcrhape you kndw 
what it means to have your daily duties a misery, eviry 
movement an effort, stomach deranged, pains in the head, 
back and loins most of the time, nerves raw and quiver- 
ing — not a moment day or night tree from suffering. 

Do as Mrs. Anspaugh did. Take Pe-ru-na. Don't wait 
but start right away. ' 



For Sale 

Oneaer'. six-room house, eenii'iit 
ei-llar. furnace bent, electric li^'bt, 
! and nil kinds of Irnit. ;il 4'i'A Brlatlg- 
i er Hoad. KrlaitiieT. K.v. Jan. lii 



Tom V,\\ 
martce' 1 at 
ur.liy nigh 

The Helper pircje will meet with 
Mrs. Jessie Hossini i Suiunhiy af- 
ternoon at 2 O'clock. 

Edward Raker nil 1 family spent 
Sunday -with his ft t her, ' J. 'Ji 






To i '"''''• anu >Wlcod r/ncLps, Bpr»nr 

■^ ^ ^i^g^3 ^gi pi L.XICKLE LUMBER CO.? 

witb Win. House incl family. 
Ludlow 



in 



Fred Reitmann and family h id 
as gtiesta Sunday B. P Egjrlestor. i 

Baker and family, near l/,ma«bur> . < ; ''' 1J u '. if0, ol "?' »" bron - • m, | 
Mrs. M l. Grutchar entertained] WUrBeitmann and wife \i 

her niee.. and husband of Hamil- .?■ xv Ba , ke ' w J fe "J?. v,i '- .•''",. U 

tou. Ohio, several davslast W??k. «L* d Ll '!> °' ° :lfc »".V. Ohk>. visited 

C. 1) S •oi i.or a and wife 



Miss Nannie bnd^e attended ser-l* •" l \"" ulr l } "™ »"«* "'' J , ( - ; ' 
vices al Bulllttsvillo laal Sunday ^-^f 1 *^ 11 * nd V (v - l:l f ' A / i ' k ( 
morning and dined with Mrs. Dora ! ^ H._ Eggleston and «i e ami 

Alice, i 'lore 'c\ Arthur. (reor.'Eje 
M7apa triad t^an'.l Charlie F.^cieston. visited at 
I Walter Sua-'i v's at IlixiV "i, O. 

s her 



uar.n u 

The friends IrM 
see Raj Rog^ers out ajjai 1 Satur- 
day ruUrht, and to know that he 



Mir. Kmma Kil^our had 



is Minn wine IniDToVen 

liay I'o^ers u if <• • id pisf' 



quests last Wednesday, Mrs Will 
Mi s Ueitmtin, Mrs. Alice Ooolrid.ir % 



I. e i "j Ropjers, w-'-v fJTiies's nf Mr-. 
!'. (' McGlaS hi nil son, ll*iwaril, 
Saturday ulghl and Sunday. 



Sadie (iood ridye and 
Raymond. 



i.i Maulius 




I ♦ 
• ♦ 

« 

■ Mrs Sarah White is no b« kter-. 
KidweU was the gUMt of J. H Snyder ami i.anily \isi.ed 
ter, Mrs Bugene Riley, last ; '•' Maxwell, Sunday. 

M. Leslie Sebree and childron 
i Rnycook and wife, w<>- 'are ul) the. l -i- - k list. 

of Eugene Riley and win-. Whts Loucetta Me-isl-v has re- 
, x |eu\ii, I horn I In* mumps. 

and Mi - C. E. .'•'! ma lit Mr** ra.iny tlulnea visited Ed. 
■ daughter, Sarah, who lashecn Maxwell and family, Sunday. 
. , ,, »iek, s some better Doipba Hebreo and family din- 

i Taylor wife and daughter|'*d with Ii • Snyder and family, 
( ' i ,ti- r'. ju- ttf lie' Ii ivdhiI. S unday ' "t i i t 'J' * / . 

ed'with T •' HutioH andfamily. | l-ystia Smith and wife ealled on 

Il.iuy Carpent'r md wife, of Uranl VVilliajncon and famuy, last 

i- ood, Sunday ed witli Kli Car- Hntidaj 

pen ter and family •■''" Shinkle and family called 

Johi Kasion end «,l-, Qmei "" *"w U bite :i,i-l wife. Sunday 

;: i- ' .■' ,. ml sit 8i hi' 

* hi Clarenr* i isWii md tannis.. ' •' llenslry wire ^indT daughter, 
near Burlington. | Marjafaret, ealled on Mrs s.u di 



ERLANGER, KY. 

^QUALITY— 

MILL WORK and LU/VIB&R 

\|DO YOU KNOW" That LUMBER today is the 
WORLDS CHEAPEST buildiu«- material. 

build isrow 

WE HAVE THE 

LOWEST PRICES 



For Saie. 

j .Vromii house and one-half acre lot 
tin MeVille. on the Ohio rher. The 
J hiiiidines an- all Ifl^ood repair. Will 
j he-sold by Ri -Review Lodge No. >-A 
[For particular* applv to J. I). Me- 
; N. •.•iy. W. R Marshall, Jeff Wilii- 
laiiison. Burlington, Ky; janfi 

Rural RoiK.h 2. 

! »■♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦*•« 

FOR SALE 



I Have for Sale 
2 International Trucks. 
2 490 Chivrolets. 
1 Ford Truck Chasis, 20- 
model. » 

CASH OR ON TIME. 

L. C. CHAMBERS, 

Petersburg* Ky. 



h 



—ARE MAKING— 

PROMPT DELIVERIES 



Mi 



>!■ 



(■AT T»E 0LI>STAND«Dixie Highway and Southern Railway 4 




Mis« 



Helen «'u„i. brother*! ^'"'.V s,,n *!V, 



..itertam'd del, ■ .a. , -,iiv i ;„• V oun»| , WiUtam XVhltM „nd wife MMt"d 
folk* last SutUrdiij even. --.■ Mitl ' ' M "';' 1 ''H 
a d.ru-e. ah I ad a v o*l ,',' ' s " l "'"> 

I II S ■ \ .|er a el Ili-ni 



and w iff, last Satur* 



Re.i Rrihtow •« ik* Wifi 
little sranddnugh 

th Miller, -.|e ii- 
■d Hi i 

lluw u>! I du ,inl t Wlfl i 

i nd sIi-imi * • i ■ 



I Ulllp 

I 

md 

i . ti 



L3fc=53»aJ^ 



J. W. HALEY, Mgr. 



Telephone Erlanger 25 



AH 



,;«aJ 



^S8|b gjp^ 



NOTICE. 

All persons owing the estate of 
j Laura Clore, deceased, please come 
J forward and nettle same at once. 
-1 Also all jtersons linving elairry* 
)^% J against said estate present them 
to met at once for settlement. 
H. M CLORE, Af?ent 
Laura Clare estate. 



Ijluit iutll apprecbttt 
^LUiiltp (Saliafcrrn 




1.4. + +-(-4 , :•++++ ^ »+->^4-+';-++++"^«fr+++i- . . 

ARE YOU A kEAUKk OF THE RECORDS!*? 



NOTICE. 

all iierHJins who have Claims 
against the estate of George E. 
j House deceased, will present tlicm 
to me, proven as the law r«M|uires. 
All j»ersons owing said estate 
will Come forward and lettle. 
W. V BRADFORD, 
Admr. 

NOTIC 10 

The Stockholder of The Mutu^ 

al Tele|i|ioiie CottlMttf ol Utlioii 

Kv .ire Heiel'V lUltllieii tllat tile 

1 1011 id dm 1 tui . and ulb 

n| the company will be' held m 
1 nuni K 1 Nf ii- ii >t h i'» M from 
' .1 hi to 4 11 in 



f. N. Kassefeaoiii & Son, 

(R1K1T8 i MARBLE 

MONUMENTS, 

3 Large 8to<h on DiepUy 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme'l 

US Main Street, 

AURORA, IND. 

JAMES L. ADAMS 

DENTIST 

Cohen Building 

Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 

The Famous O. I. G. 
I now have for sale registered 
O. I. C. Pigs, some of which are 8 
weeks old. 1 heir Hire is the famous 
CL C Callaway Jmnho, and his sire 
is Callaway Edd, the world's Grand 
Champion Roar. All stock register- 
ed fit e. 

FRANK HAMMONS, 

K. J). Klorenee. Ky. 



D. E. Castlemarl, 
ATTbRNEYATLA W % 

— Office over — 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, 



Erlanger, 



Kentucky. 



List Your Sales With Me Early In 
■he Season. 

LUTE BRADFORD 

Live Stock Auctioneer. 

Your Work Solicited. See me 
and get my terms. 
Phone Flcr:^;, *V ^. D. 

Farmers oct-14 

IT'S A WISE IDEA. 

Do as Many Others are doing 
send your cream to the 

CLOVERLEAF CREAMERY 

Burlington, Ky. 

I pay cash for cream and injure 
you a square deal. 

I RECEIVE EVERY 

FRIDAY 



J. O. HUEY, 



Manager. 



-AT HOME- 

DR. F. L. PriDDICORD 

101/ Madison Avenue, 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY. 

'Phone So. 1148. 

Women 
Made Young 

Bright eyes, a clear skin and a body 
full of youth and health may be 
yours if you will keep your system 
in order by regularly taking 

COLD MEDAL 




The world's standard remedy for kidney, 
liver, bladder and uric acid troubles, the 
enemies of liie and looks. In ' use since 
1696. All druggists, three sizes. 

Look for Um name Cold Medal on e**rr boa 
and accept no imitation 



Attention Auto Owners! 

I am prepared to do first-class 
repairing- on all makes or cars. 
Starter and generator work a 
specialty. All work guaranteed. 

Give me a trial. 



Earl M. Ay lor, 

HEBRON, KY. 
Phone Hebron 



Tou Can Trade" 
the Article You 
Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by c/4dver- 
tising. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

• ♦ 

* IMPORTANT NOTICE. ♦ 

• ♦ 

# Watch the date following * 

* your name on the margin, ♦ 
of your pan** and if it i-» • 
not eoiT«*ci plea»f> notify • 
this office at once. If jour 4 
|inpe-r h.is been djueontrnu- m 
ril by miatake before your ♦ 

Ulllf «<\|rilff| <|n fiHt ffflav * 

notifying thin office />fi it- ♦ 

i.,. a .ii* ihi^'r.UUy rorievt- e 

r«\ here * 



••*•++ 
••«♦*•«♦•«•«••»*• •«•«•••« 



Ji 






if 



\ 



J 




iiilfnainiiitlfT^ i"' 



BOOtfE CtD NTT RECORDER 



«» 

A 



*f 



I 




E 



11 



Pettit 



And inspect their line of General Merchandise 
you will find their prices 

J-U-S-T R-l-T-E. 

Blue Work Shirts - $1-00 

240 Weight Blue Denim Overalls 1-60 

220 Weight Blue Denim Overalls, Childrens 75c 

Comfort Batting 3 1-4 lb. roll 1-25 

Our Line of Groceries Is Complete. ' 

Table Meal, 12 lbs - ? 35c 

Romeo Flour, highest grade patent. 24 ' lb. bag. • • 
Liberty Bell Flour, as good as the best, 24-lb. bag-. 

Ohio Corn, 10c can, 3 * or 

Pure Cane Bulk Sugar, per 1004b. bag 

Gold Bar Pine Apple, No. 3 can, 1 lb. 14 oz 

Wisconsin Early Selected June Peas, per can 

Franklins Golden Syrup, made from cane sugar, 

1 lb. 9 oz. can • ,-..... 

Franklins Golden Syrup, 1 lb. 2 oz. can 

New Orleans Molasses, per gallon 

Jiff -Jelly and Jell-O, all flavors 1 0c 

7 Bars Swift's Pride Soap • • , 25c 

Blue Bird Bread--fresh every day. 

Fresh Meats of all Kind s 

We want all of your Eggs, Poultry and Cured Meats. 
Bring them to us and receive the Highest Price. 

GULLEY & PETTIT, 

rt Burlington, Kentucky. 

ft-"— -~ " i cao i 



Historic Mount Afernon 



1.50 

1.50 

25c 

7.90 

40c 

10c 

20c 
15c 
90c 




G 



I 

I 



Everything in Wood 




Get Our Prices 

WOOD AND ASPHALT SHINGLES, 

PULP AND PLASTER WALL BOARD, 

ORNAMENT AT, SLATE ROLL ROOFING— MIXED 

COLORS— DIAMOND SHAPE, 

LIGHT. MEDIUM and HEAVY ASPHALT ROLL^ROOF- 

ING, BARN SIDING, GARAGE' DOORS, 

.1EAVY TOBACCO RACKING. 



The A. M. Lewin Lumber Company, 

COVINGTON, KY, 

I Madison Ave. and 24th St. Phone South 465-466 A 

V._ — _• _«s/j 



REMARKABLE AERIAL VIEW OF MOUNT VERNON. . 
This picturesque view of GeorKc Washington's beautiful home on thi- I'otnmac ! 
was taken at a low altitude and Bivea almost a perfect representation ot ins old j 
house and the outlyinK buildings and grounds. 




I 



Merchants Creamery 

OF CINCINNATI 

Has opened a^Cash Buying Cream Sta. at Petersburg, 

Ky. We test and pay for your cream while/' 

; you wait. Start in anchgive us your next 

trial can. We are located in the 

Post Office Building. 



J. C. BOLEN, :-: 

PETERSBURG, KY. 



Operator 



AMERICAN LEGION NOTES 

• 

A bouquet of flowers from Pres- 
ident Wilsyu every day "helped 
bring V* ells Hawles, Commander of 
the S. Rauki'i Drqw Post No. 3*0 
of the American Le^ioa in New 
York City back to health when hfi 
was suddenly taken down with in- 
flammatory rheumatism during a 
visit to Washington. 

His name \\as Jacob Teinowit?. 
Ni>w it is .Jacob Legion Ten.iy, 
because he thought it was a more 
American name. Tcnny, who is ad- 
jutant and Americanism director 
of Walter S. Poague Post No. 161 
of the American Legion, of Chic- 
ago, officially changed his .iame 
to honor the Legion and to 
prove that he was all American. 
Be is a lawyer who Berved ovl-i- 
Beas. 



FOR SALE ETC. 

For Sale— Shetland pony, bay— 
6 years old. gentle, sound. Also 
harness- and runabout in good 
condition. W. V. Moore, Beaver 
Lick, Ky. Consolidated phone Bea- 
ver, 201. 5feb-2t 



WOOD FOR SALE— Two dollars 
per rank, six dollars per cord. Call 
or write H. fij. Tanner. Burlington, 
Ky., R. D. 3. Hebron phone. 

2(ijan-tf. 



L. H. Busby, Jr., will grind ana 
crush corn at his place on the 
Ur.ion pike every Tuesday. 
10feb-2t 




0^.^^^*^*^^)K^^l*>.^**^^# *& 



* 



LOGAN FOSTER. B. B. ALLPHIN. 

Foster & Ailphin 

Real Estate and Auction Sales Co. 

I am associated with the above finn and -rlieit your busi- 
ness. List your farms with us. Give us you.i sabs of Live 
Stock and other Peis«inal property. 

We do the advertising, auction your sale, clerk and col- 
lect. All you have to do is give us property list. 



Hay for Sale— Stack of about 3£ 
ton of extra* fine Timothy. Will 
sell all or part very cheap. K 
Warren Utz, Union R D. 1. Far- 
mers phone. lt-pij 

Post No I. American Le- For Sale-Two fresh Jersey' cowa 
gio:i of Kentucky, held its regu- with calves and one Jersey heif- 
iai meeting bebrUarv 8th, 1921 at4(*r. C\ Beekelheimer, mar Commi*- 
JJi.rarv Hall, and a large majority tsary, on Burlington and BellevteW] 
of me members wore present, and pike, 
after an interesting business ses- 
sion a "Real'' lunch was served by 
the Woman's Auxiliary. 

Mr. L. T. It/-, l'ost Commander, 

was present an I t Mid'M-ed his res- ] m u lition. Will liold about intt lbs 

Ijfnitkm, giving as his reason that ,,, j ( . ( . (• \ J% Qkines, Florence R. 

he is temporarily aosenl [rom the 1} phone Burlington 318 

Q QUnty i and liwlinVJ rt g tli.u the in-i - — — — ■ — — r 

if th • (.,-• 'jo i v \ . . 1 1 1 1 be Notice— I will canvass. tn;s neign 

i y having a:i hc iug> post I orhood and take orders for fruit 

ider in the courAyi Atter trees. Bold your order for me. 

due eonsidera lo.i th • menvbers re- 1 Clyde Berkshire, Burlington, Ky. 

luc tartly accepted his resignation 

land on motion of Mr * tz the 

I Viet— Comn. i i''er O. R. Kiish was 



For Sale— Twi fresh cows ano 
calves. C. Hedges, Burlington. Ky., ! 
K. D. 1. "-pd 

i | 

For Sale— Refrigerator in good j 



o 

* 

^kj elected Post Commander lor the 

^ j lvm.ii ides ol ,h' L.'ini and II. J. 

7F \ Aylor elect d vice-Cunimancler. 



For Sale or Trade-*- Four unbrok- 
i i ; o!t.-. : te:;m brown mares coni- 
tii'g four and five years oil. Kay- 
i moid Bcemon, Flor'n v R. i> 



^ '■' A State membership drive 
*%? | now o.» and elich rucmi r of Hod 
,.,?<;' j l'o -l b apjioUited is i ('oimniij 
to secure h- w nu*m»'efs a.ri to i 
poi't at liie next rt guiar mil 
in-' io bt 



he 



March »th, 19*1. 



FOSTER & ALLPHIN 



Covington, Ky. Walton, Ky. Phone 37 Con. 

B. B. ALLPHIN, Local Agent, Walton, -Ky. 



SALESMEN WANTFD to solicit 
orders lor lubricatLig oils, greai^ 
is aetl pai&ta s.k.ii'v or t ummis- 1 
,;on. Ad4r< b THE tfArtV RV OIL; 
CO , i i> \ il iid. Ohio. 

Lady or QeUtlem ar Agent want-| 
id in the city of ibiriington to 

stMl ii>t genuine J. R.- watkinsl 
The returning doughboys, weary Medicines, Spices, Extracts, Toilet | 
with the o s-e evjer-present canv | prep arations, etc. All or spars 

rud salmon, have influenced their time A wonderful opportunity to | 
families ip cease eating it. ac- 1 g t .t into busini:^ lor ybnraelf. I 
cording to a letter to the Am*- j Write today for ire? particulars! 
^ x | ieaji Legion Weekly irom a Sea. tie ., ;l j sample. J R. Watkins Co,, 61 
Legionnaire, who states thattherej Memphis, Te.m. l£feb-4t 



i 



* 



^ 



General Market. 



are millio.'.s of dollars worth of 
"gold lish 1 ' in warehouses along 
the Pacific coast. The writers call 

6*****^**¥**^****^¥*^ ^V^rrluiwln'oer-barrd 

^^^ . . ■ ■ _ m *i t .\ IH /it ^) IllltlW ill I * IMI I I ■" 

" = industry "winch provi left employ ^^ ^ w V an dil.2 

'ment for several thousand vater- ,. llll(>l .' ;imi e Tg ma rkets not un 

ana Of the World War.'. [form, av.-rag* of lbC 



I 



*1 00. 



DANCE 

GIVEN UNDER THE 
AUSPICES OF 

American Legion of Ky. 



The sight of prisoners in the 

'State Reformatory at "Monro-. 

Washington,, in olive drab uniform 

caused Thomas M Swale, Comma ' 

' der of the American Legion "■ 

I that State, to register a strong 

Protest. The uniforms, itwassabl. 

, were used as prison gari> on ac- 

jeou'd ioi their low eost The 

practice will probably.be diseon- 
tioued. 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦<♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 

♦ • 

» GRANT R. D. ♦ 



\\ he u. May $1.5§ 

Timidhy Hal ton $21.00. 

In t i ton $l«.50. 

flour niiddlings$2 , J. r )0 per ton 

Boei Steers T.:.> and |9.3t. 

Cows and Heifers $1 (10 a. el -.- ~M. 

Cilves .p<> and .+ 1-2 oil. 

Fit Lambs $6 and |9.00. 

ll>gs $!». r i0 and $10. oil. 

Monday's Tobacco Market. 







Covington 

Cy ithiiaa 
Carrolltoo 
Frank fori. 
sfiayaville* 

xington 



|11 66 
$11 00 
jil6.28 

A IS Ml 

>r. it 
114.86. 




corn from Indiana. 

Mrs. May Clore is recovering 

from her recent illness 

-James Hager shipped Ids tobac- j 

Co to Madison this week. 
W O. Kite paid $20 fortwoPlv- P'geo.s broken out <>• i 
oiuh Rock roosters recently !-25 last Saturday alter mo 

Mrs. Josie piatt is nursing Mrs | Hert Perk shire 

fa.ia Sutton, who has be. n very I »'»rold Conner 



• 



Clay Pigeon Sheet. 

Foilowiig is the number of clay 

a . orsiblt! 



Hi Florence, Kentucky * 

Music-r-Tanner's Jazz Band. 

Subscription 



sick 

.Its. \V»>st and wife, of Rising! 
9>w, are guests of Raj Williain- 
so i a nd wife 

K. K. Scott's sale was well at- 
tended Saturday Mr Seotl will 
make his home With his so i lb rt 

Mrs l\ T. Sienhen-t, e.lio is i'°- 
lovering Horn :m operation at I !i ' 
Quod Sainardan hospiiil, im get- 
i i ig along niCely! 

W 1 1 kite, Son i Ryl I ■ I A n- 

.."o \s ii .1 1, ,\ti< nd 'H Hi n 



i a 
i% , 



Dudley Blythe 
', ii>o porter 

Albert Pettit 

Willis Berkshira 
HiroM (rai;te.-» 
Rex Berkshire 
Thorn** Walton 
Mjo.it Slayback 
L f Weaver 
frv • i Rue 
.1 i- Berkshire 

I ( ! .■ 'i is to look 

1 Wi-.tVir Will I- i 
. o> | ,; ; '"i- • 
have \y. 



13 
19 

li 



Time Deposits 

Money Savers may now take advantage of the 
facilitius offered by many of the country banks 
to secure INTEREST ON DEPOSITS without 
undergoing the many inconveniences that are 
incident to deposits in Saving Banks. The fact 
that we pay 3 per - cent, interest on deposits 
made for a term of less than 1 2 months, and 

4 per cent 

on,, deposits made for a term of on;? year may 
• interest you in this matter. 

Boone 6o. Deposit Bank 

Established 1886. 

Burlington, Kentucky. 




Let's Stop "Kidding" Ourselves 

IT'S ALWAYS BEST TO FACE 
THE FUTURE SQUARELY! 

We are doing thi's and have greatly reduced 
prices on all 

Suits and Overcoats 

For Me^, Young Men and Boys. 

Quality and service have build our business, an(| 
we will take care of your wants at a great sav- 
ing to you. 

We carry a complete line of Sweater Coats 
and Corduroy Coats and Pants. 




605 Madison Avenue, 

Covington, Kentucky 




Lumber Pr ices Hav e Come Down! 

We have recently put in a stock of Flooring, Ceil. 
ing, and other dressed lumber on a low cost basis, and 
this, with our stock of framing and rough lumber, both 
pine and hardwood, enables us to make a very attrac- 
tive proposition to cash buyers. 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUILD. 

If you are looking for a chance to save money on 
lumjber, come and see us. 

EDGETT & FULTON LUMBERmT 

Incorporated • 

219 Crescent Ave. - - Erlanger, KjA 



I ! 






I i 



I 



Ml|i|. 



,««+•«♦♦*♦«««*«♦»♦•«*•»♦♦« *♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 

Subscribe for the Recorder. 
Try It One Year - You'll Like 
Only $1 50 the Year 

tJOTtn I oil to kt«*«<J All Thv AJn In Mil«l««| 






HBjBSJBHBHBjBJBJBjHHHHSJI |^H^HHHnBBJSjHBjSJBflSjBHBSJHBB|HSJHBflHBjBB9BaB 




k 



"^ 



SOON ECO. RECORDER 

PUKl.IHHKP KVKKY THURSDAY 
*N. E. KIDOELL, Publisher. 




50 good cigarettes 
for 10c from 
one sack of 

GENUINE 



*£nteted t\x the Post* fflce in Burling 

, ;on. Ky.. tu y< •(■oikI-cIhbs .Mail 

j SOLICITING AID 

lady Under Arrest for Raising 
Amounts Subsoribed. 

Some time fgo a lady came into 
town soliciting aid for a charity 
supposed to be located in Louis- 
ville. This lady would ask for 
^contributions and would show a 
list of names of prominent people 
with different amounts set op- 
posite their nanvs, which the lady 
■would state had be?n contribut- 
ed 5 try uAise parties. If a person 
contributed $1.00 she would change 
the amount to $10.00 for the pur- 
pose of getting othprs to sub- 
scribe similar jfmounts. One man 
in Burlington gave her $1.00 ami 
she changed it to $5.00. She went 
into one bank in Burlington and 
told them that the- other bank 
;had given her $10.00 when in fact 
r.othing had been subscribed. 

The same scheme was worked ir 
Florerce. She appeared in Walton 
Morday, ar.d was attempting to 
work the same scheme. The banks 
had been notified to h> on the While Oswald Garrison Villard, 
look out for this party,, and the an admitted pacifist, who was born ' 
authorities were notified and ai™ Germany March 13, 1872, was 

speaking before the Woman's! 
City Club in Cincinnati, last Sat- 
urday, and while women scream- 
ed from second story windows 
for police a group of" men, shout 



I A CHILD CAN RUN A SILENT ALAMO FARlVfl 
ELECTRIC POWER AND LIGHT PLANT. 
THIS PLANT TAKES CARE OF ITSELF 
AT A COST OF 3c PER DAY. 



BU 




DURHAM 

TOBACCO 



WF/ 



Wreck Club Door. 



warrant issued. Deputv Sheriff 
Harold Conner went at one? to 
to make the arrest hut the ladv 
*ad left in .an automobile, eoin'o- 
south, before he got there Her 
name is supposed to be Maude 
Sterr.bsrg, and eh» is supposed to 
be soliciting funds for the Volun- 
teers of America. 
_ The authorities alor.* the Le'x- 
lrgton pike were notified to be 
'JJL * J° ok out for this lady, and 
fe' 10 P«-> Monday night the 

Sheriff Conner, saying he had the 
party under arrest. 

The Sheriff and Deputv left at 
thel Jr °r Tg(ttOWa »°<i brou R h 
fmn!tf y *'J ld ^ P Dt,e m»n. who was 
implicated with her, to Burlington 
£ten they waived examination for 
their appearance before the next 
April grand jury. Then- bonds were 
fixed at $2,000 and $1,000 resect- 



jlllUUllll*- 



llf 



FARM BUREAU 

PRECINCT MEETINGS. 

_Geoffrey Morgan, Secretary State 
Farm Bureau Federation, will be 
the principal speaker at the follow- 
ing precinct meetings of the Farm 
Bureau: 

.Petersburg Monday afternoon 1 :30 

7-Sn" R?k ; « "it™? Mond »y night «t 
*««? ' Ei o,\ 2 li Union Tu e8dfty morn- 
ing, )fea§, Feb. 22; Walton, Tues- 
day afternoon, 1:80, Feb. 22; Flor- 
ence Tuesday night 7:30, Feb. 22. 

II you have, ever heard Geoffrey 
Morgan you will this time. If vou 
haven't, you will want to. 

Owners of 423 dogs, in Boone 
r county have not procured the 
necessary license tags. The grand 
jury will indict all who fail to take 
out the dog licenses as requirea 
'-'In one county in this state the 
1 grand jury indicted over 1200 who 
dfeiled to comply with this law. 
The' lowest fine for a failure to 
take out the license" is $19.20. 

"Feed your own'' may become a 
special appeal slogan to commun- 
ities in which farmers of foreign 
birth predominate A method will 
be worked out whereby corn rais- 
ed by Bohemian farnvrs will go 
to Bohemia, that raised by Polish 
farmers to Poland and ho on. 

""" ™^^~ 
The wife of Elmore Adams, who 
died in Covington, was buried in 
Belleview cemetery, last Thursday 



,.. Uao r o Adam s » u aui — Of — A r llG 

• jAdams, who was born and reared 

In Boone, county ufitil a few 

J rears ago, when he 1 moved to Cov- 
ngton 

. Mrs. Margaret rioshell died at 
ber home in Cincinnati, last Sun- 
day and was buried in the old 
cemetery at Huilin^ton Wedne*- 
•day at noon. Mrs Hoshell was the 
_ -Wile Of Willard Hoshell. who died 
several years ago. 

Mr. -and Mrs. Seh.ll, <>f 'In- Dixie 

''fhwaj, near Ft. Mitchell, wen.' 

•guest* of" W. C. Weaver .and 

_*», a few^ hours last Sunday 

Bteraoon Mrs. Schill is a daugh- 
ter oi the late Mack Aylor, many 
' »rs ago a citizen of thiscoun- 



mg "Let's go through p' stormed 
the doors of the Villard meeting, 
broke through a glass door that 
had been barred against them, I 
and struggled in the wreckage of 
the glass against officials and 
members of the City Club who 
blocked their way, as they de- 
manded to get in "and hear Vil- 
lard.'' - 

A rinf. call, sent te — '»e head- 1 
quarter^ as the foremost of the' 
itvaders broke thru the door, 1 
brought the police, who forced 
their way into the center of the 
struggling mass and quelled the 
disturbar.ee, hut not until more 
thar a dozen of the men had 
forced their way into the ante- 
room leading into the main aud- 
itorium. 

The audience, which was com- 
posed almost entirely of promi- 
rent club women and men. was 
throwr into confusion when the! 
glass door crashed under the im- 1 
pact from the outside and the! 
doorway framed the foremost of 1 
the advancing croup shouting 
that they wanted to "get in.' 

One arrest, was made bv police 
2* * re8u lt of the attack. Her- 
bert Seal, 23 years old, 4642 Win- 
ton road, an ex-ma riae and broth- 
er of Mhx Seal, one ofth^ first 
Cincinnati marines to die in ac- 
tion during the war, was arrest- 
ed on a charge of assault and 
battery, filed by Attorney G»y W 
Mallon, who was bruised and cov- 
ered with blood during the strug 

As soon as Seal was placed in 
the police patrol, E. W. Edwards, 
Cincinnati manufacturer, Chairman 
of the Rapid Transit Commission, 
boarded the patrol a/.d announc- 
ed he would go to headquarters 
and sign Seal's bond. 

Meanwhile, more than 1,000 per- 
sons who had assembled in the 
streets outside of the clubrooms, 
began to show signs of restless- 
ness and the- space in front of 
the buildi'ig was cleared by police, 
ami a detail of police "was placed 
o ) guard at the entrance of the 
building, 

The American Legion and other 
or g a n iz at i on s in Cincinnati h.ui 
protested against Villard being 
permuted t o speakin Cinci nnati.- 
anJ no public halT could be rent- 
ed for that purpose. 

Ctrclnnati, according to reports, 
Contains a large number of pro- 
Girmais, some of whom are h*'r 
wealthiest and most prominent clt 
i/.e is. 



Home is the place for comfort. Electrify your Home. 
Give the family the bright lights and keep them happy 
Electrify your home for safety keep the dangerous open- 
flame lights from your buildings. Electric Lights are " 
clean and dependable, and safe anywhere. 

In selecting a Farm Lighting Plant be aware of 'tee 
siz* you are b";«ng. There case some three-quarter kw 
units for practically the same price as a four kw plant- 
Investigate this matter carefully before placing your or- 
der. / 

Take into consideration that the SILENT o*LAMO> 
does' not have rohave any extra expense to install it. You 
can set this little motor down anywhere you wish, hook 
the wires on and the plant is installed. 

The SILENT ALAMO is the cheapest hand you can 
employ on your plack. The plant will light every build- 
ing around your home, and do much other hard work 
for the family. 

Don't neglect the pleasure and convenience that you 
owe yourself and family by placing: your order for the 
SILENT ALAMO. * 

W. L. KIRKPATRICK 

Burlingtoov, Kentucky. 



Public Sale! 



I will sell at public sale on the Price 
Pike, 1 mile north of Florence, Ky„ . 

Friday, February 25th, 1921 

The Following Property: 

600 Shocks of Fodder in field. 
30 tons Timothy Hay in barn. 
5 N Stacks of Hay. 
Pair fine 6 year-old Mares. 
Good Work Horse. 

Terms of Sale. < 

A credit of six months will be given, purchaser 
to give note with approved security, to be executed 
payable at Erlanger Deposit Bank, Erlanger, Ky. 

T. IS. Wallace. 

Sale will begin at 2 p. m. 



m 



tf 




Public Sale! 



PRAYERS 

—AND- 

SPRAYING MATERIAL 

The first or dormant spraying of the fruit trees is the. 
most important, yet often ignored by those who have 
fruit trees on the farms. Decrease of crops aud 'loss 
of money is|the price of this neglect. "Whether ymi 
have a few or a hundred trees you cannot afford to 
ignore the spray. , 

S O .A. LI CIDE 

THE COMPLETE DORMANT SPRAY" 

L I M E ' -S U L'P H U R 

-AND- 

LIME SULPHUR SOLUTION 

in small or large quantities. Farm Bureaus, Oranges, 
and Farm Unions will find it to i their advantage to 
g«t our prices before letting their contracts. 
WRITE TO DEPARTMENT B 



k 




C Jf. York, of the Gunpowder 
etghborhood, has been spending 
few day* with relatives in Bur- 
fcgtoo. : 

Louisa Rtddoil spent u few 
iftt week with Mrs Monette 
In Brlanysr 




HUMP 



Jew Aiiphin uifc and daughter, 
Mary, were visiting friends in Cov- 
ir.gton, the first o* the w«- -k 

Ishmuel Sisaot. was the guf.'st of 
Raymor.d Sisson, Sunday. 

Several of th» young people at- 
tended the dunce at Big Bone, 
Saturday night 

Mrs. Jess Allphin and daughter 
Mary, were guests of J M H.iki-r 
and family, Sunday 

Klmer Sutton ruid his tohaeeo 
trucked to the Covlajton market 
laat Wednesday and received j 
gwod price 

Oner Porter after » hi.«v«. *,t n 

mumps, ib al,l» to be out again 



I will offer at public auction it my farm, 2 miles east of Un- 
• ion, and 1 1-2 nailes northwest of Sichwood, Boone 
County, Ky., on Saturday, 

Feb. 26, 192 1 

The Following Property, to wit : 
1 1200 pound 11 year old black horse, good worker, ladv broke. 
1 11-year old sorrell mare good worker and driver, 

1 5-year old Jersey cow, rich milker, giving 2 irallons a day. 
t 4-year old J-ts-j & Gurnsey giving 1 gal, daily, fre*h in April. 

2 horse wagon, box bed. 2 horse cultivator Buggy. McCor- 

mack mower good as new. Hay rake. Hay frame. Marker. 
1 horse booster com drill with fertilizer attachment. Oliver E 
turning plow. Jointer. Double shovel plow. Leather tug har- 
ness. Check lines. 2 leather collars. 2 bridles. Set good 
buggy harness. Paris green blower, two row,, new. ; Share 
Farmers Telephone stock with box. One-half interest in Be- 
mis Tobacco Setter, only set 8 acres. Sharpless cream separa- 
rator. Lard press. 2 Horse spring wagon. Wood stove. 
Pitch forks. Hoes. Trace chains and other 'articles. 
5 BUSH ELLS SENSATIOH POTATOES 

TERMS MAfcB KNOWN^ON DAY OF SALE 



WE ARE AGENT8 FOR 

HUDSON SPRAYERS 

Thw most dependable and satisfactory line of sprayers 
on the market. We can supply your needs of .any 
kind or description from tiny hand Sprayers to large 
■soter driven ones— Come in and See Our Line. 



SEEDS.THAT GROW 

Timothy. Red Clover, Alfalfa, Blue Grass, Red Top, 
Sweet Clover, Northern Seed Oats-whit, or miieiJLjfci: 
All High Tested seed- Get Our Prices 
Before You Buy. • ' 



♦ 






Northern Kentucky's I k^>' 



LEADING GROCERS 
SEEDSMEN. 



Sale to begin at 12:30 sharp 



J. D. Woolery, 



ritfmra 



Long Distance Phone. S. 1855 and S. 1856 s 
Establish** 1863. 

Ill 



♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦* »e*e*eee***e«+**ee««**e*«* 

DO YOU TAKE THE RECORDER? 

If' Not Try It One ysar. 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦•♦♦« ♦♦♦eee»ee*ee»es»eee*e»eee+ 



■*■ 



wmm—mmmm 



m 



■■■■■■■■■■ 



■Pi 



\ 



COUNTY RECORDER 






I 




"Trade Where They All Trade." 



Attention, Mr. FARMER! 

Do you want to sa^ye money these times when your crops are not bringing as 
much as they should? We anticipate every decline In price. We do not wait 
to be driven to it. . If prices decline at the source of supply, we immediately put 
our prices down, whether we have large stock or small. Read these : 



H. & E. or Jack Frost pure canef Tf ft A 
granulated sugar, per cyrt ^ / . UU 

1501b. Bag Fancy White Mich i- O CK 
gan Potatoes,. Z. J 

100 lb. Bag Fancy Hand Picked 
Nary Bean*. . 

100 lb. Half BU. 

Lake Herring 

Clean Easy Soap 

(60 to box) per box 

6-Gal. Can Fancy Sorghum 

or New Orleans Molasses 

100 lb. Bag Fansy 

Head Rice ^ 



4.90 
7,50 
2.60 
4.00 
6.00 



G. & D. Special Coffee, l 

Per pound 

Gee Whiz Coffee, 

Per pound • .,. 

Golden Blend Coffee, 

Per pound 

G. & D. Special Tea, 
Per pound 

Icy Hot Tea. 

Per pound 

Bulk Cocoa, 

Per pound ' 

\ 4 Dba. Coffee or Cocoa sent postpaid . 2 lbs of 
Tea nent postpaid at these prices. 



KANSAS GREAM or ARCADE FLOUR- guaranteed the best on the market— you can 
buy cheaper flour but quality tells. " <T 1 1 ft ft 

Barrel in wood, $12.00; Barrel in 98-1 b. Cotton Bags $\ | . JU 



-If you have not joined our Pure Bred Poultry Register you should do so at 'once. 

This includes turkeys, ducks, geese and chickens. 

Send in your list, today. 



Clover Seed, Alfalfa, Timotby, Alsike, Blue Grass, Red Top. 

Agents for Jareckiz Fertilizer. 



All high grade tested. 




GROCERIES. FL OUR SEEDS. MEDICINES 
/9-2IP/KEST. /8-20W.7I" ST. 



WHOLESALE— "Covington's Largest Seed and Grocery House"- RETAIL 

Covington, Kentucky. 

Phones South 338 and 336. 

United State* Wheat Director License No. 030057- Y. 

U. S. Food Administration License No. Gel 770: 




PUBLIC SALE. 

i 

I will of fer at public sale on the J. J. Steph- 
ens farm, about 3 miles east of Rabbit Hash; 
Boone county, Kentupky, on 

Tuesday, Feb. 22, '2 1 

The Following: Property: 

Bay Horse 6-years old, sound and a good worker, Black Horse 10-years 
old, 2 fresh Cows, 10 65-pound Shoats, 200 bus. Corn in crib, 2 1-2 tons 
Timothy Hay-baled, 2 tons Alfalfa Hay-baled, Road Wagon, Disc Har- 
row; Oliver Chilled Plow,' Side Hill Plow, Single Plow, Cream Separator, 
set Work Harness, Check Lines, Collars and Bridles, 2 Water Barrels, 
Hoes, Shovels, Forks, Singletrees, Stretchers, and lot Household Furniture. 



TERMS OF SALE. 

Sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on sums over $10.00 a credit of § months 
will be given, purchaser to execute note with approved security, payable at 
Citizens Deposit Bank, Grant, Ky. 

HOLMES & SMITH. 

Sale to begin at 12 o'clock. B. C. KIRTLEY, Auctioneer 



♦ i LAID FOR SALE. 

* « 

I will sell at public auctio n on 
the premises, 051 

Saturday, Feb. 26th, 1921 

The Following Real Estate: 

Bounded on the west by the lands 
of John Conrad ; on the north by 
the lands of E. I. Rouse ; on the 
south by the lands of John Con* 
rad, and -contains 4 % acres more! 
or less, and being the land owned 
by ^Jasper Manin at the time of 
his death. 

Terms— Ode.half cash, balance 
due (Aug. 1st, 1921, with 6 per 
cent interest from date. 
E. MANNIN, Admr. 

Subscribe (or the RB 3RDBR 

Mm. Cr.nd.lt (low.) T«lb How Sh* 
Stopped Chicken Loss** 

"l*>t 'l*in- rM-»lll-il«llinirl>*l>v ihkk< WWi 
I'll known about K«i-Mi;ii. I «-l..rr With jtul <«| 
Urttlw-kWTkiUftltwtrnMul rata. Tfc-v won't 
(«« tbteyt'ar a hali he, I'll lw>t " tUl .'uuy U gnu. 
■Ainu su.i kUi liw JV, 4V . |l IS 
tela ted IWIMUtd u- 

CalUy A PsUil. B«tltfkf(*f», It*. 



3KXSX5-3KXSK3J! 



LONG and SHORT 



When you are long on funds you 'need a strong 
bank to protect your deposits. 

When you are short on funds you need a strong 

bank where you can get the accommodation 

of a loan with reasonable security. 

'Become a customer of this Bank and you are fully 
PROTECTED BOTH WAYS. 

The Largest Capital and Surplus in the county, 
therefore the greatest security to depositors. 

CAPITAL A SURPLUS 150,000.00. 

Total Resources over On. Half Million Dollars. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 

W. L. ». ROUSE, rr.md.ni. NELL H. MARTIN, A..t. CssSSSS. 
A B. RENAKER, Cathisr. LEWIS C. BEEMON, Asst. CssSSftff, 

Hi 



. lMgTMg 'ltull lrAtfeBie e fc nT -beTTurtx it-* 



Don't Worry 



Be Happy 



Green's 

CASH STORE 



-is- 



In Tune With the Times 

The day of big expenses on War Time Prices and Prdfits is 
past, for merchants as well as farmers, and we have ad- 
justed our business to meet present day conditions. 

We cheerfully take our losses on any merchandise in stock 
when wholesale prices dropped. 

We are receiving, almost daily, shipments of NEW GOODS. 
I bought at today's lower prices- and all are being sold on close 

margins of profits^ depending on increased volumn of business 

TO JUSTIFY OUR ACTION. 
I The changes 1 recently made in our store room saves one-third 

of our heat and light expenses; we have one-third less floor to 

sweep, we have as much shelving as before, our Stocks are 
| more compact and easier to sell from, and our rent is lower. 
I We are therefore happy because these conditions reduce our 

running expense and enables us to operate on smaller profits. 

WE WILL CONTINUE TO CABBY • 

good selections in all lines we have been carrying. 
Dry Goods, Notions, Ladiea' Ready-to-wear Garments, 
Hosiery and Underwear for all, Rugs, Carpets, 
Matting, Linoleum, Window Shades, 

Draperies, Men's Underwear, Etc. 
We hereby extend to the citizens of Boone County an invita- 
tion to call and see our New. Store and inspect our splendid 
values in all lines. ' You'll know the war is over when you see 
OUR LOWER PRICES. 

Green's Cash Store 

/ 

' — m 

Where Your Money Buys More - 



Farm Bureau'Notes. 



" The Farm Bureau officers ar* 
learning that the greatest .con- 
structive work as Well as ability 
to serve every member, come* 
from the precinct as a unit, rath- 1 
er than the county as a whole. 



The Executive Committeemen 
are calling precinct meetings fn 
their respective precincts. Those 
meetings are more than a success 
and tend to give every precinct 
equal service Do you need one in 
your precioet^ — 

♦♦♦♦ 

The Boone County Farnt- Bureauv- 
acting in accordance with all the 
other Farm Bureaus in the coun- 
try, are sending all agents for 
fertilizer factories home, telling 
them to come back with a price 
more nearly that of other com- 
modities, and we will have a big 
order, but not until then. You wilt 
see cheaper fertiliser presently. 



The Farm Bureau is enjoying 
the greatest activities of its young, 
life. Every day brings about new 
duties. 



Our whole aim is to serve. Our 
clover and grass seed orders for 
this season to date totals 565- 
oushels. 



Our head<iuar-tex&_are_beComing 
a veritahje* exchange for pure- 
bred and Weeding livestock— even 
unto poultry. 



The Farm Bcreau is laying out 
fertilizer demonstrations on sev- 
eral pikes in th? county Don : t 
you think a series of plots treat- 
ed with different combinations of 
fertilizer would be of great value 
in your community ? 

♦♦♦♦ 

On the last day of January the 

Minnesota Farm Bureau Federa- 

i lion reported a membership of 

J 51,000. This is an increase of 10,000* 

memi ers in 90 days. 

♦*♦♦ 

Mr. Gray Silver, Washington 
Representative* of the American- 
Farm- Bureau Federation, reports. 
that the Gronna Bill" to regulate 
the packers has passed the Senate. 



Rising Sun, 



Indiana. 



We are offering some remarkable values in our Music Depart- 
ment— Talking Machines and Records. 



You Get Quality for Your 
* Money at 

Brothers and Leid y, 

LIMABURG, KY. 

GROCERIES 

Golden Cup Coffee, 35c per lb. 3 lbs $1.00 

Peaches,' 1 lb. 14. ox. can, 45 c 

Pineapple, 1 lb. 14 oz. can, 45 c 

Fancy Cream Cheese, per lb 38c 

Prunes, ! . . 19c 

Peeled Peaches, 27c 

Apricots, , 35c 

Pearl Meal 12* lbs., 35,. 

New Sorghum Molasses, per gallon, 85c 

New Orleans Molasses, per gallon .^. 85c 

Clean Easy Soap. 6 Bars for, 25c 

Mascot Soab, 6 Bars for, , 25c 

DRY GOODS 

Blue Work Shirts, $1 .50 Reduced To 95c 

Men's Heavy Overall $3.25 Reduced To' $1.95 

Meii^s Wool^Shuts, all colors, $3.25 reduced to. $2.75 
Men's Khaki 1 piece overalls $4.75 reduced to. $3.50 

Heavy Cotton Gloves, 20c 

Bleached and Unbleached Sheeting _____ — 

240 Weight Denim, per yard, :7^~777T25c 

Washable Dress Ginghams, 40c yd- reduced to ... 19c 
Light & Dark Percales, 35c per yd reduced to 1 7c-19c 
Apron Ginghams. 35c per yard reduced to ....... . 15c 

Calico's, 30c per yard reduced to, 14c 

Pressed Felt Boots, m $4.50 

Lace Felt Boots, , $6.25 

All Rubber Arties, $2.75 

All Minds Of Feed Also Stock and Poultry Tonics. 

WE CARRY AS LARGE UNE OF 

Rubber Goods, Shoes, Dry Goods, 
Hardware, Groceries, Feed. 

as any store in Boone County. 
JUUN0US YOUR BUTTER indi lot. IUY AT HOJJtf 

BROTHERS & LEIDY 

Limaburg, Ky. 



The farmers of «. Kentucky havj 
not yet fully realized what the 
new freight rate means to them. 
If the railroads had secured the' 
rates they askpd for, the annual 
charge in the U. S. would be over 
$400,000,000 more than it will be 
in 1921. The organized farmers and 
shippers of the country »'ereabU> 
to force reduction in the valua» 
tion of the railroads $1,700,009,000. 
More than one half the freight 
charges falls upon the farmers. 



If the farmers of the country 
had not been organized and prop- 
erly financed, the AVERAGE far- 
mer would have in 1921, paid over 
$30.00 more freight than he will 
have to pay. This saving alone 
will pay for live year's annual' 
Farm Bureau dues at $6 per vear. 



After a ten day debate on Jan. 
14, the Senate passed the Wads- 
worth Bill, which authorizes and 
directs the use , of the Muscle 
i Shoals Nitrate Plant for the pro r 
|duetion of fertilizer. It should* be- 
| understood that the opponents of 
j the farmers in this proposition 
1 Were the American Cyanamide Oo^i 
j the Chilean Nitrate monoply, the. 
I fertilizer combine and the great 
I by-products interests, including the 
\\j. S. Steel Corporation. 



If all the Farm Bureau members 
of the country were to march 
down the main street of your 
town at the rate of 5,000 a day, 
it would take the line ten months 
to pass the postoffice. 



Indiana News. 

Lawrenceburg Press. 

Miss Ruth Kirtley, who went? to 
a Cincinnati hospitati svecymueh, 
improved in health. 

. +++ 

John B. Waltoii, of near Burling* 
ton, Ky., was here to visit his un- 
cle, Bob Carver, and friends Mon- 
day night. 

+++ 

B. B. Grant, of Burlington, By£ 
was in Lawrenceburg last Satur- 
day and while in 'the city called i 
at the Press- office and arrange** 
for the weekly visits of the Pressj. 
Mr. Grant's wife was formerly, 
Miss Iva Barrott of Lawrenceburg— 

The Lawrenceburg Overall Man-* 
ufacturing Company, of which*. 
Kerry Schraarr was manager, had' 
discortinued business, andl 

machinesJuw£._l*H*ir-snTpped W 
CHKinnati. Established three veers 
ago, this industry his been oper- 
ated continuously, giving steady 
employment to about 35 girls at 
good wages. The factorv was lo- 
cated in what was formerly one 
of the Rossville warehouses. 

The man who recovers first from 
the gloom of his bad busii-ess,or 
poor wages, or whatever it was 
that hit him, is the ma,: who is 
gong to hove the most Drosper- 
ity ii the better times that are 
on their way, that are on their 
way Just a« sure as the sunc©mes~ 
up and out of the east eV« 
morning. He is going to have U 
most prosperity because* his effoi 
will stretch over a larger perta 
than the fellow who slouch*** 
gloomily until the good times ar» 
so apparent that thev hit hJds' 
In the nose ^7 



Mrs Bernard Gaines euU'rtain^M 
Sd atM>ut I went v of her irkM 
last Thurwluv e\enlu 
Ughtful program hy Mr, 
Cumpl>«*ll-Martlii, soloist, ii. 
ma flrell, the hounr guest si; 
Gain**, plant*!, and HIS, sf 
Krsylieh. who ha* chares at 
prSMio.i elaa.*. , u t j^ ' 
was rendsr.-,!, mlhrf mh ^\ 
J(<* luncheon was sr r vo4. 






i^^^E&^r 1 I^BHH^B^HHHHHH&l^^ra^^H^^nnl^^^HHBflJ^^^^HflHBlHHU HHa^^HH^^^^H 



wmm 



-"• , 



BUONE COUNTY. XECOUDER 



Mrs. Marce Kkldell is visiting 
W T Kkldill ami wife, of Dayton, 
Ohio. , 

Mi&v^* Wilelln and Mary Banco, 
©f Walton, visit id relatives here 
Saturday and Sunday. 



Miss Artie Houston, of Coving- 
tor:, was the gin si of her aunt, 
Mrs. W. C. Weaver, last week* 



Miss Mary and brother Clifton 
Roberts, of \\ alton, spent the 
week-o.'iJ with M. U, Martiu and 
Wife, 

Dol]»ha Sobret* and Mrs. B. H. 
MjcCord, hold their crop of 4180 
pounds at the Kenton loose leaf 
last week at an average of 2lc. 

B. H Riley, Newton Sullivan. Jr., 
and Miss Nell Martin spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. T. J, Mal- 
k»v \i: Bullittsville neighborhood 



B. T. Kelly returned last Satur- 
day morning from Carrollion. Ky.. 
where he attended the funeral of 
Mrs. Walter Kelly, his sister-iu- 
law. 

Mrs. Lizzie Miller and Miss Mur- 
phy, of Big Bone, spent the week 
«*nd with Mrs. Miller's sons Chas. 
and Russell Miller. Mrs. Chas. Mil- 
ler has been (juite ill for several 
days. 



No sales were held by the warc- 
houses in Walton, last >veifk on ac 
count of the sickness nl one of 
the buyers, who purchases the 
greater part of the tobacco sold 
on those floors. 



Mrs. C. N. Bradshaw. of Ludlow, 
in renewing her subscription to 
the Recorder, writes: "It is jusl 
like getting a letter from home to 
get tlu* Recorder. I was r aised at 
.*. BulliUsvil'e. and an a daughter 
of Charles Helm.'' 



Prank Michels, of near th" Five 
Mile Rouse, or: th? Dixie Highway, 
has a sale advertised in this is- 
sue consisting of 29 good milch 
cows as well as other stock, feed 
and farming tools. Mr. Michels 
will move to Camp Dennison, O., 
aboutM arch 1st. 



»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 

• ♦ 

» PETERSBURG. ♦ 

• ♦ 

The sick of the town are im- 
proving. 

The town trucks are very busy 
hauling the farmers tobacco crops 
io the markets 

The river is rising and we may 
yet have high water before it 
oeeomes stationary. 

Our local carpejKrrs have a lot 
of work to do as soon as the 
weather will permit. 

Mrs \V T. Evans, of Covington, 
was here last Saturday shaking 
hands with her friends. 

I will insure that while pass- 
ing over the streets in Pete you 
will rot be choked by the dust. 

Quite a stir prevailed here last 
Saturday when Sheriff Conner, of 
Burlirgton, came down and ar- 
rested a young soldier and lady 
friend. * 

Bolivar Shinkle and Dolpha Se- 
iner will move from town into 
the country the first of March 
to try their hand raising crops 
this season. 

Our efficient P. M. Miss Ethel 
u turgeon, and her Deputy Miss 
Henrietta Qeisler, can handle the 
mail much faster since moving in- 
to the new office. 

Tandy Deck has 'returned to his 
home after spending five months 
in St. Petersburg, Florida H" said 
they had many kind of vegeta- 
bles ready for the table when he 
le£L__^ 



FLORENCE. 



Mrs. Anna Clore, of Belleview, 
widow of the late Perry Clore, 
died at her residence Sunday of 
last week. Mrs. Clore had been in 
poor jhealth for some time hn>1 
was a patient sufferer. She wa9 
laid to rest beside her husband in 
Belleview cemetery Tuesday af- 
ternoon. 



Chas. A. Fulton, of Florence, one 
of the Recorder's subscribers of 
lefng standing, was in Burlington, 
last Saturday evening, and had 
his subscription advanced another 
year. Mr. Fulton is one of the 
Florence boys who chose his pro- 
fession and went out into the 
world and made good, it is a 
pleasure to state. 



The second of the series of 
articles on the Income Tax law as 
it "^lies to farmers, which "are 
written by Maurice F. Lyons, Fed- 
eral Attorney atid Income Tax ex- 
Bert of Covington, Ky., is pub- 
ahed in this issue. Farmers 
should familiarize themselves with 
these articles, as by so doing they 
will have no trouble making out 
their income report. 



Miss Alma Swibold spent Sunday 
with Lucille Scott. 

Hugh Carey spent last Thursday 
with Jerry Conrad and family. 

Miss Hannah Oelsner spent last 
Sunday with Misa Bridget Carey. 

Paul Renaker spent the week- 
end with relatives at Cynthiana. 

Mrs. Minnie Kluemper was the 
Monday guest of Mrs. S. n. Ay- 
lor. • 

Mrs. Kd. Sydnor is visiting Mr. 
and Mr*. J- Bradley Say re, of Cov- 
ington. 

Jars, .'.tita Eliza Bradford was 
the week-end guest of Aurt Dine 
Snyder. 

Shelby Aylor ar.d wife are > the 
proud parei ts of a ba-iy girl 3ii ce 
Sunday. 

N. H Rudicill and wife, of Cov- 
ington, spent Sunday with Sam 
Hambrick and family. 

Miss Marie Jettera entertained 
Misses Nettie, Nora and Fannie 
Long with a theatre party Sat- 
urday. 

Mrs. Arnold Bailors entertained 
Ned Hull, of Da^vtstown. O, ana 
Miss Anna Stretch, of Newport, 
one day last week. 

Mrs. Elbert I.ipp and Mrs Phil 
Huffman, of Covington, were tho 
guests of J G. Renaker and wife, 
one day lust w eek 1 . 

Misses Eva and Christina Rena- 
ker entertained Witford Mitchell, 
of Rebrof. rind Milt Caldwell, of 
Berry, Ky., Snuday 



The following is taken from 
the Courier-Journal of the 9th 
inst ; 

"Dr. Horace Grant left $10,000 to 
Dr. Ousley Grant, a son, by his 
will, probated in the county court 
yesterday, and the remainder of 
his estate to his widow, Mrs. Lelia 
E. O. Grant. The estate is in real 
estate valued at $16,000, and per- 
sonal property of an estimated 
Value of $38,000. >' I 



RABBIT HASH. 



Only six states in the Union 
avow have no representation in 
the American Farm Bureau Fed- 
eration. .Of these, three will 
probaby vote affiliation at their 
annual meeting in February. The 
other three have no state" feder- 
ations, but are in the process of 
organization. The American Farm 
Bureau Federation by June 1st 
will probably include among its 
membership farmers in every stats 
in the union. 

Star ley R. Botts, 38, former well- 
krown resident of Covington, di^d 
Sar Bernardino, Cal The body 
as shipprj to Covirgton and 



Sar Bernardino, Cal The body 
shipprj to Covirgton and 
taker, to the horn" if his sister, 
Mrs. R. Bavl" Clutehinson, SlU 
Scott street. 

The funeral was h«!d last Thurs- 
day in Covirgton Burial in Belle- 
view cemetery He was the sor. 
of Harry and Eva Botts, both of 



whom died si'U'riil yrars ago — Tie" 
was born in Belleview, this coun- 
ty, where h" resided u.itil about 
fifteen years ago 



The superintendent of highways 
in Dearborn county, Indiana, has 
£iven notice that wh»n the r roH£ 
is coming out of the ground, or 
when the roads are in a soil con- 
dition, the load limit for tracks 
and wagons, \<>r three inch, tire. 
or less is 2,500 pounds, for three 
it© four inch tire 3,000 pounds, I- 
inoh to' 5-iiicii tire 3,500 pounds, 
and for 5-ineh tire and over, is 
3,800 pounds. The above load lim- 
its inolude driver and vehicle. The 
"officials of Indiana are trying to 
{protect their road*. 



Albert Clore was in the city 
last week. 

Chas. Craig put a new bed on 
his truck last week. 
' The Ladies Aid met with Mrs. 
Lou VaiiNess, Thursday. 

Bessie Myrick was th'.? guest of 
Mrs. Ida Conner, last Sunday. 

Mrs. Ruth Hodges, of New Jer- 
sey, is here visiting her folks. 

C. O. Hem pf ling was in our 
burg a while Thursday evening. 

There is* a vaudeville show at 
the' K. of P. Hall here this week, 

Eugene Wingate. and' wife were 
the Sunday guests of E. M. Hod- 
ges. 

Four crops of tobacco was sent 
down to Madison on the boat last 
Sunday. • 

There has not been any talk 
of making plant beds in this 
neighborhood! 

Wilber Kelly and family, B. W 
Clore and family, spent Sunday 
at Fillmore Kyle's.* 

Mrs. Lizzie Stephens is getting 
along nicely after an operation at 
the (rood Samaritan hospital, two 
weeks ago. 

Cale Ryle took his wife to rue 
hospital last Tuesday to consult a 
specialist about her shoulder, she 
having fell and fractured it. 



GUNPOWDER. 



► ♦♦♦ 



Edward Rouse and family, of 
Cincinnati, visited her gran 



dpair.. 



Enacting the part of a "> 
|eon,>' ostensibly to share 
: reward of ten thousand 
offered for the four 
robbed Morton <* Co 
trout bond brokers, of ifi, . n 
Liberty l«onds and iJUIMi m 

i>re*« company travelers' <<lu 
rtlled two polio Lieutenant* 
{perhaps wounded f. dulls a 
patrolmun Jan Jl, a mini kn 

to Detroh ai. I Cim-itin i-i |» 

im*\ officials at "J a,k 

dr. I 

•600 in Lthwrtv h» 



itOOl 

iii 
dob 
iditi 



in J 

pa 
own 

dor 

w 

II. 

I ..f 

on, 
uiiil 



ents J. \V. Rouse and wife, last 
Sunday. 

Dr. Roller t son and wife, of Ft. 
Thomas, visited Jl F. t'tz and 
wife, lust Sunday. 

Lonhie Tanner, who is an ex- 
pert at broom making, has made 
about fifteen brooms this winter. 

Mrs. Mints Ctz ist he first on our 

Ridge to report a brood of lit- 

j tie chicks out of 16 eggs She has 

15 chirks Stir didn't expect tiny 

more, from I fiat hatch 

Cam Kennedy and Esrfl Rouse 
sen! I heir tohucco Io (ilencoe '.o 
be sold on the loose leaf mar- 
Thr grower* are patronising about 
all the markets in Ihe Slate, 

J. P. Tanner, our mail carrier, 

While on bis route on" day Inst 
wrrk, had trouble getting around, 
Mis horse i ill in n mud hole* and 
he had to gel <>ui bl his rig 
and ashisi bun i,,ii.m i,.. could 
gel out, u h'ich was a i, , ry un- 
I It n mi Job II, we<i1 horse back 
the next <l i\ and was caught hi 
■ hi svj i .mi nod got u ikinjr U(1 

x " he. Iiappi mil iui lU-uounT "I 

I hi- i ihhHi [on mi i hi 

' .1 l einrih '■ 






bl 



" i 111* .Inn 

"H 1 ' in K 

•'"'k .1 |,« I, , tiling l 
imtfcit? M ,| ,|ir 

IB tli In (I i-.l u I. ., 1 1 .. 

i'i«i tire 

U III. I I 
till !• Ml |, ..,*,■■ | fjf. 




Successors to 

C. W. Myers 

Florence, Ky. 

We are most grateful for the appreciation shown and express- 
ed by the people of this county and surrounding for the qual- 
ity of goods, prices and service they are getting at this store. 
QUALITY— is the most important thing to consider in buy- 
ing Groceries, Dry Goods, Shoes, in fact, most any mdse. 
PRICES— as we are buying in large quantities, discounting 
our bills, hauling the goods in our own truck and adding a 
small margin for our services, it enables our patrons to par- 
chase goods at the lowest possible prices. 
SERVICE — we e^e aiming to have everything that you need 
if not, we will get it on short notice. It is our greatest desire 
to have you satisfied with every article purchased at this 
store, or we will make any corrections cheerfully — that is our 
protection, and the above are your advantages in dealing with 
this store. 

Watch Us Grow. Thank You 



GROCERIES 



-Pure Granulated Sugar 
10 pounds 



78c 



Schultze's Bread 

Large Loaf, 14c 

FINE TABLE HEAL 



9c 



4 lbs. 10c 



TELEPHONE FLOUR 

12* lb. Sack ...73c 24* lb. Sack. ...$1.45 



COFFEE 



Diamond Brand, lb. 24c 
Diamond Brand B, lb. 29c 
Diamond Brand C A., 34c 



Jersey Corn Flakes 
package 

BLUE ROSE RICE. . 
7c lb. 3 lbs 

Macaroni & Spaghetti 
13c lb; 2 for 



10c 

20c 
25c 



Websters Cove Oys- 
ters 18c- 2 cans . .. . 



35c 



Kayro Syrup OCn 

H lb. can 13c, 2 for L JU 

Lake Hering, lb. 9c QC A 

io lbs OuC 

PEANUT BUTTER, pound, 1 6c 
Large Prunes, pound 21c 



HEEKINS BAKING POWDER 

(contains no alumn) 
For the purpose of advertising this Raking Powder, we will sell 
for a limited time, the regular 10c can 

2 eans for 10c 



APPLES -Roman Beauty, lb. 6*c; 1 lbs 60c 

Grapefruit, each 8c; 2 for .-> 15c 

Oranges, pe» dozen 35c 



Palmolive Soap 



Werk's Tag Soap Oflf* 

3 bars ZUU bar. 

P. & G. Soap, bars i 7c 

Babbitt's Lye, 13c can, 2 for- 25c 



8c 



WE BUY YOUR EGGS, BUTTER C& Meats 



DRV GOODS 

Now it the time to do your sewing. We have a fine aeloction of Calicoes 
Shirting and Dress Gingham*. We handle McCall Patterns. 

Muslin, unbleached, yard 1 3 ' c 

Muslin, bleached, yard . . . ., 1 6c 

O N. T. Thread, a spool 7c 

Dress Ginghams, a yard. 1 7c 

Ladies' Hosiery %.....' 25c 

Fancy Towels, 15c and up 

Bath Towels 25c and up 

Men's Overalls .-. $1-15 

Men's Ohambray Shirts 98c 

Men's Khaki Pants $1.98 

Canvass and Jersey Gloves 1 9c 

FLASHLIGHTS 98c 



WE BUY YOUR EGGS, BUTTER, Meats 



Gent's F urnishing s 



We have a complete line of 
CQLLARS, TIES and HOSIERY. 



Men's "Lion Brand" Shoes $3.45 and up 

Men's "Balj Band" Rubbers 

and Felts • < 



$4.75 



RUBBERS 

We have a full line of rubbers for Misses', Boys' 
Ladies and Men. ■ Prices reduced 



Buy your SEEDS here at Right Prices 



WE BUY YOUR EGGS AND BUTTER 




Suoceiswre to C, W. MYERS 

Florence, - - Kentucky 



2 «TS 9MX^MMM^KX9L9FJK.9tMMM XKMWMX-xXi 

L. T. CLORE, President. HUBERT CONNER, Sao'ty 

J. L. KITE, Agent. 

Breeders Mutual Fire and Lightning 




^INSURANCE COMPANY^^ 



Of Boone County, Ky! 
Inssres Live Stock »8>inst Lobs by Fire or 'Lightning. 
. , WRITE US FOR RATES. 






m 
m 



i*/ 



VUL CANIsZ ING. 

Automobile tubes and tires repaired by the latest 
process, Bring me your old tires and I may be 
able to get several miles more service for you out 

of them. 

Auto Accessories kept in stock. 

Ooodrldge and (Jood year Tires. 

GEORGE PORTER, 

BURLINGTON, KY. 





1 



itv 
3 

to 

to 



T'S a wise idea to place your order for a car now, 
so you won't be disappointed in the spring. 

Phaeton Hudson $2538.00. Seven Passenger Hudson $2538.00 
Coupe Hudson - - $3445. Sedan Hudson - - .- $3574 
Essex Touring $1698. 

Essex Roadster $1698. 

Dodge Touring S139U. 

Dodge Coupe $2035. 

Dodge Sedan $2295. 

Cleveland Tractor $1395. 

The above prices are delivered at your door. 

It you want to place an order for any of these cars, 

call 

B. B. HUME/ Burling: ton, Ky. 



i 

to 

i 

to 

% 

to 

i 

to 
to 

m 



BjBst duality— Fair Prices 

Our constantly increasing business 
proves conclusively that "Best Quaiity 
at Fair Prices'' will win. We test each 
carefully by the latest and most accu- 
rate methods and grind lenses to ex- 
actly suit you. 

Phone South 1746 

DR. N. F. i JiijVjM ,613 Madison Ave. -Covington, Ky 




Why Worry? 

We know the price of Tires has gone sky high. But why wor- 
ry? You can have your old Tires half soled and they will be bet_ 
ter tban new ones>ecause they are guarnteed puncture proof fo 
3,500 miles and they only cost one-half as much. 

M I'll is tile bargain can only be had at 

The Conry Rubber Go. 

J^34 Pike Street, -> Covington, Ky 




A Vault That Can Not Be Robbed. 




If you live within 125 miles of 
Cincinnati you are interested in 
the wonderful Safety Deposit 
Vault at Fourth and Vine Sts., 
built by The Central Trust Co. 
and guaranteed to be^urglar, 
fire, moD^and storm proof. It 
sets in a hole in the ground, 50 
feet deep and is lined with steel 
rails set in glass slag. It is 
guarded night and day. It con- 
tains securities worth millions 
of dollars in the Safest Place in 
the country. 

Don't Keep Your Valuables Where They Can be Stolen. 

Out of town persons can afford to patronize our vault. A box, with 
complete privacy, as low as $3 a year. Write us for particulars. Farm- 
ers, Dairymen, Tobacco Growers, Market Gardeners, etc, this should in- 




The Central Trust Compary 

Fourth and Vine Sts., CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



■^^-0^*^^^^=££^S^^^53=SS^St=g^e«^S5=S5^^: 





$ Erlanger Garage | 

ft WALTON DEMPSEY, Prop. ^ 

J8 Repair Work Absolutely Guaranteed, j? 

2 EXPERT MECHANICS. J[ 

Full Line of Ford parts, Tires, Tubes 

and Accessories. * 

F. W. DEMPSEY, Jull0t , Erlanger, Ky. 

&a»gygMMI»^sV^ 



Ancient Signs Asked Vote*. 
The m <>r nlUlMid imtfuil of print* 
ed notices for uuvfrtlsuiiwut timl no- 
HtlCttl |>i of iMtftnttlM I ms undent |>recf 

dPIlJ, KM |M "fttBrf" Of I'Olllp.ll *> 

ti-.i. Tlit-re vm> nun In rail letters 
palutail sa the walls (list "Mm> Imp- 
bera wish to Imvn Trwhlua a* aadlls" 
or that "(ha fruit aallars wish ooa 
cuulus 1'itsius for (ha Utniiut h Hie.". 



Shea Thre. Feet Long. 
The latticed niiownhne rcunohlei la 
a goners! way a large tennis racket, 
with the handle mlaalng. The body 
of the shoe In two or three feet long 
and twelve tnclwa or more wide at the 
broadest part, auys the American Vor- 
eetry Magusluo, The rim la of nan, 
hi.kory or din The ski is marie' uf 
beech, birch, tnaple, ash «r spruce. 



i 



<t 



** 



i 



t 



film.*! 



£&» miiifM-itK^'m?- 



WMS^MMifl 



* 



*t 



I 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



Vol. xxxxvi 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY FEBRUARY 24, 192 1 



$1.50 Per Ye*r 



No 21 



fcteeed r^oppeftings. 



The newspaper correspondent s 
on duty in the South with Pres- 
ident-elect Harding agree that 
Mr. Charles E. Hughes ia a cer- 
tainty for Secretary of State, that 
Mr. Hays is sure of being named 
Postmaster General, and Mr Mel- 
lon nearly certain of the post at > 
the Treasury. Mr. Weeks will get t 
a place in the cabinet, and Mr i 
DaujbArtjy 'ivill be Attorney Gen- 
eral" but- there are at least two 
cabinet positions not yet filled. 

Whe World correspondent tells 
us that the chances of Mr. Heit 
getting one of the minor cabinet 
positions are getting bright, and 
the correspondent says that the 
Republican politicians all agree 
that Mr. Hert's "service* in the 
convention 1 ' entitle him to a place. 

Prom all of this it seems that 
the speculation over cabinet plac- 
es will continue right up to March 
4th. 



Need No Money 

Land Where There Is Relief 
From Life's Worrits. 



Messrs. Jess and John Delahun- 
ty, two good citizens and hust- 
ling young farmers of Beaver pre- 
cinct, were in Burlington last Sat- 
urday, interviewing the Income 
Tax man. They made this oifice a 
pleaaaut call and pressed the but- 
ton that keeps the machinery in 
the Recorder office running— each 
renewing his subscription. We 
are glad to have these good peo- 
ple aa members of our reading 
circle — they believing in helping 
to keep up home indu** .;.:>*- 



The Walton town "council is pro 
ceedlng carefully on the queation 
of contracting for electric lights 
for their town. These men want 
the best equipment and service 
that can be obtained. A proposi- 
tion has been submitted for a 
high tenalon line from Florence, 
which seems * to he the best 
proposition before them. Theques 
lion of financing this proposition 
may prevent its acceptance. 



Miss Catherine Brown and Miss 
Mary Evelyn Rouse consider them 
selves good hikers, but are not 
always familiar with the country 
in which they take their hikes. 
LaBt Sunday morning while^on one 
of their hikes they lost their way, 
and after quite a walk reached 
the residence of Mr. Clay Duncan, 
on the Bullittsville pike, and soon I 
therealter they were at their ! 
own fireside. I 



P. A. Glass, of the firm of Ba- 
ker & (Haas, blacksmiths, of Lim- 
aburg, was a visitor to Burling- 
ton, one day last week, and call- 
ed at this office aud had his 
subscription to the Recorder mov- 
ed up another year. Mr. Glass, on 
account of bad health, has quit 
the Macksmithing business anu 
will try farming as a means of 
recuperating his health. 

The auto.nobile driven by Karl 
Botts tiured turtle with* him 
about a mile from, towr on the 
Petersburg pike, last Thursday 
evening. The machine became un- 
manageable and before Mr. Botts 
could get cortrol of it jt turned 
over, but little damage was done 
The machine and Mr. Botts escap- 
ing without a scratch. 



The Islam! of Tristan da Cunha 
is dcK'ril ed aa "an unspoiled ha- 
ven of rest for the weary soul, a 
mecca for those who long for re- 
lief from worries of life, by the 
chaplain of the British cruiser 
Dartmouth, which has Just return- 
ed from a viBlt to that isolated 
spot. 

"No need to worry over money 
there, for there is noj^e," said the 
chaplain. "There are no taxes, no 
doctors, no lawyers, no clergy- 
men, no policemen, not even a 
head man. Newspapers and mail 
arrive with luck about once ev- 
ery two years. 

"There ia not even any medi- 
cince, for the last supply of 
remedies was thrown into the 
sea by the inhabitants, who arc 
remarkably healthy. Epidemics are 
unknown. 

"Tristan is a British possession 
ill the South Atlantic, between 
South Africa and South America 
Its snow capped peak towers 
nearly 8,000 feet above sea level. 
It is only twenty-one miles in 
circumference. The nearest inhab- 
ited, place is St. Helena, 1,200 miles 
away. The island itself is volcanic 
origin, the only habitable portion 
of it being a tongue of fertile 
land at the foot of the prccip- 

"Sufficient potatoes are grown 
in plots to meet the needs -of 
the inhabitants. Cattle and sheep 
were introduced years ago and 
many cattle now run wild. Clothes 
are only to be obtained by bar- 
tering from ships' that call. For 
protection v thb feet the peo- 
ple make moccasins of bullock 
hide. Wonderful socks are made 
by the women from wool carded 
by themselves. 

"From June' to October of this 
year the people had been with- 
out bread, t#a, coffee, and sugar, 
but they call* looked pretty well 
nourished. '> 

The reason there is no bread 
is that fifty or sixty- years ago 
a shipwreck near the island al- 
lowed rats to get- a s hore, so that 
since that time no wheat has been 
raised. But the men*" say that 
they are going to' try again when 
the next mail in a year or two 
brings some sc-d wheat. In the 
meantime they are in no hurry; 
if there isn't any bread they 
can be contented with potatoes. 
And to supplement their potatoes, 
fish are abundant, and cattle ana 
birds with their eggs and seals. 
They want for many things, says 
the chaplain, nevertheless "there 
to he little discontent 
ever wish to leave the 



appears 
and few 
island.'* 



The use of salt haa lx*en rec- 
ommended by many successful 
growers in the mowing of eow- 
pea hay. Although not essential, 
undoubtedly the' hay is improved 
in palatability, and it may, in the 
case of hay not entirely cured, as- 
sist in preventing fermentation. 
About 8 quarts of salt are usen 
to 1 ton of hay. 



A Mr. Shad and his ron, enroutc 
from near Cynthiana to near Law 
renceburg, ind., with a load of 
farming implements, where they 
expect to farm the coming year, 
stopped over night in Burling- 
ton one night last week. The rest 
of his household effects had beeu 
shipped by truck. 



Camp Taylor may not be sold at 
miction as had been ordered by 
the War Department. Senators 
Stanley and Beckham,' and the 
Kentucky Congressmen are using 
their influenca to get tho war de- 
partment to convert the camp 
into a hospital for invalid and 
disabled soldiers. 



*' 



The Georgia Judge who fined 
himself — f or v i ola ti ng li ve tialhc 
law was a hero. The Pennsylvania 
surgeon who operated upon him- 
surgeon who operated upon him- 
self for appendicitis was merely 
an exemplar ot Yankee thrift —C- 

J. 

The amount given In last week's 
Recorder as the salary receive I 
by the County Tax Commissioner 
was erroneous. The carpet amount 
received by the commissioner for 
1918 was $2,4K.:«, 1919 $2,»If,42 and 
1920 *3,1 16.36. FOiit of this sum the 
commissioned pays his deputies. 



To Tax Largo Trucks. 

There is a bill now pending 
before the New York Legislature 
"to tax the large 'truck off the 
highways of the State." 

There is strong support of this 
measure by many who use the 
highways, or public roads of New 
there is equally strong 
from those who use 
truck for purpose's of 



The Ohio River and tha Cansus 

The Ohio River is 968 miles long 
and it touches seventy-two coun- 
ties in six states— two in Penn- 
sylvania, fourteen in Ohio, twelve 
in West Virginia, twenty-five in 
Kentucky, thirteen in Indiana ami 
six in Illinois. 

- This elongated district owes Its 
present development to the stream 
that has long oeen a means of 
transportation, and tho its facil- 
ities in this regard, have of late 
years, been much neglected, the 
figures of the recent census 
show that it still averages high- 
er than the States in which they 
are located. 

These seventy-two counties have 
a Joint population of about 3,910,- 
000, Which is ar. average of 1,039 
to the mile. 

The area of the river counties 
is 24,523 square miles, the popu- 
lation is 3,910,463 and the aver- 
age is 159.5 to the square mile, or 
41.7 more than that of the six 
States in which they are located. 

It is also significant that the 
density is greater along those 
stretches of the river that have 
been improved and the presump- 
tion is therefore very reasonable 
that then the river improve- 
ments are completed even the 
counties in Indiana and Illisois 
will exceed the average of those 
Spates. ^^ 

Road Construction in 1920 

Beset ffitb Difficulties. 

Every kind of road cost about 
twice as much to build in 1920 
as it did in 1917, according to the 
Chief of the Bureau of Public 
Roads, United States Department 
of Agriculture, and highway con- 
struction suffered more than any 
other class of work thru railroad 
congestion, strikes labor troubles, 
and material shortages. 

After the war there was a great 
public demand for Improved j 
roads. Mary roads had been ser- i 
iously damaged by war traffic,' 
and it appeared that the return 
of men from military service 
'would provide an abundance of 
abundance, of labor. The army of 
laborers which was expected 10 
ppiy for the work did not, how- 
rialize. On the contrary 
a distinct shortage of 
wages reached the high 
ittained in the history 
In 1917, compe- 
te 



ever, mate 
there was 
labor, and 
est levels i 
of the country 
tent labor could 



secured for 

day, lint the 

in 1920 were 

a shorter 



from $1.50 to i|i:i per 
corresponding wages 
from $3 to $5 tor 
days work. 

In proportion to this demand 
there was also a pronounced scar 
city of construction materials. 
Sand, gravel, stone, and cement, 
and materials commonly used in 
road work increased in price be- 
and 1920 from 50 to 100 
Naturally, these in- 
cost were reflected in 
paid to contractors for 
Gravel roads increas- 
$4,535 to $7,250 per mile 
from 



$21,165 to upward 



York, and 
opposition 
the large 

commerce. 
This is 
may say. 



The Hebron Theater Company 
lias booked first-class pictures for 
their entertainments, and are en- 
titled to the patronage of this 
territory They show the name 
pictures as the Cincinnati movie 
theaters, 

K L Uoodridge, who has batM 
here for several years In the coal 
business, will move, next week to 
? , * r fr nr * r Hnrttrnrrrm, Tjw-ni»rt riv 
hi* lath. r-n. lau 4aa Paeon, which 
he win manage Walton Advei 

t IHi 



w ■ b,n,n from (Kit on |< J> 
No 1 «M in Hurlliifftoii, la-( 
I hursdav, Knd whll« here called 
•n tin* Reoeidf r ami ienewi»d hU 
subscript! mm! h< 



year. 



a question— certain, we 
to come up in Kentucky 
—that should be met in a more 
intelligent way than by driving 
the large truck off the* roads by 
taxation. The only solution is to 
construct some of the main roads 
of the State in so durable a form 
as to make it possible to oper- 
ate trucks over them, and then 
to keep the truck off the other 
roads. It is simply destructive to 
permit heavy trucks to operate 
at will over dirt an;l>, madadam 
roads. They tear them to pieces 
very rapidly. Nothing but con- 
crete or brick will stand up 
against the heavy truck. But 
the heavy truck may serve a tre- 
mendously useful purpose in com- 
merce if the roads are built in 
such a way as to permit it to 
travel over certain selected routes. 

Tho Wounded Soldiers. 

Many complaints are heard that 
the wour.deo soldiers are not be- 
ing properly cared for. Senator 
Robinson of Arkansas lias just 
asked Congress to appropriate 
$30,000,000 to secure more adequate 
treutment,. This may seem a 
large sum. But whatever else the 
> i ited States has to pinch, it 
must rot fall down in curing for 
these fellows. A failure to give 
suitahle attertion to these men 
will have far reachirg effects. It 
will undermine tho loyalty of 
great numbers of people who know 
of such cases of neglect. 

It will suggest that the Ameri- 
can people are very lavish of 
their cheers and enthusiasm when 
there is any fighting to be done, 
but that they forgot their obll- 
gations when the battle is over 
and the duty of caring for the 
sick and maimed comes on Thia 
is a yellow spirit of Ingratitude, 
ar.d it will c U st „ „taln on the 
flag forever if it ia permitted to 
continue. 

MKI11T HK VV'OBHK 
One of those pleasant nights 
We had last week, a young Rur- 
Mnjtou coujile were seated on a 
' b '"I Burlington, and n pusnei 

nj nverbeard (he following eon 

V elHtttioll ; 

With his arm about hei uaiVl 
he naked! M Oo you like thia pi , 

•V\ell, I rufi't *uv Jliat | Mf „ 

stuck >'i» the place,' 4 *ln- replied 
hm she nestled a little r|o»er to hhi 

mi, "but I ,,., tailll) liu enjnv 

the fturroutidtugt." 



tween 1917 

per .cent. 

creases in 

the prices 

road work 

ed from 

concrete 

of $40,000 per mile, and brick roads 

from $33,000 to $55,000 per mile. 

As fund available for road con- 
struction .are largely limited by 
statute, or by the returns from 
taxation, a majority of the states 
this year have deliberately with- 
held work, the plans for which 
had been completed, until they 
could obtain a greater return for 
their expenditure. 

China Famine Fund. 

livery Kentucky bank has been 
designated as a dei>ository for 
contributions to the China Famine 
FundN for the relief of the to,- 
000,000 inhabitants of the fiVe 
famine stricken provlnena in north 
Central China. This action, 
the sanction of the bankers, 
taken at the meeting of the 
ly appointed executive 
for the state. Through 
od it makes the sending of con- 
tributions easier, it is pointed 
out by Joseph Surge of Louisville, 
Treasurer of the fund. Contribu- 
tors, hereafter may hand contribu- 
tions to their local banker and 
he will forward them to Mr. 
Surge, at the Kentucky headquar- 
ters, Room 9 Board of Trade Build- 
ing, lyouisville. The Rpv. Dr, E. V 
Mullins, president of the South - 
ern Baptist Theological Seminary, 
is chairman having been appoint- 
PresTdcnT^ 



INCOME TAX LAW. I 

iBY MAURICE P LYONS.) 

'i i '».i£ i ? plained the individual j 
ir come, tax, let us briefly take up 
the matter oi Partnerships 

There is a blar k form No. 1005 , 
upon which the Partnership must 
make a return, irrespective of its , 
ret income, stating specifically ! 
the items of its gross income, the | 
allowable deduction", *•»• ■»"*., ju,, 
come, and the names and ad- 
dresses of the partners who 
would be entitled to share in saiii 
net income, if distributed, and the 
amount of the distributive share 
of each partner. . 

Hut each partner in making his 
ir dividual return must also in- 
clude as gross income (the amount 
before any deductions are taken) 
his distributive share of the 
partnership for the taxable year, 
whether such distribution has or 
has not taken place, for it b 
held under the law; that, the dis- 
t. ^-** e share" vii the profits of 
a plMner in a partnership is re- 
garded as receiee/i. * 

The Partnership must make a 
return regardless of the amount 
of its net income. . 

Its income, while not taxable, is 
computed in the same manner and 
upon th e same basis as provided 
fvar individuals, excepting that 
contributions or gifts made with- 
in the taxable year to corpora- 
tions, organized and operated ex- 
clusively for religious, charitable, 
scientific, or educational purposes, 
or for the prevention of cruelty 
to children or animals, etc., are 
not deductible. 
Why ? • 

Because these amounts are 
chargeable to the partners, or 
they should be, and thee,* each one 
in his return may deduct his pro- 
portionate share up to 15 per cent 
of his net income. 

In instances certain classes of 
Partnerships are deemed to be 
Corporations by the Office of In- 
ternal Revenue and it is then 
necessary to have Corporation Re- 
turns prepared. 

For instance, limited partner- 
ships of the type authorized by 
] the statutes of most of the states 
! are considered to be partnerships 
• ar.d not corporations, but where 
tho question arises the burden of 
; proof is placed upon these part* 
j nerships to show that they are 
not in fact corporations. 
In ^ome states there are part- 
nerships, so-called, which x>ffer 
■ oppo rtunity for limiting the liabil- 
I ity of ALL the members, provide 
I for the transferability of part- 
nership shares, capable* ' of hold- 
ing real estate and bringing suit 
in the Common name,, instead of 
in the name of. the partnership. 
It will plainly be seen, that such' 
are more truly corporations than 
partnerships and they would bo 
compelled to make returns and 
pay the tax as corporations. 

The income received by the 
members of the earnings of such 
partnerships as above constitut- 
ed would be treated in their per- 
sonal returns in the same manner 
as distributions on the stock of 
corporations. 

The method of doing business 
under copartnership agreement is 
fast becoming obsolete, principally 
because of the fact that ordinar- 
ily one partner is bound by the 
acts of the others when per- 
formed within the scope of the 
business, and incorporation has 
been deemed to be the better 
procedure. 

The Income Tax Law aa applied 
to Corporations will be taken up 
in my nexfc article. 



No Change In Assasmant. 
For 1920 

No change will be made in the 
1320 assessment of Boone county. 
The State Tax Commission has 
so notified the County Judge as 
follows: 

Feb. 19, 1921 

N E Riddell 
Judge Boone County Court, 

Burlington. Ky. 
Dear Sir :— 

« After consideration of the as- 
sessment of Boone county for the 
year 1921. as shown by the first 
recapitulation of the county Tax 
Commissioner's hook, we find that 
owing to the splendid work done 
by your County Tax Commissioner 
;uifl the splendid response of your 
people, that for the present year 
your county has made such an as- 
sessment that it. will not be nec- 
essary for us to direct any spe- 
eific amou it of increase on your 
assessment 
• Yours Verv Trulv, 

STATE TAX COMMISSION'. 

Graduated Individual Icome Tax 



with 
was 

new- 
committee 
this meth- 



Human Skin. 



The human skin, which forms a 
protective covering over the wholo 
of the body, consists of two lay- 
ers, an outer one and an inner 
one. The epidermis or outer skin, 
is so constructed that no mois- 



wt 



lg been 
Wilson. 



Min- 
heen 
state 
persons who 



Reports from the American 
ister at Peking, which have 
cabled to President Wilson, 
that of the 40,000,ouo 
are without adequate clothing an.l 
root!. 15,000,000 are entirely with- 
out fuel and any kind of food, 
subsisting only on dry leaves and 
bark from trees This deplorable 
condition is due to the failure of 
the last two crops 
are approximately 
sons so emaciated 
they are unable 
hovels. 



a. id now I he re 
40.000,000 per- 
from hunger, 
to leave their 



Tax On Whisky Upheld. 

The Court of Appeals of Ke..- ' 
tucky has upheld the tax of 50 j 
cet'.te "ii each gallon of whisky ! 
This tax was levied by the lasr j 
Legislature for State road pur- 
poses Judfe Kvaus has held thai! 
this same law ia UiicottatitutlOnaT ■ 
The stale eotirl s.i\h ih" tux cm 

be collected The U s. court uyi j 
U j mimt he collected The S 
Ki'.ul Depai t mi- il 'in hoi in ik. 

nnv contracts to build roads i»n 
r'cctn.K to ...ibrt this whisk j 

tax since th. court a I nlei 



ture from outside ,can ]>enetrate 
it so long as the skin itself is 
not torn Or cut. At the same 
time the pores of the skin are 
so formed that the sweat is free- 
ly discharged through the skin, 
thus ventilating the bodv and 
keeping it at an even tempera- 
ture. If some one could invent 
a material posseesing the proper- 
ties of the human skin, a mater- 
ial which would keep out all 
moisture, however heavy the 
downoour of rain, 
the free escape of the heat 
and moisture of the body, his for- 
tune would be made. 

Boono Hi Lyceum Course. 

The fourthn umber of the Boone 
High Lyceum Course was given at 
the court house last Thursday 
night, by Robe^ H B Tremain 
( o Mr Tremaiu is a character 
impersonator. He read n number 
or his own poems. The accompan- 
ist, Miss ( arnahan %ang a number 
o! songs while Mr. Tremain Was 
• hanging his costumes. The en- 
tertainment was fairly well re- 
ceived by the audience. 

Miss Carnahan is a very attrac- 
tive young lady aynl handled her 
part of the program in ■ excel- 
lent style She has>b v far, the best 
von'e of „| IV of the singers who 
ba\e appeared im the programs of 
the Lyceum Cduree W 
for her an excellent fut 



ll?Y £rEORO£ DUXLAP.) 

The suggestions and recommen- 
dations made in this article ire 
baaed' oil twenty veura' exper- 
ience in the United' States internal 
revenue service and noi thy 
theory of uue uninformed. 

It is of course admitted that our 
federal government must have re, 
enue, and*u can b \ obtained froiu 
two general sources, namelv. du- 
ties on imported goods and in- 
ternal revenue. In the. general 
scheme it is endeavored to make* 
the burden fall on those most able 
to stand it, which doctrine* none 
will dispute, and that is whv a 
tariff as a rule is levied on' so- 
called luxuries, such as diamonds, 
etc., although a certain amount 
of protection it given American 
industries by the tariff. My sug- 
gestions have to do with internal 
rever.ue and not the tariff ques- 
tion. 

Following out the practice ot 
placing taxes where thev could 
oe most easily borne, the original 
internal revenue was laid on to- 
bacco and whisky, , because those 
who smoked, chewed and drank 
could well afford to pav a little 
more ior their pleasure* and help 
support the government These 
same general lines are followed 
in the present revenue act, for 
we have the luxury tax, jewelry 
automobile, theater, club dues! 
"J*- dozens of other taxes, the 
Cluef _Dfiing the income tax. whim 
are designed to fall upon those 
most easily able to bear them. 

Li the main the present taxes 
do not Jail on those mostr able 
to pay because the clerk, steno- 
grapher or small business man 
has to pay the same tax when 
attending a show, traveling, buy- 
ing proprietary articles, convey- 
ing title to real estate, etc, as 
does the wealthy one. 

Then earest approach to an ideal 
tax is the graduated individual in- 
come tax. In the course of a year 
the average individual pays out 
about twenty dollars in the var- 
ious miscellaneous taxes now en- 
forced and he is constantly re- 
minded of the fact as well as put 
in peril periodically bv failure to 
pay on time, thereby incurring 
penalties and interest. How much 
better from every point o f view 
iT he only had to pay one tax 
and that at a definite* time and 
place, such as the individual in- 
come tax It all comes out of the 
same jnicket and is much easier 
handled by a graduated tax on 
his ir.come than by the dozens of 
petty taxes met with at every 
turn. 

Another and very important an- , 
gle is the saving that would oc- i 
cur in being able todoawavwith 
thousands ot high priced employes 
no* engaged in the administra- 
tion of the- sales of tax. There • 
should be no tax on corporations. | 
Their annual earnings should be j 
apportioned to stockholders and j 
they should pay on their share, • 
whether distributed or not. Right 
here, I suppose, many will ob- 
ject and say if a man's entire 
income consists in stock earnings 
and they declare no cash dividend 
where would he get the money 
to pay his tax? This would be 
Up to the board of directors, ana 
■ distribution of enough of the, 
earnings would have to be m.jfie 
to allow shareholders to pav their 
rhi s met hod * would 
the object icuu"nTe 
excess profits tax and ten per 
cent corporation tax, besides sav 
ing the tax payers several hun- 
dred thousands of dollars annu- 
ally in salaries to corporation in- 
vestigators In Washington today- 
there are thousands of claims 
based on differences in corpora- 
tion returns and Dr. Adams stal- 
ed before the ways and means 
committee of the house the other 
day that they were hopelessly be- i 
bind in their claims. All of these ! 
objectionable features would be 
automatically eliminated if there I 
were a simple Individual income I 
tax levied and the form not 
changed from year to year, but 
el the public get familiar with 

the, form and not have to employ' 
experts to help unravel the skein ! 



"THE CAT CAME BACK" 

Earl McNulty Escaped From 

J ail At 5 A. M Captured and 

Back In Jail At 10 A. M. 

Earl McNulty, who was con- 
fined in jail for assaulting Miss 
Rosat Peeno. of Consta nce, escap- 
ed Monday morning. McNulty haa 
made* all plans for his escape. He 
put different articles in his bed 
ard covered them with the bed 
clothing so that the lied had all 
the appearance of being occupied. 
McNulty had closed the inside cell 
door and Jailer Fowler locked this 
as usual, but McNulty had secret- 
ed himself behind a box in the 
cell corridor, and as , the jailer 
opened the corridor door and went 
a few stai>s to get a water buck- 
et, when McNulty sprang from 
behind the bo< and out the door 
he wer t with Jailer Fowler in pur- 
Me.Vulty soon outdistanced 
McNulty was tracked In 
the snow south to the creamery 
and then northwest to ihe Belle- 
view pike, where his track was 
lost McNulty made his escape at 
a time when there was no on» 
on the street. Ix4rvg about 5 a. 
m , when Jailer Fowler went to 
make the fire iu the jail. 

Sheriff Conner got busy with 
the telephone and he and Deputy 
Hume started in pursuit in a ma- 
chine. A telephone message re- 
-/fi\ c-d from a citizen of Bullitts- 
ville neighborhood, stated that Mc 
Nulty had just left her home, 
and deputy Harold Conner left 
immediately for that neighbor- 
hood, and captured McNulty and 
brought him back to jail' about 
10:30 a. m 

Jaifer Fowler has been ver;, 
cautious with his prisoners, but' 
they will escape from any jail oe 
jailer. 



■ n« wen * 

fsuit. Mc 
the jailer 



The feather. 

The weather the first two weeks 
of February with the bright, warm 
sunshine, boys plaving ball, rea 
birds and robins" flitting from 
tr^e to tree warbling as blithely 
as ..though it was good old sum- 
mer time, made one feel as tho 
spring time had really come, and 
that Mr G. Hog, the eminent pro- 
phet. Wns going to make good, 
and tha* the backbone of winter 
was broken 

Notwithstanding all these har- 
bingers fortell that spring- is not 
far away, this part of the coun- 
try was visited by a high wind 
and heavy snow fall last Satur- 
day' Snow began falling about 8 
oclock Saturday morning and con 
tmued throughout the day and 
night and at times took the ap- 
peararce of a blizaard and snow 
flew ir every direction. 

Upor awakening from their 
right's sleep Sunday morning the 
citizenry found the ground cover- 
ed with about three ieehe* of 
sr.ow. Some of our weather 
prophets dedarirg that last Sat- 
urdays weather was the worst 
experierced this winter. 

In this climate, these sudden 
changes may be expected at this 
time of year, and when these cold 
snaps come, it is safe to predict 
.they will not last long, and that 
the backbone of winter is broken, 
and according to the groundhog, 
we will have very little more win- 

Hog Wallow News. 

While attending an open session 
, of the "Hog- Wallow Debating So- 
ciety' last Saturday afternoon, 
I we gathered the following infor- 
mation by listening to soma of 
the weather prophets: , 

"That, on the first day you 
hear it thunder during the win- 
ter mouths, ori that same date in 
May we will have a cold spell. 
Ar.d, as it thundered on the ljoth 
iiist, keep a watch on the 16th 
of May — as it never fails— so aav-^ 
eth said prophet,*' 

"This is the sixteenth snow oT 
the winter.'' said another "Asthe- 
first snow fell on November Hith, 
there will be no more snow after, - 
this is gone.-' Stick a pin here. , 

That a local tobacco grower 
v ho had shipped his crop of the 
weed to a loose leaf warehouse 
and had gone ahead ^to be pres-" 
et.t when it was uMloaded. tfitf* 
not recognize Ms crop «■!,>» fr 



arrivedT as it looked so much bet- 
there than at home-it was 



another 
lor hit* 
looked 
load. 



man's crop he mistook 
own, because the truck 
like the on© he helped 



Gave riis Life. 



nrvdict j 



Marriage License. 



Official records and R<„«d Cross 
reports of Chicago, brought to 
Mrs. brauk Kendall the story that 
her soil, Lieut Oliver K Kendall 
was shot by the Germans as a 
spy just before the first great 
American victory in the war at 
Cautieny, because he would not 
reveal to his Germs i captors tie* 
d» tails oi the American forces 

The execution took place tho 
ie|K)it# said, despite the fact thut 



[lire 



rk 

in. 



has 



illiaiiisoii and 



d 



conipllcal li.g opinioiMi 



(Irani u 

- m..,s,.,» („,♦ Frrdnv from 

1 "ii U <>o|p4.f Creek to thel 

; bom* in Park Addition ■ 

uic <.t town u 

IIiiiii M 'Hi I 
towu 



north » 

tu iin\ 



family 

In in 
I new 

in the 

: tin* 



Automobile triffle hae 

ni' mi tleime thai po 

havi» t«» be Ueeneed befi 

illg ull.iw wd in tho at ice 



lllll 

llMtt I 



VI I 



«.ikliiM s 
I) « itht hwir months, uectl 
«» be reminded that I .en I 



pet lot! 



W 



»( 



The count) 
marriage lev 

.IS fillluU ', 

liar] Mu l m IM| . i 

''■'I ui. i It • II, ,iii,iii |H 

11 C Kirtley, n, Grant 
tei.u Stephens, ,,ii 

Vlv > l> W.ud. la, Wi.lt,. 
Vltrrku k is \\ ilto,, 

u w tlrifflth ii 

•th\ I'hoipi v-illl 

iliii Vi iii it ( mug 
i (in leu Walton i» Burl 
* Waflurdi il Mu. 



aim ii v 



I III lilip'lun 

( l.l.s 

,\Ln v 



In mil 

between 

\ inei ic.uis 
iere he 



| LieQteiiant Kendall W.lB 

uniform when captured 

the lilies 

Two gays i itej the 
captured the gi ,, i u 
h: '«' bet n buried When the b,,d v 

»» *tt* reiimv,,! rn the \ 

remetei y .d Hou\ illei i i , , ,,-e it 
« is Idei lifted .-, thai ,>f Kendall 

Kendall rrept oul of 1 1„. \ m#rv 

lie th« 

"id was "leranett 
' man prisoner* 
ht hi* i 
ken |,ria> 



KwidaU, 
me tim<t ICnru* 



HJLSilB^k^l^H 



n^b^nU kfJ^Bjej^Bj^Bjejl 



■M^-- ir '- : W^ BBsHBaiBBl^BBl^BBHBa^BBl^HBBUBBs^H 



»OOWl COONTT HCOIOll 



/ 




WE HAVE BEEN TELLING THE PEOPLE FOR THE PAST EIGHT YEARS THAT 
WE HAVE QUALITY GOODS TO SELL— AND THAT THE MOST IN ACTUAL 
VALUE FOR THE MO NEY SPENT COULD BE HAD BY TRADING HERE. 

How well they believe in us has been 
shown by the steady increase, in our 
business and the large number of 
new customers we have been getting 



You can buy here 
good shoes for the 
price of cheap ones 



Men's Chrome Elk Hide 
Shoes, made with heavy oak 
soles— here is a real every- 
day shoe for roug-h use. 
Formerly sold at $5£Q Aft . 
& $6. Special. .. ^«Jl«jU 

Men's dark drown Cordovan Calf 
Euglish style Shoes; a fine dres- 
sy shoe at a very low price; 
formerly sold at Stt.oO't A AA 
Now J*f.3U 



Ladie's Bungalow Aprons, made of fast color 
Percales. Special 



98c 



Ladies' New Style Waist Aprons, very neatly 
made. Special at 



Ladies' ftigh Grade Dress Shoes in brown or 
black — beautiful styles. Special 



Newest-KStyles 
or brown 



in Ladies' Spring Oxfords in black 
all toes. Special 



$4.98 
$4~98 



We can save you money on piece goods of all kinds, 
such as Ginghams, Percales, Muslin, Sheeting, Out- 
ing, Tidring,^L!nenV~etcr Our stocks are always 
new and up-to-date, as We are recieving NEW 
GOODS EVERY FEW DAYS. 



59c 



Linen Weft Toweling, 18 inches wide ; a fancy crash 4 ft 
for every day use ; formerly sold at 30c. Special . . . | JJC 



Amoskeag Heavy Feather Ticking, 32 in. wide : Oft-. 

iormerly sold at 65c. Special UuC 




ERLANGER, KY 




Special Values in Men's 
& Boys Good Trousers 



Here are well made trousers, of ser- 
lceable. dark striped materials in all 
sizes that formerly sold at £Q Eft 
$5 and $6. Special ^J.uU 



Knee Pants for boys from 7 to lt» 
years in neat dark; patterns of serv- 
iceable fabrics. &* on 
Special at , ^ | . JJ 



Boys' Gingham and Percale Blouse 
Waists in neat dark colors, for boys 
from 5 to 15 years. 40** 

Specif 41JC 



"•^Tsa-tf* 



Men's Fine Dress Shirts in beautiful 
Patterns, $2 and $2,50 £4 QQ 
values. Special 4 I . U U 



Men's Heavy Blue Denim Union-made Overalls and Coats. 
Why pay more when you can buy them 
here for 



$1.25 



Men'f $1.50 Dark Blue Chambray Work 
collar attached 



Special, 



79c 



TAKE YOUR COUNTY PAP 1 



Merter Martin and wife visited 
relatives it Walton several days 
last week. 




Mrs. James W. Good ridge Speat 
last week visiting relatives *ar 
Belleview, 



F. H. Rouse and wife entertain- 
ed several of their relatives at din 
ner last Sunday. 

y ■ 

Miss Maud Tanner, of Hebron, 
Bpent last week with Miss Gwen- 
dolyn Goodridge. 

The mercury in the thermome- 
ters the past few days has boe;i 
like the egg market— up and down. 

John L. Jones, Jr., of near Land- 
ing, sends us $1.50 10 keep a front 
seat in the Recorder's reading cir- 
cle. 




Eli Borders, of Pleasant"** Yalli\\ 
l eighborhood, sends us $1.50 to 
renew his subscription another 
year. 



Airs. Belle Clore, of Erlajiger, 
has gone to St. Petersburg, tin., 
to spend the remainder o* tn 
winter. 

-fa— 

John Myers, of the Richwoorf 
neighborhood, one oi our old-time 
subscribers, sends us $1.50 to re- 
new his s u Inscription. 



Read the advertisement of Cal- 
vin Cress, of/ Union, in another col 
umn in this issue, and when in 
teed of anything in his line give 
him a cab. 



Addison Biddell, of Otis, Colo, 
ki-i.Js us $1.50 to renew his sub- 
scription to the Recorder. He 
likes lo gei the news from hi* 
Old Kentucky Home. 



Herbert Snyder, of Petersburg 
neighborhood, was a visitor to the 
Huo last Friday afternoon. Mr. 
Snyder is one of the countyis best 
young farmers and an all" round 
good fellow. 



HEBRON THEATRE 

NEXT SATURDAY 

George Walsh in "Sink or Swim" 
Comedy "Monkey Business" 

First Show 7:30 P. M. 

Admission 22 Cents, :-: Children 1 1 Cent* 

Including War Tax 



R. L. Brown, a former resident j m ■ Wff\ TlATa H I T Tl 

or Boone, now residing in Erlan- 1 AN L 1 1 U v A I L 

ger, thought ho could get along I llH II uJlljlj 

without the Recorder, but found ■■■■■■ mm ■ w *» ■#******, 

otherwise, and while in Burling- ♦ > 

ton last Monday entered his sub-jl will sell at public auction on 
scription for the coming year. the premises, on 

■& B&ttttT&rs, Saturday, feb. 26tb. 1871 

of Union, and Mabel Northcutt, J ' ' '"' fcMfcU J ■•■■■ 

17, or Rich wood. They were mar- The Following Real Estate: 
, ried Wednesday. The RECORDER „ 
"w ishes these young people a hap-| oounaed on the west by the lands 
prosperous and long married of John Conrad ; on the north by 



PUBLIC 



SALE 



Iwill offer for sale to the highest bidder on the Lewis Rice 
farm, 2 miles north of Rich wood, Ky„ on the Dixie Highway 



py. 

life. 



H. W. Hiley, of Union, County 
Tax Commissioner, was in Burling- 
ton, last Thursday. He called «it 
this office and renewed his sub- 
scription to the Recorder. Mr. 
Riley has made a good officer and 
will be a candidate for re-elec- 
tion at the' August primary. 



FOR SALE ETC. 



For Sale— Shetland pony, bay— 
6 years old. gentle, sound. Also 
harness and runabout in good 
condition. W. V. Moore, Beaver 
Lick, Ky. Consolidated phone Bea- 
ver, 201. 5feb-'2t 



the lands df E. I. Rouse ; on the 
south by the lands of John Con- 
rad, and contains 4;^' acres more 
or less, and being the land owned 
by ^Jasper Manin at the time of 
his death. « 

Terms— One-half cash, balance! 
due Aug. 1st, 1921, with 6 per 
cent interest from date i 

E. MANNIN, Admr. 



Mch 



The Following Property: 

Six year old mare, 7yr-old horse-will Little Willie Riding Cultivator, 



WhOen .business is quiet some 
folks sit around bewailing the 
bad conditions, while others take 
the time to build up plans by 
which their trade expands on 
the next boom. 

Owen Allen, of Petersburg, was 
in town last Thursday, and left 
an advertisement for a* safeoi per- 

S,onal >PA )e,,tv in Petersburg on 
March 5m. Read his advertisement 
in another column. 

The people whose inefficient 
production make merchandise very 
scarce, have been kicking for two 
years now because the profiteers 
took advantage of that scarcity 
to make money. 



Much has been written -i.^t 



the deplorable condition of 
Man with the Hoe. but when last 
seen he was driving in town at 
the rate of JJ5 miles uu hour lo 
attend the movies. 

Miss Elizabeth Kellv, who ; 9 
teaching at Belleview, spent last 
Saturday and Sunday with her 
brother and sister, Galen and Miss 
«"tb Kelly. They spent Saturday 
in Cincinnati shopping. 

Some claim that the cold weath- 
er and snow the latter part of 
last week will be a great benefit 
to fruit growers, as it will keep 
the buds back und prevent then 
from being killed later on 



WOOD FOR SALE— Two dollars 
per rank, six dollars per cord. Call 
or write H. S. Tanner. Burlington, 
Ky., R. D. S. Hebron phone. 
- t Sfljan-tf. 

For Sale— Two fresh Jersey cowa 
with calves and one Jersey heif- 
er. C. Beckelheimer, near Commis- 
sary, on Burlington alnd Belleview 
pike i 16feb 2t— pd , 

Lady or Gentleman Agent want- 
ed in the cRy of Burlington to 
sell the genuine J. R. Watkins 
Medicines, Spices, Extracts, Toilet 
Preparations, etc. All or spare 
time. A wonderful opportunity to 
get into business for yourself. 
Write today for free particulars 
and sample. J. R. Watkins Co,, 61 
Memphis, Tenn. 16feb-4t 



Jrost Proof Cabbage Plants. 

We have millions of the finest open 
field grown plants ready now. Early 
Jersey, Charleston Wakefields, Flat 
Dutch. Parcel post paid, 300— $ 1.00; 
600-S1.60; 1000-J2 50. Express— 
2000-13.50; 5O00-$7.6O; 10,000-$12.60. 
Send for price list. Sweet potato 
and tomato plants. Parkkr Farm, 
Moultrie. Georgia. o mch-17 



For Sale. • 



A Goodwill Range Stove, coal or 
wood, six lids, latest model with 
warming oven and six gallon resi- 
voir, five lengths of pipe and two el- 
bows—been in u«»o 



good as in',, 

Mrs. W. P. Carpenter, If iorVnce Ky.\ 



■'UHu2J..iiianths; 

r~M%- III 



nquire of 



on Dixie Highway. 



weigh 1200 lbs, each~No. 1 team, 
5 -year old saddle and harness mare, took 
first premium in plantation saddle ring 
at Florence Fair, 
6 good milk cows-3 with calves by their 

sides, rest to be tresh soon, * 
Shorthorn bull, coming 2 years old, / 
300 lb. Chesterwhite sow and 6 pigs, eligi- 
ble to register, thinrind gilt farrow soon, 
Some hay and corn, 

Road Wagon, Haybed, Boxbed, 2-h. Sled, 
Spring Wagon, 60-tooth smoothing harrow, 



Oliver Chilled left-hand breaking plow, 
Single shovel plow, Dixie plow, ' 
Mowing machine, Rubber tired buggy. 
Breaking Cart, 2 sets buggy harness, 
Set double work harness, check lines, 
Collars, bridles, 550 tobacco sticks, 
One man saw, axe, hoes, forks, shovels, 
Wheel barrow, singletrees, stretchers, 
3 10-gal. milk cans, 5-gal. milk can, 
Milk buckets, strainer, 2 doz. cow chains, 
Double barrel shot gun, 22 Stevens rifle, 
Horse blanket, lap-robe* etc. 



Household and Kitchen Furniture. 

Consisting of Davenport, 2 Stano>Tablcs, Dining Room Table, Dresser 
Kitchen stove, Wood Heater, Oil Cook Stove, Window Shades, Jars, Crocks 
Lamps, and many other articles too numerous to mention. 



2-t 



Public Sale! 



For Sale— 2 female fox hounds- 
one black the other black and 
white. W. T, Berkshire, Burling- 
ton R. D. 1. 



For Sale — One acre, rix room 
house, furnace heat, electric light, 
b am and all kin d s u f f rui t t r eefl ~at 
453 Erlanger Road, Erlanger, Ky. 
Elizabeth Schoepfel, Erlanger. 



FoT Sale- 



work horses, 12 young Durham cat 



Four or five good 
g Durham cat 
tie and two fresh milk cows. Wm. 
Gaines, Burlington R. D. 3j 

23£eb— tf. 



e at .public auc- 



I will offer for sale at , 

tion, in the town of Belleview, Ky. 

Saturday, March 5, 1921 

The Perry Uore homestead, con- 
HiMti ngofa house o f 8 rooms, barn. 

•ftuu other uecesBaf .v otitbunainga. 

and one acre of ground. An ideal 



home for a doctor or retired fanner, 
_ . ,„ K E. H. CLORE 

Sale will begin at 1 :30 p. m. 



TERMS OF SALE. 
All sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on sums over $10.00 a credit of six 
months without interest will be given, purchaser to give note with approved 
security, payable at Florence Deposit Bank, Florence, Ky. 

Fitzhugh Tanner. 

Sale to begin at 12:30. LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer. 



NOTICE.. 

I do not expect to handle the 
International line this year. ' I 
have a few bargains to oHer for 
sale. 
1 Farm road wagon, 



»B3KSEg3ESX8JGS» 



CUT OUT THE MIDDLEMAN. 

j We buy from producer* only. We have no agent., cream Statist) buyer* 
| or other middlemen. Each cream producer tend, hi* cream DIRECT to I 
i our creamery. WE PAY THE SHIPPING COST. Every cent i. your*, 
i Your cream and can* are guaranteed agaimt lo** by 



For Sale— Two Buff Orpington 
roosters. Price $1.50 each, Apply to 
Mrn. Chas. Kelly, Burlington R, 1). 



For Sale— 50 bu»heln corn. Yan- 
cey Clore, Burlington R. D, No, 3 



Geo. Penn, manager ott he Boost 
County Farm Bureau, aitd \V if. 
Sutton, County Farm Agt., uttm l- 
ed a Farm Bureau meerlag at 
Bluing Sun, Ind., one night lam 
wnk. They report a good tieM 

K. A. Kyle, ol J«ff»r«ontowM, Kv , 
•pent « few day* I oat week Vis- 
iting friend* and relative* iu anu 
nnar BurUiyton Mr Ryle la very 
much attached to Boone eouniv, 
•nil hope* to make hit home 
here 



For Sale or Trade— Five year ola 
mare, also aged draft mare, bou- 
ble aet work harness, set buggy 
harness. John Cave, Jr., Burling- 
ton R. D. 3* pd j 



For Sale— Good team of mulen 
coining four yeara old, hrokeand 
ready for 'spring work. These 
mim are al>oiit lo hand* Also 
one ,-ight ytmr ,,10. mule. Kenneth 
Stephens near Rich wood ehureh 
I'lwonti Walton ti«3 



FOR SALE 

I Have for Sale 
2 International Truck*. 
2 490 Chivrolets. 
1 Ford Truck Ch«m, 20- 
mrxiel. 

CASH OR ON TIME. 

L. C. CHAMBERS, 

Petersburg. Ky. 



Subscribe lor the Recorder -It I* 
»ur county oaper mid might to 

in four bona t fading elrel* 
< * « t \ ueek 



c 



t'luia. B. Butler, formerly a res- 
ident iof this county, hut now 
proprietor wf "Lyndalr Farm," 
rear Parts, Ky., sends us tl 50 for 
a year's subscriptioi Mr Ihitlcr 
who Is a breeder of Short hort 
ar.d A J <', C. cuttle, Duroe und 
Poland China hoga Mr Sutler 
luis our l hanki 



1 late model manure spreader , 
f Ohio 2 horse riding plow, 

1 Oliver hillside breaking plow, 

2 Oliver chilled breaking plows, 

1 Disk riding cultivator, 

1 Oliver 2-row 14 tooth bottom 
gang plow, ' 

1500 rod different farm fenceing, 
10 Different lengths wire gates, 

Some lawn fence, . 
1 1919 Ford truck with stock rack 

in first class condiou, 
1 Ford touring car in good con. 

dition well equipped. 
250 Bushels corn in crib, 
3 tons good No 1 sheaf oats, 
3 T6"!b of No 1 mixed hay. 

These goods will be sold at a 
bargain. 

W. L. KIRKPATRICK. 
Burlington, Ky. 



rheTri-State Butter Co 

C«.h C.pit.l $250,000.00 CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



'I1VNNI V. I 

03 

b3iina 

31V1S 

I HI 



Free Trial 
Cant gladly 

furnished 

for 30 days 

if you have 

no cans 



Ian. 8-68,; 
.Jun. 10— 4Ue 
Jan. q7-60c 



Jan. M— 48c 
Jan. 81— 4»c 



Our Price 
This Week 



48c 



Weak Feb. 21*1 to Feb. 17th ind. 



VUwpelnt. 
It takes the eyes ef the rich to sea 
tha blessings oi povertu 



WE PAY YOUR SHIPPING COST 

50,000 cream producer* in Ohio, Indiana sod Kentucky abip their 
cream DIRECT to The Tfj USSS, which ha. been e.t.bli.hed .inca 
1910 with a..ett over s million dolUr. and now handle* MORE 
CANS OF CREAM PER- DAY THAN ANY CREAMERY IN 
THE WORLD. Your check for every ahipmanl by return mail. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦eee*< 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦sseeesoeeoee^eeeeejs 



Only $1.60 the Year 



MTUort't HsUI to Ujmm<l All Tlia, AUs In Ttilss I 



I 



r* 



k 



i 






BOOgB COUNTY RECORDER 



\ 



3.1 



v 



/ 



1t~ 



fioeaf anef?Pers©neir 



IKnrriun Advertlnlnq Representative 
T' IF. AMERICAN PRHSS ASSOCIATION 

7 



Boone Co. Lutheran Pastorate 

Rkv. Gko. A. Roykr. Pahtor. 

Sunday, February 587 th 1921 

Hebron, 0:30 a.m.. Sunday Hohool. 

2.80 a.m. Regular Bervk-B. 

All are cordially invited to these 
services. 

Boone Co. Christian Pastorate 

C. C. Omer, Pastor 
SUNDAY, FER. 27th, 1921. 
Pfc. Pleasant, Sunday School 10 a. m. 
Preaching 11 a. in. by 
Preaching 7 b. m. 
You are invited to wotwliip with us. 



A Week's News. 



Dr. Yelton anoV Richard Pfcnn 
butchered hogB last Thursday. 



"What some businesses need is 
less Jalk and more printer's ink. 



It's difficult to convince a loaf- 
er thai he isn't smarter than men 
who work. 



Very mild winter, 
seem to wear just 
mufls as ever,- 



Mrs 
quite 
slowly 



C. A, Fowler 
siek for seve 
improving. 



Say "Mouse!* 1 to a girl aid she 
thir its. of her feet; mention rats 
ar.d she'll feel of her pompadour. 



Ray Conner and Art Wciraer, of 
Cincinnati, were guests of Elmer 
Kirk patrick and family, last Sun- 
day. 



Tiie time seams to have gone 
by when you could amass n for- 
tune by selling silk shirts co 
worklngmen. 



AU the civilized nations arc 
row devoting their best efforts to 
inventing new ancT terrible forms 
of poison ghs. 

The little child of Mr. and Mrs 
Elmer Ctoodridge out on R. D. 1, 
was quite sick several days_ last 
■week with locked bowels. 



No wonder the paper shortage 
keeps up, with 15,000,000 people 
scribbling away trying to figure 
out t heir income tax returns. 

Some peoples idea of commun- 
ity singing is waking up all the 
neighbors when they return from 
a high jinks party at 2 a. m. 



N o t man y pe ople ceU-br a tp Wash 
ingtoirs birthday ny reading his 
Farew.U Address, but a lot -of 
them cut ant red paper hatchets. 

A lot of people are W illing to 
talk about stopping naval con- 
struction as soon as they get a 
navy bigger thau anybody else 
has. 



In view of public demand thai 
the new administration announce 
its policies, Mrs. Harding has se- 
lected lavender as her favorite 
color. 



The time is eoon coming when 
the prudent man will lead his 
wife down town by some route 
that will- avoid the millinery win- 
dows. 



The starving millions of Eur- 
ope have not so far been able to 
comprehend why milk is being 
poured into the rivers in this 
eountrv. 



Don't worry movement is an ex- 
cellent proposition, only some 
people who are identified with it 
seem also to helorg to the don't 
Work Club. 



A lot of people who wouldn't 
work last year because they were 
so surg. of their jobs, can now 
lie ahed just as late in the morn- 
ing as they please. 



Many of the people who howl 
the loudest about taxes are the 
same oees who elect public offi- 
cials who never had any record 
of business capacity. 



It is .figlned that the recenk 
war cost $34 8,000,000,000, but some 
people belieye it is no use try- 
ing to think out ways of pre- 
venting another one. 



Omer Cleck, of Beaver Lick, has 
a Jersey cow that upon a test 
for butter production, made 6v 
a representative of Ky. University, 
put her on the honor roll. 



The speed of the gazelle has al- 
ways made it exceedingly difficult 
to hunt them, but now it is a*com- 
mon thing to see gazelle autos dart- 
ing across the desert in Morocco in 
pursuit of these speedy an^nals. The 
resnlts of the hunt are Invariably 
greater than when horses are used, 
becanse they become tired out be- 
fore overtaking the gazelles. 
♦♦♦♦ 
Matches made by one American 
factory in a sihgle day. if placed eud 
to end, would reach half way across 
the continent. 

♦♦♦♦ 
"Latest style in dogs," is the title 
given the German police dog by 
Dean W. Horace Hoskins, of the 
New York University Veterinary 
College, who says fashions in dogs 
fluctuate as they do in dress. 
♦♦♦♦ 
Hitherto the flippers of the seals 
caught in our waters have beev re- 
garded as a waste product, but the 
Fisheries Bureau finds that they 
_ irls will yield 07 per cent of their weight 
as thick ear- in excellent glue. It hopes to find a 
market for seal flippers with the glue 

manufacturers. Each year from 2o,- 

who has beenjOOO to.36.000 fur seals- are killed on 
•al days, "j the Prlbllofjjdands, In B.-ring Sea. 
Reckoning four-flippers at, K pounds, 
the annual production of flippers "is 
100 to NO tons. % 

♦♦♦♦' 
Vaccination of dogs against, rabies 
is to bo tested on a large scale' by 
scientists working under the direc- 
tion of the Society of Practical Vet- 
erinary Medieme. It is claimed that 
in isolated cases flogs have been ren- 
dered immune from, the disease for 
two and three years with a serum 
already developed. 
♦♦♦♦ 
The curvature of the earth is such 
tfitrt a straight line a mile long would 
be 2.04 incKes from the surface at 
either end. 

♦♦♦♦ 
Tahiti's highest peak, Mt. Oro- 
hena, 7,«J21 feet in height, still re- 
mains unclimbed by any of the pres- 
ent generation, a party recently hav- 
ing failed to reach the summit. 

♦♦♦♦ / 

The Asiatic bullalo is a very valu- 
able animal, ifH" m i 1 k containing 
three and a half times as much but- 
ter fat as that of the cow. 

♦♦♦♦ { 

In LfThdou middle-ago women of 
suitable appearance are engaged to 
act as escons for society girls. They 
call at the houses where dances are 
being held, and uimvoy their charg- 
es home. f 

♦*♦♦ 
The "ocean of air," which follow- 
ers of aviation believe some day wilj 
be filled with great air liners plying 
their way from city to city on regu- 
lar schedules; must be studied from 
a meteorological standpoint and the 
wliims add fancies of the elements 
must be reduced to easily understood 
data before the dream of world-wide 
commercial aviation can become a 
reality, according to C Le Roy Mei- 
singer, government meteorologist 
here. 

♦♦♦♦ 

Miss Frances Grant. England's 
first .woman film produces, in only 
tWeuty-six years old, and already 
has the reputation of being one of 
the cleverest persons in the) business. 
♦♦♦♦ 

The area of England is not quite 
equal to that of the State of Ala- 
bama. 

'X ♦♦♦♦ 

The smallest screws in "the world, 
used by watchmakers, are so tiny 
that they look like dust. An ordin- 
ary thiiublw could hold about 100,- 
000 of them. Some of the smallest 
are only four one-thousandths of an 
inch across and can hardly be seen 
by the naked eye. 

♦♦♦♦ 

The province of Quebec has three 
schools in which maple sugar mak- 
ing is taught. The province's out- 
put of maple sagar for 1919 was 12 J 
853,667 pounds and 1,470,375 gallons 
of syrup. v 



Flavor! 



No cigarette has 
the same delicious 
flavor as Lucky 
Strike. Because— 



It's 
toasted 

LUCKY 
STRIKE 

CIGARETTE 



Jku- Jhujun***** uw(ae *<r£^ 




Some people can't ^ do business 
now, because it is time for spring 
tra<*e, and when spring com?s 
they can't do anything because 
summer business has not develop- 
ed. 



The girl with big feet need not 
be embarrassed by the short skirt 
custom. The time has gone when 
a girl could get there by sug- 
gesting her inability to do any 
thing 

The people who are taking up 
the time of the senators with 
their appeals to be appointed to 
office, are probably kicking be- 
cause Congress does not do any- 
•thi'.g. ' , 

Fitzhugh^Tanner who has been 
resiling on the Lewis /tice farm 
o« the Dixie Highway, will have 
u sale of personal property MP.ireh 
rth. °ee his advertisement in this 
batlfc • 

While the ships built by the 
I idled States during the war have 
1 i-en fr«'e frpm leiki, the ware- 
houses i» which liquor has been 
ntorra bava not proved equally 

tight 



Public Sale. 



I will sell at public auction to 
the highest bidder at the resi- 
dence of the late John Smith, de- 
ceased, \ mile south of Belleview, 
Boone county, Ky., on 

Saturday, Feb. 26th, 1921 

the following' property: 
One lot Household and Kitchen 
Furniture, lot Tools, 50 bushels 
Corn. ){ Lot in town of Belle- 
view, and^other articles too nu- 
merous to mention. 

I will offer for sale Laughery 
Island, one-half mile above Belle- 
view. ' 

Terms -will be made known on 
day of sale. 

JOHN SMITH, Adtn. 
Sale to begin at 12 o'clock M. 



Jewe lry was mucti_l a.vAU»d b\ tin 
ancients, particularly by the ladies 
of Rome. Pliny says he saw Lollia 
Paulina, the most beautiful woman 
of her time, wearing ornaments of 
gold and precious stones valued at 
upward of two millions of dollars of 
our money. 

♦♦♦♦ 
Pink pearls are so* rare ,as to have 
no fixed commercial value, though 
pearl fishers say that, when any are 
found, Indian rajahs are always will- 
ing to pay enormous prices for them. 

♦♦♦♦ 
There has been a steady increase 
in the constitution of tobacco in-- 
Frauce for several years, until now 
it amounts to more than 52 ounces 
per capita annually. 

♦♦♦♦ 
Strawberries (ran now be kept suf- 
ficiently fret-h for jam making by 
f reeaiux l«>r a puwod uf inuutha. 

Lloyd Weaver tried his luck with 
thi» lltuiy trlbV in Ouitpowiiei 
creek one day last week, and suc- 
ecwded in landing several food 
staed fish 



For Sale 

Having sold my farm and will 
move by the first of March, i will 
sell at private, sale the following pie- 
ces of furniture. and other articles 
to-wit : 
1 Double Bedstead with box spring 

matress. \ 

1 Double Child's Bedstead, walnut, 

with railing. 
1 Single Bedstead with cotton mat- 
tress. „ 
1 Walnut Drop Leaf Table. 
1 Kitchen Table. 
1 B'ancy Small Walnut Table, also 

1 Stand. 
1 ^Chiffonier and 1 Fancy Kitchen 

Cupoard, glass doors. 
6 or more Chairs and 1 Couch. 
1 Pantry Shelve Stand for diveAuses, 
1-4 Knife Kraut-cutter. 
1 No. 10 Anterprise Sausage cutter 
1 No. 8 Large Cooking Stove & pipe. 
4 doz. Mason Fruit Jars more or less 
About 30 gallons of 8 year-old Vine- 
gar. Bring your jugs along, 
feb 17-24 JOHN KAHR. 

Public Sale. 



I will sell at public auction on 
my farm 2 miles north of Union. 

Saturday, Feb 26, 1921 

The following- property. 

1 Black horse, 7 years old good 
worker weighs 1400 pounds. 
3 Jersey cows 
H Ton Ford truck. < 
1 Road wagon, 1 Ha} - bed. 
1 McCormac mowing machine, 
1 Hay rake, 1 Surrey, 
8 Barrels assorted corn, 
1 Oliver plow, 

Lot household and kitchen fur- 
niture and other articles. 

Terms— All sums of $10 and un 
der cash, over $10 a credit of six 
months will be given, purchaser 
to execute note with approved se- 
curity payable at Union Deposit 
Bank. No property to Le remov- 
ed until terms of sale have been 

complied with^___ . — — 

(TwiTl begin at 1 p. m. 

J. W. WATERS. 



Public Sale 



I will offer at publ ic auction at my 
place near Petersburg, Ky., on 
SATURDAY, FEB., 2«. 1921. 
Following property : 
Hay Bed, Rock Bed, 
Disc Harrow, Mowing Machine," 
Hay Rake, Hay Fork and Rope, 
Corn Drill, Laying-off Plow, 
Land Plow, Hillside Plow, Sled, 
Wagon, Harrow, Carriage, 
Pitchforks, Coal Fork, 
Scoop Shovel, 2 Pesthole Diggers 
Set Wagon li uniess. Hav Knife, 
One Horse, Braces and Bits, 
Hoes, Saws, 1 Heifer 2 years old. 
Many other articles too numcKOH 
to mention. 

Sale to beglu at I o'clock prompt 
M Its JAMKS IUUCK. 

Wttltcr Itol.iti-on and wife, or 
ttlciiwuod m ic.h ! .ii h'M.tl, enteilaln 
i I a lew gtic*t* SuitUilV it ueek 
i i honor of Mi P K. RobtlMCMVI 

naih birthday Those present were 
P P Robinson and wife. Karl P, 
Hohlnaon find wife, it mi \Uji ri 
ftpbinson snd wife, of l.udlnw 



Seventh £ Madison 




Covington, Ky. 



NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S GREATEST STORE 



f 

Beginning Tuesday, March 1st 




Anniversary Sale 



48 years as Northern Kentucky's Greatest store ; our birthday 

celebrated with a sale of such gigantic proportions and drastic 
j 
reductions as to completely eclipse any previous sale you have 

ever been offered. 

We have been v planning this sale for several months, have 

» been buying" special merchandise for it, and will offer thousands 

of dollars worth of new spring outer apparel, yard goods, rugs, 

draperies, and housefurnishings at the lowest prices you have 

been cfuoted since pre-war days. Remember the 

Sale Starts 
Tuesday, Melt. 1st 







f 



Let's 



settle 



this ri.gh*: nowL 






■ III ■ ■!■ aaMlTM.'l ^■■■■l QB^^^HBHi^^ 

No man ever smoked a 
better c'garetta than Camel! 

You'll 'find Camels unequalled by 
any cigarette hi the worlds at any 
price because Camels combine 
every feature that can make a 
cigarette supieiiis ' '. 

Camels expert blend- of choice 
Turkish and orfioice Domestic 
tobaccos puts Camels in a class by 
themselves. Their smoothness 
will apperl to you, and permit 
you to smoke liberally without tir- 
ing your taste ! 

Camels leave no unpleasant ciga- 
retty aftertaste nor unpleasant 
cigaretty odor ! 

You'll prefer Camel^blend to either 
kind of tobacco smoked straight ! 

paikT-,** of 20 Lt^.ircttrn, -r tmn pack.i^os (200 
ei'rfOf-Vfoi) in 2 ( j/a.-isin'"-.'>.?p'" - -fov'?r«K/ carton. Wo 
ctron4-y r*eotnmm<i tftis c irton ur tft& iiomm or 
otS.j GU&piy or erften ■">-■ t.-.ivoL 

R J. Reynolds Tobacco Ca 

Winston-Salem, N. C 



NOTICE. 

nil |H'r«miiN who havi* rliims 
nguiiirtt Hi. of (J.-orjrr U 

Rouse fleP*"aM, will proH-'H them 
to m«\ proven M th«» luw ["*|uhfii. 
All jm'ihoii* owing nui<1 entntf 
will «-om^ forward end tettt* 

W V IIK,\l>l'OlU>. 
Admr 



NOTICE. 

All perftOM owing the i>stat<» ol 

I. inn ■» Clore, daOMMd, pU'.ihc conic 
furwurd nud KltlS >Wn« M "inv 
Aim* nil pertomi having «luinii 
aguinitt mtlit estate present iheni 
to met at once for settlement 
II M Cl.OKK, Agent 



Laura ("lore 



fent 
Mali- 



For Sale 

Dim acre, hi\ rouui huuae. cttineut 
I'.'lUr, funiscti heat, eleetrlo light, 
ami all kinds of fruit, at 458 Erlattg- 
«r Hoad, Krlaiigsr, Ky. Jan.lt 

TAKK YOUjTcOUNTY PAMUt 



bH^^^^^^^Hb^H^^^^^^HI 



'^h^^m^a^tk 1 ' s^ns:^.^Uiit '<&.*& 3E&fb3B«afriE &^B&Sil 



mvzm* mm 






Republican Leadership. 



< 



It i» a c omparativ e l y easy thing 
A man of very small 
i stan 1 on one Bkfce ana 

>! of (laws in the* work 
• who an" trviiisr to 



JUONE COUNTY RfcCORDCT 



WISEk OTHERWISE 



<io 



ability 

pick a 
of pen 
things. 

'Che Repul li< hi leaders had a 
comparatively easy time tor (lu> 
past .-i^iit years Ml they had to, ^ 
a,, was to find fault with what I 
thr cl'-ctcd officials of too coun- 
try « hi doing As these of ficlals 
were faced with the most serious 
problems tint the country has 
confronted since its foundation 
tfis, the finding 9i mistakes 
was not a difficult thing to do. 
Arvmii' who had Hern in power. 
;n<i who had had to confront 
i ew situations of incredible diffi- 
culty, would baVe made fals;' 
moves, , 

Rut low tho Republican party 
fiids itsel! up against a new sit - 
uatioi It is compelled to take 
the respox sihil|ty, and it his : i 
dri something bestd 
must fonr.ulatf |>1 
and do something d 



A Combination of Sense, Non- 
sense, News, Etc. 



rhe candidal 
primary wh« 



in thp Democrat- 
thinks he can get 
the nomination without the in- 
luer.ee of the women and their 
tad bettet" stay at home 
scrotch dirt — with the chick- 



it 

for 

have 



-.no' Tli 
action oi 



cot: titrj 

man • 



<M'fi<i->- 1. 

.ii action. 
^i\ " an 1 do 
is calling 
iesi Urns that 
and ignor- 



The 

i othiii- 
\ i 1 1 ■'. 
Coigre 
|,osals 
turn 
tiVe s 
did m 



itil< t 

W 1 5 



m- 



d 



mi 



Th 



ii 



■ l.i- 
i'i | 

radii 
Mon 



tic 



Mnr 



ictli 

party hroli 

it ilppendeul 

suit of tin 
the way i i 
failed to 
the eotii t • i 

The Repui [lean pirty 
have lea! 'i "d something 
eight years of d'deat. 
his imt I ri'l. ;i |i|i.ir >nt 

tions of Congress sin>"e 
tion. 



coiid do 
for two 
a i ■ r 1 1 y o f 
its pro- 
rmp '--I 
1 1 1 ■ e\i 
e niently it 
icta practical 
nes of policy. 
R 'publicans 
lid not show 
Ki'istfuirtiVB ac- 
half of their par- 
ay for const ructive 
' [in <\ half of (heir 
iwiy auj joined an 
vvement. as the 
dissal isfactk) i 
r, iii'ii their leaders 
r th" demands of 



and 
ens. 

A preacher says society girls at 
m social unction* wear only four 
garments, two o th»*m being stock 
u.gs 1'he other two must have 
beer, a slipper and a ig leaf, as 
the smile was not counted. - 
■{-■>•>• 
A hold-up ma l it. a Western ejty 
tin 1 other day. ater relieving a 
pro sperous citizen) of his roll, 
amouiitii g to y'lDO, handed back 
"in for '^incidentals.'' There's the 
j real difference between a hold- 
■ np mail and a profiteer, 
-:-h- 

An expedition is to spend five 
years in Asia in search of ht" 

, "mi— I :g link*' I itwe:Mi man ana 
mbi.key .fudging from the way 
the election wenl last Kail, w'e 

I should think die chances for an 

I expedition of this Unel very gooa 

[right .here in America, 

gentle/nan 



T 



tl 



ft , ,,v,, ,,,.,,, working 'man 
who formerly was pulling down 
from eight to twelve dollars a 
day and" wearing $15 silk shirts to 
Work in, is now a common labor- 
ing ma. i. uiLiiuii a k>l>, and rub- 
bing his empty breadF basket up 
against the tree soup counters. 



in 



p ro- 

wiTh 



.Then 
that 
goidi a 

lelloU 
US 

liie, is reasonably honest, Buddies 
a pauper It is plain as the wart 
on your baby's nose that tome- 



no longer any doulit 

the goost- who lays the 

eggs is the laborer, the 

Who feath"is our nests for 

A man works hard all his 



Public Sale 

I will offer at public sale on the Mat Riley 
farm by Narrow Grove school house on Rich- 
ardson pike, 3 miles east of Devon Sta., 11-2 
miles west of Madison pike, on 

Tuesday, Men. 1, '21 



f. W. Kassebaum ft Sou, 

8R4NITE 4 H1RBLS 

MONUMENTS, 

H Large 8to«H on Display 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool EquipmeM 

US Main Street, 

AURORA, IN1>. 



* 



The Following Property: 



8 



onght to 

in these 
If so. it 
in the ac- 
t he elee- 



My Old Man. 



lehal od. we 
> on refer to ya 
in-: as "the old 

Vou are fright " '1 
are you not? Just 
.i i oiil the 
the first at 

, i in ihia ; 
you know 
cut of VOui 
gl£ oJ hal, 
your walk, 
Jove— with 

Some of 
youth whir! 



u l 

thh 



heard 
raorn- 



thoi.rht 
tut Slf° 

man.? 1 

years of age, 

! Thai is just 

i :•• Callow y >in h has 

:"k of ■ fg Head 

>«c ii I his moment thai 

it ii \\ e Bee i v th •■ 

ti rtisera and the an- 

.:': 1 Oie swagger oT 

i h if yo l are madly ii, 

>ourself 

ih se are errors of 
i We older ones can 
overlook, but it vai'is us to hear 
you speak in terms of disrespect 
of one you should never mention 
nave by the sacred name of fath- 
er. He may nos. be* up to your I 
style in the. piurfH-n art of mak-! 
tag a fool of himself, but ten I 
to one he forgets more in a week J 
than you will ever learn. He may I 
enjoy his oid pipe more than the 
scraps of tobacco incased in deli- 
cate rice paper, but fee still is en- 
titled to all the reverence your 
shallow brain can muster 

By and by, after you are through 
knowing it all ami begin to learn 
something you will be ashamed to 
the glass, and you will 
the fool-killer kept 
umself wh«Q you wore ripe for 



body got all that the poor fel- 
low ever made. 

F. E. A. South, of Atlanta, (la . 
whose wife adopted eleven babies 
and ipalmed them off on her 
husband as his must have felt like 
the nam rooster when the old hen 
came off the nest with a brood 
of lostinga lie looked at the 
strange l ii Is a while, and then 
remarked that they were caught 
ii his net, and lie would have to 
claim them. 

♦♦♦♦ 
it is strarge to us that some 
I organization in this country 

i should have se;'n Caoss to call a 
'jury Of 1,500 preachers topassjudg 
jn.e.ot on ladies dress The verdict 
ot a hung jury was to have been 
expected in advance. Many wo- 
men Irom all ages, from Eve down, 
have worn just- what they pleas- 
ed, and not even the judgment of 
a preacher's jury will lengthen 
the skirt, collar or sieve or.e eye- 
lash.' 



Milk Cows— hne of them registered 
Ayrshire, will be fresh by day sale, 1 
due March 10, rest giving milk. 
Team of bays- -horse and mare, coming 

8 years old, weigh about 2400 lbs. 
Black driving mare coming 8 years old. 
2 Colt coming 2 years old. 
20 bus. Oats 100 bus. bus. sorted Coras. 
Some Fodder. 2h. Farm Wagon, 
Haybed, 2-h. Platform Wagon, 
1-h. Spring Wagon, 2-h. Carriage, 
Rubber Tire Buggy good as new. 
Steel Tire Buggy. McCorrnic Mower. 
John Deere Hayrake, Hay-tedder, 
Disc Harrow, Laying-off Plow, 



Left-hand Oliver Turning Plow, 

Left-hand Steel Turning Plow, 

2-h. Jumper, 5-shovel. Cultivator. 

2 Double Shovel Plow, 50-tooth harrow. 

2 sets double Work Harness, 

2 Mens Saddles, 2 sets Buggy Harness 

Set double Carriage Harness, Collars, 

Bridles, and Check Lines, 

60 gal. Coail Oil Tank. Scalding Pan. 

Doz. Plymouth Rock Hens & 2 Roosters 

22-lb. Sledge Hammer, Doubles-trees. 

Spring Wagon Pole and double-trees. 

New Syracuse Hillside Plow, 

100 ft. Hay-rope, fork and pulleys and 

various other articles. 



JAMES L. ADAMS 
DENTIST 

Cohen Building 

Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 

The Famous O. I C ,,» 

I now have for pale registered 
<). I. G. I'lprf. some of which are 8 
weeks old. '1 heir sire is the famous 
G. C Callaway Jumbo, and his sire 
Is Callaway Edd, the world's (irand 
Champion Hoar. All stock register' 
ed In e. 

FRANK HAMMONS 

R. lb Florence, Ky. 



D. E. Castleman, 
A TTORNE YATLA W, 

— Office over — 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, 

Erhirnjcr, - Kentucky. 



<A 



List Your Sales 
the 



2 year old Bull, and 4 or 5 tons of Hay in the barn. 



look in 
wonder where' 



Kentucky News Gullins 



George Bruce lost _a fin e horse 
on his tarm at Martin. He started 
to catch the horse in the barn 
when it whirled awav, stepping 
on a tobacco stick. * The end 
flew up and penetrated about two 
ij dies between its front legs. The- 
stick was removed and the horse- 
dropped dead in p-ss than twenty 
minutes —Vance burg Sun. 
♦♦♦♦ 

Mr 0. C, Kvans of the Mt Ster- 
ling laundry is the owner of 



TERMS OF SALE. 

All sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on sums over $10.00 
a credit of six mo'nths without interest wijl be given, purchas- 
er to give note with good security, payable at Florence De- 
posit Bank, Florence, Ky., before removing property. 

Albert M. Underhill. 

Sale will begin at 10:30 a. m. LuteBradford, Auctioneer 



Public Sale. 



--,- —..dog that on Sunday gave birth 

to six puppies, two oi which are 

And then, when the "old mam' j decidedly grron. This is a pecu- 

grows weary of life's toilsome liar sight as we have never seen 

journey, and stops for the long nor heard of a dog of this Color 

est, and you fold his ha n d s across This has caused quite a bit of 

breast and take th; 1 last ' « xdtenvnt. and Mr Evans has 

at a face that has grown I bee.i busy for the past few davs 

i-eautiful in death, you may feel a showing his callers the 

I of regret that you spoke of | -Seneiiud-D-mocrat. 

♦♦♦♦ 



his 
look 



rare sight. 



him in such disrespectful i 
arid when you hoar other sprouts 
■of imbecility use th" lim-'uaecj 
that so delighted you m toe«er- 
minal period you will reel iik<> 
chasing- them with a stake ami 
crushing their skulls to se:i if 
there is any brain tissue on the 
inside —Ex 



Restoring "Normalcy." 

Some people are helping bring 
back good business, and some ar.' 
obstructing it. Producers and dis- 
tributors whoc continue to ask I 
high prices for their goods are 
in the latter class But every 
manufacturer and dealer who cuts 
his prices dowr. to the bon», 
who would rather ke°p moving 
even if hv no more than gets a 
new dollar for an old one, he is 
doing a lot toward bringing bet- 
ter tiroes. 

jVr.d similarly the working peo- 
ple who insist on unchanged wag- 
es for themselves while all kinds 

t ne 



When Dr. Welch finishes his 
cleaning . of the various d-ns <d 
vice in Louisville we hope he will 
i come down to OWensboro antl 
break ii|> the sinful private whist 
parties of the ladies of this tow. i 
an I &>nfiscate some of the old 
moth-eaten prizes they have been 
swappi \-r around town. Our Law 
and Order League evidently needs 
the help of such a practical ei u- 

sader — Owcnsboro Messenger. 

♦♦♦♦ 

We have several people in this 
community past 80 years o>f age. 
J. J. Cummins is in his 8*!d vear. 
His mini is clear and to hear 
him talk of General Morgan ana 
his command is very entertaining. 
B. F Whitaker is past 80, and is 
stout and hearty. He lives at Odd- 
ville. Mrs. Joe Ross, mother of 
'Squire J. (' B, Ross, is in her 
81th year, and can tell vou things 
that happened years ago, the same 
as the things of yesterday -Cyn- 
thiana Democrat. 



ol priced have been — fikl t ig 
toboggan, are also obstructing tfw 
return of good business 

The constant circulation of ru- 
mors about the solvency of this 
or that concern, stands to con- 
tract th" process'.** of trade 
About Christmas time, it was sain 
in many centers, that th" major- 
ity of business men wer ,x in a 
bad hole, and the impression was 
given that many were not sol- 
vent. 

But nearly two months have 
passed, and while th-re have 
Oeen a good many failures, yet 
the proportion is small to the 
•total number of peoplp engaged 
ii. ! inese These reports are all 

faggerutiona. The great majority 
business men made money 
♦•rough in the inflation period to 
carry them through the drflation 
era. 



eft 

of 



An article appears in another 
column of this issue on the ques- 
tion of Income Tax, prepared I s 
Q«brg« O. Dunlnp Mr, Uunlap !■ 
a i»on of Hev (leorg'. Ounlap who 
resided In this county a few years 
since Mr Dunlap seli'rted :m his 
life mat* a Boone county girl, 
MIm Grace Grant, datghtti ol Or 
J M Grant, of Petersburg, 



Not a firm in Kentucky pays a 
child labor tax, accordi ig to* El- 
woo 1 Hamilton, Collector of Inter- 
nal Revenue. The tax, required by 
the Government, consists of 10 
per cent on the gross value of 
articles produced with thi? aid of 
child labor. 

Under the law manufacturers or 
employers are subject to the tax 
if they employ children less than 
16 years old. No child less than 14 
years old may be employed in 
mills, canning factories,. workshops 
or manufacturing establishments. 

The few also provides that chil 
dren mav not be employed more 
than eighjt hours a day' nor more 
tluui sik days a week. Hours of 
such child employyme it are lim- 
ited to the period between six 
o'clock in the morning md seven 
o'clock at night 

Federal oificials voice the belief 
thai the State law limiting em- 
ployment of children lest than II 
years old, which h:m been enforc- 
ed vigorously, Iinm iii( down to 

Gu. child labor tux lib] 
I in i . 



I will offer for public sale on the place known 

as the Whitlock farm, on the Ohio River, 

4 miles north of Hebron, Ky., on 

Monday,Mch.7,'21 



With Me Bsrly in 

Season. 

LUTE BRADFORD 

• Live Stock Auctioneer* 

Your Work Solicited^ Sec tne 
and get my terms. 
Phone Florence, Ky. R. D. 

Farmers oct-14 

IT'S A WISE IDEA. 

Do as Many Others are doin^ 
send vour cream to the 

CLOVERLEAF CREAMERY 

Burlington, Ky. 

I pav cash for cream aud insure 
■ you a square deal. 

I RECEIVE EVERY 

FRIDAY . 

J. O. HUEY, Manager. 

-AT HOWE- 

DR. F. L. PEDDICORD 

1017 Madison Avenue, 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY. 

'Phone So. 1 148. 



*• 



The Following Property: 



2 Black horses, weigh 1 400 lbs. each. 

1 Draft horse, weigh 1400 pounds. 

1 Mare with mule colt. 

4 Cows, 1 fresh, 3 will be fresh in April. 

1 Poland china sow, will farrow in April. 

1 Poland china gilt. 

6 Shoats, weigh 90 to 100. pounds. 

1 2 Horse top wagon, good condition. 

2 Road wagons. 4 Sets work harness. 
2 Sets buggy harness. Saddle. 

1 Buggy in good condition. 2 Scythes. 

1 Dixie plow ■ Hoes. Potato hook. 

4 Disc for c ulti vator plow. 

1 Double shovel plow. 

1 2 Horse riding cultivator. 

1 3 Horse Oliver breaking plow. 



Weed cutter. 



1 Horse jumping shovel. 

2 horse jumping shovel. 

2 Oliver breaking plows. 

1 Horse corn drill. Walking cultivator. 

3 Picks. Stone hammer. 8 lb. sledge. 

6 Shovels. Cross cut saw. Grubbing hoe 

2 Shovels. 1 horse stretcher. 

3 Log chains. 6 Breast chains. 

2 Sets double trees. 2 horse sled. 

2 4 prong forks. Ice cutter. 

2 Horse hinge, 2 horse disc harrows. 

4 Cow ties. Wheel barrow. Grind stone 
2500 Lbs old tobacco. ' Bed stead. 

1 Pulley and ropes. • Range. 

Half interest in stack Oats and in two 

Stack Timothy hay. 



TERMS — Sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on sums over $10.00 a credit 
of six months will be given, purchaser to gwTnote with approved security, 
payable at Peoples Deposit Bank, Burlington, Ky. 

Thos. W. Nettles. 

Sale to begin at 12 o'clock. 



Th* 

noundi 
nundri 



tots] tobacco m|i-< .,i iiic 

lit l.i'MIUfton In VI. I 



Before and After. 
Before he gets her be says: "flow 
womanly l H when she doe* anything. 
But after he gets her he suys: "That's 
just like a woman V wheu she does s 
thing. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 



Shock Frequently Does Good. 
Keep fenr out of your nyatem. bat 
don't be troublixi at a little fright. 
Anything In the nature of a shock or 
a Jolt la helpful if it doesn't i-<nu# too 
late. It la the only uay that three- 
quarters of the Inhabitants of this 
ranh run rtver he made lo realise the 
necessity of doing what Is in them to 



do.— John 

News. 



Itlake to Chicago Dally 




Igim foil* appreciate 

tlje ^erfrice JKcnucrcfc bu 

|Il|ilip (Ealiafcrra 




SQUEEZED 
TO DEATH 

VI n the body begins to stiffen 
a:~. .r.Dvement becomes painful it 
is j.cucily aa indication that the 
kidneys are out of order. Keep 
trv "jt 4 Ofgaa* healthy by taking 

COLD MEDAL 




!% « 



H^MIIMPJJ 

' he world'r, standard remedy for kidney. 

. ver, bladder and uric acid troubles. 
'*x r )ou3 since- ;096. Take regularly and 
ceep in good health. In three sizes, all 

il, agists. Guara:iteud as represented. 

tcuk fur the n»rue Cold Medal on ovary bar 
*ad accept no inut«ti«>u 

Attention Auto Owners! 

I am prepared to do first-class 

repairing on all makes or cars. 

Starter and generator work a 

specialty. All work guaranteed. 

Give me a trial. 

Earl M. Ay lor, 

HEBRON, KY. 
Phone Hebron 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 

Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by c4dver- 
tising. 



t 

4 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



♦ 

e 
♦ 
♦ 
e 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 



IMPORTANT NOTICB. 



Watch the date following 
your nam* on the margin 
of your paper and if It is 
not correct please notify 
this, office at once. If your 
paper has been discontinu- 
ed by mistake before your 
time expire*! do not <f«>luv 
notifying thin office Al| er- 
rors aro chi-erfullj 
•d here. 



Ily «orreai- 



♦ 

♦ 
♦ 

e 
♦ 



T«kt» Yoer County l'u|a*r 
••♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦eeeeeeeeee. 



iflrBfitarliejrf'ri 



■*aJ<'£* " 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



<*> 






«f 



I 






r 



ir 



B 



1 



CALL ON 



11 



Gulley*Pettit 

And inspect their line of General Merchandise 
you will find their prices 



$100 

1.60 

75c 

. 1.25 



J 



3 



Starving China's Cry 



(This picturn U copyrighted by Undoi-wnoM ,t t'nri- rw . 



8 



J-U-S-T R-l-T-E. 

Blue Work Shirts .- 

240 Weight Blue Denim Overalls 

220 Weight Blue Denim Overalls, Childrens 

Comfort Batting 3 1-4 lb. roll 

Our Coffee 

Mixed House, high grade blend, lb 45c 

J. and M Blend 40c Golden Blend 35c 

Try a pound and see the difference. * 
Special Blend 25c Reo High Grade 20c 

Our Line of Groceries Is Complete. 

Bulk Oats, pound 5c 

Liberty Bell Flour, as good as the best, 24-lb. bag . . 1.50 

Ohio Corn, 10c can, y • -3 for 25c 

Gold Bar Pine Apple, No. 3 can, 1 lb. 14 oz 40c 

_ Jiff-Jelly and Jell-O, all flavors 10c 

~7 Bars Swift's Pride Soap.- 25c 

Blue Bird Bread-fresh every day. Fresh Meats of all kind 

Blue Rose Rice, 4 lbs . ■ 25c Yarmouth Corn » 15c 

Solitary Flour, 24 lb . 1 .50 Baldwin Apples, pk . . . . 60c 

Big Sandy Sorghum • • • • 85c Pink Salmon, can 15c 

Mothers' Oats, per box ,. 12c 

We have in stock at all times Mixed Feeds, Tuxedo Chops, 
Cearela Dairy Feed and Egg Mash, Hog Feed. Midlings. If 
Oyster Shells and Grit, per 100 lbs .$1.65 



GULLEY & PETTIT, 

I Burlington, Kentucky. m 




Merchants Creamery 

OF CINCINNATI 

Has opened d'Cash Buying Cream Sta. at Petersburg, 

Ky. We test and pay for your cream while 

you wait. Start in and give us your next 

trial can. We are located in the 

Post Office Building. 

J. C. BOLEN, x 

PETERSBURG, KY 



Operator 




I 




n 



.i 



i 



Everything in Wood 

Get Our Prices 

WOOD AND ASPHALT SHINGLES, 

PULP AND PLASTER WALL BOARD, 

ORNAMENTAL SLATE ROLL ROOFING-MIXED 

COLORS— DIAMOND SHAPE, - 

LIGHT. MEDIUM and HEAVY ASPHALT ROLLlROOF- 

INO, BARN SIDING, GARAGE'.DOORS, 

.1EAVY TOBACCO RACKING. 



I 



The A. M. Lewin Lumber Company, 

COVINGTON, *vr, 

A Madison Ave. and 24th St. Phone South 465-466 I 

V»«__ imibwi mmmmmmJi 



"CHINA'S MADONNA OF MISKrCr^ "* 

Drawn and Ilthographod by Henry 
upper left — "r amine," depicted In 
Chtna'B Cryi "Pleaee Kelp I" 



B&leiffh •■ m porter oontrfbntlomi 
• CUlneee ld«Oj?ram; upper rl^rht— . 



M' 



ORE than 40,000,000 persons 

In the five famlno -trirkon 

provinces of north central 

China face* starvation 11 nd of this nuin- 

'ber 15,000,000 now are sulisltaiug on 

dry leaves, dry grass and bark from 

trees. , 

Drouth killed the crops a year and a 
half ago. There is no surplus in Chi- 
na's hi-seasoral crops 
qlatlon requires this 
of nature to live. 

The drouth coDttnaed— the Summer 
crop never nuiterialized. With the 



planted for the fall crop. The drouth 
continued and their la>t hope van- 
ished. 

Then America awoke to the fact that 
4o,00O,0OO jiersons were without ade- 
quate clothing or fuel and 15,000,000, 
besides lacking these necessities of 
life, have not a mouthful of food. 

I>r. K. Y. Mulling, president of the 



double bounty 



her great pop- ! Southern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary, is chairman of the China Famine 
Fund which is Collecting funds iu Ken- 
tucky to send immediately to the fam- 
ine zone in China. Joseph Barge, f» 
Board of Trade Building, Louisville, bj 
greatest fortitude the people then treasurer. 



o^^^^^^^m^w^m^^.^m^^^»^wMMO 



* 
* 



LOGAN FOSTER. 



B. B. 



ALLPHIN. 



Foster & Allphin 

Real Estate and Auction Sales Co. 

1 am associated with the above firm and srlicit your busi- 
tiess. List your farms with us. Give us youa sales of Live 
Stock and other Personal property. 

We do the advertising, Ruction your^SHle, clerk ami col- 
lect. All you have to do is give us property list. 



FOSTER & ALLPHlN 

Covington, Ky. Walton, Ky. Phone 3^7 Con. 

B.'B. ALLPHIX, Local Agent, Walton, Ky. 






* 



<r 



/' " 



ar*l 



IS 



); 



PROVED EFFECTIVE BYA« 
FIFTY YEARS TRIAL 



The most widely nied remedy In the 
world to overcome Ihe stagnating 
effects of catarrh. Catarrh it 
tilent and -insidious in its 
ravages, invades nearly 
every household and 
hovers like a pesti- 
lence every- 
where. 



FOR 

CATARRH 
AND CATARRHAL 

coNsmotts 



It strikes at the root of ca- 
tarrhal troubles by stimulating 
the dieeslion, enrichinr the blood. 
toning up the nervous system and 
soothing the raw and inflamed mucous 
membrane*. Peru na seta every organ to 
working properly and gives strength, vigor 
and pep to the whole body. Try it and like 
thousands of others, learn what It means to be well. 



SOLD EVERYWHERE 



TABLET8 OR LIQUID 



Time Deposits 

Money Savers may now take advantage of the 
facilitius offered by many of the country banks 
to secure INTEREST ON DEPOSITS without 
undergoing the many inconveniences that are 
incident to deposits in Saving Banks. The fact 
that we pay 3 per cent, interest on deposits 
made for a term of l ess than 12 months, and 



4 per cent 

1 
on deposits made for a term of one year may 
interest you in this matter. 

Boone Co. Deposit Bank 

Established 1886. 

Burlington, Kentucky. ' 




Lets Stop Kidding" Ourselves 

IT'S ALWAYS BEST TO FACE 
THE FUTURE SQUARELY. 

We are doing this and have greatly reduced 
prices on all 

Suits and Overcoats 









I ATTENTION, FEEDERS! 

We carry a complete line of the following feeds and 
fdr a short time will make a special price on same: 

Bran Cotton Seed Meal Scratch Grain 

Shorts Little Chick Feed Corn 

Mixed Feed Tankage Hog Feed 

also Oats suitable for seed. 

< \ We have feeds for every purpose. Come, in and let us 
figure with you on your requirements. 

B. J. CRISLER, 

I PETERSBURG, KY. 

.Kias^KaaraFawTKiiaags^^ 



• UNION. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

Reuben Conner atttMidprl church 
here Sunday. 

Miss Ruth Stephenson spent 

the week-end with Mrs. Owen 
Blankenbeker 



AMERICAN LEGION NOTES 



American Legion members, scat- 
tered over the- world, continue to 
vlai::l together. The latest appli- 
cation for information in regard] 
in establishing a foreign post came! 
Irom t he Island of Ceylon where! 
two members of Akron, Ohio, Post 



For Men, Young Men and Boys. 

Quality and service have build our business, and 
we will take, care of your wants at a great sav- 
ing to you. 

We carry a complete line of Sweater Coats 
and Corduroy Coats and Pants. 






Mrs. Richard Smith entertained | have decided to organize tin- ex- 
at dinner Sunday, Rev. Garver and , service wai derers. The* nearest 
J. T. Bristow and family, I posts to ( eytofl are located at 

Several from hero nttcilod the I Singapore and Yokohama, more 
dance at Carey Carpenter's Frl-'thin a two week's journev away 
day night and report a fine time. . ♦♦♦♦ 

An old time charivari was giv-| A fighting chaplain quoted scrip 
en Raymond Newman and wife. ; tUfe to the members of tbe Mis- 
Mondav night at the residence of 1 souri Legislature in behalf of a 
J. R. Newman, boxi vg bill which the American 

Jeff, Fee and Eph Norman, of Legion is pushing iO that state. 
Alabama, attended the funeral of The (quotation which was made 
their brother Everett. The funeral I °7 tht > Rev . Es *rl A. Blackman, la 
was conducted by Rev. Specr, af-! f _ roln ?? ul in _ the ninth chapter of 
ter which the remains was laid 



605 Madison Avenue, 

Covington, Kentucky 




Efficient, Service and Economy 

IS MY SLOGAN 

0. SCOTT CHAltfBERS 

Embalmer and Funeral Director 

WALTON, KENTUCKY. 



•••♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦•♦•••♦♦♦•♦ •♦•♦♦ mm »«tttttijM»»MMT>~ 

Take Your Comity Paoer, $1.60. 

Read Our Advertisements and Profit ftv Them. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



►«♦♦♦♦ 



to rest in the Rice cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Feldhaus 
announce the marriage of their 
daughter, Louise Elizabeth, to 
Raymond Kirtley Newman, Satur- 
day, Feb. I9ch, 1921. The ceremony 
was performed at the home of Dr. 
L. L. Henson, of the South Street 
Baptist church, Covington 



•> — - W 

• FRANCESVILLB • 

• • 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦#♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Rev. B. F. Swindler spent Sun- 
day at Jerry Bates. 
Raymond and Robert Lee Cave, I tries, 
Cave Jr 



Corinthians. It is: "I am a boxer 
ard I hit hard and straight, not 
as one who beats the air. bsit 1 
buffet mv bodv.'' 

'♦♦♦♦ 

The "dead ILae'' for payment of 
American Legion dues has bee'i 
fixed for February 28. The names 
of members who fail to pay on or 
before that date will be stricken 
from the subscription lists of 
the American Legion Weeklv. 
♦♦♦♦ 

The convening of arr - Am eric a n- 
ism conierence in every state, fol- 
lowed by the assembling of a na- 
tional congress, to be attendad 
by Americanism directors, and 
representatives of schools, indus- 
and various civic and pa- 



sons of John Cave Jr, have'triotic (societies is o*i the pro- 
pneumonia. J gram of the Americanism Corn- 
Mrs, Sadie Goodridge and little; mission of the American Legion 
son are visiting her parents at for 1921. The, Legio.vs plan was 
Tavlorsport. formed as a result of an Ameri- 
Chas. Muntz, of Waterloo, visit- J canism conference b> Massaciiu- 
ed relative* in this neighborhood, setts, which whs held und»*r thc« 
several diys last week. | auspices of the Bay State Lo- 
E J, Aylor and wife entertain- ' gionaires 



»•<! h"r hiece and husband of 11. mi- 
ilton, Ohio, last week 

Mrs Anna Kruse was born In 
Mlanburg, Oermany, August M.\, 
184*2, came i«» Araeriea In Ih65, was 
married to CsspeF Kru^e St>>|il I •, 
IMI, 'li.-'t Vfb lh. IM1, »-.-i- Tfl 
vears liv.- mtdfiths and 23 days 

Hit bii'. ! i ' I 'In I 'J I \ i- ir-< i [O 

She leaves •" naouri her death 
• lii ■ * ■ SOim in \ "if duugl .it «>igtil 
iii a T.i i lnl trim .■ » i .. , ... 
iii*«i man) ftien la The ramtl) 
wUiw« lo ibu>K ibi-H lrienda,and 
neighbors '<» ih- man) ktndn 
Itow (hum lui i iai tin ill 
and death Ol their beloved moth 



♦♦♦♦ 

To provide fu ids for the main- 
tenance or a Salvation Army ho*- 
(« Iry for unemployed veterans, 
the American Legion in St Paul, 
MP,n . tho World War Veterans 
aid the St pnui Trades and La- 
bor AsemMy will uiin- in the 
produotlO) o> a bem-fit ent»r- 

. si nn-nt Tb > Le<io;rn 4eei*iO$tO 

cooperate uith fh«* u d^n mi tn 
ttas »sdo at a po s t mwtln ; 
i Idreased hj a prom I ieni Mlnne« 

sola liliiii i.|iii.,i 



tl 



I M 

II- I in (me gay 

fl •«' iRltlst 

• Recorders |oj « isron 



in tea, of »h> ii i .,,,,,,., || » 
i" <nie day last a k iihI 



IF YOU ARE IN NEED OF ANYTHING 

IN MY LINE GIVE ME A CALL. 

-I HANDLE THE- 

I. H. C. Farm Machinery 

t|j Repairs for sane, 

—ALSO— 

~^The Oliver Line ~ 



Fairbanks Morse Engines - 1 h. -p. $62.50; 

3 h p $107,50; 6 h- P $175.00, 

I pay the freight. 



L 



phoenix Buggies 

AND ALL KINDS OF 

Hardware & Wire Fencing 

Gantral Biacksmithing and Rubbertiring. 

Calvin Cress, - Union, Ky. . 

O SSSM 0«SSBHSSB«Ssl 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦•♦♦♦•••• seeeeeeeeeeeeseeeeoeoeeooo 

Subscribe for the Recorder. 
Try It One Year - You'll Like It. 



Is^s^sHH Hi n&^-is^i^a ^ wj-s&K&flp s ... HBI sIs^L^HHsBs^sHHs^sIs^Hb^s^bHsHHHHsHHH 



^sia^^^ : ^-:i:^v--"H- S '^- :^.> 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 






tMlCKlE, THE PRINTER'S t>EVIL 



By Charles Sughroc 

"' Western NVwap^ptr Uruon 



The Only Good Gossip Is a Dead Qne ^ 

I — J.- !■■- J 1. PB ' I . 




* 



80 ONE CO. RlC08QEH> 



vi'Hr.isuKii i:vi:k\ tiiurkHAY 
N. l£. ttlDDfit.L Publisher: 



Kntei» (i m tli* !i ist< il!<-. in Hiiiliiijj: 
am, K\« ji *; isei-otitl-flasH Mail 



A BIG MEETING. 



I 



Geoffrey Morgan, George IVnn 
a i. i W. i> Sutton have been hoW-j 
jrg meetings af different points, 
ir the cptmty on behalf of the] 
farm bureau: New members have 
b< e i reeeiyed ••' ?acto of thewj 
meetings. When Mr Morgan ana*! 
Sutton attend a m"'i"i you e 1 i 
rest assured that "tlio interest of 
the farm bureau will l>e properly' 
takci care of. as thos> men :irp 

t boroughly — fam iliar- —mith farm i. 

bureau work v royal t i «n • » Waal 
hud at the H«' >ro;i meeting Mon- 
ilay :i^ht. -\ picture shmv was 

given, lunch served and every 
one enjoyed 



i CHILD CAN RUN A SILENT ALAMO FARM 
ELECTRIC POWER AND LIGHT PLANT. 
THIS .PLANT TAKES CARE OF ITSELF 
AT A COST OF 3c PER DAY. 



• • 



GENUINE 

BULL 



r 



iho eveninz. 



Mm day afternoon those in;;i at- 
tended a meeting at Petersburg* 
which for enthusiasm and benefit 
done the farm bureau, was one of 
the beet. 

Manager Penn aid Farm Agent 
Sutton hell a meeting Q'le nun 
last week at the Kid i di school 
"house on tlu> Bullittsville pike on 
■ farm bureau business A number 
of new members Joined the bureau 
at that meeting, which was very 
enthusiastic. Th • night was dark 
and rain falling, and some folks 
thought that Messrs. , Penn and 
Sutton would not be present, hut 
when these gentlemen make a 



DURHAM- 

tobacco makes 50 
g ood cigarettes for 

10c 

Mrs. Jessie Waldo Kelly 



rv 



date, for a farm minting they will 
be there. A little rain or snow 
will not keep them away 



c 



GENERAL MARKETS. 

Potatoes )>er Mil l!,v. QQ t<> *l.Io 
Apples Baldwin s I. hi 4.r>r. ».. .>.;> 
Onions 100 lbs 75c to )!it 00 
Ccrn bushel 71 to 72c.' 
Wsheat bushel $t.!)l to W.9& 
Wheat May, $1.71 

• Hogs, $8.85 to $9 50, 

Good Steers $8:25 to p <m. 
Veal Calves $9.25 to $12 00, 
Fat Lambs $7.00 to $10 00 
Timothy hay ton $2ino 
Bran ton $21.00 
Middlings per ton $40.50 
Butter, farcy dairy 37c. 

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM 

The Ciceronian Literary Society 
of the Boone County High School 
will give an open session tiro- 
gramme this coming Friday night, 

try 25. Through the kinn- their parts ;~a"nd""they'7lao" repaid" 

their mother with obedience ana 



'•Life's race well run. 
Lile's work well done, 
Liie's crown well won — 
Now comes rest!' 1 
Mr*. Jessie^ Wal.io Kelly, aged 10, 
widow of Walter Kelly, slipped 
away uuo the sleep eternal Feb- 
ruary s, 1921. after a distressing 
illness of many months' duration. 
Perhaps it is not making too 
broad an assertion to state that 
never in the h istory of our little 
city has a life and death so : 
touched the hearts of our people. 
Beivil of her 'husband almost . 
three years, ago, with four chil- 
dren to train for life's battle, she 
took charge of his business, and 
with the help pf the larger 1 
c hildren ran it un til her healtn 
as irrevocably gone. Mrs. Kelly 
was pre-eminently a wonderful 
wife and mother, measuring up to 
the description as given in the 
31st chapter of Proverbs. When 
she realized that she was mark- 
ed for the tomb, she kept up a 
most thorough training of each 
child, both in books and the many 
problems that come up in daily 
life. How well she succeeded in 
this undertaking is known to all, 
for he it said to the credit " of 
Waldo, Lucinda, Martha and Hes- 
ter, tbey are equipped to act 






® fc'h. 



1M 



001- 



d 



. 



m 



V i 



!■' 



ress of Mr. Fowler the custodian, | 
-the programme will be given in 
the court house and will begin 
promptly at eight o'clock This 
programme is not exactly, an en- 
tertainment but gotten up for the 
purpose of training the minds of 
the students ami to improve them 
in the art of public speaking An 
admission of 25 oe-nts for adults 
and 15 cents for children will he 
charged in order to obtain money 
fOT the high school library- fund 
It is" hoped that a large -audience 
• will be present to encourage the 
efforts of the pupils. 

FREE --S100.00 PEN OF 

1AKRED PLYMBTH ROCKS, 

I am giving the above pen as a 
premium to the members of Boys' 
•and Girls Club for the best Bar- 
red'Rock Display at Ky. State 
Fair this fall. |,For details see 
Mr. Sutton, Connty Agent. 

JA.S. W. HUEY, 
1 Union, Ky. 
"Hating list now ready— sent 
free upon request. 



♦ * 

• DEVON • 
•♦ ♦ 

•♦•♦•eee>«ee»eee*«>eeeeeeee« 

Robert Woodward was on the sick 
-ltet'Monday. ' 

Mrs. Wulfeck spent Saturday and 
Sunday with friends in the city. 

Mrs. W. W. Woodward and* Mrs. 
' Ben Bristow were in the city Friday. 

Omer Kastou and wHV spent Sun- 
day with C. D. Carpenter and fain 
uUy. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. D. Carpenter and 
daughter Miss Marie, were in the 
•Ity Friday, „ 

Mr. Frank McCoy white grubbing 
some bushes had a chip to fly into 
his eye, outtiug deeply into t.ho ball 
of the eye. Thursday afteriioiiii Dr. 
Petty took him to the private hoi 
pital of l>r. Morphy, where Dr. Ktuh- 
tieeh operaud upon his aye Friday 
morning. He will lose the sight of 
that «y«- Jls i. dolug nicely and 
we hone h« will soon be hoiim. Me 
and hit wlf. have our sympathy. 



loving care. 

Still the home could 111 afford 
to lose the guiding hand and the 
■visiole presence of this ^mother, 
whose life was singularly pure 
and beautiful; whose devotion 
to duty was rarely surpassed; 
whose conscientious persistency in 
following what she believed to be 
right. These traits together with 
a tristful faith ir. her Savions 
merits she possessed, and we can- 
not understand the why of her 
goir.g. but we do know'the good 
Uod has made no mistake. 
"Peace-, be still, 
Bow thy hoad and take 
Life's rapture and Life's ill, 
And wait at last all shall be clear" 
Mrs. Kelly was a member of the 
liri versa list church, but in the ab- 
serce of a church of her faith 
she worshiped with the Presby- 
teriai congregation of this city, 
ard was loyal in her support and 
faithful ir her attendance. 

After witreesing the heroic lifo 
ard passing of this woman, Car- 
rollton should be a better place 
in which to live. We should have 
more sympathy, more neighborli- 
ness, more kindness in our hearts 
for all about us; 

Besides the four children Mrs 
Kelly is survived bv her mother 
two sisters and three brothers, to- 
gether with many other relatives 
I he funeral, conducted^ by Rev 
J. Fenstermacher. took place at 
the home Thursday at 10 a m. 
There was also a beautiful talk 
>y Miss Sue Browlnaki. Interment 
m the I O O, F ( emeterv.-Car- 
rollton Democrat. 

Mrs. Ada Conner, who has teen 
spending the winter with b.T daugh- 
ter. Mr M . Nannie McAte* nr \\ 
wood, I '"liana, is v.-ry ulck'ata hos- 
pital in < iiieimiati with pneumonia, 

Qonsiderable tobaoeo in to i..- put 
on the markei yet from this pmt , f 
thecouul\. 



Home is the place for comfort. Electrify your Home. 
Give the family the bright lights and keep them happy 
Electrify your home for safety keep the dangerous open- 
flame lights from your buildings. Electric Lights are 
clean and dependable, and safe anywhere. 

In selecting a Farm Lighting Plant be aware of the 
size you are buying. There are some three-quarter kw 
units for practically the same price as a* four kw plant. 
Investigate this matter carefully before placing your or- 
der. 

Take into consideration that the SILENT o4LAMO 
does not have to have any extra expense to install it. You 
can set this little motor* down anywhere you wish, hook 
the wires on and the plant is installed. 

The SILENT ALAMO is the cheapest hand you can 
employ on your plack. The plant will light every build- 
ing around your home, and do much other hard work 
for the family. 

Don't neglect the pleasureand convenience that you 
owe yourself and family by placing your order for the 
SILENT ALAMO. 

W. L. KIRKPATRICK 

Burlington, Kentucky. 



\j 



Public Sale! 



I will offer at public auction at my farm, 2 miles east of Un- 
ion, anc^r 1-2 miles northwest bf Richwood, Boone 
County, Ky., on Saturday, 

Feb. 26, 1921 

The Following; Property, to wit : 
1N£00 pound 11 year old black horse, (food worker, lady broke. 
1 11-year old sorrell mare good.worker and driver, 
1 5-year old Jersey cow, rich milker, giving 2 trallons a day. 

1 4- year old Jersey & Gurnsey giving 1 gal, daily, fresh in April. 

2 horse wagon, box bed. 2 horse cultivator Buggy. McCor- 

mack mower good as new. Hay rake. Hay frame. Marker. 
1 horse hoosier corn drill with fertilizer attachment. Qlive'r E 
turning plow. Jointer. Double shovel plow. Leather tug har- 
ness. Check lines. 2 leather collars. 2 bridles. Set good 
buggy harness. Paris greenJilowcr, two row, new. 1 Share 
Farmers Telephone stock with box. One-half interest in Be- 
mis Tobacco Setter, only setH acres. Sharpless cream separa- 
rator. Lard press. 2 Horse spring wagon. Wood stove. 
Pitchforks. Hoes. Trace chains and other articles. 
5 BUSHELS SENSATION POTATOES ' 

TERMS MADE KAOWN ON DAY OF SALE. 



'4 



\* 



J. D. Woolery, 

Sale to begin at 12:30 sharp. 



I 

- WE HAVE 

Just received 



SEXS2KK^:»JCSKXXX^^ 




LONG and SHORT 

When you are long on funds you need a strong 
bank to protect your deposits. 

When you are short on funds you need a strong 

bank where you can get the accommodation 

of a loan with reasonable security. 

Become a customer of this Bank and you are fully 
PROTECTED BOTH WAYS. 

The Largest Capital and Surplus in the county, 
therefore the greatest security to depositors. 

CAPITAL & SURPLUS 150,000.00. 

Total Resources over One Half Million Dollars. 



ANOTHER CARLOAD 
OF 



FANCY TIMOTHY, RED CLOVER, 
, SWEET CLOVER AND 
ALFALFA, 

all the highest possible 
Grade of Seed, 



WRITE TO DEPARTMENT B 
FOR PRICE LIST 



HILL SEEDS DIRECT 
TO THE FARMER 



HI AT WHOLESALE PRICES 



K 



Peoples Deposit Bank 



Burlington, Ky. 



Northern Kentucky's [ L ^ D,NG GROCERS 



AND SEEDSMEN. 



W. L. B. ROUSE, President. 
A. B. RENAKER. Cashier. 



NELL H. MARTIN, A..t. Cashier. 
LEWIS C. BEEMON. Asst. Cashier. 



ri.M^Ti 



hfi'MK* 



Ootfufiti* 



KX»KXa»KX»CSXS&3X:l 



l«'<>r Sii'i- Tlir.-.. Broi 
Gobbler*. Mrs. Tho« f f . 

lillKtuli II I). |. 



«« 

ii*l 



Turkey 
> . Hur- 



Mr JWM W Hu.v, ,.f ,,„. | ,,,,_ 
Hold hi. duv i»ht week, mm pounds 
of tobaceo tlie following d v lV <| 
tlir...> Barred Rook 6ouk«*r«la hi 
brought hlua mom m .n. ) m,»,, i „ 

hall iiiitKi-iti In tl 



NOTICE 

The Stockholder of The Mutu- 
al Telephone Cotnfany of Union, 
K y. are hereby notified that tbu 
il«'ctiou of directors ami oflicers 
of tin- company will be held in 
I it ion Ky. March Mb 1921 from 
' a. m. to 4 p- m 
3tpd N. C. Tantn-r, .''rcsuleut. 



For Sale. 

."i room hoiis»< and one-half aor«* lot. 
In MeVllln, on the Ohio rlvor. 'rim 
tMillrltngH arn all In pnort repair. Will 
lie mild by H>dlnvmw Lodge No. 6M. 
for |>arr It'tilars apply to J. |). Mc 
N..ly, W It. Marshall. J. IT WHIN 
auison. HiirlliiKton, K\ • janfl 

Rural Honta t. 
• is.att bo a KNOCK KR #j 



Long; Distance Phone S. 1855 and S. 1856. 

established 1863. 
Ill 



Notice. 



W* will do all kinds of grinding 
any day If not I II. ul over pheut»-«-oa!l 
IM. KAHTON KKOH 

oinohl7.p<l Burlington, Ky. 



Thw third artlolf. on the Income 
Tax, prepared by Maurice L 
Lyon*. Attorney and Income Ts< 
i*xp«jrt, is puhlUhwl in another 
column Thia article doals with 
Partnerships, and la very valua- 
ble to farmers who ('onduct their 
farms with other sharing in th. 
pro! Its 



v'wffil^iM&miMzfMii 




y 




BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



"Trade Where They All Trade," 



'^ 



*> 



Attention, Mr. FARMER! 

Do you want to save money these times when your w-rops are not bringing as 
much as they should ? We anticipate every decline in price. We do not wait 
to be driven to it. If prices decline at the source of supply, we immediately put- 
our prices down, whether we have large stock or small! Read these; 

150 lb. Bag Fancy White Michw * *» G - A D ' S P*** 1 '&**** 
gan Potatoes, 

100 Jb. Bag Fancy Hand Picked 
Navy Beans 

1001b. Half Bbl. ' 
Lake Herring 

Clean Easy Soap 
(60 to box i per box 

6-Gal. Can Fancy Sorghum 
or New Orleans Molasses 

100 lb. Bag Fansy 4 Dot. Coffee or' Coco* hhiu postpaid, 2 Idb of 

Head Rice , , . D s U U Tea.Hent postpaid at these prices. 

KANSAS CREAM or ARCADE FLOUR— guaranteed the best on the market— you can 
buy cheaper flour but quality tells. . <t1 1 EH 

Barrel in wood, $12. 00; Barrel in 98-lb. Cotton Bags ' $ | | .QU 

If you have not joined our Pure Bred Poultry Register you should do so at once. 
— This includes turkeys, ducks* geese and chickens. 
Send in your list today. 

Clover Seed, Alfalfa, Timothy, Alsike, Blue Grass, Red Top. All high grade tested. 

Agents for Jareckiz Fertilizer. 



2.65 

4.90 

7,50 
2.60 
4.00 
6.00 



Per pound 
Gee Whiz Coffee, 

Per pound • • • • 

Golden Blend Coffee, 

Per pound • 

G. & D. Special Tea, 

Per pound - 

Icy Hot Tea, ' 
Per pound ......... 

Bulk Cocoa, 
Per pound 



~20c 
30c 
35c 
49c 
75c 
20c 




GRO CERIES. FL OUR SEED S . MEDICINES 

AS '-2 7 PIKE ST. /a-2ow.7™sr. 



\, 



WHOLESALE— "Covington's Largest Seed and Grocery House"- RETAIL 

Covington, Kentucky. 

Phones South 335 and 336. 

United States Wheat Director License No. 030057-Y. 
U. S. Food Administration License No. G-1770. 



J 



PUBLIC SA LE! 

» 

I will sell at public sale at the old Loder 
barn in Petersburg^ Ky., on 




The Following Property : 




Sorrel Marc 8-y-o. saddle and harness, 
Bay Mare 9-years old work mare,